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Author Topic: Japanese Royals News  (Read 273084 times)
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Miss Marple

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« Reply #900 on: December 09, 2016, 09:08:00 PM »

It makes me wonder what if Kiko would have delivered a girl instead of a boy?

It would not have happened. I am sure there was IVF and a lot of testing involved just to make sure. IMO they determined the gender because she already had two daughters.
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Rita

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« Reply #901 on: January 10, 2017, 09:13:47 PM »

On January 8, 2017, Japan's Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko attended the opening of the New Year Grand Sumo Tournament at the Ryogoku Kokugikan in Sumida, Tokyo.





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bumbershoot

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« Reply #902 on: January 10, 2017, 11:00:37 PM »

The emperor's puffy face makes me wonder if he's ill and on steroids for some condition.
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Curtains

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« Reply #903 on: January 11, 2017, 12:46:39 AM »

 Star Star Pedes


As it stands now, the line of succession is:

Emperor Akihito
1.) Crown Prince Naruhito
2.) Fumihito, Prince Akishino
3.) Prince Hisahito of Akishino

Had Hisahito not been born, who would be in that third position (assuming also that Aiko remained "unsuitable")?
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« Reply #904 on: January 11, 2017, 06:27:16 AM »

thanks Curtains.

I don't really know, as there aren't any male relatives besides Hisahito. The Emperor's brother Prince Hitachi has no children. The Emperor's uncle Prince Mikasa, who passed October 27, 2016, has no male-line grandsons. Every other sibling is female:

- Emperor Akihito
- Masahito, Prince Hitachi (brother), alive 81, years old in succession
- Takako Shimazu, (sister), alive, 77 years old, not in succession
- Shigeko Higashikuni (sister), 1925-1961
- Atsuko Ikeda (sister), alive, 85 years old, not in succession
- Sachiko, Princess Hisa, 1927-1928
- Kazuko Takatsukasa (sister), 1929-1989


Royal reigning family
The Emperor
 * The Empress
  ^ The Crown Prince
   * The Crown Princess
     ^ The Princess Toshi, Princess Aiko


then there are the Cadet branches that have/could have produce a male heir:

House of Akishino
Fumihito, Prince Akishino   
^ Prince Hisahito of Akishino
   = succeeding cadet branch because of Hisahito

House of Hitachi
Masahito, Prince Hitachi (Emperors brother - no issues)

House of Mikasa
Takahito, Prince Mikasa (1915-2016)
 ^ Princess Yasuko of Mikasa
 ^ Prince Tomohito of Mikasa (issues: 2 daughters)
 ^ Yoshihito, Prince Katsura (1948-2014; no issues)
 ^ Princess Masako of Mikasa

House of Takamado
Norihito, Prince Takamado (66 years old)
 ^ Princess Akiko of Mikasa
 ^ Princess Yoko of Mikasa
 = in 2013 the imperial household decided to scrap this branch and integrating it into his fathers houshold (Takahito, Prince Mikasa, House of Mikasa)

So there are at the moment 3 cadet branches left: Akishino, Hitachi, Mikasa.

Should Hisahito not have been born, I presume Norihito would have taken over and then they would have changed it to female succession. They would have had to....there is no male anywhere in the cadet branches anymore. Or they would have pulled some other stunt. Hence my believe that Kiko would do anything to make "her" branch survive. Lots to do with pride and self preservation, and whatever else I've mentined before. But that's just my deduction and opinion.


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Tinika

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« Reply #905 on: January 11, 2017, 08:29:13 AM »

thanks Curtains.

I don't really know, as there aren't any male relatives besides Hisahito. The Emperor's brother Prince Hitachi has no children. The Emperor's uncle Prince Mikasa, who passed October 27, 2016, has no male-line grandsons. Every other sibling is female:

- Emperor Akihito
- Masahito, Prince Hitachi (brother), alive 81, years old in succession
- Takako Shimazu, (sister), alive, 77 years old, not in succession
- Shigeko Higashikuni (sister), 1925-1961
- Atsuko Ikeda (sister), alive, 85 years old, not in succession
- Sachiko, Princess Hisa, 1927-1928
- Kazuko Takatsukasa (sister), 1929-1989


Royal reigning family
The Emperor
 * The Empress
  ^ The Crown Prince
   * The Crown Princess
     ^ The Princess Toshi, Princess Aiko


then there are the Cadet branches that have/could have produce a male heir:

House of Akishino
Fumihito, Prince Akishino   
^ Prince Hisahito of Akishino
   = succeeding cadet branch because of Hisahito

House of Hitachi
Masahito, Prince Hitachi (Emperors brother - no issues)

House of Mikasa
Takahito, Prince Mikasa (1915-2016)
 ^ Princess Yasuko of Mikasa
 ^ Prince Tomohito of Mikasa (issues: 2 daughters)
 ^ Yoshihito, Prince Katsura (1948-2014; no issues)
 ^ Princess Masako of Mikasa

House of Takamado
Norihito, Prince Takamado (66 years old)
 ^ Princess Akiko of Mikasa
 ^ Princess Yoko of Mikasa
 = in 2013 the imperial household decided to scrap this branch and integrating it into his fathers houshold (Takahito, Prince Mikasa, House of Mikasa)

So there are at the moment 3 cadet branches left: Akishino, Hitachi, Mikasa.

Should Hisahito not have been born, I presume Norihito would have taken over and then they would have changed it to female succession. They would have had to....there is no male anywhere in the cadet branches anymore. Or they would have pulled some other stunt. Hence my believe that Kiko would do anything to make "her" branch survive. Lots to do with pride and self preservation, and whatever else I've mentined before. But that's just my deduction and opinion.




Thanks so much for this--really informative and interesting.  Star

I had no idea there had been this kind of succession crisis.  Poor Aiko. And poor Masako.  I wish she'd just run the other way when Naruhito proposed, in love or not.

And this just makes me think for the billionth time how glad I am not to be a member of the Japanese Imperial house.
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Purple

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« Reply #906 on: January 11, 2017, 11:16:29 AM »

I find it uncomfortable to visit this board because of the succession "crisis" and the whole story behind the birth of Hisahito  Nerves so off I go somewhere else.  I'll just add that maybe Aiko had a lucky escape and could lead a normal life
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MidnightDiamond

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« Reply #907 on: January 11, 2017, 01:14:58 PM »

Did they do the thing where you pick the gender for Hisahito? I know that before Hisahito there was talks to let Aiko be Empress but when Hisahito was born it died down a bit. I heard Aiko has anxiety issues like her mother so it might be best for her!
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PeDe
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« Reply #908 on: January 13, 2017, 06:59:32 PM »

January 13
Emperor Akihito, Empress Michiko and other imperial family members attend the New Year Poetry Reading (Utakai-Hajime-no-Gi) ceremony at Matsunoma main hall of the Imperial Palace.
 ?Waka? poems penned by imperial family members, as well as 10 works selected from the public by judges, were recited at the annual event in Matsunoma main hall in the Imperial Palace.








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« Reply #909 on: January 13, 2017, 07:02:16 PM »




What's the significance of the hand-fan with their official outfits, anybody know?











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bumbershoot

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« Reply #910 on: January 13, 2017, 08:48:29 PM »

Sensu -- folding fans -- are considered an essential accessory to formal dress. Even brides and grooms will caryy them if they wear traditional wedding clothing. Apparently for the Imperial family, even when they wear western-style court dress, fans denote the formality of the occasion.

Right this minute I am looking at a photo I have of the Empress Michiko at the funeral of the Emperor Hirohito. She is what one might deem 19th century western-style mourning clothing: a long black dress, her typical little perched had, topped with a circular elbow-length veil.  In her left hand she is holding an umbrella because it was raining that day, and in her black-gloved right hand is a folded black fan.  Folden fan=formal occasion.
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« Reply #911 on: January 14, 2017, 12:46:25 AM »


I figured that it is part of their formal attire, what I 'm asking is why, where the histrory/tradition came from.
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bumbershoot

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« Reply #912 on: January 14, 2017, 05:04:08 AM »

I think the folding fan was developed in Japan, but not until paper-making technology came over from China. I know that in times past, messages were sometimes written on fans and carried -- always closed -- by court officials. Perhaps that particular use tended to establish them as an official item of dress.

I doubt you will ever see anyone in the Japanese Imperial Family with an opened fan. They are, as far as I know, always carried closed.
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Laprincess

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« Reply #913 on: January 14, 2017, 06:07:17 AM »

From Wiki:

The oldest existing Chinese fans are a pair of woven bamboo side-mounted fans from the 2nd century BCE.[3] The Chinese character for "fan" (扇) is etymologically derived from a picture of feathers under a roof. The Chinese fixed fan, pien-mien, means 'to agitate the air'. A particular status and gender would be associated with a specific type of fan. During the Song Dynasty, famous artists were often commissioned to paint fans. The Chinese dancing fan was developed in the 7th century. The Chinese form of the hand fan was a row of feathers mounted in the end of a handle. In the later centuries, Chinese poems and four-word idioms were used to decorate the fans by using Chinese calligraphy pens. In ancient China, fans came in various shapes and forms (such as in a leaf, oval or a half-moon shape), and were made in different materials such as silk, bamboo, feathers, etc.[4]


Japanese foldable fan (sensu)

Japanese foldable fan of late-Heian period (c. 12th century)

Traditional Japanese ceremony at Itsukushima Shrine

Japanese rigid fan (uchiwa)
Japanese foldable fan[edit]
In ancient Japan, hand fans, such as oval and silk fans were influenced greatly by the Chinese fans.[5] The earliest visual depiction of fans in Japan dates back to the 6th century CE, with burial tomb paintings showed drawings of fans. The folding fan was invented in Japan, with date ranging from the 6th to 9th centuries.[6][7][Crazy[9] It was a court fan called the Akomeogi (衵扇 Akomeōgi?) after the court women's dress named Akome.[6][10] According to the Song Sui (History of Song), a Japanese monk Chonen (奝然 Chōnen?, 938-1016) offered the folding fans (twenty wooden-bladed fans hiogi (桧扇 hiōgi?) and two paper fans kawahori-ogi (蝙蝠扇 kawahori-ōgi?)) to the emperor of China in 988.[Crazy[9][11] Later in the 11th century, Korean envoys brought along Korean folding fans which were of Japanese origin as gifts to Chinese court.[12] The popularity of folding fans was such that sumptuary laws were promulgated during Heian period which restricted the decoration of both hiogi and paper folding fans.[11][13]
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debbydeb

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« Reply #914 on: January 14, 2017, 06:57:09 AM »

from https://www.soas.ac.uk/ga...n-of-the-folding-fan.html

Japanese folding fans are supposed to be closed whenever possible and may be opened only when necessary, they did not start as decorative art or craft items but instead were an information device and are still used as such in Japan today.

Originally only used by the aristocracy and Samurai classes fans were not just a practical device used to keep cool but due to their easily portable form they evolved from being used as a simple writing material to be used for communication, instructive educational tools, recording or writing instruments, symbols of status, decorative and fine arts and even as weapons.

There are many examples of fans containing important information such as rules; regulations; Court orders, decisions and announcements; letters; calendars; schedules; prayers, medical transcriptions; text books for education, maps and so on.  It is only in the later period that a folding fan developed more as an object of art or decorative art.

While it is not known when paper folding fans were first made the oldest reference to a paper folding fan (Kawahori ? bat wing) appears in ?Relationship with Japan of the Song History? written in 988 A.D., when it lists gifts including Kawahori and Hi-ogi from Japan to the Song Dynasty. Showing the status, at this time, of the fan in Japan to be considered suitable as gifts for royalty.

=====

From a website of a kyoto fan shop:
https://www.kyosendo.co.j...eading/the_origin_of_fan/


In the early years of Heian period (794 ? 1185), at the time of Shou-wa (an era name, 834 ? 848), there was an institution in  which the emperor bestowed fans on courtiers at court, ?Saikyuki? (the record of court practices and usage, written in Chinese style by MINAMOTO no Takaaki ? cited from wikipedia) explains. Consequently, it is thought that by that time folding fan was already invented and used in the Metropolis of Kyoto.

T
he first fan is made of the mokkan (narrow strip of wood on which an official message is written), by binding their one side together. They are called Hi-ougi meaning Japanese cypress fan. Since then Hi-ougi becomes one of the must-item for men of the court.

Soon fans prevailed among women in the court. Gracefully ornamented with various paintings fans became their personal belongings. On the most old Hi-ougi found from inside of the arm of the statue of Buddha in the temple, To-ji in Kyoto, there is wording of the first year of Genki (879). Paper fans was also invented with wood fans in the Heian period, brought to China with hi-ougis and had widely spread to much further Europe.



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