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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #135 on: January 12, 2017, 11:34:15 PM »

Queen Victoria travelled to Dublin, Ireland in 1900.   
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q9gwnKH15Xo
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NoviceDisher

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« Reply #136 on: January 16, 2017, 11:59:33 PM »

Not sure if this is the correct place to discuss it, but the MasterPiece theater Victoria is quite eye opening. The Young Victoria movie did not make her look this young. This Victoria is so young and how tough she was. !! Makes me really admire her more.
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NoviceDisher

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« Reply #137 on: January 17, 2017, 12:05:57 AM »

I am confused as to what is the difference between the scope of power between QEII and Queen Victoria. Could anyone please explain in brief. Thanks !
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Ellie

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« Reply #138 on: January 17, 2017, 12:41:34 AM »

In the beginning of QV's reign the monarch had more executive powers sort of like the American President. She could dissolve Parliament at will, did not always have to take the PM's advice on ministers and the like for example. QEII will always take the PM's advice on ministers, and as far as I know with the changes in the elections in the UK she can no longer dissolve Parliament or call for elections, though someone can correct me if I'm wrong here. By the time QV died, though, a lot of the power she had in the beginning had waned. Her son was fabulous at reshaping the monarchy to the pomp and circumstance people wanted, and had great respect from a lot of the ministers because he was surprisingly a very good king; "I am king of ALL people," he famously roared when he was asked why he cared about how a socialist leader's health was doing. QV probably wouldn't have had that reaction, ha!

The book Victoria by AN Wilson explains a lot of this, though it's very heavy and political, it's a fascinating read into Queen Victoria as a woman, wife, mother, /and/ monarch and how the mythos of QV the monarch who did nothing is quite frankly...just myth. She was always very intensely involved and liked to be informed and had a great political sense of what her people wanted despite being distant from the and not appearing in public as they so wanted her to.

For a look at the historical powers of the monarchy you can see a lot of it on the Wikipedia page. Smiley
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Ktc

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« Reply #139 on: January 17, 2017, 01:38:13 AM »

In the beginning of QV's reign the monarch had more executive powers sort of like the American President. She could dissolve Parliament at will, did not always have to take the PM's advice on ministers and the like for example. QEII will always take the PM's advice on ministers, and as far as I know with the changes in the elections in the UK she can no longer dissolve Parliament or call for elections, though someone can correct me if I'm wrong here. By the time QV died, though, a lot of the power she had in the beginning had waned. Her son was fabulous at reshaping the monarchy to the pomp and circumstance people wanted, and had great respect from a lot of the ministers because he was surprisingly a very good king; "I am king of ALL people," he famously roared when he was asked why he cared about how a socialist leader's health was doing. QV probably wouldn't have had that reaction, ha!

The book Victoria by AN Wilson explains a lot of this, though it's very heavy and political, it's a fascinating read into Queen Victoria as a woman, wife, mother, /and/ monarch and how the mythos of QV the monarch who did nothing is quite frankly...just myth. She was always very intensely involved and liked to be informed and had a great political sense of what her people wanted despite being distant from the and not appearing in public as they so wanted her to.

For a look at the historical powers of the monarchy you can see a lot of it on the Wikipedia page. Smiley

This is very helpful. Thank you Thumb up
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NoviceDisher

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« Reply #140 on: January 17, 2017, 04:04:28 PM »

^^ Thank you Ellie for the response.

I am also mighty confused by the PBS version of Victoria. Not that I am any means an expert in QV, but I did not think she was besoted by Lord M in a romantic sense, but looked to him for guidance. She did admire him a lot though but more as a mentor than a romantic partner I thought. He was also not this attractive person but older, heavier, grayer.

Also, I did not think she had any relationship whatsoever with her mom and it was Prince Albert who was responsible for bringing them closer and that too long after Conroy was made to leave and they were married and had kids. In this though she is seen crying to her mom.  Confused. QV always came across as young, but mature , determined and dutiful. But in this they make her sound brattish. Heck in this version of Queen V, even I wanted to smack her and make her accept a regent cause she came across as selfish and childish and unfit to rule  Shocked. Don't know which version is true. Any guesses ? Thanks
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Principessa

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« Reply #141 on: January 17, 2017, 04:17:46 PM »

^^ Thank you Ellie for the response.

I am also mighty confused by the PBS version of Victoria. Not that I am any means an expert in QV, but I did not think she was besoted by Lord M in a romantic sense, but looked to him for guidance. She did admire him a lot though but more as a mentor than a romantic partner I thought. He was also not this attractive person but older, heavier, grayer.

Also, I did not think she had any relationship whatsoever with her mom and it was Prince Albert who was responsible for bringing them closer and that too long after Conroy was made to leave and they were married and had kids. In this though she is seen crying to her mom.  Confused. QV always came across as young, but mature , determined and dutiful. But in this they make her sound brattish. Heck in this version of Queen V, even I wanted to smack her and make her accept a regent cause she came across as selfish and childish and unfit to rule  Shocked. Don't know which version is true. Any guesses ? Thanks

Also IMO the actress playing QV looks much better and prettier then the real QV.
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NoviceDisher

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« Reply #142 on: January 17, 2017, 04:38:30 PM »

^^ I agree, except for the big eyes  

It is disappointing because I was looking forward to this. I did not know before the Crown that it was Churchill who was the first PM under QEII and he mentored her  Secret. I knew about Lord M and QV though thanks to movies and series. If done properly as in a non-romantic relationship between QV and Lord M which I am kinda sure it was in RL, it would have been nice to contrast how both men mentored young Queens and how it influenced them in future.
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #143 on: January 17, 2017, 11:20:56 PM »

On July 16, 1897, Queen Victoria wrote a letter of thanksgiving expressing her gratitude to her people for the spontaneous outburst of loyal affection which she had experienced during her Diamond Jubilee.
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« Reply #144 on: January 17, 2017, 11:27:40 PM »

This might sound a little bit ghoulish, but I've often wondered if it would be possible to extract any DNA from Queen Victoria's remains in efforts to prove that  she had inherited the genes for hemophilia. I've seen two theories: one that hemophilia arose in the BRF as a result of a mutation in Queen Victoria. (Have even seen a cosmic-ray hit on her ovaries as the reason). The other theory is that there were instances of the disorder in her maternal line. Since they can now pretty clearly identify the genes responsible, I would be curious about that.
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Ellie

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« Reply #145 on: January 17, 2017, 11:32:33 PM »

QV did have a decent relationship with her mother until Conroy's real power over her mother came about when Victoria was going through puberty. Otherwise, though, she was very close and her mother would write her lovely sweet notes regularly, and as an adult she would basically beg for scraps of Victoria's attention.

I think as a young woman Victoria was quite pretty but all that childbearing wears you out. Albert was very handsome too.
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Principessa

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« Reply #146 on: January 18, 2017, 10:04:56 AM »

This might sound a little bit ghoulish, but I've often wondered if it would be possible to extract any DNA from Queen Victoria's remains in efforts to prove that  she had inherited the genes for hemophilia. I've seen two theories: one that hemophilia arose in the BRF as a result of a mutation in Queen Victoria. (Have even seen a cosmic-ray hit on her ovaries as the reason). The other theory is that there were instances of the disorder in her maternal line. Since they can now pretty clearly identify the genes responsible, I would be curious about that.

The hemophilia inheritence in the offspring of QV is a fine school/studies example, as it relatively well documented and good to follow in the lineage. I often encoutered it during (basic) genetic classes.

In the past it has been suggested that QV was not the biological child  of the Duke of Kent, as the disease was not noticed/seen before in the royal lineage. And as it seemed another  disease dissapeared after QV (porphyria) The English language Wikipedia about hemophilia in European royals provide clear arguments against and clear explanation with regard to the hemophilia https://en.wikipedia.org/...hilia_in_European_royalty:

"...Although an individual's haemophilia can usually be traced in the ancestry, in about 30% of cases there is no family history of the disorder and the condition is speculated to be the result of spontaneous mutation in an ancestor.

Victoria appears to have been a spontaneous or de novo mutation and is usually considered the source of the disease in modern cases of haemophilia among royalty. Queen Victoria's father, Prince Edward, Duke of Kent, was not a haemophiliac, and the probability of her mother having had a lover who suffered from haemophilia is minuscule given the low life expectancy of 19th-century haemophiliacs. Her mother, Victoria, Duchess of Kent, was not known to have a family history of the disease, although it is possible that the mutation began at her conception and was passed down only to Victoria and not to her two other children. In the same way, had Queen Victoria herself only had seven children, the mutation would probably be assumed today to have occurred at the conception of Princess Alice, as she was the only known carrier among Victoria and Albert's first seven children.

Queen Victoria's eldest daughter, Victoria, Princess Royal, apparently escaped the haemophilia gene as it did not appear in any of her matrilineal descendants. Victoria's fifth child, Helena, may or may not have been a carrier; two healthy sons survived to adulthood but two other sons died in infancy and her two daughters did not have issue. Victoria's sixth child, Louise, died without issue. Her sons Edward, Alfred, and Arthur were not haemophiliacs. However, her daughters Alice and Beatrice were confirmed carriers of the gene, and her son Leopold was a sufferer of haemophilia, making his daughter Princess Alice, Countess of Athlone a carrier as well...."

"...No living member of the present or past reigning dynasties of Europe is known to have symptoms of haemophilia or is believed to carry the gene for it. The last descendant of Victoria known to suffer from the disease was Infante Don Gonzalo, born in 1914, although dozens of descendants of Queen Victoria's (including males descended only through females) have been born since 1914. However, because the haemophilia gene usually remains hidden in females who only inherit the gene from one parent, and female descendants of Victoria have left many descendants in royal and noble families, there remains a small chance that the disease could appear again, especially among the female-line Spanish descendants of Princess Beatrice...."

"...Because the last known descendant of Queen Victoria with haemophilia died in the 1940s, the exact type of haemophilia found in this family remained unknown until 2009. Using genetic analysis of the remains of the assassinated Romanov dynasty, and specifically Tsarevich Alexei, Rogaev et al. were able to determine that the "Royal Disease" is actually haemophilia B. Specifically, they found a single-nucleotide change in the gene for clotting Factor IX that causes incorrect RNA splicing and produces a truncated, nonfunctional protein..."
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Suzerain

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« Reply #147 on: January 18, 2017, 10:20:11 AM »

The haemophilia thing is indeed interesting. I once found myself reading about QV and the haemophilia gene on Wikipedia and reading about her descendants and their life stories made me feel sad. So many had very tragic fates. There were brothers who died a few years apart both in car accidents because a minor injury turned out to be life threatening thanks to haemophilia (I forget names and who they were) etc. I'm not sure if the gene is still hiding somewhere, I recall there was something about it possibly reappearing at some point in one of the branches of the family tree.

It's so random; the Swedish royal family for example can breathe a sigh of relief they did not get the haemophilia gene because luckily Prince Arthur was not a haemophiliac and didn't pass the gene on to his daughter Margaret. Also, Princess Sibylla's grandfather Leopold was a haemophiliac but sons do not inherit it from their fathers so her father Charles Edward was not a carrier or haemophiliac himself.

Edit: I had to check... The two brothers, great-grandsons of QV, were Alfonso, Prince of Asturias and Infante Gonzalo of Spain. Gonzalo died in 1934 at the age of 19 and Alfonso died in 1938 at the age of 31. Both were kept in specially-tailored jackets to prevent injury from accidents but in the end that didn't help.

Here's a bit about Alfonso on Wikipedia: "A car accident led to Alfonso's early death in 1938, at the age of 31. He crashed into a telephone booth and appeared to have minor injuries but his haemophilia led to fatal internal bleeding."

And here's something about Gonzalo:
"In August 1934 Gonzalo was spending the summer holidays with his family at the villa of Count Ladislaus Hoyos at P?rtschach am W?rthersee in Austria. On the evening of 11 August, Gonzalo and his sister Infanta Beatriz were driving from Klagenfurt to P?rtschach. Near Krumpendorf, Beatriz, who was driving, was forced to swerve to avoid a cyclist (the retired jockey Baron Neimans). The car crashed into a wall. Neither Gonzalo nor Beatriz appeared badly hurt, and so they returned to their villa. Several hours later it became clear that Gonzalo had severe abdominal bleeding. Because he had a weak heart, an operation was ruled out. He died two days later."
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Ellie

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« Reply #148 on: January 18, 2017, 10:26:34 AM »

Felipe's great-uncles were the ones who died. Gonzalo and Jaime, sons of Alfonso and Victoria Eugenia who was Queen Victoria's beautiful granddaughter who carried the gene. One in a car crash, the car driven by his sister Beatriz, the other from complications a few years later I believe. Her brother Leopold died from hemophilia as well. It was a heartbreaking plague on that family. Sad They most likely suffered from Hemophilia B, as Tsesarevich Alexei's remains were tested and that was the type he had.

Via Wikipedia, Hemophilia B is a deficiency of factor IX: 'In terms of mechanism, factor IX deficiency leads to an increased propensity for haemorrhage. This is in response to mild trauma or even spontaneously, such as in joints (haemarthrosis) or muscles. Factor IX deficiency can cause interference of the coagulation cascade, thereby causing spontaneous hemorrhage when there is trauma. Factor IX when activated activates factor X which helps fibrinogen to fibrin conversion.'
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« Reply #149 on: January 18, 2017, 11:10:06 AM »

Felipe's great-uncles were the ones who died. Gonzalo and Jaime, sons of Alfonso and Victoria Eugenia who was Queen Victoria's beautiful granddaughter who carried the gene. One in a car crash, the car driven by his sister Beatriz, the other from complications a few years later I believe. Her brother Leopold died from hemophilia as well. It was a heartbreaking plague on that family. Sad They most likely suffered from Hemophilia B, as Tsesarevich Alexei's remains were tested and that was the type he had.

Via Wikipedia, Hemophilia B is a deficiency of factor IX: 'In terms of mechanism, factor IX deficiency leads to an increased propensity for haemorrhage. This is in response to mild trauma or even spontaneously, such as in joints (haemarthrosis) or muscles. Factor IX deficiency can cause interference of the coagulation cascade, thereby causing spontaneous hemorrhage when there is trauma. Factor IX when activated activates factor X which helps fibrinogen to fibrin conversion.'

There is apparently also a variation in severity.
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