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Author Topic: Mette-Marit - NEWS  (Read 851895 times)
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onar

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« Reply #2490 on: October 22, 2018, 07:42:22 PM »

Nice to see her.
Where was she hiding?
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Celia

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« Reply #2491 on: October 23, 2018, 04:47:02 AM »

She's been hiding while her hair color grows out.
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Kemenate

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« Reply #2492 on: October 23, 2018, 09:43:04 AM »

She's been hiding while her hair color grows out.
Nice one

What was she talking about in that NRK interview?
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onar

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« Reply #2493 on: October 23, 2018, 11:03:34 AM »

She's been hiding while her hair color grows out.
Laugh bounce
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linnpinn

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« Reply #2494 on: October 24, 2018, 07:50:06 PM »

The court announced today that Mette-Marit has been diagnoses with chronic pulmonary fibrosis.

Could currently only find Norwegian sources.

http://www.kongehuset.no/...tid=166099&sek=112472
https://www.nrk.no/norge/...sk-lungesykdom-1.14263003 An video interview with MM, Haakon and her doctor at this source.
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bumbershoot

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« Reply #2495 on: October 24, 2018, 07:55:52 PM »

Oh, that's TERRIBLE news.
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Lille

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« Reply #2496 on: October 24, 2018, 08:09:48 PM »

Oh no - not good news  No
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Lady Adelaide

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« Reply #2497 on: October 24, 2018, 08:16:42 PM »

I had a feeling something was up with her lately... wow, this sounds terrible!
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Kemenate

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« Reply #2498 on: October 24, 2018, 08:24:55 PM »

Not surprised, she smoked for years. Hope she is stoping now.
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karma chamelion

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« Reply #2499 on: October 24, 2018, 08:30:10 PM »

How terrifying for her and her family, they can be thankful that she has the best medical care available.
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« Reply #2500 on: October 24, 2018, 08:31:07 PM »

The doctor says it is autoimmune desease, and not lifestyle- og environmentally related, but of course smoking helps for nothing.
She will undergo more tests at the Oslo university hospital, possible abroad if necessary.
They dont want to give the presise diagnosis, she says she finds it uncomterble to talk about her won Health in public.
Symptoms are shortness of breath, coughs and feeling tired. she says she has had the symptoms for years and is glad to know what it is, and must learn to live with the uncertanty.
She wants to work as much as possible,but there will be times where she needs to rest, or have a litle reduced program like during the visit to Baltikum.
she is glad it has been diagnosed early and is optimistic.
The docots says it is caught early, and the devellopment is slow, after more tests they hope to offer treatment that can reduce the devellopment and controll it.
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PeDe
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« Reply #2501 on: October 24, 2018, 08:34:21 PM »

Not surprised, she smoked for years. Hope she is stoping now.


You don't get pulmonary fibrosis from smoking alone, you have it and different circumstances, e.g. smoking can trigger it. But so can lots of other factors....see below


Pulmonary fibrosis is a lung disease that occurs when lung tissue becomes damaged and scarred. This thickened, stiff tissue makes it more difficult for your lungs to work properly. As pulmonary fibrosis worsens, you become progressively more short of breath.

The scarring associated with pulmonary fibrosis can be caused by a multitude of factors. But in most cases, doctors can't pinpoint what's causing the problem. When a cause can't be found, the condition is termed idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

The lung damage caused by pulmonary fibrosis can't be repaired, but medications and therapies can sometimes help ease symptoms and improve quality of life. For some people, a lung transplant might be appropriate.


Signs and symptoms of pulmonary fibrosis may include:
- Shortness of breath (dyspnea)
- A dry cough
- Fatigue
- Unexplained weight loss
- Aching muscles and joints
- Widening and rounding of the tips of the fingers or toes (clubbing)


The course of pulmonary fibrosis and the severity of symptoms can vary considerably from person to person. Some people become ill very quickly with severe disease. Others have moderate symptoms that worsen more slowly, over months or years.

Some people may experience a rapid worsening of their symptoms (acute exacerbation), such as severe shortness of breath, that may last for several days to weeks. People who have acute exacerbations may be placed on a mechanical ventilator. Doctors may also prescribe antibiotics, corticosteroid medications or other medications to treat an acute exacerbation.


Causes
Pulmonary fibrosis scars and thickens the tissue around and between the air sacs (alveoli) in your lungs. This makes it more difficult for oxygen to pass into your bloodstream. The damage can be caused by many different factors including long-term exposure to certain toxins, certain medical conditions, radiation therapy and some medications.

Occupational and environmental factors. Long-term exposure to a number of toxins and pollutants can damage your lungs. These include:
- Silica dust
- Asbestos fibers
- Hard metal dusts
- Coal dust
- Grain dust
- Bird and animal droppings

Radiation treatments
Some people who receive radiation therapy for lung or breast cancer show signs of lung damage months or sometimes years after the initial treatment. The severity of the damage may depend on:

- How much of the lung was exposed to radiation
- The total amount of radiation administered
- Whether chemotherapy also was used
- The presence of underlying lung disease
- Medications


Many drugs can damage your lungs, especially medications such as:

- Chemotherapy drugs. Drugs designed to kill cancer cells, such as methotrexate (Trexall, Otrexup, others) and cyclophosphamide, can also damage lung tissue.
- Heart medications. Some drugs used to treat irregular heartbeats, such as amiodarone (Cordarone, Nexterone, Pacerone), may harm lung tissue.
- Some antibiotics. Antibiotics such as nitrofurantoin (Macrobid, Macrodantin, others) or ethambutol can cause lung damage.
- Anti-inflammatory drugs. Certain anti-inflammatory drugs such as rituximab (Rituxan) or sulfasalazine (Azulfidine) can cause lung damage.


Medical conditions - Lung damage can also result from a number of conditions, including:
- Dermatomyositis
- Polymyositis
- Mixed connective tissue disease
- Systemic lupus erythematosus
- Rheumatoid arthritis
- Sarcoidosis
- Scleroderma
- Pneumonia


Many substances and conditions can lead to pulmonary fibrosis. Even so, in most cases, the cause is never found. Pulmonary fibrosis with no known cause is called idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

Researchers have several theories about what might trigger idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, including viruses and exposure to tobacco smoke. Also, some forms of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis run in families, and heredity may play a role in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

Many people with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis may also have gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) a condition that occurs when acid from your stomach flows back into your esophagus. Ongoing research is evaluating if GERD may be a risk factor for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, or if GERD may lead to a more rapid progression of the condition. However, more research is needed to determine the association between idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and GERD.
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onar

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« Reply #2502 on: October 24, 2018, 08:41:09 PM »

I googled it. I'm so very sorry for her and her family, it sounds horrible.
I wish all the best, honestly.
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Ellie

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« Reply #2503 on: October 24, 2018, 08:43:34 PM »

Oh no, that's awful. I have something like this (not caused by smoking, it is a long story), and it can be managed but there is no cure as your lung tissue is permanently scarred and unable to function.

Being diagnosed early like that means she'll probably be fine. Lots of medication though to manage things.
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Jazzy

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« Reply #2504 on: October 24, 2018, 08:48:01 PM »

How terrifying for her and her family, they can be thankful that she has the best medical care available.

I totally agree. Very terrifying.  Sad
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