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Author Topic: The Mountbattens  (Read 63744 times)
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loveofenglishtradition

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« Reply #135 on: April 12, 2021, 04:26:01 PM »

I just finished reading Mary Soames' memories of her life as Winston Churchill's daughter - a very lively book. She met Louis Mountbatten at official events, had even a little crush on him because he was so charming and funny (of course much older than she was and not always on one page with her father), but the funniest thing is: she and her sister called him privately "glamour pants". I won't be able to see pictures of him any more without thinking: glamour pants, glamour pants...

On Youtube, there's the 12 part series about his life. He really loves talking about himself but from what I've seen, there's great archival material - the short movie he and Edwina made with Charlie Chaplin for example.

Right now, after finishing quite a number of Churchill-focused books, I'm digging into the Mountbattens a bit more. Right now, I'm reading the book about Dickie and Edwina, but I have some more lined up.

As I mentioned above, I loved the book by Lady Pamela Hicks and gave it as a present to my mother (a retired English teacher with a burning love for anything British), and she loved it, too.

What an interesting family. (quote)




Thanks for the book recommendation, I hope i can find them in a kindle version. I can also recommend Philip Eade's biography of Prince Philip "...his early turbulent life". it contains a lot of information about the Mountbattons, also about his uncle Louis and wife Edwina who led quite a scandalous life regarding the moral rules at that time.

Just like your mother I have a great love for anything British, reading British authors, visiting the country as often as possible, learned to bake scones (not so difficult) to have a real Devon cream tea once in a while in Germany. The only problem is to get the "clotted cream", but fortunately there is an English Shop in our city.
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« Reply #136 on: April 12, 2021, 04:45:50 PM »

I have Lady Pamela Hicks' book on Kindle so it is available there.  It only goes up to when she got married though.
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loveofenglishtradition

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« Reply #137 on: April 12, 2021, 05:13:00 PM »

On itv last night the documentary "My years with the Queen" aired. Its an interview style documentary between India Hicks and Lady Pamela Hicks (Mountbatten's daughter).
Very insightful documentary about the Queen's early years and the Mountbatten family. Though I must say Lady Pamela came across as very snobby and reinforcing that aristocratic "I'm better than you" vibe, though I guess at her age she can perhaps get away with it; after all she is one of the last aristocrats living from that era. She has some interesting comments regarding Charles' wedding, and about her own family. My favourite comment was "The Moubtbattens meant something" in relation to their status compared to other aristocratic families.

But it was lovely to see images of the Queen in her younger years, she really was a true beauty (and still is, imo!)

Unfortunately I cannot watch ITV here. Too bad that she came across like "I'm better than you". It is however remarkable that she is not prejudiced or racist, because her granddaughter, Maddison who was and still is in the model business is married to a Nigerian music entrepreneur, producer or whatever. They have three children together and don't live in a mansion or big country house, but in a middleclass house in Oxfordshire, not too far from her granny's country estate "The Grove".They even are renting a small logcabin in their backyard to visitors on "airbnb". So they are in need of earning some extra money, I assume.

 According to Maddisons instagram they often visit the grandmother and she warmly  welcomes her beautiful mixed great grandchildren.


Maddison is the daughter of Pamela's eldest daughter Edwina, who is not a prominent person on social media and very shy in public.

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Duchess of Verona

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« Reply #138 on: April 13, 2021, 04:23:55 AM »

Dual citizen US and Ireland here, from southern Donegal right above the bay  where they blew them sky high. I would agree with Curtains. I trust you will not tell me I don't know what I'm talking about Curley Sharon? As Uncle to the Queen's husband, First  Sea Lord of the Admiralty, last Viceroy of India, Supreme Allied Commander of SE Asia during WWII, first Governor-General of India after overseeing the partition and the creation of Pakistan, Made Earl Mountbatten of Burma IN HIS OWN RIGHT, not inherited...... Pretty sure history will look back at him and remember.

I did not know that about you, DoV. You’re full of surprises!
My Grandparents were born in Frosses, Donegal and emigrated to America  around 1922. After they became citizens here in US, the depression came and they returned to the family 'home farm' in Ireland, where my dad was born of American citizens in Ireland (1 of 7!). This enabled my dad, myself and Juliet to be dual citizens. I used to  'go home' as my Grandparents called it, every year in the 70's  onward for the  summer with them. Our family  has lived on the same property since well before the American Revolution. The name of the home farm is a bastardization of the Norman french for red because the heather ran from the top of the ridge all the way down to the river...maybe 30 acres.  My Great Grandmother, whom I never knew, had a rose garden that outlived her which I still remember to this day.

And to go back to the Mountbatten thing, the gates on the estate had an entwined cypher of EB (Earl of Burma) worked into the 10' tall wrought iron.....Isn't that right Curley Sharon??? Bone Fides here.
I looked it up on twitter and there was nothing about that, so it's probably fake news...  Halo
You know the beauty of Ireland, is when you have family there, no matter how long it's been, you still have family. It had been about 20 years since I had last been. The Duke had an unexpected business thing that brought us to Ireland on virtually no notice. I tacked on  a couple of days extra and we  drove to Donegal. I pulled into the family owned pub in town and said  to the bartender (who had the family look) "Are you a Verona?  Can you tell your dad the Duchess is here?" and he came trotting down the stairs and spent the next 3 days giving the Duke the personal tour of the county. It was the Duke's first visit.

Here's the bay https://www.pinterest.com/pin/353954851935821638/

Donegal in general is fantastic https://www.audleytravel....aces-to-go/county-donegal
« Last Edit: April 13, 2021, 04:37:17 AM by Duchess of Verona » Logged
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« Reply #139 on: April 13, 2021, 10:03:52 AM »

Dual citizen US and Ireland here, from southern Donegal right above the bay  where they blew them sky high. I would agree with Curtains. I trust you will not tell me I don't know what I'm talking about Curley Sharon? As Uncle to the Queen's husband, First  Sea Lord of the Admiralty, last Viceroy of India, Supreme Allied Commander of SE Asia during WWII, first Governor-General of India after overseeing the partition and the creation of Pakistan, Made Earl Mountbatten of Burma IN HIS OWN RIGHT, not inherited...... Pretty sure history will look back at him and remember.

I did not know that about you, DoV. You’re full of surprises!
My Grandparents were born in Frosses, Donegal and emigrated to America  around 1922. After they became citizens here in US, the depression came and they returned to the family 'home farm' in Ireland, where my dad was born of American citizens in Ireland (1 of 7!). This enabled my dad, myself and Juliet to be dual citizens. I used to  'go home' as my Grandparents called it, every year in the 70's  onward for the  summer with them. Our family  has lived on the same property since well before the American Revolution. The name of the home farm is a bastardization of the Norman french for red because the heather ran from the top of the ridge all the way down to the river...maybe 30 acres.  My Great Grandmother, whom I never knew, had a rose garden that outlived her which I still remember to this day.

And to go back to the Mountbatten thing, the gates on the estate had an entwined cypher of EB (Earl of Burma) worked into the 10' tall wrought iron.....Isn't that right Curley Sharon??? Bone Fides here.
I looked it up on twitter and there was nothing about that, so it's probably fake news...  Halo
You know the beauty of Ireland, is when you have family there, no matter how long it's been, you still have family. It had been about 20 years since I had last been. The Duke had an unexpected business thing that brought us to Ireland on virtually no notice. I tacked on  a couple of days extra and we  drove to Donegal. I pulled into the family owned pub in town and said  to the bartender (who had the family look) "Are you a Verona?  Can you tell your dad the Duchess is here?" and he came trotting down the stairs and spent the next 3 days giving the Duke the personal tour of the county. It was the Duke's first visit.

Here's the bay https://www.pinterest.com/pin/353954851935821638/

Donegal in general is fantastic https://www.audleytravel....aces-to-go/county-donegal

Nice!! 
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« Reply #140 on: April 13, 2021, 10:18:14 AM »

More than 15 years ago I once did a group camping trip through part of Ireland (we were with 9 in total, incluiding the tour guide). In general a fantastic country and especially fantastic inhabitants. For example, when we visited a local pub, we were carried away by Irish people in an Irish dance through the pub. An enthusiastic lady tried to teach us the movements. And we often had hilarious and warm conversations. We started just south of Dublin, crossed Ireland straight to Galway, then towards Killarney (including the lovely Ring of Kerry area), half an arc across the south of Ireland to Cork (whiskey tasting among others) and from there to Dublin (including Temple Bar of course; Guinness Brewery and Trinity College). After that we took the boat back to Wales (that area was also included in this trip). I truly enjoyed Wales and Ireland!


These days I am "captivated" by the Northern Irish series 'The Derry girls'. Since I don't have access to Channel 4 or Netflix, I have to make do with what I find online (especially Youtube). Currently I got a friend with Netflix so far that he has now started with the series. I already got quotes from the first episodes via Whatsapp. Grin


Derry Girls is a sitcom created and written by Northern Irish writer Lisa McGee and produced by British production company Hat Trick Productions. It is set in Derry, Northern Ireland, during The Troubles in the 1990s. Erin (Saoirse-Monica Jackson), her cousin Orla (Louisa Harland), their friends Clare (Nicola Coughlan) and Michelle (Jamie-Lee O'Donnell), and Michelle's English cousin James (Dylan Llewellyn) navigate their teen years during the end of The Troubles in Derry, where they all attend a Catholic girls' secondary school. Erin lives with her father Gerry and mother Mary, her baby sister Anna, Mary's younger sister Sarah, Sarah's daughter Orla, and her maternal grandfather, Joe. James is Michelle's cousin; his mother Cathy left Derry for England to have an abortion but gave birth to him and raised him in London. She sends him back to Derry to live with Michelle and her mother Deirdre when she is going through a divorce.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Derry_Girls
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loveofenglishtradition

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« Reply #141 on: April 13, 2021, 06:45:28 PM »

Duchess of Verona and Principessa,

so interesting to read your stories about Ireland! Visiting Ireland has long been on my agenda. Due to Covid we could not visit last year, but I hope we will maybe next year!
I have the impression that many Americans and Canadians as well have Irish heritage and are still very fond of their ancestors.

I have been reading all , really all books of Lucy Montgomery Smith, who is Canadian, and became mostly know by her story "Anne of Green Gables". In her work there is always a strong connection to irish and Scottish forefathers. Sometimes she has written in Irish or Scottish dialect, which is really difficult to understand for somebody whose native language is not English
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anneboleyn

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« Reply #142 on: April 13, 2021, 06:58:48 PM »

It is my dream to visit England, Ireland and Scotland. I have been enthralled with English history since I was nine years old, and as someone who is both Scottish and Irish, I would love to visit those countries where my roots are.
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« Reply #143 on: April 13, 2021, 07:01:24 PM »

Duchess of Verona and Principessa,

so interesting to read your stories about Ireland! Visiting Ireland has long been on my agenda. Due to Covid we could not visit last year, but I hope we will maybe next year!
I have the impression that many Americans and Canadians as well have Irish heritage and are still very fond of their ancestors.

I have been reading all , really all books of Lucy Montgomery Smith, who is Canadian, and became mostly know by her story "Anne of Green Gables". In her work there is always a strong connection to irish and Scottish forefathers. Sometimes she has written in Irish or Scottish dialect, which is really difficult to understand for somebody whose native language is not English


I visited Ireland around 18 months ago. I really recommend Malin Head and Glenveagh national Park.
Within NI, I cannot recommend Derry/Londonderry enough. Fascinating yet sad history, but a gorgeous place with very friendly people. It's very close to the border, and not too far from where Mountbatten had his residence in the Republic. There are some wonderful restaurants and museums in Derry too. And yes, watch Derry Girls, Sister Michael is just perfect!!

If you visit Dublin, I really, really recommend visiting the EPIC museum. It is a museum dedicated to Irish migration. It's interactive, and covers society as well as history, sport and culture. Nearby is a replica of the Jeannie Johnson famine ship, the only famine ship where nobody died on the journey across the Atlantic.
As you say, many in North America can find some Irish ancestry, and these two museum spaces are really informative if you want to learn more or engage in your family history.

Sorry I sound like a blooming tour guide!
AB, I can give some great recommendations for Scotland too, but I don't want to go off on another diatribe!
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« Reply #144 on: April 13, 2021, 08:13:39 PM »

I visited Ireland half a lifetime ago and my fondest memories are of the incredibly lovely and friendly people. My hubby asked one of the extremely nice people at a pub, if those blood tourists won't go on there nerves, with their ideas of romantic and almost medival Ireland, the fairies and their never ending request that the band in the pub play "Oh Danny boy", they just laughed and said: "no, they are fun"...

We had a funny anecdote there: on a rather chilly summer day, we got to talking with some locals and yes, about the weather and one guy, dead serious, said: well yes, this summer seems rather chilly, but last year, there was a day, when it was so hot, that driving his car, he needed to roll down the window....
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« Reply #145 on: April 14, 2021, 03:46:29 AM »

If you go to Scotland, def visit Culloden Battlefield.
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« Reply #146 on: April 14, 2021, 07:15:40 AM »

Dual citizen US and Ireland here, from southern Donegal right above the bay  where they blew them sky high. I would agree with Curtains. I trust you will not tell me I don't know what I'm talking about Curley Sharon? As Uncle to the Queen's husband, First  Sea Lord of the Admiralty, last Viceroy of India, Supreme Allied Commander of SE Asia during WWII, first Governor-General of India after overseeing the partition and the creation of Pakistan, Made Earl Mountbatten of Burma IN HIS OWN RIGHT, not inherited...... Pretty sure history will look back at him and remember.

I did not know that about you, DoV. You’re full of surprises!
My Grandparents were born in Frosses, Donegal and emigrated to America  around 1922. After they became citizens here in US, the depression came and they returned to the family 'home farm' in Ireland, where my dad was born of American citizens in Ireland (1 of 7!). This enabled my dad, myself and Juliet to be dual citizens. I used to  'go home' as my Grandparents called it, every year in the 70's  onward for the  summer with them. Our family  has lived on the same property since well before the American Revolution. The name of the home farm is a bastardization of the Norman french for red because the heather ran from the top of the ridge all the way down to the river...maybe 30 acres.  My Great Grandmother, whom I never knew, had a rose garden that outlived her which I still remember to this day.

And to go back to the Mountbatten thing, the gates on the estate had an entwined cypher of EB (Earl of Burma) worked into the 10' tall wrought iron.....Isn't that right Curley Sharon??? Bone Fides here.
I looked it up on twitter and there was nothing about that, so it's probably fake news...  Halo
You know the beauty of Ireland, is when you have family there, no matter how long it's been, you still have family. It had been about 20 years since I had last been. The Duke had an unexpected business thing that brought us to Ireland on virtually no notice. I tacked on  a couple of days extra and we  drove to Donegal. I pulled into the family owned pub in town and said  to the bartender (who had the family look) "Are you a Verona?  Can you tell your dad the Duchess is here?" and he came trotting down the stairs and spent the next 3 days giving the Duke the personal tour of the county. It was the Duke's first visit.

Here's the bay https://www.pinterest.com/pin/353954851935821638/

Donegal in general is fantastic https://www.audleytravel....aces-to-go/county-donegal

Nice!! 

I love your backstories, Duchess. You add some fun contexts here. Plus you sew bling.
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« Reply #147 on: April 14, 2021, 09:03:09 AM »

Duchess of Verona and Principessa,

so interesting to read your stories about Ireland! Visiting Ireland has long been on my agenda. Due to Covid we could not visit last year, but I hope we will maybe next year!
I have the impression that many Americans and Canadians as well have Irish heritage and are still very fond of their ancestors.

I have been reading all , really all books of Lucy Montgomery Smith, who is Canadian, and became mostly know by her story "Anne of Green Gables". In her work there is always a strong connection to irish and Scottish forefathers. Sometimes she has written in Irish or Scottish dialect, which is really difficult to understand for somebody whose native language is not English


My trip to Ireland was around my student times. During a fun shopping trip I remarked to a friend that I wanted to go to Ireland once. She reacted immediately with "let's go now then". And so happened, that summer we were in Ireland  Grin

As said the organised trip also included Wales, which was suprizing. Such a beautiful nature (we visited a.o. Snowdonia).

Schotland is still on my to go list. But in general I need the push, as I am relatively passive in taking holiday's and organizing trips.
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anneboleyn

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« Reply #148 on: April 14, 2021, 05:55:16 PM »

If you go to Scotland, def visit Culloden Battlefield.

I absolutely want to go here! I gave in to the pressure last summer and watched seasons 1-4 of Outlander in a week. Soooo good!
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« Reply #149 on: April 15, 2021, 09:56:28 AM »

If you go to Scotland, def visit Culloden Battlefield.

I absolutely want to go here! I gave in to the pressure last summer and watched seasons 1-4 of Outlander in a week. Soooo good!

Oooh yeah great series (but I also liked the books, awaiting part 9 of the series)
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