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PeDe
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« on: August 25, 2012, 06:40:22 PM »

I read an article about William of Gloucester, and realised I know nothing about them...so here it is.

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The Duke of Gloucester 1355-1397



Thomas of Woodstock, 1st Duke of Gloucester, on engraving from the 1700s. Seventh and youngest son of the English king Edward III. Engraved by Godfrey and published in 1776 by F.Blyth. Thomas of Woodstock, 1st Duke of Gloucester, 1st Earl of Buckingham, 1st Earl of Essex, Duke of Aumale, KG (7 January 1355 – 8 or 9 September 1397) was the thirteenth and youngest child of King Edward III of England and Philippa of Hainault. He was the fifth of the five sons of Edward III who survived to adulthood.

His Wife: Lady Eleanor de Bohun (c. 1366 – 3 October 1399) was the elder daughter and co-heiress with her sister, Mary de Bohun, of their father Humphrey de Bohun, 7th Earl of Hereford. Her mother was Lady Joan Fitzalan, daughter of Richard FitzAlan, 10th Earl of Arundel and his second wife Eleanor of Lancaster.




The Duke of Gloucester 1483-1485



King Richard III, Duke of Gloucester and Yorkist King of England. He was King of England for two years, from 1483 until his death in 1485 during the Battle of Bosworth Field. He was the last king of the House of York and the last of the Plantagenet dynasty. His defeat at the Battle of Bosworth Field was the decisive battle of the Wars of the Roses and is sometimes regarded as the end of the Middle Ages in England. He is the subject of an eponymous play by William Shakespeare. Richard was born at Fotheringhay Castle, the eighth and youngest child of Richard Plantagenet, 3rd Duke of York (who was a strong claimant to the throne of King Henry VI), and Cecily Neville. Richard spent several impressionable years of his childhood at Middleham Castle in Wensleydale under the tutelage of his cousin Richard Neville, 16th Earl of Warwick (later known as the "Kingmaker" because of his role in the Wars of the Roses).


His Wife: Lady Cecily Neville, Duchess of York (3 May 1415 – 31 May 1495)[1] was the wife of Richard Plantagenet, 3rd Duke of York, and the mother of two Kings of England: Edward IV and Richard III. Lady Cecily Neville was a daughter of Ralph Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland, and Joan Beaufort, Countess of Westmorland. Her maternal grandparents were John of Gaunt, 1st Duke of Lancaster, and Katherine Swynford. John of Gaunt was the third son of Edward III of England and Philippa of Hainault.




Duke of Gloucester 1414-1447



Humphrey of Lancaster, 1stDuke of Gloucester, 1st Earl of Pembroke, also known as Humphrey Plantagenet, was "son, brother and uncle of kings", being the fourth and youngest son of King Henry IV of England by his first wife, Mary de Bohun, brother to King Henry V of England, and uncle to the latter's son, king Henry VI of England. Humphrey was the exemplar of the romantic chivalric persona. Mettled, courageous, he was a foil for the beautiful princess Jacqueline, his wife. His learned, widely read, scholarly approach to the early renaissance cultural expansion demonstrated the quintessential well-rounded princely character. He was a paragon for Eton College, an exemplar for Oxford, accomplished, diplomatic, with political cunning. Unlike his brothers, he was not naturally brave, but opinionated, fervent and judgmental. He exaggerated his own achievements, but idolised his brother Henry V.


His Wife: Jacqueline of Wittelsbach (Dutch: Jacoba van Beieren; French: Jacqueline de Bavière) (16 August 1401 – 8 October 1436) was Duchess of Bavaria-Straubing, Countess of Hainaut and Holland from 1417 to 1432. She was also Dauphine of France for a short time between 1415 and 1417 and Duchess of Gloucester in the 1420s, if her marriage to Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester, is accepted as valid. Jacqueline was the last Wittelsbach ruler of Hainaut and Holland. Following her death, her estates passed into the inheritance of Philip the Good, Duke of Burgundy.




The Duke of Gloucester 1640-1660



Henry Stuart, 1st Duke of Gloucester, was the third adult (and youngest) son of Charles I and his queen, Henrietta Maria of France. He is also known as Henry of Oatland.
After his father's defeat at the end of the English Civil War, the prince (unlike his older brothers, who escaped with their mother to France) was captured and brought to London. His captivity was largely shared by his elder sister Princess Elizabeth. He was lodged in the royal apartments in the White Tower of the Tower of London, under the "protection" of the Republican army. During the debates among Republican army leaders Oliver Cromwell and Henry Ireton about what kind of regime should succeed the now abolished rule of Charles I, it was briefly suggested that the young prince might be placed on the throne, and made to govern as the kind of limited, constitutional monarch that Parliament wanted. Part of the motivation for this came from the perception that, unlike his brothers Charles and James, he was sufficiently young to have not yet been "corrupted" by the Catholic and absolutist views of his mother and father, and might be brought up by tutors who shared the Parliamentary perspective. However, this option quickly faded away, as the Rump Parliament opted instead for the establishment of a Republican Commonwealth. Henry was moved to more comfortable surroundings and allowed to live with relative freedom under the eyes of his Parliamentary guardians.




The Duke of Gloucester 1743-1805



Prince William Henry, Duke of Gloucester and Edinburgh, was a member of the British Royal Family, a grandson of George II and a younger brother of George III.
Prince William was born at Leicester House, London. His parents were Frederick, Prince of Wales, eldest son of George II and Caroline of Ansbach, and Princess Augusta of Saxe-Gotha, then Princess of Wales. He was christened at Leicester House eleven days later. His godparents were his paternal uncle by marriage, The Prince of Orange (for whom someone stood proxy); his paternal uncle, The Duke of Cumberland; and his paternal aunt, The Princess Amelia. As a grandchild of the sovereign, he was styled His Royal Highness Prince William at birth. He was fourth in the line of succession at birth.


His Wife: Maria Walpole (10 July 1736 – 22 August 1807), the Countess Waldegrave and Duchess of Gloucester and Edinburgh, was a member of the British Royal Family, the wife of Prince William Henry, Duke of Gloucester and Edinburgh. Her marriage to the Duke without the knowledge of King George III led to the passing of the Royal Marriages Act 1772.




The Duke of Gloucester 1776-1834



Prince William Frederik, Duke of Gloucester and Edinburgh, was a member of the British Royal Family, a great-grandson of King George II and nephew and son-in-law of King George III.
Prince William of Gloucester was born on 15 January 1776 at the Teodoli Palace in Rome, Italy. His father was Prince William, Duke of Gloucester, the third son of the Prince of Wales. His mother was Maria, Duchess of Gloucester, the illegitimate daughter of Edward Walpole and granddaughter of Robert Walpole. As a great-grandson of George II he held the title of Prince of Great Britain with the style His Highness, not His Royal Highness, at birth. The young prince was christened at Teodoli Palace, on 12 February 1776 by a Rev Salter. His godparents were the Duke and Duchess of Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg (his first cousin once-removed and his wife) and The Margrave of Brandenburg-Ansbach (his second cousin once-removed).


His Wife: The Princess Mary, Duchess of Gloucester and Edinburgh (25 April 1776 – 30 April 1857) was a member of the British Royal Family, the eleventh child and fourth daughter of George III. She married her cousin, Prince William Frederick, Duke of Gloucester and Edinburgh, when both were 40, and was his widow in later life. In her last years, her niece, Victoria, was on the throne as the fourth monarch during Mary's life, after her father and two of her brothers. Princess Mary was the longest-lived (at 81 years) and last survivor of George III's fifteen children; of those fifteen issue, thirteen lived to adulthood. She was also the only one of George III's children to be photographed. She died on 30 April 1857 at Gloucester House, London.




The Duke of Gloucester 1900-1974



Prince Henry, Duke of Gloucester (Henry William Frederick Albert, was a soldier and member of the British Royal Family, the third son of King George V of the United Kingdom and Queen Mary.
Prince Henry was born on 31 March 1900, at York Cottage, on the Sandringham Estate. His father was George V of the United Kingdom, the eldest surviving son of Edward VII of the United Kingdom. His mother was Mary of Teck, the only daughter of Prince Francis, Duke of Teck and Princess Mary Adelaide of Cambridge. In 1898, Queen Victoria issued letters patent granting the children of the Duke and Duchess of York the style Royal Highness. Thus he was styled His Royal Highness Prince Henry of York from birth.


His Wife: Princess Alice, Duchess of Gloucester, (née Alice Christabel Montagu Douglas Scott; 25 December 1901 – 29 October 2004) was a member of the British Royal Family. The daughter of the 7th Duke of Buccleuch & Queensberry, Scotland’s largest landowner, her brothers Walter and William and her nephew John were all Conservative MPs. By marriage, she was sister-in-law to Edward VIII and George VI and aunt to Elizabeth II. She was the mother of Prince William of Gloucester, who died young, and Prince Richard, Duke of Gloucester. Her first cousin, Marian Louisa Montagu Douglas Scott, was the grandmother of Sarah, Duchess of York, wife of Alice’s great-nephew, The Duke of York.




Gloucester Family in 1950





The current Duke of Gloucester 1974-to date



Prince Richard, Duke of Gloucester, is a member of the British Royal Family. Prince Richard is the youngest grandchild of King George V and Queen Mary. He has been Duke of Gloucester since his father's death in 1974. He is currently 21st in the line of succession. The Duke of Gloucester carries out royal engagements on behalf of his cousin, Queen Elizabeth II.
The Duke of Gloucester is the second son of the late Duke of Gloucester and the late Princess Alice, Duchess of Gloucester (third daughter of the 7th Duke of Buccleuch). His Royal Highness is a grandson of George V and a first cousin to The Queen. He became heir to his father's titles following the death of his elder brother, Prince William of Gloucester, in a flying accident on 28 August 1972. He succeeded his father in June 1974.


His Wife:Birgitte, Duchess of Gloucester (Birgitte Eva; formerly van Deurs; born Henriksen, 20 June 1946).Birgitte was born Birgitte Eva Henriksen, in Odense, Denmark, the younger daughter of Asger Preben Knud Wissing Henriksen, a lawyer, and his wife, Vivian van Deurs. She took her mother's last name, van Deurs, when her parents separated.





The Future Duke of Gloucester



Alexander Patrick Gregers Richard Windsor, Earl of Ulster (born 24 October 1974) is the only son of the Duke and Duchess of Gloucester. As the eldest son and heir-apparent of the Duke of Gloucester, he is accorded the title Earl of Ulster. He was educated at Eton College, King's College London (BA War Studies, 1996), and the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst.

Lord Ulster was married on 22 June 2002 to Claire Booth, a physician, in the Queen's Chapel, St. James's Palace, London. The couple have two children:
- Xan Richard Anders Windsor, Lord Culloden (born 12 March 2007)
- Lady Cosima Rose Alexandra Windsor (born 20 May 2010)[1]



This is just a rough overview - here it is in more detail if you are interested: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duke_of_Gloucester
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« Reply #1 on: August 25, 2012, 06:53:35 PM »


Soooo, what prompted all this Gloucesterism was this  Spiteful

How the Queen sabotaged my passionate affair with her cousin: Zsuzsi Starkloff tells the story of how Prince William of Gloucester fell for her and scandalised the royals in the process.




Forty years on, she still wears the prince’s ring on a chain around her neck, its weight and royal insignia a daily reminder of what might have been.

She could have married into the Royal Family, but instead she lives a modest existence on a mountain-top in Colorado, many thousands of miles from the world and the intrigues of the House of Windsor which caused her downfall. Otherwise, Hungarian-born Zsuzsi Starkloff could have been Duchess of Gloucester, with a sprawling estate in Northamptonshire and a grace-and-favour apartment in Kensington Palace. Her natural modesty and cool good looks would have won her many admirers and a place in the nation’s heart.

Instead, the unseen forces of the Establishment and a fatal plane crash put paid to a love which, though it remained largely secret, shook the royal court to its core.


Prince William of Gloucester (1941 - 1972) relaxes on his 21st birthday at his home at York House

Today, surrounded by mementos and photographs of her ill-starred affair, 78-year-old Mrs Starkloff has broken her decades-long silence to talk to the Mail about the love of her life. In August, 1972, her lover, the spectacularly handsome Prince William of Gloucester, died instantly, aged just 30, when his Piper Arrow light aircraft stalled on a tight turn in an air race and crashed to the ground.

A grandson of King George V, he was the Queen’s first cousin and the most dazzling royal of his generation. Clever, cool, athletic and muscular, William was a hero-figure to the young Prince Charles, who modelled himself on his older cousin and, ten years later, named his first-born after him. But despite his natural gifts, the prince’s one fatal flaw was that he had fallen for an older woman who was both a divorcee and a foreigner. The prince could have anything he wanted in life, but not her. For the powers-that-be at Buckingham Palace had already labelled Zsuzsi Starkloff ‘the new Mrs Simpson’ (after the American divorcee whose affair with Edward VIII triggered the Abdication Crisis in 1938) and were out to break the romance in any way they could.

The rules surrounding royalty back in the 1970s were very different. On the plus side, Prince William took his royal position extremely seriously. For him, the idea of being caught with his trousers down, a la Prince Harry, would be repugnant. On the minus side, the nation’s first family was propped up by a cant and hypocrisy which extended all the way up to the Queen herself.

In 1972, William’s clear intention to wed a divorcee was greeted with apoplectic horror, and yet only six years later his cousin, Prince Michael of Kent, did just that, marrying a Czech-born divorcee with the full approval of the Queen and court, and turning the former Marie-Christine von Reibnitz into Princess Pushy.



Zsuzui Starkloff would have been popular as a result of her cool good looks and natural honesty

Today, Mrs Starkloff looks back with a surprising lack of rancour at the way she was forced out of her lover Prince William’s life. She says: ‘He explained to me that it was his family’s fear that he would be likened to the Duke of Windsor. They wanted an end to the affair.’ Quite how unreasonable this presumption was can be seen by comparing the two men.

The former Duke of Windsor (William’s uncle) was already on the throne as Edward VIII when the Mrs Simpson affair became a public scandal, while the younger man, as a junior prince, had no chance of ever succeeding to the Throne. And whereas Edward VIII put his woman before duty, William, as we shall see, tried and tried to put duty before the woman.

‘William had a huge loyalty to his family — he wanted to do the right thing — and of course I supported him in that,’ says Mrs Starkloff, lightly shrugging off the Mrs Simpson parallel. ‘He had to make up his own mind, and he did that without influence from me.’ The couple met when William, aged 27 and on attachment to the Foreign Office, was working as a junior diplomat at the British Embassy in Tokyo. Tall, slim and beguilingly charming, he’d had a string of girlfriends but became smitten by Zsuszi, a Hungarian ex-model, after the pair met at a party.

Having been only briefly introduced, Zsuzsi next day sent her chauffeur to the embassy with a note saying: ‘Dear Prince Charming, I have a slipper missing. Would you like to come to a party?’ ‘He was quite a man,’ recalls Mrs Starkloff. ‘He was very manly, very passionate. And mature beyond his years.’ From the start, the prince was transfixed. He wrote home to his parents, the Duke and Duchess of Gloucester, asking what their reaction would be if he proposed marriage.

‘They were against it,’ Zsuzsi says. ‘It came as no shock to me. I was seven years older than William for a start, divorced, and a different religion. I knew it was doomed.’ Even so, still he persevered. His old schoolfriend, Giles St Aubyn, recalled: ‘She was witty, intelligent, attractive. William sparkled in her company. ‘But the relationship overshadowed everything else. It resulted in a period of great anguish for him, for it involved him in disagreements with his friends and family.’ One friend from that time, businessman Shigeo Kitano, recalls seeing the couple together: ‘Prince William was obviously deeply in love with her. She was very beautiful, with large brown eyes and long auburn hair. When she smiled, she had a big dimple.

‘She was a good dresser and carried herself gracefully. She conversed in flawless Japanese and was clearly a very clever woman.’ The romance increased in pace over two years, but while courtiers were happy for the prince to sow his wild oats when abroad, they were increasingly nervous about what would happen when his tour of duty was over.

Pressure started to mount on him to dump his girlfriend, among whose sins — apart from being twice-married —was that she was the mother of two small children. There was also the tricky business, for bigoted courtiers anyway, of her being Jewish. These points were brought home forcefully during the prince’s time in Japan by his boss, Sir John Pilcher, the British Ambassador.

Sir John had been encouraged to report back to London on the prince’s relationship, a task in which he took evident relish. ‘I soon heard that delectable feminine presence was frequently to be discovered in Prince William’s home,’ Pilcher smoothly purred. ‘We thought it wise of him to be attached to such an attractive and adult person.’

n fact, this was diplomatic double-speak. What he actually meant was that it was fine for a woman to take care of the prince’s passionate needs, but at no time should she be mistaken for wifely material.

In the language of the seasoned diplomat, Sir John went on: ‘Left to his own devices, the Prince needed a degree of prompting. He was immensely good-natured and took in remarkably good part the observations I felt bound to make.

‘This was notably the case when I had to point out the constitutional and diplomatic service aspects of marrying a foreigner. He undertook to pause and think.’ Put in everyday language, the prince had been leaned on. Hiding his disappointment, he secretly ventured to get the love of his life accepted by the Royal Family. An opportunity arose when the Queen despatched her sister, Princess Margaret, to Japan, apparently on official duties but also to look Mrs Starkloff over.

The princess and the divorcee were introduced, and Zsuzsi now recalls: ‘On the surface she was friendly. She told William: “I’m not surprised you’re in love with her” — and we all had dinner together.’ Within days, though, Margaret had written to her cousin warning him off any matrimonial plans. She wrote: ‘I was so pleased to have the opportunity of a quick word with you. I do think you would be wise to wait for a bit, and then come home and see how everything looks.’ Margaret went one step further, advising him to confide in his boss Sir John Pilcher — a treacherous suggestion since the ambassador was reporting back to London on the prince’s every move.

But it was clear that Princess Margaret was not passing her own message to the Prince, but that of the Queen. Back in the 1970s, the Sovereign clearly still took the view that true love was the implacable enemy of royalty — as it had seemed in the cases of her uncle, the Duke of Windsor, and her sister Margaret (with her ill-fated affair with Group Captain Townsend).

William, it was clear, must not be allowed to follow suit. None of this, though, made any difference to the prince. He decided, against all advice, to bring Zsuzsi home to England. She recalls: ‘He organised a trip to Scotland to visit his uncle, the Duke of Buccleuch, and we spent some time there before going to the Prince’s country home, Barnwell. His father had suffered a stroke and was very ill. He was in a wheelchair.

‘I had a wonderful welcome from the Duchess (of Gloucester). She was warm and friendly, sitting with her flowers and her needlework, and we chatted. But she was very reserved and it was hard to know what she was really thinking.’ Much the same as all the other royals, no doubt? ‘She didn’t show it, but I’m sure that it was there,’ says Mrs Starkloff.

By this time the relationship had become public knowledge, and reports circulated that during her six-week stay in Britain, Mrs Starkloff had met the Queen. In fact, nothing could have been less likely. Her Majesty kept her distance and made it known she wanted an end to the affair.

And she got it. William finally caved in to family pressure, and with Zsuzsi in New York for family reasons, he called a halt. Yet it was still far from over.
With his father now ailing, Prince William was encouraged to abandon his diplomatic career and return to Northamptonshire to tend the family estate. That way, an eye could be kept on him. But as a ruse, it only partially worked.

Soon he had gone to America, where he and his lover were reunited. ‘We got an aircraft and we flew around together, or drove,’ she recalls. ‘We went to California to see some of my friends, then travelled on through the United States and Hawaii. ‘We did a lot of wonderful things together on this journey across the country, and for the most part he wasn’t recognised. I think he relished the anonymity. It was wonderful for him not to be bothered by people.


Read more here: http://www.dailymail.co.u...lised-royals-process.html






« Last Edit: August 25, 2012, 06:58:40 PM by PeDe » Logged

Miss Waynfleet

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« Reply #2 on: August 25, 2012, 06:58:09 PM »

Thanks for the thread  Star

Wasn´t William just hot?

BTw what´s with this teasing of Harry? Oh Daily Fail, just show pictures.

« Last Edit: August 25, 2012, 07:34:32 PM by Miss Waynfleet » Logged
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« Reply #3 on: August 25, 2012, 07:30:24 PM »

But with his diagnosed porphyria, it's certainly a good thing that he never was able to reproduce.
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« Reply #4 on: August 25, 2012, 08:22:03 PM »

Thanks for the thread  Star

Wasn´t William just hot?

BTw what´s with this teasing of Harry? Oh Daily Fail, just show pictures.


Thank you PeDe this was a very interesting article. I had not known that Charles had such admiration for him, but it is easy to see that he'd be an attractive role model for a young man to emulate.
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« Reply #5 on: August 25, 2012, 08:49:29 PM »


you're most welcome Miss W  Star and TLLK  Star
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« Reply #6 on: August 26, 2012, 01:49:33 AM »

Lovely thread, PeDe, thank you for starting it  Star . This is a nice family.
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« Reply #7 on: August 26, 2012, 02:14:17 AM »


You are welcome DowntownTO  Star and it's so good to see you
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« Reply #8 on: August 26, 2012, 03:43:12 AM »

A calender for September, the couple will also attend the Paralympics. I will add the websites of some the places they visit, it´s often interesting  Smiley

6th September 2012

The Duke of Gloucester will visit the Rotherham Hospice, Broom Road, Rotherham, South Yorkshire

http://www.rotherhamweb.co.uk/features/hospice.htm

also visiting Beatson Clark, The Glass Works, Greasbrough Road, Rotherham, South Yorkshire

http://www.beatsonclark.co.uk/

The Duke and Duchess of Gloucester will attend a Garden Party at Clifton Park, Rotherham, South Yorkshire

The Duchess of Gloucester will visit Safe@Last, Great House, Waterside Business Park, Rotherham Road, Dinnington, Sheffield

http://www.safeatlast.org.uk/index.html

Also visiting Lifewise, Kea Park Close, Hellaby, Rotherham, South Yorkshire

http://www.safetycentreal...rg.uk/directory/lifewise/

7th September 2012

The Duke of Gloucester will attend the Concours of Elegance at Windsor Castle, Windsor, Berkshire

http://www.concoursofelegance.co.uk/

12th September 2012

The Duke of Gloucester will present the Royal Charter to the Builders Merchant Company and afterwards will attend a Lunch at Skinners' Hall, 8 Dowgate Hill, London EC4R.

http://www.wcobm.co.uk/ev...ion_of_the_royal_charter/

13th September 2012

The Duke of Gloucester President, Peterborough Cathedral Development and Preservation Trust, will attend the Launch of the Peterborough 900 Campaign, Peterborough Cathedral, Peterborough

http://www.peterborough-c.../the-cathedral-trust.html

The Duke of Gloucester  Colonel-in-Chief, The Royal Anglian Regiment, will attend a Rededication Ceremony of the War Memorial in Peterborough.

The Duke of Gloucester will visit Wood Green Animal Shelter, King's Bush Farm, London Road, Godmanchester, Cambridgeshire

http://www.woodgreen.org....ut/visit_us/godmanchester

14th September 2012

The Duke of Gloucester will open Lightmoor Village, Telford, Shropshire.

The Duke of Gloucester will attend a Reception at Attingham Park, Atcham, Shrewsbury, Shropshire.

15th September 2012

The Duke of Gloucester Grand Prior, the Most Venerable Order of the Hospital of St. John of Jerusalem, will attend the Inauguration Ceremony of the Commandery of the Bailiwick of Jersey.

http://www.orderofstjohn.org/

25th September 2012

The Duke of Gloucester Patron, Global Heritage Fund, will attend the Contemporary Arts meets Heritage Reception given by the Global Heritage Fund at the British Museum, London.

http://globalheritagefund.org/

As Patron, he also will attend a Global Heritage Fund Dinner in Kensington, London.

27th September 2012

The Duke of Gloucester Royal Colonel, 6th Battalion The Rifles, will visit training in Paderborn, Germany.

The Duchess of Gloucester will open the redeveloped Sydney Simmons Homes in Ashtead, Surrey.

The Duchess of Gloucester will open the new Day Care and Endoscopy Unit at Epsom and St Helier Hospital, Epsom, Surrey.

The Duchess of Gloucester will open the new facilities at Woodlands School, Leatherhead, Surrey

28th September 2012

The Duke of Gloucester Patron, British Association of Friends of Museums, will attend a Reception at the Towner Gallery, Eastbourne

« Last Edit: August 26, 2012, 03:49:13 AM by Miss Waynfleet » Logged
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« Reply #9 on: August 26, 2012, 03:54:17 AM »

PeDe, great article  Star

What a romantic, but sad story - imagine if Prince William had lived, what a different life the current Gloucesters would have led. When Birgitte married, she was marrying the second son and likely never considered she would become Duchess of Gloucester.
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« Reply #10 on: August 26, 2012, 04:06:16 AM »

PeDe, great article  Star

What a romantic, but sad story - imagine if Prince William had lived, what a different life the current Gloucesters would have led. When Birgitte married, she was marrying the second son and likely never considered she would become Duchess of Gloucester.


you are most welcome Columbo, glad you enjoyed it  Star


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« Reply #11 on: August 26, 2012, 04:06:56 AM »



Great calendar, Miss W  Star (when karma allows)  Thumb up
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« Reply #12 on: August 26, 2012, 05:32:08 AM »

Thankyou so much my dear Professor PeDe!   Star   Love these historic threads.

 Star to you , Miss Waynefleet for the detailed calendar.  You too are on the "faculty" of Royal Dish!

I am your most faithful student!     Flowers
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« Reply #13 on: August 26, 2012, 06:16:14 AM »

Thanks Pede.   Star Star 
Such a lot of work went into making sure Royals married suitable partners after the Wallis Simpson affair.

I am struck by the likeness of the young William to his cousin Major Ronald Ferguson.
You can tell that they were related with that strong boned handsome face.

I didn't know that Beatrice and Eugenie were related to the Gloucesters through their mother as well! 
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« Reply #14 on: August 26, 2012, 06:53:16 AM »


You are welcome DowntownTO  Star and it's so good to see you

Thank you!

I'm very interested in the archaeological investigation into the whereabouts of Richard III's grave. I'll try to post a link to an article - I've never done that before, so, as the old song says, "Wish me luck as you wave me goodbye . . ."   .

OK, here it is:  http://www.telegraph.co.u...n-the-Hunchback-King.html
« Last Edit: August 26, 2012, 07:01:24 AM by DowntownTO » Logged
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