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Author Topic: Queen Elizabeth I and Mary Queen of Scots  (Read 37785 times)
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #90 on: March 29, 2022, 12:25:06 AM »

On November 14, 1575 Queen Elizabeth I refused the crown of The Netherlands offered by the Dutch rebels.
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #91 on: July 14, 2022, 01:29:50 AM »

Before the marriage contract to the Dauphin Francis of France was actually signed, Mary, Queen of Scots signed three separate deeds by which, in the event of her demise without children, Scotland and Mary's right to the throne of England were made over freely to the crown of France.
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #92 on: October 31, 2022, 12:10:57 AM »

Mary, Queen of Scots, drawn from life while Dauphine of France   
http://www.pinterest.com/pin/751256781603763880
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #93 on: December 08, 2022, 10:21:53 PM »

Happy Birthday Mary, Queen of Scots   
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MO3VkZOAVcE
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #94 on: January 31, 2023, 12:43:23 AM »

A painting of Mary, Queen of Scots by Sir James Dromgole Linton   
http://www.fineartamerica...ames-dromgole-linton.html
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #95 on: June 01, 2023, 01:20:50 AM »

Archduke Charles of Austria was one of the possible men Queen Elizabeth I might have married.   
As to whether he might convert to Protestantism, Charles replied that he and his family had always been Catholic.   
The Queen would think little of him if he casually tossed his religion away.
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #96 on: July 26, 2023, 01:11:42 AM »

Did Queen Mary I hate her sister Queen Elizabeth I?   
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IFm4AE1Hm4Y
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anneboleyn

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« Reply #97 on: July 26, 2023, 03:01:29 AM »

Did Queen Mary I hate her sister Queen Elizabeth I?   
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IFm4AE1Hm4Y

I canít even imagine how complex Maryís feelings would have been towards her half-sister. Iím sure she loved her but there would have also been so much valid room for contention.
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Paulina

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« Reply #98 on: July 26, 2023, 05:11:09 AM »

Their father treated both their mothers horribly. Royal princesses who were his Queens did not get beheaded, though. Funny that. Only aristocratic/noble  wives.
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« Reply #99 on: July 26, 2023, 11:04:19 AM »

Did Queen Mary I hate her sister Queen Elizabeth I?   
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IFm4AE1Hm4Y

I canít even imagine how complex Maryís feelings would have been towards her half-sister. Iím sure she loved her but there would have also been so much valid room for contention.
I wonder how well they actually knew each other - they were 17 years apart, that is a generation.
They were also kept apart by the customs of royal medieval child-rearing: child was kept in the nursery with her nurses and nannies and the young woman was in her rooms.
Add to this that Anne Boleyn and Mary did not get along (small wonders), and during Boleyn's time Mary was kept very much on the outside, replaced as royal princess by the baby sister and then later on after Boleyn, Mary struck  friendships with some of the other wives while Elizabeth was on the outside, we have to wonder how much sisterly love there was or had opportunity to grow.
Plus they were pretty firmly on very opposing sides of the religious battle.
I really don't think there was any love lost between these two women.
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anneboleyn

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« Reply #100 on: July 26, 2023, 03:34:43 PM »

I believe for a bit that Mary was required to live with Elizabeth and serve her, as another way of demeaning her. However, Elizabeth would have been a baby then. I do think some of the later wives like Jane Seymour and Katherine Parr tried to reconcile the girls.
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #101 on: October 31, 2023, 11:58:53 PM »

Mary, Queen of Scots regularly washed her face with white wine. She believed that it helped her complexion.
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« Reply #102 on: November 01, 2023, 01:17:21 AM »

Mary, Queen of Scots regularly washed her face with white wine. She believed that it helped her complexion.

yup. it prolly did. it might have wshed all that carcenetic lime they put on their faces to look white

was it lime they put on...(off to look it up.... Thinking Thinking

G Thinking
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« Reply #103 on: November 01, 2023, 08:26:36 AM »

It was thought that Elizabeth I of England may have contracted smallpox in 1562, which left scarring on her skin and brought about her later faithful use of Venetian ceruse to hide the blemishes that remained.

Venetian ceruse, also known as blanc de ceruse de Venise and Spirits of Saturn, was a 16th-century cosmetic used as a skin whitener. It was in great demand and considered the best available at the time, supposedly containing the best quality white lead sourced from Venice, the global merchant capital at the time. It is similar to the regular ceruse, although it was marketed as better, more exclusive and more expensive than the regular ceruse variant. The regular ceruse white pigment is a basic lead carbonate of chemical formula 2 PbCO 3∑Pb(OH)2 while the mineral cerussite is a simple carbonate of lead (PbCO3).

A recipe from 1688 described the cosmetic as a mixture of water, vinegar, and lead. The cosmetic's use of white lead as a pigment was detrimental to the human body and caused lead poisoning, skin damage, hair loss and in some cases eventual death.

White lead was not only used in Venetian ceruse, but also several other 16th century cosmetics. They had presence in blush products for application on the cheeks and were used in lip stains, by combining red pigments such as vermilion or sandalwood and cinnabar, which contained more harmful compounds such as mercury sulphide.



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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #104 on: November 28, 2023, 12:16:18 AM »

Queen Elizabeth I of England received the Dutch ambassadors.   
http://www.maryevans.com/history/10048458
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