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Author Topic: The Romanovs  (Read 99980 times)
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Principessa

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« Reply #390 on: March 13, 2019, 10:05:02 AM »

I can remember the story that Olga was still a child with regard to her mindset when she was off to marry. Apparently she was lost, and was found somewhere playing with dolls.
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Malenkaya

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« Reply #391 on: March 13, 2019, 11:39:32 PM »

I can remember the story that Olga was still a child with regard to her mindset when she was off to marry. Apparently she was lost, and was found somewhere playing with dolls.

She was overwhelmed and was found hiding, clutching a doll at one time. The sad part is she likely would have been pregnant with Constantine I at the time since she got pregnant fairly quickly after the wedding. She was just a baby, having a baby.

To Olga's credit I think she did remarkably well in her situation. Pity she doesn't get the same recognition that Queen Marie of Romania does. Granted Olga was scandal free. Marie was not.
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« Reply #392 on: March 14, 2019, 10:18:55 AM »

Geeh, I get totally lost with all those same-name royals.. Crazy
So Grand Duke Konstantine Nikolaevich and Grand Duchess Alexandra Josefovna had a daughter named Olga (and one named Vera) and Olga went on to become Queen of the Hellenes.
Dad's parents were Czar Nikolas and Czarina Alexandra (albeit Fjodorovna)..they also had a daughter named Olga (who possibly became godmother to her same-name niece) who was Queen of Württemberg. (and the aunt to which Konstantine N. and Alexandra J. sent their unruly second child Vera)..
For crying our loud, couldn't they be a bit more inventive with names? Don't know, call one daughter Harper Seven or Ivy Blue?
Anyway: Katharina (very tragic love story, sob) Olga and Vera are three Generations of russian princesses in the Württemberg Family and there are countless referrences to them:
Katharina co-founded the University of Hohenheim, the RaifeisenBank System (still big in Germany) and the much loved Fall Festival Wasen (the elder sister of the more famous Munich Wiesen) after the distrastrous effects of the vulcanic erruption of Tambora caused the "year without a summer" thus a year without harvest, a period of terrible starvation and suffering. The University was to research on how to harden crop so that like the winter crop Russia sent to allevate the hunger, crop was more immune to temperature drops. Ever since Hohenheim has  been one of Europe's finest agricultural universities. The first Gymnasium (high-school) for Girls was called Königin-Katharina-Gymnasium and it still exist.
Olga just as well founded several social projects and the Children's hospital in Stuttgart (capital of the former kingdom and now Bundesland) is still known affectionally as the "Olgäle". Several other hospitals and Schools carry her and her husband's names.
And as already mentioned Vera (Wera) founded the important Wera Homes for young women who had "fallen from grace". Vera was adament, that they should be given a choice whether to keep the babies or give them up for adoption, which was a very differernt approach to most other countries, who simply took away any rights of the new mothers. The young women there were also helped to find new jobs or learn a trade. Very forward for those times…The Wera homes for battered women still exist as well.
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« Reply #393 on: March 14, 2019, 10:23:34 AM »

I can remember the story that Olga was still a child with regard to her mindset when she was off to marry. Apparently she was lost, and was found somewhere playing with dolls.

She was overwhelmed and was found hiding, clutching a doll at one time. The sad part is she likely would have been pregnant with Constantine I at the time since she got pregnant fairly quickly after the wedding. She was just a baby, having a baby.

To Olga's credit I think she did remarkably well in her situation. Pity she doesn't get the same recognition that Queen Marie of Romania does. Granted Olga was scandal free. Marie was not.

According to information George and Olga met the 1st time when she was 12 years old. And they married when she was 16 years old, still a child IMO (I know the level of maturity can variate per age, but still 16).

She seemed to be an active lady:
https://en.wikipedia.org/..._Constantinovna_of_Russia

I have heard the sisters of George: Alexandra, Dagmar (Maria) and Thyra were very fond of Olga. While they weren't fond of Louise (of Sweden), the wife of their eldest brother Frederik VIII.
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« Reply #394 on: March 14, 2019, 10:31:09 AM »

Geeh, I get totally lost with all those same-name royals.. Crazy
So Grand Duke Konstantine Nikolaevich and Grand Duchess Alexandra Josefovna had a daughter named Olga (and one named Vera) and Olga went on to become Queen of the Hellenes.
Dad's parents were Czar Nikolas and Czarina Alexandra (albeit Fjodorovna)..they also had a daughter named Olga (who possibly became godmother to her same-name niece) who was Queen of Württemberg. (and the aunt to which Konstantine N. and Alexandra J. sent their unruly second child Vera)..
For crying our loud, couldn't they be a bit more inventive with names? Don't know, call one daughter Harper Seven or Ivy Blue?
Anyway: Katharina (very tragic love story, sob) Olga and Vera are three Generations of russian princesses in the Württemberg Family and there are countless referrences to them:
Katharina co-founded the University of Hohenheim, the RaifeisenBank System (still big in Germany) and the much loved Fall Festival Wasen (the elder sister of the more famous Munich Wiesen) after the distrastrous effects of the vulcanic erruption of Tambora caused the "year without a summer" thus a year without harvest, a period of terrible starvation and suffering. The University was to research on how to harden crop so that like the winter crop Russia sent to allevate the hunger, crop was more immune to temperature drops. Ever since Hohenheim has  been one of Europe's finest agricultural universities. The first Gymnasium (high-school) for Girls was called Königin-Katharina-Gymnasium and it still exist.
Olga just as well founded several social projects and the Children's hospital in Stuttgart (capital of the former kingdom and now Bundesland) is still known affectionally as the "Olgäle". Several other hospitals and Schools carry her and her husband's names.
And as already mentioned Vera (Wera) founded the important Wera Homes for young women who had "fallen from grace". Vera was adament, that they should be given a choice whether to keep the babies or give them up for adoption, which was a very differernt approach to most other countries, who simply took away any rights of the new mothers. The young women there were also helped to find new jobs or learn a trade. Very forward for those times…The Wera homes for battered women still exist as well.

When reading the Wikipedia entrance on daddy dearest, this family had many problems of it own:

https://en.wikipedia.org/...yevich_of_Russia#Marriage
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« Reply #395 on: March 14, 2019, 02:12:02 PM »

I think Konstantin was simply dealt very bad Cards inlife. His wife was a shrew, his marriage broke down when he couldn't provide her with the diamond setting of viceroy, General and advisor to the czar positions.
Alexandra seemed to be very self-absorbed, very vain, very much stuck in conservative ways and quite apparently she wasn't very maternal either.
For all that it's worth, Konstantin seemed to have a better relationship to all his children, passing on his rather liberal ideas, but he failed to stand up to his wife on the home front.
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« Reply #396 on: March 14, 2019, 06:28:50 PM »

I can remember the story that Olga was still a child with regard to her mindset when she was off to marry. Apparently she was lost, and was found somewhere playing with dolls.

She was overwhelmed and was found hiding, clutching a doll at one time. The sad part is she likely would have been pregnant with Constantine I at the time since she got pregnant fairly quickly after the wedding. She was just a baby, having a baby.

To Olga's credit I think she did remarkably well in her situation. Pity she doesn't get the same recognition that Queen Marie of Romania does. Granted Olga was scandal free. Marie was not.

According to information George and Olga met the 1st time when she was 12 years old. And they married when she was 16 years old, still a child IMO (I know the level of maturity can variate per age, but still 16).

She seemed to be an active lady:
https://en.wikipedia.org/..._Constantinovna_of_Russia

I have heard the sisters of George: Alexandra, Dagmar (Maria) and Thyra were very fond of Olga. While they weren't fond of Louise (of Sweden), the wife of their eldest brother Frederik VIII.

I've read that Maria Fyodorovna was in fact behind the marriage and invited her brother to meet Olga and that she appearantly talked her parents over to accept the marriage proposal as they deemed their daughter too young.
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« Reply #397 on: March 14, 2019, 09:09:55 PM »

Grand Duchess Vera Konstantinovna married Duke Eugen of Wurttemberg on May 4, 1874.   
Tsar Alexander II arranged for Vera's father to settle a million rubles on her as a dowry.
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« Reply #398 on: March 14, 2019, 09:26:03 PM »

For crying our loud, couldn't they be a bit more inventive with names? Don't know, call one daughter Harper Seven or Ivy Blue?

Russian naming traditions are pretty strict and I suspect it was even moreso for the upper classes to stick to the same names over and over again. I remember that people were excited when Nicholas II named one of his daughters Tatiana because it was a name traditionally used by peasants and not royalty. Nicholas II also allowed Victoria Melita to keep the name Viktoria when she and Kirill were welcomed back to Russia despite Viktoria not being a Russian name.

There were some names that were associated with the pre-Modernization of Russia too like Pelagia and Marfa. I couldn't imagine them using Eudoxia or Sophia due to the fate of the bearers of those names in Romanov history.
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« Reply #399 on: March 17, 2019, 11:20:41 PM »

Tsar Nicholas I had named his own sons Alexander and Constantine in honor of his brothers, Alexander I and Grand Duke Constantine.
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« Reply #400 on: March 18, 2019, 12:15:00 AM »

I thought Romanov dowries came from the apanage Tsar Paul set up.  A grand duchess received a minimum of 1,000,000 rubles; anything more than that was at the discretion of her parents and what her friends and family gave her.  Jewels, furniture, more cash, etc.  A grand duke received a set, minimum sum per year from the apanage from the time of his majority (I think it was 100,000); any more could come to him from inheritance and other family support (like inheriting a palace or having one built for him).

Grand Duke Alexander talks about these things in his fun autobiography, Once A Grand Duke.
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« Reply #401 on: March 18, 2019, 11:59:04 PM »

In 1763 Empress Catherine II learned that a collection of 225 paintings accumulated by a Polish art dealer who regularly supplied paintings to King Frederick II of Prussia had not been paid for. Frederick had decided that he could not afford them. Catherine bought the entire collection.
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« Reply #402 on: March 21, 2019, 11:58:41 PM »

The paternal uncles of Nicholas II decided that Nicholas should marry publicly in St. Petersburg, not privately at Livadia. At the coronation, the uncles insisted that Nicholas go on to the French ambassador's ball after the disaster at Khodynka Meadow.
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« Reply #403 on: March 22, 2019, 07:40:27 PM »

I thought Romanov dowries came from the apanage Tsar Paul set up.  A grand duchess received a minimum of 1,000,000 rubles; anything more than that was at the discretion of her parents and what her friends and family gave her.  Jewels, furniture, more cash, etc.  A grand duke received a set, minimum sum per year from the apanage from the time of his majority (I think it was 100,000); any more could come to him from inheritance and other family support (like inheriting a palace or having one built for him).

Grand Duke Alexander talks about these things in his fun autobiography, Once A Grand Duke.

Yes. This is why Alexander III changed the system of who could/couldn't inherit the title of HIH Grand Duke/Duchess and were HH Prince/ss instead. There were just too many males in the family! Which is ironic considering how many issues the Romanovs had with succession prior to Paul I. Nicholas I had 18 legitimate grandsons and 5 legitimate granddaughters through his 4 sons. It's interesting to see how many of the men ended up not marrying or marrying commoners instead.
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« Reply #404 on: March 22, 2019, 07:43:50 PM »

I thought Romanov dowries came from the apanage Tsar Paul set up.  A grand duchess received a minimum of 1,000,000 rubles; anything more than that was at the discretion of her parents and what her friends and family gave her.  Jewels, furniture, more cash, etc.  A grand duke received a set, minimum sum per year from the apanage from the time of his majority (I think it was 100,000); any more could come to him from inheritance and other family support (like inheriting a palace or having one built for him).

Grand Duke Alexander talks about these things in his fun autobiography, Once A Grand Duke.

Yes. This is why Alexander III changed the system of who could/couldn't inherit the title of HIH Grand Duke/Duchess and were HH Prince/ss instead. There were just too many males in the family! Which is ironic considering how many issues the Romanovs had with succession prior to Paul I. Nicholas I had 18 legitimate grandsons and 5 legitimate granddaughters through his 4 sons. It's interesting to see how many of the men ended up not marrying or marrying commoners instead.

I'd say that if the monarchy hadn't been abolished surely most of them would've married other people.
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