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Author Topic: Queen Victoria  (Read 41682 times)
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Suzerain
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« Reply #150 on: January 18, 2017, 12:35:48 PM »

I don't think Jaime had haemophilia (he died at 66), only Alfonso and Gonzalo.

Here's some sort of map about the whole thing:

http://www.englishmonarch...images/various/haem1v.jpg

Another one

« Last Edit: January 18, 2017, 12:41:12 PM by Suzerain » Logged

Principessa

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« Reply #151 on: January 18, 2017, 12:58:46 PM »

Because the hemophilia gene usually remains "hidden" in females who only inherit the gene from one parent, and female descendants of Victoria have left many descendants in royal and noble families, there remains a small chance that the disease could appear again, especially among the female-line Spanish descendants of Princess Beatrice.

> Infanta Beatriz's two sons were not affected by the disease. Beatriz's eldest daughter, Sandra, has two children, a son and daughter. Her son is not affected, and her daughter has two sons, who are apparently unaffected. Beatriz's youngest daughter, Olimpia, had six children; her two eldest daughters, Beatrice and Sibilla are both married with children, none of whom, in the case of their sons, appear to be hemophiliacs. If Sibilla's descendants were to express or transmit the gene, however, another reigning dynasty of Europe would, in the 21st century, join the rest of the reigning families that inherited the disease from Queen Victoria. Olimpia's youngest daughters are still unmarried, but there is still a chance they could be carriers. Another daughter, Laura, died as a child, as did her only son, Paul, the latter of whom was apparently not a hemophiliac.

> Infanta Maria Cristina had four daughters, all potential carriers. Her eldest daughter, Vittoria Eugenie, had a daughter and three sons, the latter all apparently unaffected. The Infanta's second daughter, Giovanna, had only one child, an unaffected son. Her two youngest daughters, Donna Maria Teresa and Donna Anna Sandra, also have only daughters. Of these, only one, Maria Teresa's second daughter, Isabel, is married, but she also has only a daughter. There is a chance the disease may remain in this branch of Princess Beatrice's descendants.

In the overview Suzerain posted Beatriz and Maria Christina are shown with two X, indicating they are no carrier of the affected gene(s). But there is still a change one of them or both are carriers. It couldn't be ruled out completely yet, there is a (very) small chance.

Victoria Eugenie also had a stillborn son, Fernando, who could have been a hemophiliac.

Maurice Battenberg (son of carrier princess Beatrice) being a hemophiliac has been disputed, among others as he was allowed active service in the army (which seems to be unlikely for a "known" hemophiliac)

Another Maurice, the 2nd son of Alice of Albany (= daughter of hemophiliac prince Leopold), died in infancy,  so it is not (100%) known if he was a sufferer

Sources: Wikipedia
« Last Edit: January 18, 2017, 01:10:40 PM by Principessa » Logged
identitycrisis

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« Reply #152 on: January 18, 2017, 02:02:46 PM »

Poryphria didn't disappear after Victoria. Prince William of Gloucester was diagnosed with it before his death, a fact admitted by his mother and Princess Margaret. It was also inherited by some of her Prussian descendants through the Princess Royal.
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« Reply #153 on: January 18, 2017, 02:17:09 PM »

Poryphria didn't disappear after Victoria. Prince William of Gloucester was diagnosed with it before his death, a fact admitted by his mother and Princess Margaret. It was also inherited by some of her Prussian descendants through the Princess Royal.

Correct, but some in the past suggested that this disease was not present (and/or seen) anymore after QV. Thereby indirect suggesting that QV wasn't a biological child of the Duke of Kent (and therefore not  legitimate for the throne.) As mentioned before both the poryphria and hemophilia suggestion have been refuted.

Edit: after some additional reading I found the comment that ancestors of the British royals (in particular "mad" king George III) had suffered from poryphria is a hypothesis. In 2010, an exhaustive analysis of historical records concluded that the porphyria claim was based on spurious and selective interpretation of contemporary medical and historical sources
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Felicia

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« Reply #154 on: January 19, 2017, 12:55:44 PM »

A N Wilson who made the suggestion about Victoria has since retracted it
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NAOTMAA

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« Reply #155 on: May 26, 2018, 08:56:30 PM »

I noticed that 2 days ago (May 24th) was the 199th anniversary of the Queen's birth.

Do any of our British (and other commonwealth) posters know of any possible plans for next year's bicentennial?
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #156 on: January 05, 2019, 11:16:57 PM »

In her last yearly migration to the Hotel Excelsior Regina at Cimiez near Nice, Queen Victoria travelled as the Comtesse de Balmoral.
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SvenskaSarah

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« Reply #157 on: January 08, 2019, 01:17:19 AM »

Apologies for the change of topic, and if this has been covered up thread, I've not managed to read it all...
Does anyone know what happened to the little crown tiara. Victoria wore? I wondered if it was on display anywhere?
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #158 on: January 16, 2019, 11:38:51 PM »

On January 29, 1856 Queen Victoria introduced a new decoration for bravery called the Victoria Cross. The Victoria Cross was inscribed "for valour". It brought with it a pension of ten pounds a year.
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anastasia beaverhausen

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« Reply #159 on: January 17, 2019, 12:03:24 AM »

Apologies for the change of topic, and if this has been covered up thread, I've not managed to read it all...
Does anyone know what happened to the little crown tiara. Victoria wore? I wondered if it was on display anywhere?

According to Wikipedia, itís on display in the Jewel House at the Tower of London.
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luvcharles

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« Reply #160 on: January 17, 2019, 01:20:50 AM »

I noticed that 2 days ago (May 24th) was the 199th anniversary of the Queen's birth.

Do any of our British (and other commonwealth) posters know of any possible plans for next year's bicentennial?

I believe that there are plans for a joint celebration in Germany for the 200th anniversary of the births of both Prince Albert and Queen Victoria with possibly Prince Charles attending to represent The Queen.

I haven't heard of any planned commemorations in the UK itself.
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Carreen

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« Reply #161 on: January 18, 2019, 12:22:17 AM »

Oooh, that would be wonderful. I think Prince Albert is often underestimated. I can recommend Karina Urbach's book about Anglo-German family relationships to get into the mood for the celebrations :-)

And no matter how grumpy QV appears, how self-centered in her dealings with her children - I think she was a great queen who learned from her mistakes, and she was a fantastic grandmother. Her children might have struggled with her, but her grandchildren, especially the girls, adored her.

I have a complete weakness for Prince Albert and Queen Victoria. Yes, we would make many things differently today, but they did the best they could, and none of us can do more.

Politically, the Coburg model of constitutional monarchy was a great idea and had other countries adopted it, Europe would probably have suffered less in the 20th century.

I will certainly hold my own private ceremony :-) (like I did my own private mourning at the 100th anniversary of the slaughter of the Romanovs.)

If anyone will be present at the celebrations, I'd love to know!
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #162 on: January 20, 2019, 10:52:13 PM »

The composer Felix Mendelkssohn visited Queen Victoria.   
http://www.blog.musicteac...ohn-part-2-queen-victoria
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #163 on: January 29, 2019, 11:59:25 PM »

The history of Kensington Gardens started in 1689 when King William III and Queen Mary II bought the Nottingham house in Kensington. Queen Victoria commissioned the Italian Gardens. These gardens feature a water garden with four octagonal ponds symmetrically arranged around a central marble fountain.
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #164 on: February 11, 2019, 12:06:34 AM »

In her last yearly migration to the Hotel Excelsior Regina at Cimiez near Nice, Queen Victoria travelled as the Comtesse de Balmoral.   
Was the decade after Prince Albert's demise in 1861 a lost decade for Queen Victoria?
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