Please read here on how to use images on RoyalDish. - Please read the RoyalDish message on board purpose and rules.
Images containing full nudity or sexual activities are strongly forbidden on RoyalDish.


Pages: 1 [2]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Disabled royals  (Read 6460 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Kaiserin

Big Member
*******

Reputation: 846

Offline Offline

Germany Germany

Posts: 1870





Ignore
« Reply #15 on: April 24, 2017, 11:40:40 PM »

Maria Pia's father and Roberts grandmother had the same father, so the mental disability might indeed have had sth to do with inbreeding.
Then again, also his second wife's grandmother and his great-grandmother were siblings, but obviously none of the kids with his 2nd wife were mentally disabled?

Strange, these two marriages. As if he could not find any other wife than a cousin?

But the strangest thing is that it was his second wife who had the six kids from his first marriage declared "legally incompetent" by court after Roberts death, referring to their "learning difficulties". So the mental disability was maybe made up by the second wife to get her own issue better share of the heritage ... (which failed)?

His best known child of the second marriage was Empress Zita of Austria, btw.
Logged
LadyBunion

Large Member
******

Reputation: 215

Offline Offline

United Kingdom United Kingdom

Posts: 1447



WWW

Ignore
« Reply #16 on: April 24, 2017, 11:51:55 PM »



Not Beatrice, but Alice was Philip's mother. There's a wonderful biography on her by Hugo Vickers, I believe.

it is an excellent book, well worth reading
Logged
bumbershoot

Warned
Gigantic Member
*********

Reputation: 659

Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 3158





Ignore
« Reply #17 on: April 25, 2017, 01:08:13 AM »

I would be willing to bet that there are other royals, even in the present day, whose disabilities are a closely guarded secret.
Logged
emtishell

Medium Member
*****

Reputation: 156

Offline Offline

Australia Australia

Posts: 706





Ignore
« Reply #18 on: April 25, 2017, 05:06:41 AM »

When the remains of Richard III were discovered recently, it proved he did in fact suffer from curvature of the spine, which gave him a hunchback.

"Mad" King George III may have possibly suffered from porphyria, a blood disease that causes a number of issues, included madness...... I believe it's also been suggested Henry VIII suffered from something similar, since in his later years he suffered from ulcerated legs, and became increasingly tyrannical!

I read somewhere recently (and I can't think where) of suggestions that somewhere along the family lines of current royal houses there is "illegitimacy" due to the fact heamophilia (which was rife amongst the royal houses) somehow completely disappeared

**EDIT - actually, the article I read was about the parentage of Victoria, since it was HER decendants who carried heamophlia, where it hadn't previously existed in the royal family.... interesting article here

http://www.englishmonarchs.co.uk/haemophilia.html
« Last Edit: April 25, 2017, 05:12:21 AM by emtishell » Logged
emtishell

Medium Member
*****

Reputation: 156

Offline Offline

Australia Australia

Posts: 706





Ignore
« Reply #19 on: April 25, 2017, 05:17:22 AM »

Interesting.....

A. N. Wilson suggested that Victoria's father could not have been the Duke of Kent for two reasons:

The sudden appearance of hæmophilia in the descendants of Victoria. The illness did not exist in the royal family before.
The supposed disappearance of porphyria from the descendants of Victoria. According to Wilson, the disease was prevalent in the royal family before Victoria but not afterwards.[6]
Both arguments can be countered. Since hæmophilia is X-linked, in order for a father to transmit the condition he must have it himself, but Conroy was healthy. Hæmophiliacs were unlikely to survive in the early nineteenth-century, given the poor state of medicine at the time.[7] Indeed, life expectancy was 11 years or younger, even into the later half of the twentieth-century,[Crazy and is still as low in developing countries.[9] Nor is there evidence of hæmophilia in either Conroy's ancestors or descendants, or any mention of any hæmophiliacs in any document associated with the Kents. It is likely that the mutation arose spontaneously because the Duke of Kent was in his 50s when Victoria was conceived; hæmophilia-causing mutations arise more frequently in the children of older fathers,[10] and spontaneous mutations account for about 30% of cases.[11]

With regard to porphyria (which famously George III may have had), there is no genetic evidence that the royal family even had the disease and its diagnosis in George III's case (and others) has been questioned.[12] If the diagnosis of hereditary porphyria is correct, it may have continued among descendants of Victoria. At least two of her descendants, Charlotte, Duchess of Saxe-Meiningen, and Prince William of Gloucester are suspected of having suffered from it.[13]

Great topic!!!!
Logged
Ellie

Big Member
*******

Reputation: 576

Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 2115





Ignore
« Reply #20 on: April 25, 2017, 06:11:41 AM »

He suggested, but in his biography, he comes to the conclusion she absolutely was his daughter. Look how similar she is in appearance to the rest of the Hanoverians with the nose, and bulging eyes. No doubt the Duke of Kent was her father.
Logged
emtishell

Medium Member
*****

Reputation: 156

Offline Offline

Australia Australia

Posts: 706





Ignore
« Reply #21 on: April 25, 2017, 07:03:53 AM »

He suggested, but in his biography, he comes to the conclusion she absolutely was his daughter. Look how similar she is in appearance to the rest of the Hanoverians with the nose, and bulging eyes. No doubt the Duke of Kent was her father.

Yes, the article I quoted above provides cointering arguments to the claims..... I just knew that I had read of rumours - from what I understand there were many attempts to discredit Victoria's claim to the throne
Logged
TexasBear

Small Member
****

Reputation: 144

Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 599





Ignore
« Reply #22 on: April 25, 2017, 08:51:59 AM »

When the remains of Richard III were discovered recently, it proved he did in fact suffer from curvature of the spine, which gave him a hunchback.

He had scoliosis, which is a sideways curvature of the spine. His shoulders would have been uneven, but not noticeably so when clothed. Kyphosis is the "hunchback" rounding of the spine. Shakespeare's literary description of a outwardly crooked man to reflect his inner wickedness has distorted the historic record.
Logged
Rebecca

Mini Member
***

Reputation: 117

Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 263





Ignore
« Reply #23 on: April 25, 2017, 03:52:08 PM »

^Thank you for clarifying that.. I have scoliosis that has never been treated so my spine is crooked, but am certainly not a hunchback. I hate hearing/reading those who suffer from it being referred to in that way. Especially since it is not an accurate description. I would hardly consider having it a true disability anyway. Everyone has abnormalities and imperfections in their bodies, some are just more noticeable than others. IMO that doesn't necessarily make them disabilities.
« Last Edit: April 25, 2017, 03:58:24 PM by Rebecca » Logged
Kimothy

Micro Member
**

Reputation: 30

Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 141





Ignore
« Reply #24 on: April 25, 2017, 04:22:30 PM »

^Thank you for clarifying that.. I have scoliosis that has never been treated so my spine is crooked, but am certainly not a hunchback. I hate hearing/reading those who suffer from it being referred to in that way. Especially since it is not an accurate description. I would hardly consider having it a true disability anyway. Everyone has abnormalities and imperfections in their bodies, some are just more noticeable than others. IMO that doesn't necessarily make them disabilities.

 Star for you, Rebecca!

I too have scoliosis (and a bunch of other maladies that are too long to list here haha!) but I certainly don't view Princess Eugenie as having a disability. She just had a curved spine and, luckily, was able to have it corrected. It allows her to be more understanding towards those who have the condition.
Logged
TexasBear

Small Member
****

Reputation: 144

Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 599





Ignore
« Reply #25 on: April 26, 2017, 04:41:59 AM »

^Thank you for clarifying that.. I have scoliosis that has never been treated so my spine is crooked, but am certainly not a hunchback. I hate hearing/reading those who suffer from it being referred to in that way. Especially since it is not an accurate description. I would hardly consider having it a true disability anyway. Everyone has abnormalities and imperfections in their bodies, some are just more noticeable than others. IMO that doesn't necessarily make them disabilities.

 Star
Logged
Pages: 1 [2]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to: