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Author Topic: Ruth Bader Ginsburg Has Died  (Read 1595 times)
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anastasia beaverhausen

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« Reply #45 on: Yesterday at 05:58:44 PM »

But if the EC goes no state elects a president that is the whole point. It will be by popular vote which is the only truly democratic way to vote. And for sure it is not California and New York that decide elections. It's the states that are mixed like Florida and Pennsylvania and Wisconsin. Some people just may not like how people in those states vote but there is no runaround for that one. People think and feel what they want and bring it to the ballot box. It is also a fact that rural America is changing due to immigration and more and more people are moving to metro areas. Cities and towns are becoming regional areas. Americans still move around a lot. Rural America loses nothing if we go to popular vote. Unless you are saying rural America is full of redneck idiots who hate people who don't look or act like them. I live in a podunk place that is arguably part of a super region with some big cities and their problems and assets. We are all Americans are our fates are tied and we should vote like it.

All very true, Periwinkle. I’m not advocating for one side or the other, but I want it to be fair. Right now I feel like my vote counts less than someone who lives in a largely rural or unpopulated state. We have had two Presidents elected in the last 20 years who did not win the popular vote, and that hadn’t happened in over 100 years prior to 2000.
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Paulina

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« Reply #46 on: Yesterday at 08:16:49 PM »

No other country has an antiquated, 18th century electoral voting  process. I believe it hinders our now fragile democracy. Or republic. Whatever it is we are rapidly sliding away from.
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Oh_Caroline

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« Reply #47 on: Yesterday at 09:06:35 PM »

I’m not sure how to work it out but I’d love to see a who hell of a lot more voter protections and supports in place along with compulsory voting.  Again not sure how it would work but it boggles the mind that the voter turnout is typically between 50-60% of eligible voters.  I know that it’s a mega complicated issue but it needs to be addressed.
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Eliza B

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« Reply #48 on: Yesterday at 09:14:32 PM »

But if the EC goes no state elects a president that is the whole point. It will be by popular vote which is the only truly democratic way to vote. And for sure it is not California and New York that decide elections. It's the states that are mixed like Florida and Pennsylvania and Wisconsin. Some people just may not like how people in those states vote but there is no runaround for that one. People think and feel what they want and bring it to the ballot box. It is also a fact that rural America is changing due to immigration and more and more people are moving to metro areas. Cities and towns are becoming regional areas. Americans still move around a lot. Rural America loses nothing if we go to popular vote. Unless you are saying rural America is full of redneck idiots who hate people who don't look or act like them. I live in a podunk place that is arguably part of a super region with some big cities and their problems and assets. We are all Americans are our fates are tied and we should vote like it.

All very true, Periwinkle. I’m not advocating for one side or the other, but I want it to be fair. Right now I feel like my vote counts less than someone who lives in a largely rural or unpopulated state. We have had two Presidents elected in the last 20 years who did not win the popular vote, and that hadn’t happened in over 100 years prior to 2000.

I don't mind the EC, IN THEORY, Im a fan of popular in truth. But the governors have gerrymandering going on for the EC.  They recut voting districts to ensure they are more one side than the other. So instead of the larger population cities deciding, and instead of redistributing the power of voting evenly across the country...  it's the same 10 swing states.

Many people don't turn out (over 30%) because they don't need to, or don't feel their vote counts. Blue state is blue. Red states red.
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Chandrasekhi

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« Reply #49 on: Today at 01:52:30 AM »

There are 3 Measures of Voter Turnouts:
 [1] % of Registered Voters - RV
 [2] % of Voting Age Population - VAP
 [3] % of Voting Eligible Population - VEP (subtracting non-citizens and ineligible felons from the voting-age population and adding eligible overseas voters)

According to Pewresearch.org, compared to OECD countries:
 On [1], VAP, the US does not compare well but 2016 was a comparatively good year
 On [2], RV, the US fares better than most OECD countries
 On [3], VEP, the US compares more favourably than on VAP
The US has one of the largest differences between VAP and RV



There is an interactive graph in the article below,  with the comparison of VAP & RV for OECD countries.

Quote
https://www.pewresearch.o...most-developed-countries/
.....
The highest turnout rates among OECD nations were in Belgium (87.2%), Sweden (82.6%) and Denmark (80.3%). Switzerland consistently has the lowest turnout in the OECD: In 2015, less than 39% of the Swiss voting-age population cast ballots for the federal legislature.
......
One factor behind Belgium’s high turnout rates – between 83% and 95% of VAP in every election for the past four decades – may be that it is one of the 24 nations around the world (and six in the OECD) with some form of compulsory voting, according to IDEA. (One canton in Switzerland, also an OECD member nation, has compulsory voting.)
.......
 In many countries, the government takes the lead in getting people’s names on the rolls – whether by registering them automatically once they become eligible (as in, for example, Sweden or Germany) or by aggressively seeking out and registering eligible voters (as in the UK and Australia). As a result, turnout looks pretty similar regardless of whether you’re looking at voting-age population or registered voters.
In the U.S., by contrast, registration is mainly an individual responsibility.
......
No matter how they’re measured, U.S. turnout rates have been fairly consistent over the past several decades, despite some election-to-election variation. Since 1976, voting-age turnout has remained within an 8.5-percentage-point range – from just under 50% in 1996, when Bill Clinton was re-elected, to just over 58% in 2008, when Barack Obama won the White House. However, turnout varies considerably among different racial, ethnic and age groups.
....
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casie

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« Reply #50 on: Today at 09:40:06 AM »

I just want to tell her thank you.  Thank you for holding out as long as you could.  Thank you for all that you did and all that you were.  RIP, RBG.  



Thank you  Casie.

This made me tear up.  She did hold on for as long as she could. I know this is breaking her heart because she wanted to live until the election.  I'm so sad and sorry for her family.

I just wanted to let you know that I appreciated your post.  I'm trying to have a little faith here.  I think that things will be okay.  I don't know how, but all is not lost yet. 
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