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Author Topic: Charles - news & photos II  (Read 78146 times)
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danifaul

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sorry for my bad english




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« Reply #390 on: June 26, 2017, 08:49:12 PM »

I disagree

I think he'll change his name.
As a meaning / symbolism..... Like a new book

Before Charles,the prince of Wales...... placed the image of Diane.
''Now'' King Philip, and Queen Camilla .... (and too is Homage to his father)

He can say that he learned from the mistakes and regrets, but that he has matured and is ready to serve the people.
A new story, a new name  Thinking  I think they'll try.

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The Queen celebrating...return of BRF
PruNordstrom

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« Reply #391 on: June 27, 2017, 01:21:07 AM »

A bit OT:
Everybody in the family has 3 or 4 names. Does Philip have more than one name?
I did watch the wedding coverage but it cuts away after Elizabeth's vows. (Philip's comes after that).
« Last Edit: June 27, 2017, 01:27:13 AM by PruNordstrom » Logged

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« Reply #392 on: June 27, 2017, 02:43:51 AM »

A bit OT:
Everybody in the family has 3 or 4 names. Does Philip have more than one name?
I did watch the wedding coverage but it cuts away after Elizabeth's vows. (Philip's comes after that).

As far as I can find, he only has the one name. 
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esther angeline

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« Reply #393 on: June 27, 2017, 02:47:14 AM »

He was baptized Philippos Andreou ( Philip Andrew) of Greece and Denmark.  . His father was Andrew and Prince Andrew was named for him.
When he was naturalized, he claimed Philip Mountbatten as his full name
« Last Edit: June 27, 2017, 02:52:55 AM by esther angeline » Logged
PruNordstrom

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« Reply #394 on: June 27, 2017, 02:52:22 AM »

Thanks. The only other info I could find was 'Prince Philip of Greece & Denmark'.
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« Reply #395 on: July 14, 2017, 05:32:52 PM »

One has a sweet tooth! Prince Charles reveals he takes HONEY in his tea instead of sugar (and a master blender says we should ALL make the swap)

    Prince Charles takes his tea black with one spoon of honey, it's been revealed
    Master blenders applauded the future king and they said we should all try it
    Honey compliments the delicate flavour of tea better than sugar, she says
    But a nutritionist warns it's no healthier for you than a lump or two


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.u...EY-tea-instead-sugar.html
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Countess of Cows

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« Reply #396 on: July 15, 2017, 10:32:11 PM »

http://www.newyorker.com/...=1693000&kwp_1=726097

MEOW! Sally Bedell Smith sets out to answer in a new biography, “Prince Charles: The Passions and Paradoxes of an Improbable Life” (Random House).

a deeply unpopular man. Writers in both the conservative and the liberal press regularly refer to him as “a prat,” “a twit,” and “an idiot,” with no apparent fear of giving offense to their readership. In a 2016 poll, only a quarter of respondents said that they would like Charles to succeed the Queen, while more than half said they would prefer to see his son Prince William crowned instead. Even among those who profess to think him a decent chap, there is a widespread conviction that he does the monarchy more harm than good. “Our Prince of Wales is a fundamentally decent and serious man,” one conservative columnist recently wrote. “He possesses a strong sense of duty. Might not it be best expressed by renouncing the throne in advance?”

The man we encounter here is a ninny, a whinger, a tantrum-throwing dilettante, “hopelessly thin-skinned . . . naïve and resentful.” He is a preening snob, “keenly sensitive to violations of protocol,” intolerant of “opinions contrary to his own,” and horribly misled about the extent of his own talents. (An amateur watercolorist, he once offered Lucian Freud one of his paintings in exchange for one of Freud’s; the artist unaccountably demurred.)

His mother, whom he would later describe as “not indifferent so much as detached,” worried that he was a “slow developer.” His father, Prince Philip, thought him weedy, effete, and spoiled.

In the Royal Navy, which Charles entered at his father’s prompting, his superiors, faced with his “inability to add or generally to cope well with figures,” sought to “build in more flexibility and to tailor duties closer to his abilities.” They changed his job from navigator to communications officer,

The strange artificiality of his youthful “achievements,” and the nagging self-doubt it engendered, seems to have left him peculiarly vulnerable to the blandishments of advisers willing to reassure him that he was actually a brilliant and insightful person, who owed it to the world to share his ideas.

The stances he takes do not follow predictable political lines but seem perfectly calibrated to annoy everyone. Conservatives tend to be upset by his enthusiasm for Islam and his environmentalism; liberals object to his vehement defense of foxhunting and his protectiveness of Britain’s ancient social hierarchies. What unites his disparate positions is a general hostility to secularism, science, and the industrialized world.

the Guardian won a ten-year battle to release two batches of the meddlesome “black spider memos,” under Britain’s Freedom of Information Act, he was unabashed. A spokesman defended the Prince’s right “to communicate his experiences or, indeed, his concerns or suggestions to ministers” in any government, and, by then, the law had been obligingly changed to make much royal correspondence exempt from future release. Not long after, there appeared a two-volume, 1,012-page compendium of Charles’s articles and speeches from 1968 to 2012. The books, which retailed at more than four hundred dollars a set, were illustrated with his own watercolors and bound in forest-green buckram on which his heraldic badge—three feathers, a crown, and the motto “Ich dien,” meaning “I serve”—was emblazoned in gold. ♦





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« Reply #397 on: July 16, 2017, 03:51:36 AM »

Charles opens 'holistic' clinic at the stately home he saved for the nation



Prince Charles is creating a state-of-the-art clinic that will offer free ‘holistic’ care for patients referred by NHS doctors.

Charles, who has faced criticism in the past for his support for complementary health therapies, has won backing from the NHS and local authorities for his Health and Wellbeing Centre, which will assist patients battling a range of illnesses, from cancer to obesity. The centre will be built in the grounds of Dumfries House, a stately home in Ayrshire that the Prince saved for the nation a decade ago. Besides complementary therapies, the purpose-built centre will offer fitness and education programmes.

It is not known which therapies will be used at the new centre, but a conference on ‘integrated’ approaches to women’s health at the mansion this autumn will explore homeopathy, reflexology and acupuncture.

For ten years, Dumfries House has been run as a tourist attraction and community centre, but the Prince has also used it to promote some of his utopian ideas, such as championing traditional crafts.

The Prince has long been an advocate of alternative medicine despite criticism from some medical experts that such approaches often have little scientific basis. In 2012, he called for the NHS to recognise ‘the core human elements of mind, body and spirit’, as well as simply treating disease.

In his ‘black spider memos’ – released in 2015 after a ten-year freedom of information battle – he lobbied the last Labour Government to change public spending plans in favour of complementary medicine.

The Prince also founded a charity in the 1990s called the Foundation for Integrated Health, which promoted alternative medicine. However, it was shut down in 2010 amid allegations of large-scale fraud by a former official. The Prince’s Charities Foundation rescued Dumfries House in 2007 when the 7th Marquess of Bute put the mansion on the market for £45 million. The Prince had to borrow £20 million against his charities to save it.

Doom-mongers warned the ‘vanity project’ was the most ‘reckless gamble of his life’ but the estate now welcomes 25,000 visitors a year.

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Lizardcandy

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« Reply #398 on: July 16, 2017, 08:44:27 AM »

Charles opens 'holistic' clinic at the stately home he saved for the nation



Prince Charles is creating a state-of-the-art clinic that will offer free ‘holistic’ care for patients referred by NHS doctors.

Charles, who has faced criticism in the past for his support for complementary health therapies, has won backing from the NHS and local authorities for his Health and Wellbeing Centre, which will assist patients battling a range of illnesses, from cancer to obesity. The centre will be built in the grounds of Dumfries House, a stately home in Ayrshire that the Prince saved for the nation a decade ago. Besides complementary therapies, the purpose-built centre will offer fitness and education programmes.

It is not known which therapies will be used at the new centre, but a conference on ‘integrated’ approaches to women’s health at the mansion this autumn will explore homeopathy, reflexology and acupuncture.

For ten years, Dumfries House has been run as a tourist attraction and community centre, but the Prince has also used it to promote some of his utopian ideas, such as championing traditional crafts.

The Prince has long been an advocate of alternative medicine despite criticism from some medical experts that such approaches often have little scientific basis. In 2012, he called for the NHS to recognise ‘the core human elements of mind, body and spirit’, as well as simply treating disease.

In his ‘black spider memos’ – released in 2015 after a ten-year freedom of information battle – he lobbied the last Labour Government to change public spending plans in favour of complementary medicine.

The Prince also founded a charity in the 1990s called the Foundation for Integrated Health, which promoted alternative medicine. However, it was shut down in 2010 amid allegations of large-scale fraud by a former official. The Prince’s Charities Foundation rescued Dumfries House in 2007 when the 7th Marquess of Bute put the mansion on the market for £45 million. The Prince had to borrow £20 million against his charities to save it.

Doom-mongers warned the ‘vanity project’ was the most ‘reckless gamble of his life’ but the estate now welcomes 25,000 visitors a year.



My eyes couldn't roll any harder. I wish someone somewhere along the line had thought it important to teach him about scientific evidence and how you know..proof of treatments working...is important.
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Ellie

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« Reply #399 on: July 16, 2017, 09:23:21 AM »

Lots of people are into it and the NHS funds it, which is ridiculous to me.

I guess if you do it alongside traditional medicine and it makes you feel better, sure, whatever your choice, but to choose it over actual medicine boggles the mind.
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rosella

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« Reply #400 on: July 16, 2017, 10:54:08 AM »

Charles starting advocating for alternative therapies way back in 1982. He made a keynote speech to the British Medical Association in favour of them instead of 'surgery and strong drugs'. Because Charles was their new President and Patron the BMA established an inquiry into alternative medicines/therapies. At the end of four years the Association published its report, concluding that most of those treatments had little or no effect.
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« Reply #401 on: July 16, 2017, 11:35:51 AM »

Is this true?

This article refers to the 'Coronation of King Charles III' - but Charles has said he will be known as King George VII as he believes the previous King Charles' have been unlucky. He is entitled to use any of his names: Charles, Philip, Arthur or George as his regal name. His Grandfather, King Charles VI was known within his family as Bertie, while his great Uncle who would have been King Edward VIII was known as David.

From this article: http://www.dailymail.co.u...-s-deadliest-diamond.html


OT, but there was a few articles here in Austalia when Harry was here last month, as many people didn't seem to realise his name is actually Henry..... one of the official Instagram pages used his full title, Prince Henry of Wales, and many commented "correcting" them!
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