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Author Topic: The Queen/ DoE : news & photo's  (Read 509180 times)
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fairy

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« Reply #15 on: February 05, 2012, 09:11:25 PM »

That QEII leans heavily on the DoE is nothing new. We have known that for decades.

While I am quite certain that countries like Aus and Canada will discuss (or have discussed in private) whether or not they should be staying underneath the british crown, once QEII is gone, I have to say that at the end of each reign, the country is quite certain that the new monarch will neither be up to the job nor quite as loved and adorred asa the old one. There is something to cherishing the good old times and fear of the unknown.
Just read any newspaper article at the time of Victoria's death or at Edward's short final illness and you will see that even though for ex, the british public had quite disliked Victoria's withdrawal and almost hermitage life, they feared the change the new monarch would bring. And later on when they got used to Edward, they wondered if his bland and boring son was up to it. I am very sure that a lot of people had their doubts the very very young and inexperienced Elizabeth with her "german husband" would be going to be a good idea for Britain.
And I am equally sure that would Charles have a long reign and the monarchy was comparatively stable, people would dread the change to the beloved William as well.
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« Reply #16 on: February 05, 2012, 10:51:02 PM »

well, if they are worried about how the Queen is getting on at her age, they (Cambridges & Harry) should roll up their sleeves, do some actual work. "No Actions, Talk Only" comes to mind.  Dead

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« Reply #17 on: February 05, 2012, 10:57:23 PM »

well, if they are worried about how the Queen is getting on at her age, they (Cambridges & Harry) should roll up their sleeves, do some actual work. "No Actions, Talk Only" comes to mind.  Dead

There are many other senior royals, ones who are actually on the civil list, who can step up as well. Andrew, Eddie and Sophie come to mind. Eddie, other than his work with the DOE awards, doesn't seem very active. And as the children of the current monarch, they could do more.

Harry and Will are both active duty military. I don't believe, could be wrong, Andrew did much when he was active duty either. They are doing their part serving the country. The Duchess on the other hand, definitely could do more.

Neither Andrew, Edward or Sophie are on the Civil List...Andrew and Edward have not been on it for years.  The Queen pays them from her own personal funds.  The only thing we as taxpayers pay for for them are their security, which Sophie does not have anymore.

I agree that William and Harry should step up to the plate, but I also feel Beatrice and Eugenie should too.  They have the HRH title, they can’t expect to use the “we’re at uni looking for jobs” forever.  This is why I am so glad Edward and Sophie chose to not give Louise and James HRH titles.

Nice articles, I am really looking forward to all the Jubilee documentaries, particularly the brief inputs from the grandchildren.  Most of them were young in 2002, the Princesses being in their early teens, so it’s great now they are all adults they can get involved.
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« Reply #18 on: February 05, 2012, 10:59:53 PM »

Funny quip by HM regarding the paparazzi:  http://theroyalpost.com/2...-grant-and-the-paparazzi/
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Willow.rr

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« Reply #19 on: February 05, 2012, 11:28:22 PM »

That QEII leans heavily on the DoE is nothing new. We have known that for decades.

While I am quite certain that countries like Aus and Canada will discuss (or have discussed in private) whether or not they should be staying underneath the british crown, once QEII is gone, I have to say that at the end of each reign, the country is quite certain that the new monarch will neither be up to the job nor quite as loved and adorred asa the old one. There is something to cherishing the good old times and fear of the unknown.
Just read any newspaper article at the time of Victoria's death or at Edward's short final illness and you will see that even though for ex, the british public had quite disliked Victoria's withdrawal and almost hermitage life, they feared the change the new monarch would bring. And later on when they got used to Edward, they wondered if his bland and boring son was up to it. I am very sure that a lot of people had their doubts the very very young and inexperienced Elizabeth with her "german husband" would be going to be a good idea for Britain.
And I am equally sure that would Charles have a long reign and the monarchy was comparatively stable, people would dread the change to the beloved William as well.

Canada was feeling patriotic last year.  The "Royal" designation was restored to the Canadian Forces, thus becoming Royal Canadian Air Force and Royal Canadian Navy.
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fairy

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« Reply #20 on: February 06, 2012, 09:40:07 AM »

Really? due to Kate's heartwarming canadian embrace?  Halo
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« Reply #21 on: February 06, 2012, 10:53:43 PM »

Really? due to Kate's heartwarming canadian embrace?  Halo

Canadian veterans had been working on it since 2007.  http://rcn-rcaf.blogspot.com/
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« Reply #22 on: May 06, 2012, 09:50:48 PM »

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news...;ns_source=PublicRSS20-sa

Why has the Queen never visited Greece?

Queen Elizabeth II is probably the most well-travelled monarch ever. She has been to 116 countries on official state visits as Queen, but not Greece. Why?

The Queen has travelled from the tiny island nation of Tuvalu in the Pacific, to Russia, China, Chile, Ghana, Australia and almost everywhere in between.

So it may seem surprising that she has never made the relatively short hop over to the birthplace of her husband, Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh.

Prince Philip is a "Greek prince," says royal historian Hugo Vickers, so it is an "interesting" omission.

The reason, he believes, is because of the fraught history of the monarchy in Greece, which affected Prince Philip's immediate family.

"Prince Philip doesn't like Greece, because they put his father [Prince Andrew] on trial, and he might have been executed," says Vickers.

"In 1922, they all had to flee." Prince Philip was a baby at the time and rarely returned.

It is not completely true that the Queen has never been to Greece - she did go there at the invitation of King Paul, Prince Philip's cousin, in 1950, but that was before she became Queen.

In 1963 King Paul also came to Britain on a state visit but it was "hugely controversial" says Vickers, because Greece held a number of political prisoners at the time.

Soon after that visit, King Paul died. His successor, King Constantine - Prince Philip's first cousin once removed - was ousted when the monarchy was abolished in 1973.

He lives in London, still considers himself king, and has a close personal relationship with the Queen, according to Michael Binyon, foreign affairs specialist at The Times newspaper.

All of this has "made things difficult" says Vickers. But he also suspects the Queen may have never been invited by the Greek president to make a state visit.

Prince Philip did go to Athens to visit his mother before she moved to London in the 1960s - but he would travel on his own, says Vickers.

Israel is another notable omission from the Queen's list of state visits.

Security is a major factor in this case, but, says Binyon, the biggest problem is diplomatic sensitivity over visiting Jerusalem. Israel regards Jerusalem as the capital, but it is not recognised as such by Western nations, who base their embassies in Tel Aviv instead.

"It would create tremendous, intractable problems and the Queen doesn't want to be included in those," he says.

Egypt is a surprise omission from the Queen's travel itinerary, he adds, given its influence in the region, and its potential for business with Britain.

As things stand, Latin America is something of a black spot. The Queen has only been to two countries there - Brazil and Chile.

ut the British government has made it clear it wants to boost ties in the region, so that number may go up, with Peru one possible candidate for a future visit, believes Binyon.

Argentina, on the other hand, would be "out of the question" because of the tensions created by the Falklands War 30 years ago, says Binyon.

Prince Philip has, however, visited the country (in 1962). He has also been, without the Queen, to countless other nations around the world, often in his work for the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF).

Prince Philip also often attends foreign funerals on the Queen's behalf.

In many ways, the map of the Queen's state visits reflects the state of British diplomatic relations with the rest of the world.

"They [state visits] are always done on government advice. They are always done for a reason," says Hugo Vickers

Indeed the Foreign and Commonwealth Office has a panel which approves all state visits, called the Royal Visits Committee.

"There are always more requests for visits than can be accommodated," says a spokesperson at the FCO, and a trip's foreign policy benefit is a key factor when choosing a location.

A state visit by the Queen can sometimes pave the way for politicians and business to move in afterwards. In the 1970s, she went to countries like Saudi Arabia and Brunei. At that time "it was all about oil, money and investments," says Vickers.

But more often it works the other way around, with a state visit by the Queen acting as a kind of marker that things have reached a more stable point - for example the Queen's trip to Ireland last year.

The Queen has made it to every single nation in the Commonwealth, except two of the more recent entrants, Rwanda and Cameroon.

When she had the Royal Yacht Britannia, it was easier for her to get around, especially to far-flung places like the Pacific Islands. Its decommissioning in 1997 has made a tangible difference, says Vickers.

Age will surely become an increasing consideration. The Queen, though going strong, is 86 years old.

But aside from her state visits, does the Queen ever travel somewhere just on holiday - just to relax?

"The Queen doesn't really do that sort of thing. She doesn't have holidays - she goes to Balmoral," says Vickers.

But, he says, there is one exception. She loves horses, and has been known to travel to France and the US for the races.
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Miss Waynfleet

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« Reply #23 on: May 09, 2012, 02:43:28 PM »

State Opening of Parliament in London May 9, 2012

http://www.daylife.com/se...ueen+elizabeth+may+9+2012



















The page boy is I believe one of Lady Sarah Chattos sons
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Miss Waynfleet

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« Reply #24 on: May 09, 2012, 05:43:27 PM »

http://live.independent.c...Event/The_Queens_Speech_2
http://www.independent.co...eform-battle-7727924.html

The Queen's Speech: Stage set for Lords reform battle

Historic legislation to reform the House of Lords is included in today's Queen's Speech setting out the Government's agenda for the year ahead, despite warnings from MPs that it could tear the coalition apart.

The controversial measures could result in an 80 per cent elected Upper House of Parliament, with numbers of peers "substantially" cut from their current 800.

But the proposal faces stiff resistance not only from sitting peers but also large numbers of Conservative backbenchers, with some experts predicting that pitched battles between opponents and supporters of reform could swallow up weeks of parliamentary time.

Constitutional change features in the Speech alongside new laws to support families, reform pensions and break up the banks to prevent a repeat of the financial crash.

But Tory Prime Minister David Cameron and his Liberal Democrat deputy Nick Clegg insisted that the Government's main focus over the coming year will remain on bringing down the state deficit and promoting economic growth.

Mr Cameron and Mr Clegg said in a joint statement: "The primary task of the Government remains ensuring that we deal with the deficit and stretch every sinew to return growth to the economy, providing jobs and opportunities to hard-working people across Britain who want to get on."

While stressing that Lords reform is not their Government's top priority, they insisted it was right to press ahead with the controversial reforms, which featured in the manifestos of all three major parties in the 2010 general election.

"We believe that power should be passed from the politicians at Westminster back to the people of Britain, which is why we will keep the promise in our parties' manifestos and reform the House of Lords, because those who make laws for the people should answer to the people," they said.

Today's Speech, delivered amid lavish traditional ceremony in the House of Lords, promises 19 Government Bills, including four in draft form, in a legislative programme for the coming year which the Queen told MPs would "focus on economic growth, justice and constitutional reform".

A Children and Families Bill will deliver the biggest shake-up of support for children with special needs in England for 30 years and will "put families front and centre of our national life", said Mr Cameron and Mr Clegg.

The Bill will implement plans to make inter-racial adoption easier in England and to allow mothers and fathers throughout Britain to share parental leave following the birth of their child.

A new six-month time limit on care proceedings will be introduced in England and Wales, and the law will be changed to ensure more children have a relationship with their fathers after families break up - despite a Family Justice Review last year which warned that a presumption of paternal access would create risks.

Banks will be required to create a "ring fence" between High Street services for households and businesses and the risky "casino" activities of their investment arms.

The Banking Reform Bill will implement the recommendations of last year's Vickers Report with the aim of insulating vital consumer and business services from global financial shocks, making it easier to close down banks which get into trouble and curtailing the implicit state bailout guarantee which the sector currently enjoys.

The Government risks clashes with unions with a Public Service Pensions Bill containing reforms which have already provoked massive strikes - with further walkouts expected tomorrow - as well as an Enterprise and Regulatory Reform Bill overhauling employment tribunals and cutting inspections on businesses.

Slashing "unnecessary" red tape will make Britain "one of the most-business-friendly countries in the world", promised Mr Cameron and Mr Clegg.

The Bill also aims to strengthen shareholders' power to reject excessive boardroom pay deals and will create a Green Investment Bank to accelerate investment in environment-friendly projects.

Legislation will raise the state pension age to 67 between 2026 and 2028, meaning later retirement for anyone aged under 52 now, and will commit the Government to further increases as lifespans lengthen. The Pensions Bill will also implement the Budget proposal for a new single-tier state pension set at around £140 a week.

A draft Care and Support Bill proposed new personal budgets for adults in care, but leaves larger-scale reform - currently the subject of all-party talks - until after the upcoming Government White Paper on care.

A new National Crime Agency, due to start work in 2013 tackling serious and organised crime and strengthening border security, will be established by the Crime and Courts Bill, which also introduced an offence of drug-driving and modernised the court system and the process for appointing judges in England and Wales.

A Defamation Bill offers new protections for freedom of speech in England and Wales and a Justice and Security Bill will allow courts to hear evidence from security and intelligence agencies behind closed doors.

Controversial plans to increase surveillance of internet traffic - branded a "snooper's charter" by critics - were included in a draft Communications Data Bill, which could allow security agencies to access details of the time and origin of messages but not their content.

An Energy Bill will reform the electricity market across the UK to enable large-scale investment in low-carbon generation capacity, while a draft Water Bill aims to improve competitiveness and efficiency of the industry in England and Wales.

PA
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« Reply #25 on: May 09, 2012, 05:48:50 PM »

I loved the fur edged thingy she was wearing as cape / stole whatever - went nicely with the bling  Champagne
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« Reply #26 on: May 09, 2012, 07:32:52 PM »


"If Kate and William have a daughter she WILL be Queen under new Royal reform" - I didn't realize there was ever a posibility that a daughter wouldn't be Queen.  Huh?



Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.u...-plans.html#ixzz1uOXpHUBZ










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just a serf

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« Reply #27 on: May 09, 2012, 11:42:37 PM »

Cannot imagine Will & Fake in those photos doing what QEII are Philip are doing  No

If that time comes the House of Lords will likely have ceased to exist as it does now, and Will & Fake will face an audience of commoners who grew up knowing all about their scandals and pathetic work ethic.

It will be a sort of dead pan comedy routine
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« Reply #28 on: May 10, 2012, 12:00:26 AM »

Just imagine her with the dress from yesterday walking to the throne
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« Reply #29 on: May 10, 2012, 12:18:50 AM »

Just imagine her with the dress from yesterday walking to the throne

Well according to @TheDuchessStyle QEII was a KopyKate with her white Parliament dress. Who knew Katie was such a trendsetter.  Tongue

"First Kate wears a white gown, then a day later the Queen follows suit in all white for the opening of Parliament."
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