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Author Topic: Royal Christmas Cards 2015  (Read 5339 times)
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Roman Patrician

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« Reply #15 on: January 03, 2016, 05:23:42 AM »

With respect to the various Christmas cards, I found the signatures most interesting, particularly those from the SRF. Why is it that Spanish-speaking people -- I've noticed this in Mexican and Cubana friends, too -- always put extra swoopy lines under and/or around their signatures? I've seen even fairly young kids to this?

It all looks a little unusual to us Yanks' eyes, because penmanship is a lot more standard here than in Europe. Even if it isn't being taught formally in schools any longer, for the most part, you can still see traces of good old Palmer Method in most American's handwriting. (Unless they went to Dominican schools, in which case they may write in a  Dominican backhand).



As a born European, working in schools there and her in the US, I have to tell you that I don't see any standardized penmanship in the US. It might have been some generations ago, but handwriting here is one of the worst things in present times. Every parent I know from elementary school to high school and above complains about their children not learning cursive in schools anymore. And when we moved to the US our son was actively discouraged to write in cursive. When I stepped on the teacher's toe's, she told me that he would write differently than other children in the US  Blink  and overall the teachers are happy if the children put something on the paper, they don't care if it's pencil, pen, or marker, and prefer print.  Blink Classmates of his in high school still used to write in print  Huh? .  These schools were all A-graded schools.

You can be taught to write a certain way in a certain places, but over time your handwriting will change according on how little or much you write, it changes with age, and also changes according to your psychological state.


I don't know how old your son is but I'm 25 and when I was in school in New York, I was actively taught cursive in the 3rd and 4th grade. Perhaps it's a regional thing.

In terms of the Palmer method, I would say that it was universal among most Northeastern (and perhaps on the other coast as well) up until my mother's generation. My grandparents and every other person in their social circle had the same cursive script. During research for my thesis, I noticed that JFK's handwriting was exactly the same as my grandparents, despite being a few years older and educated in Massachusetts.

I agree with PeDe that handwriting changes over time and due to other circumstances. I can see that in my own handwriting.

I personally love Leonor's signature.
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PeDe
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« Reply #16 on: January 03, 2016, 05:38:59 AM »

With respect to the various Christmas cards, I found the signatures most interesting, particularly those from the SRF. Why is it that Spanish-speaking people -- I've noticed this in Mexican and Cubana friends, too -- always put extra swoopy lines under and/or around their signatures? I've seen even fairly young kids to this?

It all looks a little unusual to us Yanks' eyes, because penmanship is a lot more standard here than in Europe. Even if it isn't being taught formally in schools any longer, for the most part, you can still see traces of good old Palmer Method in most American's handwriting. (Unless they went to Dominican schools, in which case they may write in a  Dominican backhand).



As a born European, working in schools there and her in the US, I have to tell you that I don't see any standardized penmanship in the US. It might have been some generations ago, but handwriting here is one of the worst things in present times. Every parent I know from elementary school to high school and above complains about their children not learning cursive in schools anymore. And when we moved to the US our son was actively discouraged to write in cursive. When I stepped on the teacher's toe's, she told me that he would write differently than other children in the US  Blink  and overall the teachers are happy if the children put something on the paper, they don't care if it's pencil, pen, or marker, and prefer print.  Blink Classmates of his in high school still used to write in print  Huh? .  These schools were all A-graded schools.

You can be taught to write a certain way in a certain places, but over time your handwriting will change according on how little or much you write, it changes with age, and also changes according to your psychological state.


I don't know how old your son is but I'm 25 and when I was in school in New York, I was actively taught cursive in the 3rd and 4th grade. Perhaps it's a regional thing.

In terms of the Palmer method, I would say that it was universal among most Northeastern (and perhaps on the other coast as well) up until my mother's generation. My grandparents and every other person in their social circle had the same cursive script. During research for my thesis, I noticed that JFK's handwriting was exactly the same as my grandparents, despite being a few years older and educated in Massachusetts.

I agree with PeDe that handwriting changes over time and due to other circumstances. I can see that in my own handwriting.

I personally love Leonor's signature.

He is 25, as old as you are, and we had the equal school experience in the Southern and in the North Eastern States. My husband grew up in New York, finishing Uni, and starting his first job there. He remarked the same thing about the second generation to follow him.

I don't think of it as much as a regional issue, but more of an individual school preference. I taught in various Elementary and Middle Schools and German at a College in the South, plus the Northeast, and it was fairly the same wherever I looked.

Just recently, our boss had me write 74 Christmas Card greetings that we mailed out to our partner associations and government agency's because I had a "beautiful penmanship" as he puts it  Roll Eyes to me it's fairly decent, but when we tested everybody else's we had a good laugh and a funny discussion about writing cursive because aside from 2 other people everybody in our dept. had what we in Germany call a "Sauklaue" (scrawl). We range in ages from 31 - 63 years.

What I'm stating isn't meant to be disrespectful, just an observation. It's just a pity, really, and I'm glad you attended a school which emphasized writing cursive. And I bet there are others here with your experience, which differs completely from mine.
« Last Edit: January 03, 2016, 06:03:28 AM by PeDe » Logged

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« Reply #17 on: January 03, 2016, 06:09:44 AM »

I'm 47 and actively learned in elementary school in Texas.
My children , in the same general area, 2 of my 3 learned cursive in school learned it and one didn't.

He's signature looks like a kindergartener.
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Roman Patrician

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« Reply #18 on: January 03, 2016, 06:17:36 AM »

With respect to the various Christmas cards, I found the signatures most interesting, particularly those from the SRF. Why is it that Spanish-speaking people -- I've noticed this in Mexican and Cubana friends, too -- always put extra swoopy lines under and/or around their signatures? I've seen even fairly young kids to this?

It all looks a little unusual to us Yanks' eyes, because penmanship is a lot more standard here than in Europe. Even if it isn't being taught formally in schools any longer, for the most part, you can still see traces of good old Palmer Method in most American's handwriting. (Unless they went to Dominican schools, in which case they may write in a  Dominican backhand).



As a born European, working in schools there and her in the US, I have to tell you that I don't see any standardized penmanship in the US. It might have been some generations ago, but handwriting here is one of the worst things in present times. Every parent I know from elementary school to high school and above complains about their children not learning cursive in schools anymore. And when we moved to the US our son was actively discouraged to write in cursive. When I stepped on the teacher's toe's, she told me that he would write differently than other children in the US  Blink  and overall the teachers are happy if the children put something on the paper, they don't care if it's pencil, pen, or marker, and prefer print.  Blink Classmates of his in high school still used to write in print  Huh? .  These schools were all A-graded schools.

You can be taught to write a certain way in a certain places, but over time your handwriting will change according on how little or much you write, it changes with age, and also changes according to your psychological state.


I don't know how old your son is but I'm 25 and when I was in school in New York, I was actively taught cursive in the 3rd and 4th grade. Perhaps it's a regional thing.

In terms of the Palmer method, I would say that it was universal among most Northeastern (and perhaps on the other coast as well) up until my mother's generation. My grandparents and every other person in their social circle had the same cursive script. During research for my thesis, I noticed that JFK's handwriting was exactly the same as my grandparents, despite being a few years older and educated in Massachusetts.

I agree with PeDe that handwriting changes over time and due to other circumstances. I can see that in my own handwriting.

I personally love Leonor's signature.

He is 25, as old as you are, and we had the equal school experience in the Southern and in the North Eastern States. My husband grew up in New York, finishing Uni, and starting his first job there. He remarked the same thing about the second generation to follow him.

I don't think of it as much as a regional issue, but more of an individual school preference. I taught in various Elementary and Middle Schools and German at a College in the South, plus the Northeast, and it was fairly the same wherever I looked.

Just recently, our boss had me write 74 Christmas Card greetings that we mailed out to our partner associations and government agency's because I had a "beautiful penmanship" as he puts it  Roll Eyes to me it's fairly decent, but when we tested everybody else's we had a good laugh and a funny discussion about writing cursive because aside from 2 other people everybody in our dept. had what we in Germany call a "Sauklaue" (scrawl). We range in ages from 31 - 63 years.

What I'm stating isn't meant to be disrespectful, just an observation. It's just a pity, really, and I'm glad you attended a school which emphasized writing cursive. And I bet there are others here with your experience, which differs completely from mine.


I didn't take any of your posts to be disrespectful, actually I find the topic very interesting (and I apologize if it's off-topic). You may be right that it is an individual school preference which is a pity as I think it was emphasized quite a lot in the U.S. in the first half of the 20th century. I also can't speak for my schools as to whether it is still taught. Likely it isn't as I've read many schools in the U.S. are dropping penmanship altogether and utilizing tablets and such.

Speaking of royal kids signing their parents' Christmas cards... are Leonor and Sofia the only ones to do so? Do the Benelux kids (Lux when they were younger) and Scandinavian families do that as well? It's a sweet tradition.
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« Reply #19 on: January 03, 2016, 05:55:12 PM »

With respect to the various Christmas cards, I found the signatures most interesting, particularly those from the SRF. Why is it that Spanish-speaking people -- I've noticed this in Mexican and Cubana friends, too -- always put extra swoopy lines under and/or around their signatures? I've seen even fairly young kids to this?

It all looks a little unusual to us Yanks' eyes, because penmanship is a lot more standard here than in Europe. Even if it isn't being taught formally in schools any longer, for the most part, you can still see traces of good old Palmer Method in most American's handwriting. (Unless they went to Dominican schools, in which case they may write in a  Dominican backhand).



As a born European, working in schools there and her in the US, I have to tell you that I don't see any standardized penmanship in the US. It might have been some generations ago, but handwriting here is one of the worst things in present times. Every parent I know from elementary school to high school and above complains about their children not learning cursive in schools anymore. And when we moved to the US our son was actively discouraged to write in cursive. When I stepped on the teacher's toe's, she told me that he would write differently than other children in the US  Blink  and overall the teachers are happy if the children put something on the paper, they don't care if it's pencil, pen, or marker, and prefer print.  Blink Classmates of his in high school still used to write in print  Huh? .  These schools were all A-graded schools.

You can be taught to write a certain way in a certain places, but over time your handwriting will change according on how little or much you write, it changes with age, and also changes according to your psychological state.


I don't know how old your son is but I'm 25 and when I was in school in New York, I was actively taught cursive in the 3rd and 4th grade. Perhaps it's a regional thing.

In terms of the Palmer method, I would say that it was universal among most Northeastern (and perhaps on the other coast as well) up until my mother's generation. My grandparents and every other person in their social circle had the same cursive script. During research for my thesis, I noticed that JFK's handwriting was exactly the same as my grandparents, despite being a few years older and educated in Massachusetts.

I agree with PeDe that handwriting changes over time and due to other circumstances. I can see that in my own handwriting.

I personally love Leonor's signature.

He is 25, as old as you are, and we had the equal school experience in the Southern and in the North Eastern States. My husband grew up in New York, finishing Uni, and starting his first job there. He remarked the same thing about the second generation to follow him.

I don't think of it as much as a regional issue, but more of an individual school preference. I taught in various Elementary and Middle Schools and German at a College in the South, plus the Northeast, and it was fairly the same wherever I looked.

Just recently, our boss had me write 74 Christmas Card greetings that we mailed out to our partner associations and government agency's because I had a "beautiful penmanship" as he puts it  Roll Eyes to me it's fairly decent, but when we tested everybody else's we had a good laugh and a funny discussion about writing cursive because aside from 2 other people everybody in our dept. had what we in Germany call a "Sauklaue" (scrawl). We range in ages from 31 - 63 years.

What I'm stating isn't meant to be disrespectful, just an observation. It's just a pity, really, and I'm glad you attended a school which emphasized writing cursive. And I bet there are others here with your experience, which differs completely from mine.


I didn't take any of your posts to be disrespectful, actually I find the topic very interesting (and I apologize if it's off-topic). You may be right that it is an individual school preference which is a pity as I think it was emphasized quite a lot in the U.S. in the first half of the 20th century. I also can't speak for my schools as to whether it is still taught. Likely it isn't as I've read many schools in the U.S. are dropping penmanship altogether and utilizing tablets and such.

Speaking of royal kids signing their parents' Christmas cards... are Leonor and Sofia the only ones to do so? Do the Benelux kids (Lux when they were younger) and Scandinavian families do that as well? It's a sweet tradition.

I don't know about the Luxes, but I think the Dutch kids (Amalia et al) have signed a card or two.  I could be wrong, but I thought I had seen Amalia's signature once before.   Thinking  I've never seen the Danish kids' signatures on a card, nor the Swedes and Norwegians. 

I've also seen Elena's cards, and IIRC, Froilan and Victoria have signed the cards in addition to their mother.   No swirly designs under their names. 
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« Reply #20 on: January 04, 2016, 08:14:00 PM »

Guillaume and Stephanie of Luxembourg's card.  I assume the language on the front is Luxembourgish. 

A very "meh" card-just like them.





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« Reply #21 on: January 04, 2016, 08:16:10 PM »

Looks like the cheap cards you could buy in supermarkets around Christmas time  Whistle. At least the language is Luxembourgish.
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« Reply #22 on: January 04, 2016, 08:19:16 PM »

^ Has Linus learned how to speak it yet?  Thinking
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« Reply #23 on: January 04, 2016, 08:19:24 PM »

Looks like the cheap cards you could buy in supermarkets around Christmas time  Whistle. At least the language is Luxembourgish.

I'm glad that part of it is in Luxembourgish.  They should have used Luxembourgish on the inside of the card too.  

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« Reply #24 on: January 04, 2016, 08:38:04 PM »

She gave an interview in Lux some time ago but the questions for such interviews always have to be handed in to the cour well in advance and IMO, her Lux wasn't so great. The language is very easy to learn if you speak German and French so her being able to communicate in this language isn't a great achievement. This card is by far the worst I've seen, it is boring, looks cheap and the message is very cold and unpersonal. At least Henri delivered his speech in Lux and wished the people Merry Christmas without looking cold and distant
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