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Author Topic: Joachim has hereditary "viking disease"  (Read 11249 times)
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Suzerain
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« on: March 17, 2013, 08:42:56 PM »

The message to the prince: "Viking disease" hereditary

Joachim has been operated because of an illness that makes his fingers curl towards the palm and are difficult or impossible to straighten. Apparently the illness is hereditary.

Prince Joachim operated because of unpleasant disorder

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« Reply #1 on: March 17, 2013, 08:56:51 PM »

I mentioned that in one of Marie's threads as well  http://

here's more: The Vikings and Baron Dupuytren's disease

Dupuytren’s disease (DD) is an ancient affliction of unknown origin. It is defined by Dorland as shortening, thickening, and fibrosis of the palmar fascia producing a flexion deformity of a finger. Tradition has it that the disease originated with the Vikings, who spread it throughout Northern Europe and beyond as they traveled and intermarried. After being present for hundreds of years, DD was named in the 19th century after a famous French surgeon, who was not the first to describe it.



I gather it's similar to rheumatoid arthritis.



What is Dupuytren's disease?
Dupuytren's (say "duh-pwee-TRAHNZ") disease can change how your hand looks and may make it hard or impossible to use one or more of your fingers.

The disease causes tissue under the skin of the palm of your hand to thicken and shorten. This can pull and bend the fingers in toward the palm. You may not be able to straighten them.




The disease gets worse slowly but rarely causes pain. You can treat it, but there is no cure. It may only involve the palm and never affect your fingers, and you may never need treatment.

Dupuytren's disease occurs most often in people ages 50 and older. It often affects both hands and can sometimes affect the soles of the feet.  Dupuytren's disease is also called Viking's disease.


What causes Dupuytren's disease?
The cause of Dupuytren's disease is not known. It might be inherited, because the disease tends to happen in families. The thickening of the tissue may be related to alcoholism, smoking, or diabetes.


What are the symptoms?
You may first see or feel a small lump in the palm of your hand, usually near where your ring finger and small finger meet.

As Dupuytren's disease gets worse, a fibrous cord may develop in the tissue of the palm. The cord may extend to one or more fingers, usually the ring or small finger. The cord may pull your finger toward your palm. This is called Dupuytren's contracture.

At some point you may not be able to move your fingers back or flatten your hand on a table. You may find it hard or impossible to do things like put on gloves, wash your hands, or pick up things. The disease usually does not cause pain. If you do have pain, it?s most likely when you first get the disease.


How is Dupuytren's disease diagnosed?
Your doctor will look for skin changes on your palm and feel for any knots or a cord. He or she will ask you to move your hand, wrist, and fingers. Your doctor will ask you questions about your family and your symptoms. Your doctor also will ask you about smoking and alcohol use.


How is it treated?
The goal of treatment for Dupuytren's disease is to keep your hand working as best as it can.
> When you first get the disease, your doctor may have you try finger stretches, a splint, or steroid shots.
> Some doctors are using a treatment called needle aponeurotomy to separate the tight cords in the palm using a needle.
> A medicine called collagenase (such as Xiaflex) may be injected to try to dissolve some of the tight tissue.
> Surgery may be recommended if you cannot straighten your fingers or pick things up.
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Suzerain
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« Reply #2 on: March 17, 2013, 09:01:23 PM »

I'm sorry for starting another thread!  Blush

Thanks for the info on this disease. I have to check the other thread now too! So far I'm not aware of anyone in my family who would've had it for certain but I'd say there's a big possibility it's lurking somewhere in there since I have ancestry in pretty much every Northern European country. Not sure though how rare the condition is.

Edit: Hmm... Okay, seems to me it's not very common. Everyone has a couple of alcoholics in their family I'm sure and some smokers and autoimmune diseases are pretty common too but I think my family doesn't have this particular ailment.
« Last Edit: March 17, 2013, 09:08:35 PM by Suzerain » Logged

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« Reply #3 on: March 17, 2013, 09:01:43 PM »

Having never heard of this disease I decided to learn more about it from here:
http://www.nhs.uk/conditi...e/Pages/Introduction.aspx

What causes Dupuytren's contracture?
In many cases, the exact cause of Dupuytren's contracture is unknown, but it seems to run in families. Other factors, such as diabetes, epilepsy, heavy smoking and heavy alcohol consumption, have also been linked to it.

Does anyone else in the DRF have it?  And although the doctors may have said his is hereditary, I wonder if this will make him reconsider his habits re drinking and smoking?
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« Reply #4 on: March 17, 2013, 09:02:49 PM »

I'm sorry for starting another thread!  Blush

Thanks for the info on this disease. I have to check the other thread now too! So far I'm not aware of anyone in my family who would've had it for certain but I'd say there's a big possibility it's lurking somewhere in there since I have ancestry in pretty much every Northern European country.




OH No! No worries Suzerain  Hug I just google translated the article form (I think BT) there. This is much better, because it doesn't cut in the other event.

 Hug Hug
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« Reply #5 on: March 17, 2013, 09:04:43 PM »

Having never heard of this disease I decided to learn more about it from here:
http://www.nhs.uk/conditi...e/Pages/Introduction.aspx

What causes Dupuytren's contracture?
In many cases, the exact cause of Dupuytren's contracture is unknown, but it seems to run in families. Other factors, such as diabetes, epilepsy, heavy smoking and heavy alcohol consumption, have also been linked to it.

Does anyone else in the DRF have it?  And although the doctors may have said his is hereditary, I wonder if this will make him reconsider his habits re drinking and smoking?

I hope he recovers well and soon and that this will help him want to stop smoking if he still smokes.
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Maria
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« Reply #6 on: March 17, 2013, 09:08:01 PM »

It's quite common in Denmark - thus the "Viking disease". I remeber hearing about it in basic anatomy when I went to med school Smiley I'm thinking that Margrethe's father and grandfather could easily have had it - back then the public would not have been told about it, but that doesn't mean they couldn't have had it.
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« Reply #7 on: March 17, 2013, 09:11:43 PM »

It's quite common in Denmark - thus the "Viking disease". I remeber hearing about it in basic anatomy when I went to med school Smiley I'm thinking that Margrethe's father and grandfather could easily have had it - back then the public would not have been told about it, but that doesn't mean they couldn't have had it.
Maria---you went to med school? Wow. I am very impressed Yes
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Maria
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« Reply #8 on: March 17, 2013, 09:12:23 PM »

A looong time ago Blush
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PeDe
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« Reply #9 on: March 17, 2013, 10:58:43 PM »


here you go:

Prince Joachim had surgery in his left hand for Dupuytren's disease. It is a condition in which the fingers can no longer be straightened with time due to the formation hard and knotted strands of the hand's connective tissue, confirms royal family communication and press chief Lene Balleby to tv2.dk

- I can tell that the prince had surgery for Dupuytren's disease, commonly known as "driver fingers," says Lene Balleby.

She adds that it was the same hereditary disorder that the Prince Consort had surgery a few years back for.

The disease is relatively frequent and not difficult to operate. In the mildest cases, this can be solved with the tapping a needle through the skin to the cutting of the strings. In severe cases, there is a definite surgery to remove the strings. Prince Joachim said to be in good spirits and that he has no pain after surgery.

- Not at all. Everything is in the best order, he told the magazine.
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« Reply #10 on: March 18, 2013, 03:59:34 AM »

A looong time ago Blush
Doesn't matter that it was a long time ago. Still impressive Yes
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« Reply #11 on: March 18, 2013, 04:27:32 AM »

My mother-in-law had Dupuytren's Contracture, as did her brother - both corrected by surgery.
It was supposedly genetic for them as they were teetotallers and non smokers.  Though they both rode horses (held reins) a lot.)
My brother-in-law has it in mild form and has kept it at bay with stretching physio, steroid injection and ultrasound - though he will probably need surgery too  ... if a new technique injecting something to target excessive collagen deposits doesn't prove as helpful as expected.
They are of Viking descent. I wonder why it shows up more in Northern European Caucasians??

Hopefully Joachim will not get a recurrence of the condition too quickly, it does happen. Crap
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« Reply #12 on: March 18, 2013, 04:37:11 AM »

Runs in my family, too. My brother has had the surgery on both hands. I have it in both hands, but can't take enough time off from work -- which involves a pounding a keyboard -- to get it fixed. And last year when I was at a big Norwegian cultural event here in California, I discovered one of the exhibitors was a pharmaceutical company offering a drug used to treat the condition. Clearly they know their target market would be present.

Oh, and by the way, we are both non-smokers and if either of us drinks at all, it is only in very very moderate amounts.
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Jonathan

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« Reply #13 on: March 18, 2013, 09:00:58 PM »

Well I smoke drink and am epileptic and the only time I curl my fingers has nothing to do with a need for an operation
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« Reply #14 on: March 18, 2013, 09:32:06 PM »


 Star for you Jonathan.
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