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Author Topic: Bavarian Royal - The Wittelsbacher  (Read 78637 times)
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Kristallinchen

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« Reply #105 on: May 07, 2020, 05:51:50 PM »

Wasn't one of Ludwig's castles the inspiration for the castle in Disneyland?

Yes, Neuschwanstein.
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Kristallinchen

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« Reply #106 on: May 12, 2020, 09:58:02 PM »

A study claims that King Ludwig II was sane.    
http://www.telegraph.co.u...ave-been-so-mad-after-all
Cyril, I recall reading that Ludwig II was a very good swimmer and his drowning was considered suspicious. He had bankrupted/was on his way to bankrupting Bavaria with his Castle-build programme and the powers that be were very concerned. He was a visionary.


There're several things fishy about this situation. Ludwig was in good condition at the time of his death. Dr. Gudden was an old man.

That basically rules out the thesis of the two fighting and Dr. Gudden winning.

Also Ludwig committing suicide doesn't make much sense to me. I think he would've done it much earlier.

Yes, he was a gambler, but he was also not totally alien to politics. I've read that he was very opposed to the idea of a Prussian unified German Empire. He feared that the Hohenzollern might become too powerful. Guess he wasn't this crazy after all. He refused to sign the document offering Wilhelm I. the german crown for a long time. As Bavaria was after Prussia itself, the most important Kingdom in Germany, that was quite something. If word got out, others might follow (like the Kings of Saxony and Württemberg). I believe Ludwig was finally bribed with money (most likely spent on his castles). Who knows what they (the government, Prussians) really feared about coming out and therefore declaring Ludwig insane. Yes, his spending was outrageous, but it hardly made up for him being cast away.

Also interesting: Prince regent Luitpold, although ruling on behalf of Ludwig and later his brother Otto, was careful enough not to call himself King (as the real King, even if being declared insane, was still alive).

His son, Ludwig III. was not so clever and made himself King, despite Otto being still alive. Sure the end of war and revolution would've most likely thrown him away anyway, but it was still a thing of unfidelity the people of Bavaria wouldn't forgive and forget. Ludwig III. was basically an imposter to them.
« Last Edit: May 12, 2020, 11:27:25 PM by Kristallinchen » Logged
CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #107 on: August 27, 2020, 02:03:23 AM »

Why was King Ludwig II of Bavaria obsessed with Medieval fantasy and fairy tales?
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karma chamelion

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« Reply #108 on: August 27, 2020, 02:10:11 AM »

Why was King Ludwig II of Bavaria obsessed with Medieval fantasy and fairy tales?

I think it has mostly been attributed to his obsession with Richard Wagner but having read quite a bit about him (eccentric royals are fascinating to me) I think he had a whimsical nature and escaped his world of lessons and tutors from an early age. Plus he grew up in castles full of Medieval armor and portraits, he basically lived in a fantasy.
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PeDe
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« Reply #109 on: August 27, 2020, 07:07:45 AM »

Why was King Ludwig II of Bavaria obsessed with Medieval fantasy and fairy tales?

It is written and handed down, that he grew up with very distant parents that left him to grow up surrounded by servants and teachers on Burg Hohenschwangau (Castle) built by his father King Maximilian. Left by his parents and acess to literature, it is said he early developed interest with Medieval chivalry, Medieval legends and fairytale castles.


Hohenschwangau Castle



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PeDe
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« Reply #110 on: August 27, 2020, 07:33:08 AM »

A study claims that King Ludwig II was sane.    
http://www.telegraph.co.u...ave-been-so-mad-after-all
Cyril, I recall reading that Ludwig II was a very good swimmer and his drowning was considered suspicious. He had bankrupted/was on his way to bankrupting Bavaria with his Castle-build programme and the powers that be were very concerned. He was a visionary.


There're several things fishy about this situation. Ludwig was in good condition at the time of his death. Dr. Gudden was an old man.

That basically rules out the thesis of the two fighting and Dr. Gudden winning.

Also Ludwig committing suicide doesn't make much sense to me. I think he would've done it much earlier.

Yes, he was a gambler, but he was also not totally alien to politics. I've read that he was very opposed to the idea of a Prussian unified German Empire. He feared that the Hohenzollern might become too powerful. Guess he wasn't this crazy after all. He refused to sign the document offering Wilhelm I. the german crown for a long time. As Bavaria was after Prussia itself, the most important Kingdom in Germany, that was quite something. If word got out, others might follow (like the Kings of Saxony and Württemberg). I believe Ludwig was finally bribed with money (most likely spent on his castles). Who knows what they (the government, Prussians) really feared about coming out and therefore declaring Ludwig insane. Yes, his spending was outrageous, but it hardly made up for him being cast away.

Also interesting: Prince regent Luitpold, although ruling on behalf of Ludwig and later his brother Otto, was careful enough not to call himself King (as the real King, even if being declared insane, was still alive).

His son, Ludwig III. was not so clever and made himself King, despite Otto being still alive. Sure the end of war and revolution would've most likely thrown him away anyway, but it was still a thing of unfidelity the people of Bavaria wouldn't forgive and forget. Ludwig III. was basically an imposter to them.


He was sane. He was a very good swimmer. He was killed.

Ludwig II ascended to the throne with 19 years after his father, King Maximilian II of Bavaria died. Ludwig was utterly unprepared for politics, and his interest veered to arts, architecture, and music all his life. He spend a lot of states money for his castles, building the Bayreuth Festspielhaus (Bayreuth Festival Theatre), where Wagner held is operas....etc. He overspend, and when the ministers started to critcise him, Ludwig II threatened to dismiss the entire cabinet and replacing them with new people.

The ministers started looked for causes to depose Ludwig II by constitutional means, and the only way they could was to declare him mentally ill, and unable to rule. And that's what they did. Parallel, the cabinet asked Ludwig II's uncle, Prince Luitpold, to replace Ludwig II once he was deposed.

Ludwig III is Luitpolds son.

Bavarians didn't like Ludwig III because he made himself king, but because his father Luitpold had an active participation in the deposition of his nephew, King Ludwig II, and took over the throne. So a non-ruling line deposed and stole the throne from the ruling line.

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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #111 on: August 28, 2020, 01:35:29 AM »

How often did Ludwig II (when he was Prince Ludwig) have contact with his grandfather King Ludwig I?
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PeDe
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« Reply #112 on: August 28, 2020, 02:48:42 AM »

It's not really known.

What is known is, that his grandfather, King Ludwig I, asked for a change of name, because the boy was born on his birthday. Ludwig II was initially named Otto II. When his younger brother was born he was named Otto  Crazy

When Ludwig II was 8 months, his wet-nurse died of typhoid fever. Ludwig had to be suddenly weaned and became ill, causing great anxiety about his life. At the age of 3, Ludwig became Crown Prince of Bavaria, when his grandfather was forced to abdicate as a result of his liaison with the scandalous Lola Montez. From then on Ludwig was manoeuvred into a position of prominence, restriction, extreme isolation and loneliness. I guess after this incident, there was very little if no contact to his grandfather.

It is also known, that as child, Ludwig II had a touchy pride in his high position. He had to come first, whether it was in games with his younger brother Otto or the order of precedence when entering a room in company. And it is said that Ludwig never let Otto forget he was the Crown Prince.

Letters say, when Ludwig got in trouble as a child he was beaten by his father. Otto, who described as a merry and witty boy, was his parents' favourite. King Maximilian had a taste for intellectual pursuits and could understand neither Ludwig's melancholy gloom nor his romantic dreams. Ludwig's mother had no great intellect or force of character and hardly any interest in politics. Ludwig's moodiness, pride and sensitivity were ruthlessly suppressed. This way Ludwig learned that secrecy and deceit were the only effective weapons he possessed with which to preserve his inner life. He was said to have been quite good in French language, history and mathematics.
 
Via historical papers, it is reported that the only person who Ludwig did not fear was probably his governess, Sybille Meilhaus.

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