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Author Topic: Nicholas II & Family  (Read 32327 times)
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Carreen

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« Reply #150 on: March 03, 2020, 08:12:10 PM »

Why  I think that Frittie's death had a lasting impact on Alix: 1. it turned her mother into a deeply sad woman which must have influenced the whole family, and 2. it made obvious to all her daughters that they were probable carriers (according to the book Queen Victoria's Genes, the basic facts about haemophilia were known in the 19th century although only incompletely understood). And 3., when Alix discovered that her son was a hemophiliac, she knew only too well what it meant. Her mother had been close to Leopold which meant that Alix knew about his sufferings, and Frittie's death must have horrified her in retrospect.

It's just my hypothesis.
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Kristallinchen

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« Reply #151 on: March 03, 2020, 10:41:43 PM »

Why  I think that Frittie's death had a lasting impact on Alix: 1. it turned her mother into a deeply sad woman which must have influenced the whole family, and 2. it made obvious to all her daughters that they were probable carriers (according to the book Queen Victoria's Genes, the basic facts about haemophilia were known in the 19th century although only incompletely understood). And 3., when Alix discovered that her son was a hemophiliac, she knew only too well what it meant. Her mother had been close to Leopold which meant that Alix knew about his sufferings, and Frittie's death must have horrified her in retrospect.

It's just my hypothesis.

From this pow I agree with you. Alix certainly was too young to remember Frittie and his death, but yes in another way it affected her deeply.
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lilyrose

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« Reply #152 on: March 04, 2020, 03:55:22 AM »

They never thought they were in danger - and there were plenty of opportunities to send the children, at least their daughters, away to her sister Victoria. Alix refused. Even Nicholas considered it could have been prudent, but she had infantalised her daughters so much 'the little girlies' would never leave. Olga Nikolaevna had wanted to accept Aunt Victoria's offer, when she had heard about it.

Agreed. I can't find the quote right now, but Victoria MH had offered to take at least the three younger girls (her reasoning being that Alexei, as the heir, was never going to be allowed to leave, and that Olga, as the oldest, might possibly be seen as politically important somehow) somewhat early on and was denied because the family did not want to be split up. Which was ironic because they were split up for a couple months when N&A and Maria were sent ahead to Ekaterinburg while the others stayed behind in Tobolsk.
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miliosr

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« Reply #153 on: March 08, 2020, 10:42:08 PM »

The March 8th, 1917 entry from French Ambassador Maurice Paleologue's diaries:

There has been great agitation in Petrograd all day. Processions have been parading the main streets. At several points the mob shouted for "Bread and peace!" At others it sang the Working Man's Marseillaise. In the Nevsky Prsopect there have been slight disorders

I had [Alexander] Trepov, Count Tolstoi, Director of the Hermitage, my Spanish colleague, Villasinda, and a score of my regular guests to dinner this evening.

The occurrences in the streets were responsible for a shade of anxiety which marked our faces and our conversation. I asked Trepov what steps the Government was taking to bring food supplies to Petrograd, as unless they are taken the situation will probably soon get worse. His replies were anything but reassuring.

When I returned to my other guests, I found all traces of anxiety had vanished from their features and their talk. The main object of conversation was an evening party which Princess Leon Radziwill is giving on Sunday: it will be a large and brilliant party, and everyone was hoping that there will be music and dancing.

Trepov and I stared at each other. The same words came to our lips:

"What a curious time to arrange a party!"

In spite of the fact that revolution is in the air in his capital, the Emperor, who has spent the last two months at Tsarskoie-Selo, left for General Headquarters this evening.
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miliosr

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« Reply #154 on: March 12, 2020, 12:25:21 AM »

The March 11th, 1917 entry from French Ambassador Maurice Paleologue's diaries:

[G]eneral Khabalov, Military Governor of Petrograd, has had the city placarded with the following warning this morning:

All meetings or gatherings are forbidden. I notify the civil population that I have given the troops fresh authority to use their arms and stop at nothing to maintain order.

 
In spite of the warning of the Military Governor, the mob is becoming increasingly disorderly and aggressive; in the Nevsky Prospekt it is getting larger every hour. Four or five times the troops have been compelled to fire to escape being brushed aside. There are scores of dead.

As I needed a rest after all the work and worry of today (I have been literally besieged by anxious members of the French colony), I turned out after dinner for an evening call on Countess P-----, who lives on Glinka Street.

When I left her about eleven o’clock, I heard that demonstrations were continuing in the neighbourhood of Our Lady of Kazan and the Gostiny-Dvor. I thought it as well to return to the embassy by the roundabout way along the Fontarska. My car had just reached the quay when I noticed a house which was a blaze of lights; opposite it was a long line of cars and carriages. Princess Leon Radziwill’s party was in full swing; I caught a glimpse of the car of the Grand Duke Boris as we passed.

Senac de Meilhan tells us that there was plenty of gaiety in Paris on the night of the 5th October, 1789.

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miliosr

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« Reply #155 on: March 16, 2020, 01:32:34 PM »

[Note: The Revolution began in earnest on March 12, 1917. French Ambassador Maurice Paleologue covered the unfolding events in great detail in his diaries.]

The March 15th, 1917 entry:

But the whole of the interest of the day has been concentrated on the little town of Pskov, halfway between Petrograd and Dvinsk. It was there that the imperial train, which failed to reach Tsarskoie-Selo, stopped at eight o'clock yesterday evening.

The Emperor, who left Mohilev on March 13 at 4:30 a.m., decided to go to Tsarskoie-Selo, the Empress having begged him to return there at once. About three o'clock in the morning of March 14, as the engine of the imperial train was taking in water at the station of Malaia-Vichera, General Zabel, commander of His Majesty's Railway Regiment, took it upon himself to awaken the Emperor to tell him that the line to Petrograd had been closed and that Tsarskoie-Selo was in the hands of the revolutionary forces. After giving vent to his surprise and irritation at not having been better informed, the Emperor is said to have replied:

"Moscow will remain faithful to me. We will go to Moscow!"

Then he is reported to have added, with his usual apathy:

"If the revolution succeeds, I shall abdicate voluntarily. I'll go and live at Livadia: I love flowers." [Note: Bolded is my emphasis.]
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miliosr

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« Reply #156 on: March 18, 2020, 11:26:54 PM »

The March 16th entry from French Ambassador Maurice Paleologue's diaries:

Nicholas II abdicated yesterday, shortly before midnight.

Nicholas: "I decided to abdicate yesterday. But I cannot be separated from my son; that is more than I could bear; his health is too delicate you must realize what I feel . . . I shall therefore abdicate in favour of my brother, Michael Alexandrovitch."

The Emperor then went into his study with the Minister of the Court; he came out ten minutes later with the act of abdication signed.

[Note: Paleologue's diaries then reprint the abdication statement in full.]

History can show few events so momentous, or so pregnant with possibilities and far-reaching in their effects. Yet of all those of which it has left any record, is there a single one which has taken place in such casual, commonplace and prosaic fashion, and above all with such indifference and self-effacement on the part of the principal hero?

Is it simply lack of interest in the Emperor's case? I think not. His abdication degree,over which he has pondered long if he did not actually word it himself, is inspired by the loftiest sentiments, and its general tone is nobility itself. But his moral attitude at this supreme crisis appears perfectly logical if it is admitted as I have often remarked, that for many months past the unhappy sovereign has felt himself lost and that he long ago made his sacrifice and accepted his fate.


The accession of the Grand Duke Michael to the throne has aroused the fury of the Soviet: "No more Romanovs!" is the cry in all quarters: "We want a republic!"

The Soviet is now master.
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miliosr

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« Reply #157 on: March 20, 2020, 12:40:17 AM »

From the March 17th, 1917 entry of French Ambassador Maurice Paleologue's diaries:

It was through the Grand Duke Paul that that the Empress learned yesterday evening of the Emperor's abdication; she had heard nothing from him for two days. She burst out:

"It's quite impossible! It isn't true! It's another newspaper lie! I believe in God and trust the army. Neither could have deserted us at so critical a moment!"

The Grand Duke read her the abdication which had just been published. The everything came home to her and she burst into tears.
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fruela

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« Reply #158 on: March 20, 2020, 12:44:01 AM »

I'm afraid they are now on the way to a Bonapartean (?) empire.
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miliosr

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« Reply #159 on: March 22, 2020, 07:25:45 PM »

From the March 18th, 1917 entry of French Ambassador Maurice Paleologue's diaries:

After discussing this topic [Nicholas II's abdication] for some considerable time, I asked Basily [Note: Nicholas Alexandrovitch Basily, charge of the diplomatic section of General Headquarters]:

Paleologue: "Have you seen the Emperor since his abdication?"

Basily: "Yes. On the March 16th, when the Emperor was returning from Pskov to Mohilev, General Alexeiev sent me to tell him how the situation was developing. I met his train at Orcha and went straight to his coach. He was absolutely calm but it shocked me to see him with a haggard look and hollow eyes. After telling him of the latest happenings in Petrograd, I took the liberty of saying that we at the Stavka were greatly distressed because he had not transferred his crown to the Tsarevitch. He answered quietly: "I cannot be separated from my son." I learned afterwards from his escort that before the Emperor came to his decision he had consulted his physician Professor Feodorov: "I order you to give me a frank answer," he had said. "Do you think it possible that Alexis can get better?" "No, Your Majesty, his disease is incurable." "That's what the Empress thought long ago, though I myself still had hopes. As God has willed it thus I shall not separate myself from my poor boy!"
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anastasia beaverhausen

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« Reply #160 on: March 23, 2020, 01:36:45 AM »

I'm afraid they are now on the way to a Bonapartean (?) empire.

That is an interesting concept Fruela. 
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miliosr

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« Reply #161 on: March 23, 2020, 10:54:40 PM »

From the March 19th, 1917 entry of French Ambassador Maurice Paleologue's diaries:

Nicholas Romanov, as the Emperor is now styled in official documents and the papers, has asked the Provisional Government for:

(1) A free pass from Mohilev to Tsarskoie-Selo; (2) Permission to reside at the Alexander Palace until his children have recovered from the measles; (3) a free pass from Tsarskoie-Selo to Port Romanov on the Murman coast.

The government has granted his requests.

Miliukov, who is my authority for this information, presumes that the Emperor intends to ask the King of England for a place of refuge. [Note: Pavel Milyukov, Minister of Foreign Affairs in the Provisional Government.]

"He should lose no time in getting away," I said. "Otherwise, the Soviet extremists might quote some awkward precedents against him."

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miliosr

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« Reply #162 on: March 24, 2020, 10:03:45 PM »

From the March 21st, 1917 entry of French Ambassador Maurice Paleologue's diaries:

During the last few days a rumour has spread among the mob that "Citizen Romanov" and his wife, "Alexandra the German," are working secretly for a restoration of autocracy, with the connivance of the "moderate" ministers. The Soviet accordingly demanded the immediate arrest of the sovereigns yesterday evening. The Provisional Government yielded to its desires. The same evening four deputies of the Duma left for G.H.Q. at Mohilev, with instructions to bring the Emperor back with them.

As regards the Empress, General Kornilov went to Tsarskoie-Selo this morning with an escort. On his arrival at the Alexander Palace he was immediately received by the Tsarina who heard the decision of the Provisional Government without remark; all she asked was that she should be left all the servants who are looking after her invalid children - a request which has been granted. The Alexander Palace is now cut off from all communication with outside.

Miliukov is very much upset over the arrest of the Emperor and Empress; he wants the King of England to offer them the hospitality of British territory and even to guarantee their safety; he has therefore begged Buchanan [Note: Sir George Buchanan, British Ambassador to Russia, 1910-1917] to wire to London at once and insist on having an answer without a moment's delay.

"it's the last chance of securing these poor unfortunates' freedom, and perhaps of saving their lives!" he told us.

Buchanan returned at once to the Embassy to convey Miliukov's suggestion to his Government.
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Gemsheal

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« Reply #163 on: March 24, 2020, 10:39:45 PM »

Excellent!  Thank you for posting! 
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miliosr

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« Reply #164 on: March 26, 2020, 12:33:29 AM »

From the March 22nd, 1917 entry of French Ambassador Maurice Paleologue's diaries:

The Emperor reached Tsarskoie-Selo this morning.

His arrest at Mohilev produced no incident; his farewell to the officers about him (many of whom shed tears) was disconcertingly banal in its simplicity.

Returning from a visit to the Admiralty Canal I came through Glinka Street where the Gran Duke Cyril Vladimirovich lives. I saw something waving over his palace -- a red flag!
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