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Author Topic: William - news and photos  (Read 1226854 times)
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Margaret

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« Reply #7350 on: August 10, 2017, 03:10:10 AM »

Dash2   I am stupid stupid stupid. I promised myself that I wouldn't watch the ever so dramatic documentary, then I went and did. And now I'm   and  Real mad I hope this isn't OT but it seems that neither 'motherless' prince (and they're grown men now) feels it might be appropriate to think of the hungry, the poor, the sick, the homeless, the marginalized people in their country and actually do something for them. This carrying on and /sharing/whining imo is a bit much 20 years later, not to mention they are hardly the only ones who have lost a loved one, or for that matter never had a mother to begin with, so this to me is pure 'poor me, pr puke'. JMO The money spent on that syrupy tribute would have been better used to help the people who are in desperate and deep need. Yes, they are entitled to their feelings, their grief, but again I was stupid stupid stupid to watch it. It didn't generate sympathy or the pity I think they were shooting for, that's in the past, it just made me angry. Statues and stories cost money, and it's not their money I'll bet. Agree with Vava some of it is very moving, but personally I should have quit watching while I was still moved Blush  Grow up already, William Real mad the people who fund your lifestyle deserve more from you.

Midnight Diamond  Laughing  Awesome find  Star

ETA: I just reread my post and realized that my focus was on the 'boys' and not the subject of the Documentary. I am not changing it, this says a lot and I might be in the minority but to me, this was about the 'poor wittle pwinces'. JMO

I'm sure you're not in the minority.  If you are, I'm there, too.   Though I admit I couldn't watch the whole thing.  Listening to William makes me irrationally angry.  I am biased against him anyway because I don't like him, and there is a limit to how many times I am able to listen to him saying how "sweet" a photograph is before I start to strangle him.  I watched the doco as long as could but it can't have been more than about five minutes before I couldn't stand any more and wanted to throw things at the monitor, so I turned it off. 

I was never a fan of their mother but I have come to appreciate that Diana did take her work seriously, and did a good job of it.  If these two whining man-children truly want to honour her, they should stop whining and set about working as assiduously as she did for the causes to which she was dedicated.  That would be a fitting tribute to her.   
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KimmySue

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« Reply #7351 on: August 10, 2017, 04:38:16 AM »

 Good post

Stop whining and start working. Time for the men to start acting like adults.
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Aubiette

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« Reply #7352 on: August 10, 2017, 04:50:16 AM »

I watched it AND enjoyed it but I don't dislike, much less hate William or any of them.
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Ellie

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« Reply #7353 on: August 10, 2017, 05:06:40 AM »

I couldn't deal with it. The whining and using their dead mother to make them look better, as an excuse, poor us we're little boys who lost our mother--shut up, you're grown men, take responsibility, especially William. And the more Harry is around William the worse, I think, and it shows.
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Suzy

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« Reply #7354 on: August 10, 2017, 02:05:59 PM »

I couldn't deal with it. The whining and using their dead mother to make them look better, as an excuse, poor us we're little boys who lost our mother--shut up, you're grown men, take responsibility, especially William. And the more Harry is around William the worse, I think, and it shows.

I agree especially with the last bit. Will seems to be a very bad influence on people around him like Kate or Harry and obviously the KP office as well. I think he does pull rank a lot, thinks he is superiour and knows best and if you criticise him you're probably out forever.
The documentary was the usual whiny nonsense with Will's mandatory insults of Harry disguised as lame jokes but one thing I found strange. The first part when people were again and again talking about her humor and Harry talked about what advise she gave him, it made her look like an airhead. I was surprised that this part got the thumbs up from KP but I think this is what they see in her. The fun loving, silly and very naive girl who did stupid things she often regretted is their role model instead of the hard-working mother who truly cared for other people and tried for a long time to be a good senior royal despite a lot of personal problems.
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Witchell: Clearly a greater share of royal burden will fall on you and as that happens you will grasp it willingly?
Will: Absolutely willingly. And as that time comes I'll be the first person to put my hand up and take it on. But [] my grandfather is so active [] and unwilling to slow down.
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« Reply #7355 on: August 10, 2017, 02:26:00 PM »

As long as they paint Diana as the fun, awesome mom who was the victim of the evil Royal Family I'm sure William is okay with it.  Angry

I think it shows how little she was present in their lives (Harry vaguely seemed to hint at this and how the divorce kept them away from both parents). She was just there to be fun and leave when it got boring; they don't remember anything else from her, which is so sad considering the amazing things she did do with her fame and publicity.

When I think about my parents, I think about their many screw-ups, sure, and the fun stuff, but also the sort of people I want to be--or in some cases in their example do not want to be... It seems they just want a fun, frivolous life with no responsibilities and seem to say that's what their mother told them! See, no work, have fun, say you're going to be a present parent or work and do neither and do whatever you want!
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Margaret

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« Reply #7356 on: August 10, 2017, 03:00:54 PM »

Suzy and Ellie, I think you make very good points about William & Harry's perception of their mother, and I find the notion that they may see her most appealing qualities as those associated with her fun-loving side rather than her work ethic to be very interesting.  What you say ties in with something I said in a post a week or so back, which was basically that I am not particularly interested in their perceptions since their views are views formed by children, whose role in their now deceased parent's life was always that of a child, and, because she died, their relationship was frozen at that point and will always be that of parent and child/adolescent.  They did not know her when they were adults, and their views are always going to be skewed, and flavoured by things they have been told or heard or read since then, and they will only take on board the things that fit within their rose-tinted image of her as naughty mother who did the fun stuff.  That is what they think is important and it is how they want to remember her, not as a hard-working role model who had difficulties in her life but rose above them and did a serious job well and who spent a fair amount of time improving herself so she could do it even better.
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Sondra Finchley

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« Reply #7357 on: August 10, 2017, 11:37:05 PM »

Personally I think they should have let the anniversary pass quietly this time.

You know how fashions or styles of 20 years ago look dated but once you hit 30-40 years it looks hip/reassessed/resurrected? I wonder if thats the same thing here. I havent watched the documentary other than the one clip I saw somewhere (maybe here) and it seemed so silly and likely skewed for whatever purpose it was needed. The ten year was one thing but it seems a bit more awareness of the state of the world would have been helpful rather than this personal indulgence crap. Somehow nostalgia for that time seems out of place right now, but maybe in 10 years it won't be.

TLDR; this was totally tone deaf and made no one, including the subject, look good
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wisdomheaven

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« Reply #7358 on: September 06, 2017, 12:32:21 AM »

William today back at Grenfell towers. He promised to come back during his initial visit. He was in good form today.

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The Royal Foundation has established a Support4Grenfell Community Hub in north Kensington to provide additional mental health resources for the children, young people and families affected by the fire. The Foundation has been working with local leaders and experts in the field, while charity partners like Place2Be, Child Bereavement UK, The Art Room and Winston’s Wish – some of which have longstanding links with the royals – have been helping with the local response.


William also gave a speech earlier in the day

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THE DUKE OF CAMBRIDGE GIVES A SPEECH AT THE NATIONAL MENTAL HEALTH AND POLICING CONFERENCE
Thank you, Chief Constable. And thank you very much for inviting me here today.  I am extremely grateful to have the opportunity to join you all today as you discuss some important topics, which I know you’ve been speaking about.

I’d like to start, if I may, by acknowledging the role you play in our society and the considerable pressures you are under.  The police service only ever seems to make the news when one of two things happen: either a terrible tragedy or atrocity occurs, and quite rightly the police are praised for their extraordinary bravery and sacrifice.  Or at the other end of the spectrum, a decision is held up to account and censor. 

Amidst all this, the reality of policing day to day is often overlooked. Your officers face the most difficult and chaotic elements of society every day: broken families; serious injury; terrifying assault; alcohol and drugs abuse; trying to maintain the peaceful and ordered society that most of us take for granted, and to do so whilst maintaining the British concept of policing by consent. It’s a really difficult job, and the fact that it goes on every day under our noses without most of us noticing is testament to your skill in doing it.  Our whole way of being as a nation owes its peaceful existence to what you do, day in day out; and we are very proud of you.

One of the things that I most enjoy about travelling overseas is observing how different nations do policing.  There are some terrific examples, but I can honestly say that I have never encountered a culture of policing as it is in this country – discreet, low-key, with a sense of humour and great common sense.  It would probably be diplomatically remiss of me to name countries whose policing is different to this.  I would never be permitted to make a speech again if I did!  So I won’t name anyone … but, as an aside, one of my favourite moments on an overseas trip a few years ago was watching two rival tiers in a police force – one local, one state – vying for supremacy to escort a convoy I was in. 

The two motorcycle groups repeatedly bumped into one another at high speed, nudging one another off the road, until one force caved in and relinquished the road in favour of the other.  What was very funny was that the visit was semi-private but I think that by the end of my very first journey the whole city knew I was there. Discreet policing it was not!

Policing by consent – in the way that you do it, and for which British police services are so rightly praised around the world – is hard work.  Policing is physically and mentally tough.  The stresses of uncertain and tense situations take their toll.  It is also hugely rewarding and at times enjoyable, and I know many of you talk about a policing family. 

You have been talking this morning about the issue of mental health and the impact it has on policing.  One in four adults will experience a mental health problem, so it is perhaps not a surprise that an estimated one third of all policing demand is connected to a vulnerable person in mental distress. This has a significant impact on policing time and effort, and it can also have a personal impact on those on the front line dealing with these cases. As a former RAF Search and Rescue and Air Ambulance pilot, I know what this feels like.

Over the past two years I worked with the East Anglian Air Ambulance alongside the police and other emergency services. My team was frequently tasked to help people in extreme distress, and I know I was not alone in being affected by some of the calls I attended. One of my first call outs was to a young man who had taken his own life. Looking at the statistics, I was astounded by how prevalent this was. Suicide is the biggest killer of young men in this country. Not cancer, knife crime, or road deaths – but suicide. This had a big impact on me.

I was very fortunate to work with a team where we were encouraged to talk through the things we had seen when we returned to base.  There were days when, like you, we would have to watch our colleagues save some lives, and lose others. We saw traumatised parents dealing with the shock of having children involved in catastrophic accidents.

There were patients we lost who we fought hard to save. I know that these real life tragedies can stay with you for a long time afterwards – even when we like to pretend they don’t.

Being a member of the emergency services takes considerable mental strength and resilience, and I believe there is more that we can and should do to support all first responders to look after their mental health. You are skilled at helping people in extreme distress – so you should be looked after just as much.

Members of the police service are twice as likely to suffer from mental health problems as the general public. The recent Police Federation survey also showed that officers fear disclosing mental health problems due to stigma, the reaction they would receive from supervisors and colleagues, and the possible impact on their careers. Two thirds of respondents had come to work, despite serious concerns about their mental well-being.

This issue is by no means confined to the police force – the fear of stigma and a negative reaction is common in many workplaces. Over the past 18 months, through our Heads Together campaign, Catherine, Harry and I have been working with leading charities to change the conversation about mental health, and I’m really pleased MIND is here today. Don’t get me wrong: there is a place for a stiff upper lip, and for a sense of humour to help get through a situation.  But there is also a place for openness and mutual support – that has to be part of the mix and, till now, it has not been sufficient.  Our aim has been to help tackle the stigma surrounding the issue, and to make it easier for people to get help as soon as they need it, without worrying what others will think of them. 

We are beginning to see progress, with more people talking about mental health than ever before, but we still have a long way to go.

The National Police Chiefs Council and College of Policing have a real opportunity to lead from the front on this issue. Police Officers are quite rightly respected for their courage and bravery. By creating an atmosphere where colleagues feel comfortable to talk openly and honestly about their issues, you can show that asking for support should be seen as a sign of strength, and not of weakness.

There are a number of organisations able to provide immediate support on the phone or online, an in particular, the MIND Blue Light Infoline that offers specialist support for those serving in the emergency services.  I am delighted that MIND’s Blue Light programme is represented here today.  As you may know, it supports many police services across the country to provide simple and easy access to immediate support.​

Building on this work by MIND Blue Light, and the Heads Together campaign, I will be convening representatives of the emergency services to consider ways in which society might better support the work you do. The tragedy at Grenfell, and the conclusion of my work as an Air Ambulance pilot, spurred me to look into doing what I can to support you in a practical way. 

The reason I think all of this is important is that being a first responder is tough enough as it is.  These pressures are not going to go away.  Therefore, it is properly essential you are equipped to withstand the realities of 21st century policing.  If more openness about mental wellbeing is part of the solution, as I believe it is, then I would like to help you with that.

I sincerely hope that the remainder of the day goes very well, and that today marks an important milestone in improving the support that you get and so rightly deserve.

Thank you very much indeed for having me to speak.
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danifaul

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« Reply #7359 on: September 06, 2017, 04:47:51 AM »

Quote
Which is why I struggle to believe William when he says he just wants his family to have 'as normal as life as possible'.
If he wanted that, he wouldn't be sending his eldest across town to one of our pushiest primary schools — Thomas's in Battersea — or creating an alternative court at Kensington Palace.
Yes, he is driven by a genuine desire to help people, but he also has a strong — and immature — need to be adored.
But being a successful monarch is not just about winning the 'People's Prince' competition. It's also about tradition, history and, to an extent, mystery.
The Queen has always understood this, it's what underpins her success. She has an authority, a wisdom, an air of mystique that elevates her above the everyday.She is more than just a star turn; she is an icon, and that's what makes her a Queen. It's a lesson for anyone who would inherit her crown.
http://www.dailymail.co.u...h-Vine.html#ixzz4rrIRnWeR

 Jumping  Now .... pay attention, stubborn prince
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Aubiette

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« Reply #7360 on: September 06, 2017, 07:15:19 AM »

Nice speech and event!
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Ellie

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« Reply #7361 on: September 06, 2017, 07:23:24 AM »

Ah, if Wills could be like this all the time instead of petulant and rude!

A shame because glimpses like this show he could potentially be a good king.
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wisdomheaven

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« Reply #7362 on: September 06, 2017, 07:48:52 AM »

Ah, if Wills could be like this all the time instead of petulant and rude!

A shame because glimpses like this show he could potentially be a good king.

I think William does very well in these more direct engagements with the public. Like I said on another thread, he will never have Harry's photogenic warmth or charisma, but I think he comes across very well regardless. I love his events with Centrepoint because they show a really warm and engaged side of him.

I don't know what gets lost between these different kinds of engagements, but there you go.
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« Reply #7363 on: September 09, 2017, 04:28:38 PM »

During the Grenfell visit, a little boy gave William a pink rose especially for George.  William's reaction warmed my heart:


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anastasia

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« Reply #7364 on: September 09, 2017, 04:35:09 PM »

I think William is capable of doing a lot more than he does in terms of attitude. He can respond to children very well, in particular. He could step up his game if he chose to. He could never be truly magnetic, imho, but he certainly could do a lot better.
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