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Author Topic: Prince Henry, Duke of Gloucester  (Read 12925 times)
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Bunnyette

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« Reply #45 on: December 08, 2019, 03:57:09 AM »

And some people are REALLY reluctant to get rid of anything. When I cleaned out my late MIL's house, she literally had summer slipcovers for furniture that had been in her parent's house 75 years ago. We didn't have the furniture, but she kept the slipcovers. You would not believe the amount of stuff that I had zero interest in, that came to my house.  She loved everything orange and gold, which does not go at all in my pale pearl grey house. Dear Husband: "Just live with it for a couple of years". It's now been 5 years and I am finally getting to send some of it off to auction houses to be sold. On the first round I was able to raise enough to put in a whole house generator. My husband acts like I'm cutting his fingers off one knuckle at a time.
And isn't that the truth? I am kind of dreading the day the police come to our house to investigate a domestic violence case with a man howling like victim in a slasher movie. I sincerely hope there is a female officer with them, otherwise I fear that his sobbing: "she is threatening to take away this rusty and broken skrewdriver my father gave me 35 years ago and that I just now found in the garden shed" will fall on very understanding and compassionate ears….

Whaaat we’re married to the same husband!
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Princess MS

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« Reply #46 on: December 08, 2019, 04:29:14 AM »

And some people are REALLY reluctant to get rid of anything. When I cleaned out my late MIL's house, she literally had summer slipcovers for furniture that had been in her parent's house 75 years ago. We didn't have the furniture, but she kept the slipcovers. You would not believe the amount of stuff that I had zero interest in, that came to my house.  She loved everything orange and gold, which does not go at all in my pale pearl grey house. Dear Husband: "Just live with it for a couple of years". It's now been 5 years and I am finally getting to send some of it off to auction houses to be sold. On the first round I was able to raise enough to put in a whole house generator. My husband acts like I'm cutting his fingers off one knuckle at a time.
And isn't that the truth? I am kind of dreading the day the police come to our house to investigate a domestic violence case with a man howling like victim in a slasher movie. I sincerely hope there is a female officer with them, otherwise I fear that his sobbing: "she is threatening to take away this rusty and broken skrewdriver my father gave me 35 years ago and that I just now found in the garden shed" will fall on very understanding and compassionate ears….

Whaaat we’re married to the same husband!

My mother passed away 9 years ago (and my father 25 years ago). It took 2 years to finalise her estate and sell the house - so pretty much everything was left in the house during that period. We kept some pieces of furniture and ornaments etc but the rest were donated or sent to auction. I could not bring my self to throwing out many personal effects so they were boxed up and shipped 800 miles to my place. They are mostly still in boxes. I think when I move out of my home that will be the time that some hard decisions will need to be made as no-one in the next generation (nieces and nephew) will have any interest. It is not easy - you feel such guilt for dis guarding things that were important to a parent and a reflection of them and their interest and day to day life. Sad
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Margaret

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« Reply #47 on: December 08, 2019, 08:10:12 AM »

And some people are REALLY reluctant to get rid of anything. When I cleaned out my late MIL's house, she literally had summer slipcovers for furniture that had been in her parent's house 75 years ago. We didn't have the furniture, but she kept the slipcovers. You would not believe the amount of stuff that I had zero interest in, that came to my house.  She loved everything orange and gold, which does not go at all in my pale pearl grey house. Dear Husband: "Just live with it for a couple of years". It's now been 5 years and I am finally getting to send some of it off to auction houses to be sold. On the first round I was able to raise enough to put in a whole house generator. My husband acts like I'm cutting his fingers off one knuckle at a time.
And isn't that the truth? I am kind of dreading the day the police come to our house to investigate a domestic violence case with a man howling like victim in a slasher movie. I sincerely hope there is a female officer with them, otherwise I fear that his sobbing: "she is threatening to take away this rusty and broken skrewdriver my father gave me 35 years ago and that I just now found in the garden shed" will fall on very understanding and compassionate ears….

Whaaat we’re married to the same husband!

My mother passed away 9 years ago (and my father 25 years ago). It took 2 years to finalise her estate and sell the house - so pretty much everything was left in the house during that period. We kept some pieces of furniture and ornaments etc but the rest were donated or sent to auction. I could not bring my self to throwing out many personal effects so they were boxed up and shipped 800 miles to my place. They are mostly still in boxes. I think when I move out of my home that will be the time that some hard decisions will need to be made as no-one in the next generation (nieces and nephew) will have any interest. It is not easy - you feel such guilt for dis guarding things that were important to a parent and a reflection of them and their interest and day to day life. Sad

My mother passed away five years ago at the age of 98.   At the age of 90 she moved from the house she had lived in for 40 years to a self-care unit in a retirement complex.  At that stage we got rid of a lot of stuff and learnt that the 1940s lounge and bedroom furniture that was so special to her and had been decent quality at the time of its purchase no longer had any value and had to be taken to the tip.  Seven years later when she was no longer able to care for herself in self care, we moved her out of there and she came to live with my husband and me for what turned out to be the last year of her life.  We got rid of all the furniture and most (though only most) of the ornaments and stuff, but there is still stuff that needs to be dealt with, like the ornaments and little bits and pieces that bring back memories of family events going back to my childhood and people who have long passed.  The main point of this ramble though is that I now have what is left of my grandmother's c. 1910 willow pattern dining setting, and afternoon tea service.  I have had that for many years and had it in a display cabinet.  But now I also have my mother's 1940s wedding china which has little roses on it and which I will never use, and the heavy 1981 dining setting that my mother gave us for our wedding gift but which she chose without reference to me and which I don't particularly like and may never use again but could not possibly part with because of its provenance.  As well as all that I also have the rather good white Wedgwood dinner service that my (now deceased) brother bought in about 1980 after his divorce and which came to me rather than any of his children, and also the Tapio Wirkkala Ultima Thule dinner service and other bits and pieces that I bought for myself because that is what I like.   So I have five dinner services.  My husband and I hardly ever entertain but there is no way I can get rid of any of those dinner and tea services because they are part of my history and were so important to family members.  Does that make me a crazy hoarder or just sentimental? 
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Princess MS

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« Reply #48 on: December 08, 2019, 08:55:09 AM »

And some people are REALLY reluctant to get rid of anything. When I cleaned out my late MIL's house, she literally had summer slipcovers for furniture that had been in her parent's house 75 years ago. We didn't have the furniture, but she kept the slipcovers. You would not believe the amount of stuff that I had zero interest in, that came to my house.  She loved everything orange and gold, which does not go at all in my pale pearl grey house. Dear Husband: "Just live with it for a couple of years". It's now been 5 years and I am finally getting to send some of it off to auction houses to be sold. On the first round I was able to raise enough to put in a whole house generator. My husband acts like I'm cutting his fingers off one knuckle at a time.
And isn't that the truth? I am kind of dreading the day the police come to our house to investigate a domestic violence case with a man howling like victim in a slasher movie. I sincerely hope there is a female officer with them, otherwise I fear that his sobbing: "she is threatening to take away this rusty and broken skrewdriver my father gave me 35 years ago and that I just now found in the garden shed" will fall on very understanding and compassionate ears….

Whaaat we’re married to the same husband!

My mother passed away 9 years ago (and my father 25 years ago). It took 2 years to finalise her estate and sell the house - so pretty much everything was left in the house during that period. We kept some pieces of furniture and ornaments etc but the rest were donated or sent to auction. I could not bring my self to throwing out many personal effects so they were boxed up and shipped 800 miles to my place. They are mostly still in boxes. I think when I move out of my home that will be the time that some hard decisions will need to be made as no-one in the next generation (nieces and nephew) will have any interest. It is not easy - you feel such guilt for dis guarding things that were important to a parent and a reflection of them and their interest and day to day life. Sad

My mother passed away five years ago at the age of 98.   At the age of 90 she moved from the house she had lived in for 40 years to a self-care unit in a retirement complex.  At that stage we got rid of a lot of stuff and learnt that the 1940s lounge and bedroom furniture that was so special to her and had been decent quality at the time of its purchase no longer had any value and had to be taken to the tip.  Seven years later when she was no longer able to care for herself in self care, we moved her out of there and she came to live with my husband and me for what turned out to be the last year of her life.  We got rid of all the furniture and most (though only most) of the ornaments and stuff, but there is still stuff that needs to be dealt with, like the ornaments and little bits and pieces that bring back memories of family events going back to my childhood and people who have long passed.  The main point of this ramble though is that I now have what is left of my grandmother's c. 1910 willow pattern dining setting, and afternoon tea service.  I have had that for many years and had it in a display cabinet.  But now I also have my mother's 1940s wedding china which has little roses on it and which I will never use, and the heavy 1981 dining setting that my mother gave us for our wedding gift but which she chose without reference to me and which I don't particularly like and may never use again but could not possibly part with because of its provenance.  As well as all that I also have the rather good white Wedgwood dinner service that my (now deceased) brother bought in about 1980 after his divorce and which came to me rather than any of his children, and also the Tapio Wirkkala Ultima Thule dinner service and other bits and pieces that I bought for myself because that is what I like.   So I have five dinner services.  My husband and I hardly ever entertain but there is no way I can get rid of any of those dinner and tea services because they are part of my history and were so important to family members.  Does that make me a crazy hoarder or just sentimental? 

Sentimental and maybe also same as me .... you would feel guilty... but one day you might feel empowered... I'm getting there as health not good and no direct family... and I can see my contents binned in under a day ... my brothers won't care and won't want any of it - apart from the house which being in Sydney is worth a lot
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leatherface

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« Reply #49 on: December 08, 2019, 09:35:15 AM »

And some people are REALLY reluctant to get rid of anything. When I cleaned out my late MIL's house, she literally had summer slipcovers for furniture that had been in her parent's house 75 years ago. We didn't have the furniture, but she kept the slipcovers. You would not believe the amount of stuff that I had zero interest in, that came to my house.  She loved everything orange and gold, which does not go at all in my pale pearl grey house. Dear Husband: "Just live with it for a couple of years". It's now been 5 years and I am finally getting to send some of it off to auction houses to be sold. On the first round I was able to raise enough to put in a whole house generator. My husband acts like I'm cutting his fingers off one knuckle at a time.
And isn't that the truth? I am kind of dreading the day the police come to our house to investigate a domestic violence case with a man howling like victim in a slasher movie. I sincerely hope there is a female officer with them, otherwise I fear that his sobbing: "she is threatening to take away this rusty and broken skrewdriver my father gave me 35 years ago and that I just now found in the garden shed" will fall on very understanding and compassionate ears….

Whaaat we’re married to the same husband!

My mother passed away 9 years ago (and my father 25 years ago). It took 2 years to finalise her estate and sell the house - so pretty much everything was left in the house during that period. We kept some pieces of furniture and ornaments etc but the rest were donated or sent to auction. I could not bring my self to throwing out many personal effects so they were boxed up and shipped 800 miles to my place. They are mostly still in boxes. I think when I move out of my home that will be the time that some hard decisions will need to be made as no-one in the next generation (nieces and nephew) will have any interest. It is not easy - you feel such guilt for dis guarding things that were important to a parent and a reflection of them and their interest and day to day life. Sad

My mother passed away five years ago at the age of 98.   At the age of 90 she moved from the house she had lived in for 40 years to a self-care unit in a retirement complex.  At that stage we got rid of a lot of stuff and learnt that the 1940s lounge and bedroom furniture that was so special to her and had been decent quality at the time of its purchase no longer had any value and had to be taken to the tip.  Seven years later when she was no longer able to care for herself in self care, we moved her out of there and she came to live with my husband and me for what turned out to be the last year of her life.  We got rid of all the furniture and most (though only most) of the ornaments and stuff, but there is still stuff that needs to be dealt with, like the ornaments and little bits and pieces that bring back memories of family events going back to my childhood and people who have long passed.  The main point of this ramble though is that I now have what is left of my grandmother's c. 1910 willow pattern dining setting, and afternoon tea service.  I have had that for many years and had it in a display cabinet.  But now I also have my mother's 1940s wedding china which has little roses on it and which I will never use, and the heavy 1981 dining setting that my mother gave us for our wedding gift but which she chose without reference to me and which I don't particularly like and may never use again but could not possibly part with because of its provenance.  As well as all that I also have the rather good white Wedgwood dinner service that my (now deceased) brother bought in about 1980 after his divorce and which came to me rather than any of his children, and also the Tapio Wirkkala Ultima Thule dinner service and other bits and pieces that I bought for myself because that is what I like.   So I have five dinner services.  My husband and I hardly ever entertain but there is no way I can get rid of any of those dinner and tea services because they are part of my history and were so important to family members.  Does that make me a crazy hoarder or just sentimental? 

Margaret,

You are not crazy,  just highly sentimental with a small dash of hoarder. 

I'm still sorting out my mother's estate because the inheritance taxes are massive and I have no cash to pay it.  But one it is all done and I can sell her house all I'll keep are her dinner service which she bought as a gift to herself following her divorce from my father and the cabinet they are displayed in.

The rest I will give to the replies if they want it.
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #50 on: January 10, 2020, 10:49:34 PM »

The Duke and Duchess of Gloucester spent their honeymoon at Boughton. Three weeks later, the court was plunged into mourning by the demise of King George V's sister, Princess Victoria.
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« Reply #51 on: January 11, 2020, 12:59:10 AM »

And didn't they opt for a smaller wedding in the BP chapel because her father had just died?
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #52 on: January 11, 2020, 10:39:41 PM »

The marriage was originally planned to take place at Westminster Abbey. However, it was moved to the Private Chapel at Buckingham Palace due to the demise of Lady Alice's father, John Montagu Douglas Scott, 7th Duke of Buccleuch.
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #53 on: February 17, 2020, 11:11:17 PM »

Prince Henry at the Trooping of the Colour in 1928   
http://www.gettyimages.com/license/1151166828
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #54 on: March 25, 2020, 09:48:58 PM »

Princess Alice and her son Prince Richard on the boating lake in Battersea Park     
http://www.alamy.com/stoc...gloucester-106765329.html
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