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Author Topic: Kate's - COCKTAIL (shorter) dresses  (Read 347332 times)
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MarieQueenie

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« Reply #975 on: September 25, 2020, 01:26:01 AM »

The whole family looks pretty. They certainly like blue (I think they wore blue in last year's card. I think it must be kate's fav color.

It's color of royalty in France and then worldwide. Fire blue is called bleu roi in French, royal blue. In France, they where moments in the history of the country when only the king had the permission to wear blue outfits during official events. Bleu roi = the blue of the king, the blue color of kings clothes / coats.
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MarieQueenie

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« Reply #976 on: September 25, 2020, 01:53:53 AM »

Another McQueen lace dress $1,853  Snore Snore Snore



Of course she had to buy a new white lace dress. Not like she could have recycled this one...



I love this dress, one of the prettiest ever ! perfect for a wedding too. The hat is cute too.
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SvenskaSarah

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« Reply #977 on: September 25, 2020, 02:55:48 PM »

The whole family looks pretty. They certainly like blue (I think they wore blue in last year's card. I think it must be kate's fav color.

It's color of royalty in France and then worldwide. Fire blue is called bleu roi in French, royal blue. In France, they where moments in the history of the country when only the king had the permission to wear blue outfits during official events. Bleu roi = the blue of the king, the blue color of kings clothes / coats.

Purple has, or had, similar status too. During medieval and the early modern period (esp. the Elizabethan era) there were laws about what colours and fabrics people could wear, depending on their status. Purple was one for royalty, perhaps extending to the upper echelons of the aristocracy. I think even now purple is used by jockeys riding horses owned by the monarch? I know that when the suffragette Emily Davison attempted to pin a suffragette banner on the King's horse in 1913 she was able to pick out the horse based on the colour of the jockey's ensemble.

Interesting that purple is a mixture of blue and red too  Smiley
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Lady Alice

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« Reply #978 on: September 26, 2020, 04:22:18 PM »

The dyes - indigo, cobalt, and such - were so expensive that only royalty could afford them. It pretty much held true until the industrial revolution and the dawn of synthetic dyes.
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Paulina

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« Reply #979 on: September 26, 2020, 06:14:53 PM »

There is a superb book called Blue: History of a Color, by Michel Patoureau. Very readable, accessible. I read it about 20 years ago and really liked it.
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« Reply #980 on: September 26, 2020, 07:01:54 PM »

There is a superb book called Blue: History of a Color, by Michel Patoureau. Very readable, accessible. I read it about 20 years ago and really liked it.

Do you know if it is available in e-book format? It sounds like a fascinating read.
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« Reply #981 on: September 26, 2020, 07:06:16 PM »

A little history of red and purple natural dyes:

https://blog.patra.com/20...tural-and-synthetic-dyes/

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Tyrian purple: the most expensive dye in the world

The most well-known shellfish dye was the Tyrian purple, royal purple or imperial purple as it was called, which came from sea snails in the Eastern Mediterranean in the ancient city of Tyre. This dye was very special for all the civilisations around the Mediterranean and its use spanned whole centuries. It was the most expensive dye in the whole of ancient world, as the colour it produced was very bright and colourfast. Because of its properties, its use was restricted for royals, members of the royal family, and senior public officers and priests.

Archaeological evidence points out that the ancient Phoenicians first discovered and used it (Tyre was an important Phoenician city). From them, it became known to ancient Greeks, Romans and through them in Byzantium and Medieval Europe. It was so sought after that the Byzantine emperor Theodosius I prohibited its use from the lower classes or the penalty was death. The privilege of using this purple dye is so profound that the phrase “born in purple” was born in that period. In Western Europe, it was replaced in prominence around the 12th century, and finally went out of fashion around the 19th century, when a synthetic purple was invented and thus it became more accessible to the wider masses.

For red dye:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cochineal

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The cochineal (/ˌkɒtʃɪˈniːl/ KOTCH-ih-NEEL, /ˈkɒtʃɪniːl/ KOTCH-ih-neel; Dactylopius coccus) is a scale insect in the suborder Sternorrhyncha, from which the natural dye carmine is derived. A primarily sessile parasite native to tropical and subtropical South America through North America (Mexico and the Southwest United States), this insect lives on cacti in the genus Opuntia, feeding on plant moisture and nutrients. The insects are found on the pads of prickly pear cacti, collected by brushing them off the plants, and dried.

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Cochineal dye was used by the Aztec and Maya peoples of North and Central America as early as the second century BC.[4] Eleven cities conquered by Montezuma in the 15th century paid a yearly tribute of 2000 decorated cotton blankets and 40 bags of cochineal dye each.[5] Production of cochineal is depicted in Codex Osuna. During the colonial period, the production of cochineal (grana fina) grew rapidly.[6] Produced almost exclusively in Oaxaca by indigenous producers, cochineal became Mexico's second-most valued export after silver.[7] Soon after the Spanish conquest of the Aztec Empire, it began to be exported to Spain, and by the 17th century was a commodity traded as far away as India.[Crazy The dyestuff was consumed throughout Europe and was so highly prized, its price was regularly quoted on the London and Amsterdam Commodity Exchanges (with the latter one beginning to record it in 1589)[6].

On the same subject:

https://www.bbc.com/cultu...t-that-painted-europe-red

A brief description of what the rest of the population wore from the Patra blog:

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Natural dyes in antiquity and modern times

The dyes that were used for garments were proportionate to the wealth or importance of the people. Wealthy people were wearing brightly hued colours, while the lower class was wearing clothes in the shades of white or brown. The slaves’ clothes were dyed in greys, greens and browns. Either way, dyed garments were expensive and a matter of exclusivity, across the whole ancient world.

Ancient and present day natural dyes come from three sources, mineral, animal and vegetable. The strength of the color you get depends not only on the dye source, but what is in the water you use for the dye bath and on the mordant or fixative you use to set the dye.

if you've ever visited Monument Valley/the Navajo Reservation and had your eyes bug out at the price of a Navajo rug done the in the manner passed down through the ages- not only does the weaver raise, shear, clean, comb and spin the wool (on a spindle) themselves, but the wool is hand dyed from plants they collect themselves. Many won't reveal the sources for a dye, but will share the dye plants they have collected with other weavers. You never pass through a Navajo loom when empty, and there is a small mistake left in each one.

Back to our regularly scheduled topic now . . .





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Future Crayon

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« Reply #982 on: December 12, 2020, 09:21:54 AM »





Alessandra Rich Petal Dress,  1000-ish
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Eliza B

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« Reply #983 on: December 12, 2020, 12:04:06 PM »





Alessandra Rich Petal Dress,  1000-ish

Kates current tailor is excellent. That's one shapeless dress that was transformed into something figure flattering.
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CathyJane

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« Reply #984 on: December 14, 2020, 09:50:17 PM »

I like the dress, but the ruffles on the neckline make it look like she's wearing shoulder pads. I still wish she'd cut her hair or keep it tied back one way or another.
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« Reply #985 on: September 23, 2021, 08:53:09 AM »

Cream tailored boucle and chiffon midi dress, Self Portrait, 400



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dwi
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« Reply #986 on: September 23, 2021, 04:20:04 PM »

don't like this outfit.
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« Reply #987 on: September 23, 2021, 06:33:34 PM »

dwi, I don't either, the collar imo is too big for her frame, hate the belt, the too short jacket (the way it sticks out over her hiney), lacey skirt reminds me of a nightgown I used to have  Snare.  only a tiny person would want those pockets widening the hips

It is just TOO  TOO (if you know what I mean  Wink )
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« Reply #988 on: September 23, 2021, 09:54:04 PM »

Agreed. There are too many disparate things going on in the outfit, any one of which would have been fine to guild an outfit around.  The color is great.

Has anyone noticed her outfit looks suspiciously like the tall cocktail tablecloth in the background? 
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« Reply #989 on: September 23, 2021, 09:54:50 PM »

OOps I thought it was a skirt and jacket combo and was ready to blast her with: "doesn't really go well together".
Don't like the skirt, I actually do really like those fine pleated chiffon or satin skirts, but I hate the lace panel.
And I like the smart little bouclet jacket, which with a slim pencil skirt in a fabric matching the lapel (more bouclet would firmly put it into Mature bridal wear) could look rather nice and conservatively elegant.
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