Please read here on how to use images on RoyalDish. - Please read the RoyalDish message on board purpose and rules.
Images containing full nudity or sexual activities are strongly forbidden on RoyalDish.


Pages: 1 ... 59 60 [61] 62 63 ... 65   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Camilla News & Events  (Read 290385 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
periwinkle

Gigantic Member
*********

Reputation: 1194

Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 4031





Ignore
« Reply #900 on: December 22, 2020, 01:07:49 AM »

I have a question. Is it becoming common to say Merry Christmas in the UK? I want to remember everyone saying Happy Christmas and Camilla does in the video but everyone else seems to say Merry not Happy. I've noticed this in other contexts.
Logged
ralf103

Huge Member
********

Reputation: 1182

Offline Offline

United Kingdom United Kingdom

Posts: 2772





Ignore
« Reply #901 on: December 22, 2020, 01:46:53 AM »

Hmm odd one now I've thought about it - in writing I and most people I know would put Merry Christmas - often followed by "and a Happy New Year" but actually out-loud I would probably say Happy Christmas or 'have a lovely Christmas'. I heard once that Queen never says/writes Merry Christmas to avoid appearing to condone Christmas drinking...how true that is or if its just on of those made up rules people come up with to explain why Royals do something in one way rather than another I'm not sure.
Logged
periwinkle

Gigantic Member
*********

Reputation: 1194

Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 4031





Ignore
« Reply #902 on: December 22, 2020, 03:11:48 AM »

Interesting ralf does merry imply drinking always? I never thought about that.
Logged
Margaret

Gigantic Member
*********

Reputation: 1432

Offline Offline

Australia Australia

Posts: 4120





Ignore
« Reply #903 on: December 22, 2020, 05:24:32 AM »

"Merry Christmas" can be sourced back to the 16th century, and "merry" does not necessarily imply drinking.  https://www.whychristmas....toms/merrychristmas.shtml  But I can well imagine that the very religious, and Protestant religious at that, Elizabeth might frown on the use of "merry" in a greeting.
Logged
fairy

Most Exalted Member
*

Reputation: 4575

Offline Offline

Posts: 19919





Ignore
« Reply #904 on: December 22, 2020, 09:14:42 AM »

Non native speakers usually consider merry a much more festive and perhaps even solemn expression, since one hears it usually only in the Merry Christmas context. Happy - as in Happy Birthday seems a lot more loud, funny - more like having a good time, a great party etc...
I indeed once met an english teacher who corrected my daughter's Happy Christmas, (by the way, you can't imagine how much my daughters get corrected in english by their german teachers!!) saying that in Germany Christmas was a solemn festive and quiet time, not the rambunctious party affair with the silly party hats and the drinking... Champagne
Logged

Mary's life motto:
"if I had the choice between world peace and a Prada handbag, I'd choose the latter one" Marian Keyes.
Maria
Administrator
Most Exalted Member
************

Reputation: 4196

Offline Offline

Posts: 21762




« Reply #905 on: December 22, 2020, 03:16:59 PM »

In Danish we have two expressions; one covers before Christmas’ “god jul”, the other when Christmas is there “glædelig jul”. Same rules apply to Easter. However lots of people mix them up and many use English expressions instead so Beer
Logged
Ellie

Muted
Ginormous Member
***********

Reputation: 1946

Online Online

Posts: 7201


proud moron thx Scooby Doo




Ignore
« Reply #906 on: December 22, 2020, 04:49:14 PM »

I always thought 'happy Xmas' was British English while 'merry Xmas' is us Americans!
Logged

writing angry fauxminist letters in the Lesbaru
Booklover

Warned
Medium Member
*****

Reputation: 300

Offline Offline

Canada Canada

Posts: 872





Ignore
« Reply #907 on: December 22, 2020, 05:16:14 PM »

I always thought 'happy Xmas' was British English while 'merry Xmas' is us Americans!

I thought the same.
Logged
kbart

Mini Member
***

Reputation: 123

Offline Offline

United Kingdom United Kingdom

Posts: 241





Ignore
« Reply #908 on: December 22, 2020, 08:02:19 PM »

I always thought 'happy Xmas' was British English while 'merry Xmas' is us Americans!
It usually is but a poster upthread pointed out that us Brits tend to say Happy Christmas, but write Merry Christmas (and a Happy New Year) to avoid the repetition of Happy...  So Merry has probably crept into the spoken language. Noone is too bothered here, especially atm, we'll take anyone's good wishes... 
Logged
Margaret

Gigantic Member
*********

Reputation: 1432

Offline Offline

Australia Australia

Posts: 4120





Ignore
« Reply #909 on: December 22, 2020, 09:46:20 PM »

The first Christmas card, issued 1843 in England, and linked to in my post a few messages above, says "A Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year to you", and in "A Christmas Carol", published in the same year, Dickens used the expression "Merry Christmas".  I grew up in an Anglophile family and was programmed to say "Merry Christmas" whether spoken or written.

Logged
SvenskaSarah

Big Member
*******

Reputation: 489

Offline Offline

United Kingdom United Kingdom

Posts: 1823





Ignore
« Reply #910 on: December 24, 2020, 05:05:54 PM »

Growing up in the UK, there is much more "Merry Christmas" than "Happy Christmas". I never like the latter, mainly because I dont like using the same adjective when wishing someone a happy new year!
The Christmas Carol "We wish you a merry Christmas" is, to me, so intrinsically British. I'm not sure of its origins and I know that other countries have their version, such as Sweden's "God Jul önskar vi er alla". Eevery child under 7 learns "We wish you a Merry Christmas" at school. I'm not sure if it's a British thing or just my family being funny, but I was always discouraged to write "Xmas" on Christmas cards and so on.

Going back to Camilla, I was struck by how beautiful she is after seeing the recent photos published. Of the photographs of when she was younger I never thought she was very attractive, but she has matured well and looks very serene, classy and gorgeous!
Logged
periwinkle

Gigantic Member
*********

Reputation: 1194

Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 4031





Ignore
« Reply #911 on: December 24, 2020, 05:11:46 PM »

Thank you all for the history lesson on the sayings. Yes I thought Merry Christmas was American and Happy Christmas was UK but it's all very interchangeable these days isn't it. Camilla has definitely aged well. I think she looks better now than when they first started openly dating and the early years of marriage. I think it must be a combination of love and confidence that comes from being loved plus a really good hairstylist. I remember that scene in Fleabag when they went to Claire's hairdresser to complain about her looking like a pencil and the hairdresser said hair isn't everything and the whole salon stopped and said oh yes it is lol.
Logged
A Citizen not a Subject

Warned
Large Member
******

Reputation: 676

Offline Offline

United Kingdom United Kingdom

Posts: 1507





Ignore
« Reply #912 on: December 24, 2020, 06:48:05 PM »

I don’t personally mind if it’s “Merry” or “Happy” Christmas, I just can’t bear “Xmas” in place of the full word.
Logged

I live in hope that one day I will be able to elect my Head of State.
anastasia beaverhausen

Ginormous Member
***********

Reputation: 1744

Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 7088





Ignore
« Reply #913 on: December 25, 2020, 01:33:16 AM »

I don’t personally mind if it’s “Merry” or “Happy” Christmas, I just can’t bear “Xmas” in place of the full word.

Me neither!  Seriously, it’s only 5 more letters.....
Logged
Lady Liebe

Gigantic Member
*********

Reputation: 851

Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 4229


Provence Amaryllis




Ignore
« Reply #914 on: January 03, 2021, 12:11:25 AM »

Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall Surprises Cancer Hero:

https://people.com/royals...tch-her-shocked-reaction/

Quote
On Thursday, Camilla shared a special moment in which she surprised the CEO of a cancer charity with a special honor during a visit to her London home, Clarence House, earlier this year.

Dame Laura Lee, who is the Chief Executive of Maggie’s — a network of drop-in centers across the U.K., which aim to help anyone who has been affected by cancer — thought she was invited to Clarence House for an interview about her charity work, but there was a much bigger surprise in store. (snip)

Camilla, who is President of Maggie’s, then presents Lee with the Outstanding Contribution Award as part of the inaugural Pride of Scotland Awards. (The statue was hiding behind one of the pillows on a nearby couch!)

“I’ve come to tell you that you’ve won the Pride of Scotland Award for your outstanding contribution to Maggie’s,” Camilla says.

“Outrageous! You’re outrageous!” an elated Lee exclaims.

“I’m afraid we’ve plotted it,” Camilla then says with a laugh as she directs Lee to look behind the cushion for her award.

Lovely surprise, but I am wondering if an in person meeting was wise at this time.
Logged

Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not his own facts.       Daniel Patrick Moynihan
Pages: 1 ... 59 60 [61] 62 63 ... 65   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to: