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Author Topic: Prince Henry, Duke of Gloucester  (Read 11904 times)
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LucyintheSky

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« Reply #30 on: November 29, 2019, 01:41:49 AM »

I sort of expected this since they moved from Apartment 1 to the Old Stable Block (right?).  They lease out their country place and since all their kids are established there’s probably not a lot of things they need...especially all this stuff.  Hopefully each of the kids have kept some keepsake items.  With the profits they can afford to donate to charity, set up funds for the grandkids, or whatever.  And this means that there will be less to do when the pass...and lower the tax burden. 

It’s a bit sad but very logical.  With both the Duke and Duchess in their mid 70s it’s a good time to start divesting their items.

Also, hopefully the RCT got to go through and pick out what they felt would be good additions to the collection. 
Thanks Oh_Caroline! Thumb up
That makes sense! However is it all going to charity? Or just some?
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Oh_Caroline

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« Reply #31 on: November 29, 2019, 01:47:05 AM »

I sort of expected this since they moved from Apartment 1 to the Old Stable Block (right?).  They lease out their country place and since all their kids are established there’s probably not a lot of things they need...especially all this stuff.  Hopefully each of the kids have kept some keepsake items.  With the profits they can afford to donate to charity, set up funds for the grandkids, or whatever.  And this means that there will be less to do when the pass...and lower the tax burden. 

It’s a bit sad but very logical.  With both the Duke and Duchess in their mid 70s it’s a good time to start divesting their items.

Also, hopefully the RCT got to go through and pick out what they felt would be good additions to the collection. 
Thanks Oh_Caroline! Thumb up
That makes sense! However is it all going to charity? Or just some?

Certain lots are going to various charities and of course if things go well they might do some private donations.
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Duchess of Verona

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« Reply #32 on: November 29, 2019, 02:24:15 AM »

I hope they get the prices that are the estimate. We inherited a pair of English George III demi-lune tables and a pair of  English George II gilt and mahogany mirrors when my MIL died. She paid $6000 for the tables and $8000 for the mirrors at a very high end gallery in London in the 1960s. This would be a substantial amount in 2019 dollars. I recently go an estimate from a NY sales gallery of $5000 for all 4 pieces. My problem is that they are getting dry and the veneers and inlay are becoming loose. But it would cost more to send them to the restorer than they are worth. Dear Husband wont let me sell them at that price, so I boxed them up carefully and sent them to the attic, so they don't start losing pieces, in the hopes that one day the market cycles back around and they are in fashion again and become worth spending the money to stabilize them. . But right now, brown furniture, as my friend the decorator calls it, is not in fashion.
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fairy

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« Reply #33 on: November 29, 2019, 08:45:19 AM »

I do like buying at auctions, you actually (with a good auction house) get fairly close to a sane price, esp when it comes to jewellery and you pay mostly the material. But all in all the essence is: does someone like the piece?
I found a carpet that I absolutely loved and that would have been perfect for our living room, the starting price was reasonable and the people at the auction house said, that typically carpets don't go all that well.  Confused Mine did.. it was the only one piece that day that went waaaayyyy beyond asking price and must have made his previous owner very very happy...well,  Cry
My mother in law has an entire set of Dresden China (pre WWII), which she insists is worth a fortune... saw the identical set at the auction house and hubby was quite surprised to see his mom's "fortune" was not even meeting the asking price of 600Euros...it will break MIL's heart... Spiteful
Apparently (acc. to the auction house staff) there is a bit of a generation move here: the elder generation (80-100 ys) are passing on their heritage pieces. But lifestyle has changed: nobody has much space and time for statement pieces that are not to be used but only to be looked at. Appartment and house sizes in Europe do not allow for extra cupboards filled with China and Crystal that you don't use. So the heirs usually pick a few small pieces and sell the rest. Same is with furniture, you keep one piece and sell the rest...so the market is flooded.
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #34 on: November 30, 2019, 12:33:16 AM »

I like the needlework Princess Alice, Duchess of Gloucester did on the George III armchairs.
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Margaret

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« Reply #35 on: November 30, 2019, 06:12:13 AM »

I like the needlework Princess Alice, Duchess of Gloucester did on the George III armchairs.

I love those chairs!   270 years old but their sleek, unfussy, design is very modern, I think, and much to my taste.  I would like to have those.  Unfortunately I do not have the spare 5 - 8 thousand pounds I would need to buy them!



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Kristallinchen

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« Reply #36 on: November 30, 2019, 10:00:29 AM »

I do like buying at auctions, you actually (with a good auction house) get fairly close to a sane price, esp when it comes to jewellery and you pay mostly the material. But all in all the essence is: does someone like the piece?
I found a carpet that I absolutely loved and that would have been perfect for our living room, the starting price was reasonable and the people at the auction house said, that typically carpets don't go all that well.  Confused Mine did.. it was the only one piece that day that went waaaayyyy beyond asking price and must have made his previous owner very very happy...well,  Cry
My mother in law has an entire set of Dresden China (pre WWII), which she insists is worth a fortune... saw the identical set at the auction house and hubby was quite surprised to see his mom's "fortune" was not even meeting the asking price of 600Euros...it will break MIL's heart... Spiteful
Apparently (acc. to the auction house staff) there is a bit of a generation move here: the elder generation (80-100 ys) are passing on their heritage pieces. But lifestyle has changed: nobody has much space and time for statement pieces that are not to be used but only to be looked at. Appartment and house sizes in Europe do not allow for extra cupboards filled with China and Crystal that you don't use. So the heirs usually pick a few small pieces and sell the rest. Same is with furniture, you keep one piece and sell the rest...so the market is flooded.

Space is one thing. The other is that such furniture,  plates etc. won't be used as people say they're so valuable they could get dirty/break etc. So they rot in some place or put in a cupboard for reasons of showing off only.
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Duchess of Verona

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« Reply #37 on: November 30, 2019, 07:36:53 PM »

And some people are REALLY reluctant to get rid of anything. When I cleaned out my late MIL's house, she literally had summer slipcovers for furniture that had been in her parent's house 75 years ago. We didn't have the furniture, but she kept the slipcovers. You would not believe the amount of stuff that I had zero interest in, that came to my house.  She loved everything orange and gold, which does not go at all in my pale pearl grey house. Dear Husband: "Just live with it for a couple of years". It's now been 5 years and I am finally getting to send some of it off to auction houses to be sold. On the first round I was able to raise enough to put in a whole house generator. My husband acts like I'm cutting his fingers off one knuckle at a time.
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leatherface

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« Reply #38 on: December 01, 2019, 09:15:17 AM »

It's not reluctance DoV, it's hoarding.

I had the same issue when my mother died. I am still getting rid of 20 years and 2 houses worth of furniture and brick a brats that I have no use for.
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fairy

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« Reply #39 on: December 01, 2019, 07:37:32 PM »

And some people are REALLY reluctant to get rid of anything. When I cleaned out my late MIL's house, she literally had summer slipcovers for furniture that had been in her parent's house 75 years ago. We didn't have the furniture, but she kept the slipcovers. You would not believe the amount of stuff that I had zero interest in, that came to my house.  She loved everything orange and gold, which does not go at all in my pale pearl grey house. Dear Husband: "Just live with it for a couple of years". It's now been 5 years and I am finally getting to send some of it off to auction houses to be sold. On the first round I was able to raise enough to put in a whole house generator. My husband acts like I'm cutting his fingers off one knuckle at a time.
And isn't that the truth? I am kind of dreading the day the police come to our house to investigate a domestic violence case with a man howling like victim in a slasher movie. I sincerely hope there is a female officer with them, otherwise I fear that his sobbing: "she is threatening to take away this rusty and broken skrewdriver my father gave me 35 years ago and that I just now found in the garden shed" will fall on very understanding and compassionate ears….
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anastasia beaverhausen

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« Reply #40 on: December 01, 2019, 08:29:26 PM »

And some people are REALLY reluctant to get rid of anything. When I cleaned out my late MIL's house, she literally had summer slipcovers for furniture that had been in her parent's house 75 years ago. We didn't have the furniture, but she kept the slipcovers. You would not believe the amount of stuff that I had zero interest in, that came to my house.  She loved everything orange and gold, which does not go at all in my pale pearl grey house. Dear Husband: "Just live with it for a couple of years". It's now been 5 years and I am finally getting to send some of it off to auction houses to be sold. On the first round I was able to raise enough to put in a whole house generator. My husband acts like I'm cutting his fingers off one knuckle at a time.
And isn't that the truth? I am kind of dreading the day the police come to our house to investigate a domestic violence case with a man howling like victim in a slasher movie. I sincerely hope there is a female officer with them, otherwise I fear that his sobbing: "she is threatening to take away this rusty and broken skrewdriver my father gave me 35 years ago and that I just now found in the garden shed" will fall on very understanding and compassionate ears….

 Star For Fairy and DoV

Mr. Beaverhausen and I have polar opposite views on “stuff”. He has all of his parents’ stuff and all of his stuff from all of his life. I have thrown clothes away that have dry rotted. I am what can be kindly called a minimalist. Except for clothes and shoes. I swear I’m just going to pay someone to come here and haul it all away and then say we were robbed.
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Kristallinchen

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« Reply #41 on: December 01, 2019, 10:59:45 PM »

And some people are REALLY reluctant to get rid of anything. When I cleaned out my late MIL's house, she literally had summer slipcovers for furniture that had been in her parent's house 75 years ago. We didn't have the furniture, but she kept the slipcovers. You would not believe the amount of stuff that I had zero interest in, that came to my house.  She loved everything orange and gold, which does not go at all in my pale pearl grey house. Dear Husband: "Just live with it for a couple of years". It's now been 5 years and I am finally getting to send some of it off to auction houses to be sold. On the first round I was able to raise enough to put in a whole house generator. My husband acts like I'm cutting his fingers off one knuckle at a time.
And isn't that the truth? I am kind of dreading the day the police come to our house to investigate a domestic violence case with a man howling like victim in a slasher movie. I sincerely hope there is a female officer with them, otherwise I fear that his sobbing: "she is threatening to take away this rusty and broken skrewdriver my father gave me 35 years ago and that I just now found in the garden shed" will fall on very understanding and compassionate ears….

 Star For Fairy and DoV

Mr. Beaverhausen and I have polar opposite views on “stuff”. He has all of his parents’ stuff and all of his stuff from all of his life. I have thrown clothes away that have dry rotted. I am what can be kindly called a minimalist. Except for clothes and shoes. I swear I’m just going to pay someone to come here and haul it all away and then say we were robbed.

Same with my boyfriend and me. He made so many things (like sports) in his life and of course I can understand the wish to have something to remember, but somehow there has to be some point to stop. Luckily since me moving half time him, he's started to throw away things.
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #42 on: December 04, 2019, 01:21:23 AM »

Princess Alice, Duchess of Gloucester greeted Queen Juliana of The Netherlands at Carpenters Hall in London, England in 1972.     
http://www.gettyimages.com/license/104708654
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fairy

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« Reply #43 on: December 04, 2019, 12:29:39 PM »

What a fun pic. It certainly screams for a Caption with Alice having a very sad make-up fail and Juliana moving in for a full smoochie...
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Mary's life motto:
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dwi

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« Reply #44 on: December 04, 2019, 06:33:25 PM »

I hope they get the prices that are the estimate. We inherited a pair of English George III demi-lune tables and a pair of  English George II gilt and mahogany mirrors when my MIL died. She paid $6000 for the tables and $8000 for the mirrors at a very high end gallery in London in the 1960s. This would be a substantial amount in 2019 dollars. I recently go an estimate from a NY sales gallery of $5000 for all 4 pieces. My problem is that they are getting dry and the veneers and inlay are becoming loose. But it would cost more to send them to the restorer than they are worth. Dear Husband wont let me sell them at that price, so I boxed them up carefully and sent them to the attic, so they don't start losing pieces, in the hopes that one day the market cycles back around and they are in fashion again and become worth spending the money to stabilize them. . But right now, brown furniture, as my friend the decorator calls it, is not in fashion.

that happened to a friend.  they had beautiful furniture and rec'd an estimate, which was  very low.  the same thing was said that 'brown' furniture is out of favor.  i don't care.  i love brown furniture - esp. against white furniture and walls, which i have.  would think that mahogany and rosewood would have better value, but don't know.  for the usa, mahogany pieces seem to have to be rare, in good/fine condition and have the maker's label on it.  being made in nyc, boston or philly is also key, along with age.
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