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Author Topic: A disabled heir  (Read 32927 times)
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Lady Alice

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« Reply #75 on: July 18, 2013, 05:51:23 AM »

Emma was fiercely set on that throne and an heir to her new kingdom, so better not get in her way. Her new hubby was pretty old and well not particularly attractive for a virgin bride... but Emma also was brought up extraordinarily sheltered, I bet she didn't even know what caused pregnancies and then she was very isolated in the NL. I can't see her finding a conspiracy mate that never ever appeared close to her again.
Interesting case all put together... Thinking

(Ever heard of the idiotic rumours of Richard Leakey being Wimlex bio Dad? Yeah right either him or perhaps the pillsbury Dough boy?)

Is anyone else tired of the stupid illegitimacy rumors, from Harry to WimLex to whoever? (no, not directed at you, Fairy dear, just a question in general)... what's that Biblical saying? Let the one without sin cast the first stone? Hmmmmm...
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fairy

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« Reply #76 on: July 18, 2013, 09:27:37 AM »

I find them mightily funny. If you for ex watch the engagement video of the QueenBee, you can see a girl so giddily in love that the video alone is as potent as a prozak, the idea that a couple of grinning months later she'd hop in the sack with someone else is so absurd it's funny. Same with Margrethe and the rumours of Joachim being a love child. Yeah well, just three months after giving birth to her firstborn she conceived again. Honestly a lot of women at that time are sore enough to greet their husbands with a knife and a "WTF" rather than considering a rump with another man. They are just "Elvis is alive" sort of funny.

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Mary's life motto:
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #77 on: September 23, 2019, 03:05:04 AM »

Philip Prospero, Prince of Asturias (1657-1661) was the son of King Philip IV of Spain and Marianna of Austria. He was heir apparent to the throne. He suffered from epilepsy and became ill frequently.
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Hanimefendi

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« Reply #78 on: September 23, 2019, 10:00:43 AM »

Philip Prospero, Prince of Asturias (1657-1661) was the son of King Philip IV of Spain and Marianna of Austria. He was heir apparent to the throne. He suffered from epilepsy and became ill frequently.

Is your line 'he suffered from epilepsy and became ill frequently' cut and pasted directly from Wikipedia ?

I know you love to get your post count up with random postings but I have to speak up in this case.  I have epilepsy and it is not considered a disability!!!
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Margaret

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« Reply #79 on: September 23, 2019, 10:37:31 AM »

Philip Prospero, Prince of Asturias (1657-1661) was the son of King Philip IV of Spain and Marianna of Austria. He was heir apparent to the throne. He suffered from epilepsy and became ill frequently.

Is your line 'he suffered from epilepsy and became ill frequently' cut and pasted directly from Wikipedia ?

I know you love to get your post count up with random postings but I have to speak up in this case.  I have epilepsy and it is not considered a disability!!!

I am glad that your epilepsy is not so severe that it is disabling, Hanimefendi, but, in Australia and the USA and probably most other countries, people who suffer from severe and frequent epileptic seizures that interfere with their daytime activities can obtain Social Security disability benefits.  Epilepsy can also occur in conjunction with other disabling conditions.  Young Prince Philip Prospero died before his fourth birthday, following a severe epileptic attack.  I think it is fair to say that having such severe epilepsy in seventeenth century Spain definitely constituted a disability.  
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Jonathan

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« Reply #80 on: September 23, 2019, 10:57:09 AM »

Philip Prospero, Prince of Asturias (1657-1661) was the son of King Philip IV of Spain and Marianna of Austria. He was heir apparent to the throne. He suffered from epilepsy and became ill frequently.

Is your line 'he suffered from epilepsy and became ill frequently' cut and pasted directly from Wikipedia ?

I know you love to get your post count up with random postings but I have to speak up in this case.  I have epilepsy and it is not considered a disability!!!

I am glad that your epilepsy is not so severe that it is disabling, Hanimefendi, but, in Australia and the USA and probably most other countries, people who suffer from severe and frequent epileptic seizures that interfere with their daytime activities can obtain Social Security disability benefits.  Epilepsy can also occur in conjunction with other disabling conditions.  Young Prince Philip Prospero died before his fourth birthday, following a severe epileptic attack.  I think it is fair to say that having such severe epilepsy in seventeenth century Spain definitely constituted a disability. 

 Star
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fairy

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« Reply #81 on: September 23, 2019, 05:57:33 PM »

Philip Prospero, Prince of Asturias (1657-1661) was the son of King Philip IV of Spain and Marianna of Austria. He was heir apparent to the throne. He suffered from epilepsy and became ill frequently.

Is your line 'he suffered from epilepsy and became ill frequently' cut and pasted directly from Wikipedia ?

I know you love to get your post count up with random postings but I have to speak up in this case.  I have epilepsy and it is not considered a disability!!!
And I would rather advise you not to accuse people who are very valued board members with an impressive amount of rather informative historical posts of raking up a post count with random posts. This is insulting and derogatory and certain not called for.
As to epilepsy not being a disability: in many countries it certainly is considered such.
Disabilities are however nothing to be ashamed off and should not be considered a bad label.
And nobody has done any of this.
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Mary's life motto:
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Lady Willoughby

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« Reply #82 on: September 23, 2019, 06:22:24 PM »

Philip Prospero, Prince of Asturias (1657-1661) was the son of King Philip IV of Spain and Marianna of Austria. He was heir apparent to the throne. He suffered from epilepsy and became ill frequently.

Is your line 'he suffered from epilepsy and became ill frequently' cut and pasted directly from Wikipedia ?

I know you love to get your post count up with random postings but I have to speak up in this case.  I have epilepsy and it is not considered a disability!!!
And I would rather advise you not to accuse people who are very valued board members with an impressive amount of rather informative historical posts of raking up a post count with random posts. This is insulting and derogatory and certain not called for.
As to epilepsy not being a disability: in many countries it certainly is considered such.
Disabilities are however nothing to be ashamed off and should not be considered a bad label.
And nobody has done any of this.


Keep on keeping on Cyril. I love your posts. They are a breath of fresh air among the snark (which I frequently enjoy too  Laughing)
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fruela

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« Reply #83 on: September 23, 2019, 06:51:40 PM »

Philip Prospero, Prince of Asturias (1657-1661) was the son of King Philip IV of Spain and Marianna of Austria. He was heir apparent to the throne. He suffered from epilepsy and became ill frequently.
CS, thanks a lot for your historical posts. I have checked who you meant and  read he was a sick child who died aged four or five. Too much in-breeding, I'm afraid: his parents were uncle and niece. Honestly, having a look at these family trees is disturbing. These people were über-royals.
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Jonathan

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« Reply #84 on: September 23, 2019, 07:37:25 PM »

Philip Prospero, Prince of Asturias (1657-1661) was the son of King Philip IV of Spain and Marianna of Austria. He was heir apparent to the throne. He suffered from epilepsy and became ill frequently.

Is your line 'he suffered from epilepsy and became ill frequently' cut and pasted directly from Wikipedia ?

I know you love to get your post count up with random postings but I have to speak up in this case.  I have epilepsy and it is not considered a disability!!!
And I would rather advise you not to accuse people who are very valued board members with an impressive amount of rather informative historical posts of raking up a post count with random posts. This is insulting and derogatory and certain not called for.
As to epilepsy not being a disability: in many countries it certainly is considered such.
Disabilities are however nothing to be ashamed off and should not be considered a bad label.
And nobody has done any of this.


 Star Fairy

I've struggled with epilepsy for years. It is a disability and I mange it quite well, but it is hard.

I love GyrilSebastians posts
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Ghost

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« Reply #85 on: September 23, 2019, 08:04:37 PM »

Jonathan and the other posters suffering with epilepsy - all my love!

My dearest uncle, who was also my godfather, had it. It is a battle that you are fighting and winning every time.
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TLLK

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« Reply #86 on: September 23, 2019, 10:13:02 PM »

Philip Prospero, Prince of Asturias (1657-1661) was the son of King Philip IV of Spain and Marianna of Austria. He was heir apparent to the throne. He suffered from epilepsy and became ill frequently.

Is your line 'he suffered from epilepsy and became ill frequently' cut and pasted directly from Wikipedia ?

I know you love to get your post count up with random postings but I have to speak up in this case.  I have epilepsy and it is not considered a disability!!!

I am glad that your epilepsy is not so severe that it is disabling, Hanimefendi, but, in Australia and the USA and probably most other countries, people who suffer from severe and frequent epileptic seizures that interfere with their daytime activities can obtain Social Security disability benefits.  Epilepsy can also occur in conjunction with other disabling conditions.  Young Prince Philip Prospero died before his fourth birthday, following a severe epileptic attack.  I think it is fair to say that having such severe epilepsy in seventeenth century Spain definitely constituted a disability.  
Star Margaret.
To Jonathan-Thank you for sharing your story with us and  having had the pleasure of chatting with you over the years, I have nothing but admiration for you.

Cyril-Keep on posting!!!!
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Jonathan

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« Reply #87 on: September 23, 2019, 10:29:02 PM »

Thank you sweetheart, and you Ghost, I love chatting here with you all as well.

Cyril - you have a fan club here  Hug
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christina01
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« Reply #88 on: September 23, 2019, 11:20:37 PM »

Philip Prospero, Prince of Asturias (1657-1661) was the son of King Philip IV of Spain and Marianna of Austria. He was heir apparent to the throne. He suffered from epilepsy and became ill frequently.

Is your line 'he suffered from epilepsy and became ill frequently' cut and pasted directly from Wikipedia ?

I know you love to get your post count up with random postings but I have to speak up in this case.  I have epilepsy and it is not considered a disability!!!
Are you usually this rude to posters Hanimefendi? I'm sorry you have epilepsy, but most certainly in Australia epilepsy can certainly be considered a disability
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #89 on: September 24, 2019, 02:53:39 AM »

Felipe Prospero, Prince of Asturias   
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ctLi8xy0OX4
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