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Author Topic: Sovereignly Spanish Past  (Read 3658 times)
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CyrilSebastian

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« on: December 19, 2014, 10:26:59 PM »

Ferdinand VI delighted in sailing downriver in a luxurious barge equipped with a plush red velvet pavilion trimmed with silver.       
The fleet of boats accompanying the royal barge was made in the shape of peacocks or deer.
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #1 on: December 21, 2014, 09:29:58 PM »

Queen Isabella II and her sister, the Infanta Luisa married on the same day, October 10, 1846.     
Isabella married Francisco de Asis.     
Luisa married Antoine, Duke of Montpensier.
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #2 on: February 24, 2019, 11:31:07 PM »

Infanta Isabella Clara Eugenia (1566-1633) was the daughter of King Philip II of Spain. Isabella was the only person whom Philip permitted to help him with his work, sorting his papers and translating Italian documents into the Spanish language for him.
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #3 on: March 20, 2019, 10:53:28 PM »

King Ferdinand VII decreed what is known as the Pragmatic Sanction of 1830, allowing a woman to sit on the Spanish throne. When Ferdinand died in 1833, his wife, Queen Maria Christina, became regent on behalf of the three year old Queen Regnant Isabella II. However, the Infante Carlos, also known as Carlos V, alleged that the Pragmatic Sanction did not apply to him because he was born before they were approved.
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fruela

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« Reply #4 on: March 21, 2019, 05:20:04 PM »

King Ferdinand VII decreed what is known as the Pragmatic Sanction of 1830, allowing a woman to sit on the Spanish throne. When Ferdinand died in 1833, his wife, Queen Maria Christina, became regent on behalf of the three year old Queen Regnant Isabella II. However, the Infante Carlos, also known as Carlos V, alleged that the Pragmatic Sanction did not apply to him because he was born before they were approved.
And so many sorrows  this brought about,with  King WA's Borbón Parma cousins still there. CS, you know so much about all these things: Isabel de Castilla and her daughter  Juana were both rightful queens. The Salic Law was introduced by the Borbón dynasty, is that right?
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #5 on: March 21, 2019, 09:11:50 PM »

King Ferdinand VII decreed what is known as the Pragmatic Sanction of 1830, allowing a woman to sit on the Spanish throne. When Ferdinand died in 1833, his wife, Queen Maria Christina, became regent on behalf of the three year old Queen Regnant Isabella II. However, the Infante Carlos, also known as Carlos V, alleged that the Pragmatic Sanction did not apply to him because he was born before they were approved.
And so many sorrows  this brought about,with  King WA's Borbón Parma cousins still there. CS, you know so much about all these things: Isabel de Castilla and her daughter  Juana were both rightful queens. The Salic Law was introduced by the Borbón dynasty, is that right?
     
 
France and Spain, especially in the houses of Valois and Bourbon, followed the Salic Law. The Salic Law of succession was introduced into Spain by King Philip V.
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #6 on: April 03, 2019, 11:51:43 PM »

In April 1833, King Ferdinand VII called upon Infante Carlos, Count of Molina to take an oath of allegiance to Isabella as Princess of Asturias. In respectful but firm terms, Carlos refused. On October 1, 1833, Carlos issued a manifesto declaring his own accession to the throne.
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #7 on: May 03, 2019, 02:15:22 AM »

During his reign, the Spanish court considered King Charles II an obstruction in the affairs of state and an unimportant figure with almost no power.
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #8 on: May 16, 2019, 02:30:54 AM »

Expulsion of the Moors from Spain, decreed by King Philip III of Spain on April 9, 1609   
http://www.alamy.com/expu...of-spain-image835372.html
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #9 on: May 22, 2019, 03:03:42 AM »

In January 1540, King Charles I of Spain visited the Palace of Fontainebleau.     
http://www.alamy.com/stoc...ntainebleau-29129490.html
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #10 on: June 07, 2019, 03:03:22 AM »

Philip V of Spain - Oath of allegiance of the military orders   
http://www.alamy.com/stoc...bon-oath-of-82071116.html
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