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Author Topic: A disabled heir  (Read 29516 times)
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luvcharles

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« Reply #90 on: September 24, 2019, 03:02:08 AM »

 Star
Philip Prospero, Prince of Asturias (1657-1661) was the son of King Philip IV of Spain and Marianna of Austria. He was heir apparent to the throne. He suffered from epilepsy and became ill frequently.

Is your line 'he suffered from epilepsy and became ill frequently' cut and pasted directly from Wikipedia ?

I know you love to get your post count up with random postings but I have to speak up in this case.  I have epilepsy and it is not considered a disability!!!
Are you usually this rude to posters Hanimefendi? I'm sorry you have epilepsy, but most certainly in Australia epilepsy can certainly be considered a disability

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luvcharles

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« Reply #91 on: September 24, 2019, 03:04:35 AM »

Philip Prospero, Prince of Asturias (1657-1661) was the son of King Philip IV of Spain and Marianna of Austria. He was heir apparent to the throne. He suffered from epilepsy and became ill frequently.

Is your line 'he suffered from epilepsy and became ill frequently' cut and pasted directly from Wikipedia ?

I know you love to get your post count up with random postings but I have to speak up in this case.  I have epilepsy and it is not considered a disability!!!
And I would rather advise you not to accuse people who are very valued board members with an impressive amount of rather informative historical posts of raking up a post count with random posts. This is insulting and derogatory and certain not called for.
As to epilepsy not being a disability: in many countries it certainly is considered such.
Disabilities are however nothing to be ashamed off and should not be considered a bad label.
And nobody has done any of this.



Well said Star

I too love reading many of Cyril's posts. They often get me doing more research into royals about whom I know very little and sometimes about those I have spent a lifetime studying or those I will be researching for my Ph.D starting next year.
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Margaret

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« Reply #92 on: September 24, 2019, 03:58:15 AM »

Philip Prospero, Prince of Asturias (1657-1661) was the son of King Philip IV of Spain and Marianna of Austria. He was heir apparent to the throne. He suffered from epilepsy and became ill frequently.

Is your line 'he suffered from epilepsy and became ill frequently' cut and pasted directly from Wikipedia ?

I know you love to get your post count up with random postings but I have to speak up in this case.  I have epilepsy and it is not considered a disability!!!
And I would rather advise you not to accuse people who are very valued board members with an impressive amount of rather informative historical posts of raking up a post count with random posts. This is insulting and derogatory and certain not called for.
As to epilepsy not being a disability: in many countries it certainly is considered such.
Disabilities are however nothing to be ashamed off and should not be considered a bad label.
And nobody has done any of this.



Well said Star

I too love reading many of Cyril's posts. They often get me doing more research into royals about whom I know very little and sometimes about those I have spent a lifetime studying or those I will be researching for my Ph.D starting next year.

I, too, enjoy reading Cyril's posts, and looking at the images that accompany them.  These posts often introduce me to royals I knew nothing about, or get me thinking more about those I do know about.  An old photograph can bring a long gone royal to life in a way that no amount of text can achieve.  Till now I had no idea about Philip Prospero and his short, sad life.  Researching him has led to me acquiring knowledge about the 17th Century Spanish RF and an interest in the circumstances that I otherwise would not have had.  Keep posting please, Cyril!

And hugs to Jonathan and all other posters for whom epilepsy or similar challenges are a part of life.
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karma chamelion

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« Reply #93 on: September 24, 2019, 04:27:37 AM »

Philip Prospero, Prince of Asturias (1657-1661) was the son of King Philip IV of Spain and Marianna of Austria. He was heir apparent to the throne. He suffered from epilepsy and became ill frequently.

Is your line 'he suffered from epilepsy and became ill frequently' cut and pasted directly from Wikipedia ?

I know you love to get your post count up with random postings but I have to speak up in this case.  I have epilepsy and it is not considered a disability!!!
And I would rather advise you not to accuse people who are very valued board members with an impressive amount of rather informative historical posts of raking up a post count with random posts. This is insulting and derogatory and certain not called for.
As to epilepsy not being a disability: in many countries it certainly is considered such.
Disabilities are however nothing to be ashamed off and should not be considered a bad label.
And nobody has done any of this.



Well said Star

I too love reading many of Cyril's posts. They often get me doing more research into royals about whom I know very little and sometimes about those I have spent a lifetime studying or those I will be researching for my Ph.D starting next year.

I, too, enjoy reading Cyril's posts, and looking at the images that accompany them.  These posts often introduce me to royals I knew nothing about, or get me thinking more about those I do know about.  An old photograph can bring a long gone royal to life in a way that no amount of text can achieve.  Till now I had no idea about Philip Prospero and his short, sad life.  Researching him has led to me acquiring knowledge about the 17th Century Spanish RF and an interest in the circumstances that I otherwise would not have had.  Keep posting please, Cyril!

And hugs to Jonathan and all other posters for whom epilepsy or similar challenges are a part of life.

Me as well, I've gone down quite a few very enjoyable rabbit holes thanks to CS. Jonathan, I always enjoy your posts as well Hug
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« Reply #94 on: September 26, 2019, 07:49:30 PM »

Philip Prospero, Prince of Asturias (1657-1661) was the son of King Philip IV of Spain and Marianna of Austria. He was heir apparent to the throne. He suffered from epilepsy and became ill frequently.

Is your line 'he suffered from epilepsy and became ill frequently' cut and pasted directly from Wikipedia ?

I know you love to get your post count up with random postings but I have to speak up in this case.  I have epilepsy and it is not considered a disability!!!

Don't attack other posters simply because you disagree with them. That's not cool, here or elsewhere.
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Curtains

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« Reply #95 on: September 29, 2019, 01:18:57 AM »

Philip Prospero, Prince of Asturias (1657-1661) was the son of King Philip IV of Spain and Marianna of Austria. He was heir apparent to the throne. He suffered from epilepsy and became ill frequently.

Cyril, thanks as always for calling attention to some amazing bits and bobs of information we would never otherwise think to look into.  Rock on my friend!   Star
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #96 on: September 29, 2019, 02:47:16 AM »

Philip Prospero, Prince of Asturias (1657-1661) was the son of King Philip IV of Spain and Marianna of Austria. He was heir apparent to the throne. He suffered from epilepsy and became ill frequently.

Cyril, thanks as always for calling attention to some amazing bits and bobs of information we would never otherwise think to look into.  Rock on my friend!   Star
     
 
Curtains, Thank you for the kind words!  Yes Yes Yes
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