Please read here on how to use images on RoyalDish. - Please read the RoyalDish message on board purpose and rules.
Images containing full nudity or sexual activities are strongly forbidden on RoyalDish.


Pages: 1 [2]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Missing White Woman Syndrome  (Read 2256 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Princess MS

Warned
Gigantic Member
*********

Reputation: 678

Offline Offline

Australia Australia

Posts: 3408





Ignore
« Reply #15 on: October 18, 2021, 01:42:39 PM »

I have heard about the story of the woman in the US but I have to ask who is she ? What makes her more of a “story” than another person?

Gabby Petito and her murderer were huge users of all forms of social media, which meant a lot of press opportunities, and there is legitimate speculation that the Laundrie parents aided their son to abscond on his uncle’s boat to the Bahamas - with a decoy search and delay. Plus the police inUtah intervened and pretty much blamed the woman, initially hiding their camera footage. Which all adds up to an internationally newsworthy story.

But in Australia??? When I first saw this I wondered if she had a connection to this country but apparently not .... click bait

Australians have very strong links with the US. I followed the story after it was posted in one of my international social media groups… not a clickbait scenario. It’s actually a very grassroots campaign.

Ok well just another sad US story
Logged
Lady Liebe

Gigantic Member
*********

Reputation: 868

Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 4377


Provence Amaryllis




Ignore
« Reply #16 on: October 18, 2021, 03:32:07 PM »

I have heard about the story of the woman in the US but I have to ask who is she ? What makes her more of a “story” than another person?

Gabby Petito and her murderer were huge users of all forms of social media, which meant a lot of press opportunities, and there is legitimate speculation that the Laundrie parents aided their son to abscond on his uncle’s boat to the Bahamas - with a decoy search and delay. Plus the police inUtah intervened and pretty much blamed the woman, initially hiding their camera footage. Which all adds up to an internationally newsworthy story.

But in Australia??? When I first saw this I wondered if she had a connection to this country but apparently not .... click bait

Australians have very strong links with the US. I followed the story after it was posted in one of my international social media groups… not a clickbait scenario. It’s actually a very grassroots campaign.

Ok well just another sad US story

Hester makes a good point about Gabby's use of social media and the backstory that came to light after her disappearance.

I first read about this back in June, it is the case of a missing African American geologist in Arizona. His father is basically conducting his own investigation, and is also very vocal on the subject of this thread.

Yes, it's from the DM, but honestly it had the best coverage. It brought up things I had not known before.

https://www.dailymail.co....barely-knew-vanished.html

For our US dishers, Buckeye AZ is strung out along I 10 just to the west of Phoenix.
« Last Edit: October 18, 2021, 04:34:49 PM by Lady Liebe » Logged

Of all tyrannies, a tyranny sincerely exercised for the good of its victims may be the most oppressive. It would be better to live under robber barons than under omnipotent moral busybodies.     CS Lewis
anneboleyn

Warned
Large Member
******

Reputation: 183

Offline Offline

Canada Canada

Posts: 1587





Ignore
« Reply #17 on: October 18, 2021, 05:14:38 PM »

I am glad that Gabby was found and her family was given closure. I hope they are given justice as well by capturing Brian and bringing him to trial.

I do, however, notice the stark difference in the search for Gabby and the search (or lack thereof) for the thousands of missing Indigenous women in Canada.
Logged

“And she will keep coming back to life, over and over again, because beneath the skin of this gentle human lives a warrior unstoppable.” - Annabelle M. Ramos
GoodGollyMissMolly

Small Member
****

Reputation: 244

Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 585





Ignore
« Reply #18 on: October 18, 2021, 07:00:13 PM »

As a black woman in the US I can say with certainty that MWWS is a thing. It’s taught in college classes and widely acknowledged as why so many black, Hispanic, and indigenous women go completely unnoticed by the media when they go missing are in harms way.


I won’t speak for other countries because I don’t live in other countries and rarely does their media come across my desk, however, in the US, WOC are completely on our own. All we have is each other.
Logged
jolene

Large Member
******

Reputation: 287

Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 1407





Ignore
« Reply #19 on: October 18, 2021, 08:01:57 PM »

I am glad that Gabby was found and her family was given closure. I hope they are given justice as well by capturing Brian and bringing him to trial.

I do, however, notice the stark difference in the search for Gabby and the search (or lack thereof) for the thousands of missing Indigenous women in Canada.
Not Canadian, but Up and Vanished season three is focused on the disappearance of Ashley Loring HeavyRunner: https://upandvanished.com/season-3/
Logged
fairy

Most Exalted Member
*

Reputation: 4602

Offline Offline

Posts: 19994





Ignore
« Reply #20 on: October 18, 2021, 08:11:11 PM »

We shouldn't ignore the fact that the "white women" in this "white women missing syndrome" refer to the classic middle-upper class level.
White women from low social classes, runaways, prostitutes etc.. none of them rate much of a mention until the media can report a possible serial killer.
Sadly far too many of the girls and women of colour who have gone missing belong to lower social classes and were living in dangerous circumstances, that contribute to their compromised safety.
Logged

Mary's life motto:
"if I had the choice between world peace and a Prada handbag, I'd choose the latter one" Marian Keyes.
Paulina

Gigantic Member
*********

Reputation: 945

Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 3533





Ignore
« Reply #21 on: October 18, 2021, 09:52:07 PM »

As a black woman in the US I can say with certainty that MWWS is a thing. It’s taught in college classes and widely acknowledged as why so many black, Hispanic, and indigenous women go completely unnoticed by the media when they go missing are in harms way.


I won’t speak for other countries because I don’t live in other countries and rarely does their media come across my desk, however, in the US, WOC are completely on our own. All we have is each other.

Adding on, much of the power structure in the traditional media, tv, news corporations, magazines, etc., are comprised of white men, white women (who fought to get there) and more in the last ten years, women of color. But the true decision making power of what stories to run likely still remains white men. They just don’t see other women. Oprah, in her heyday, did bring some attention to women of color.

Coverage reflects themselves, sadly. Also, Fairy’s point, too.

Logged
perdie

Big Member
*******

Reputation: 1125

Offline Offline

Posts: 1942





Ignore
« Reply #22 on: October 18, 2021, 11:30:59 PM »

We shouldn't ignore the fact that the "white women" in this "white women missing syndrome" refer to the classic middle-upper class level.
White women from low social classes, runaways, prostitutes etc.. none of them rate much of a mention until the media can report a possible serial killer.
Sadly far too many of the girls and women of colour who have gone missing belong to lower social classes and were living in dangerous circumstances, that contribute to their compromised safety.


There's a very narrow set of parameters of what will interest the press - and to a certain extent, though not so much now, the press dictates the interest.  They publish what they think will get a response.  Someone mentioned Madeleine McCann upthread.  Cute little three year old girl disappears, with speculation that she's been stolen for child sex abuse or on demand for someone wanting a cute little blonde daughter.  It became a huge media circus.  At some point, it was pointed out that Ben Needham, a cute little blonde nearly-two year old who went missing in Greece hadn't received nearly as much attention.  The year after Madeleine McCann went missing, a woman and her partner staged the kidnapping and disappearance of her daughter, Shannon Matthews.  She was a little older so not as cute, and the family were working class.  It didn't receive the same attention, and in fact much of the national newspaper coverage focused on the class difference and attributed that to the differing coverage.  So even within the relatively narrow scope of missing white British child, only one - the middle class blonde girl from a married couple - received huge attention.  Sadly, there's any number of children who weren't white and the attention has been sparse at best - and when they do get attention it's in comparison to the cases I've mentioned above, however uneven they were.  It's a very sad story that attention gets focused in such a narrow way - whether that's because it's assumed readers/viewers etc won't be interested or experience has shown that will be the case who knows at this stage.
Logged
Lady Liebe

Gigantic Member
*********

Reputation: 868

Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 4377


Provence Amaryllis




Ignore
« Reply #23 on: October 18, 2021, 11:55:01 PM »

We shouldn't ignore the fact that the "white women" in this "white women missing syndrome" refer to the classic middle-upper class level.
White women from low social classes, runaways, prostitutes etc.. none of them rate much of a mention until the media can report a possible serial killer.
Sadly far too many of the girls and women of colour who have gone missing belong to lower social classes and were living in dangerous circumstances, that contribute to their compromised safety.


 Star

I was thinking about that too.

Everyone has made excellant points here.

I want to give a shout out to our local media who have become much better of late in publicizing missing children, teenagers and elderly (usually) dementia patients. While you never hear the details, iis always nice to see they've been found. Social media helps too. The local media have also been diligent at bringing up missing persons cases both recent and cold cases, and some have been solved.

With cell phone alerts now, plus electronic highway signs, amber and silver alerts get more attention too.

All to the good.

Much more work to keep on with.

Logged

Of all tyrannies, a tyranny sincerely exercised for the good of its victims may be the most oppressive. It would be better to live under robber barons than under omnipotent moral busybodies.     CS Lewis
emtishell

Big Member
*******

Reputation: 556

Offline Offline

Australia Australia

Posts: 1823





Ignore
« Reply #24 on: October 19, 2021, 12:43:28 AM »

It is very much a thing, and was raised here in Australia many years ago after the terrible murder of Jill Meagher - pretty, white, middle class woman.

Around the same time a sex worker was also murdered in the same city (albeit she was white as well) - while there were vigils and demands for justice (of course) for Jill’s murder, the other one went under the radar and had little to no resources allocated. Is it telling that even now I can remember Jill’s fill name, her husband’s name and even her killer’s??? But an itinerant sex worker murdered in her van she used to see clients?

The reality is there is an issue with how the media deals with missing and murdered women, and its not racist nor political to discuss how we do better.
Logged
Hester
Board Helper
Warned
Most Exalted Member
************

Reputation: 2587

Offline Offline

Samoa Samoa

Posts: 13987





Ignore
« Reply #25 on: October 19, 2021, 12:55:45 AM »

We shouldn't ignore the fact that the "white women" in this "white women missing syndrome" refer to the classic middle-upper class level.
White women from low social classes, runaways, prostitutes etc.. none of them rate much of a mention until the media can report a possible serial killer.
Sadly far too many of the girls and women of colour who have gone missing belong to lower social classes and were living in dangerous circumstances, that contribute to their compromised safety.


There's a very narrow set of parameters of what will interest the press - and to a certain extent, though not so much now, the press dictates the interest.  They publish what they think will get a response.  Someone mentioned Madeleine McCann upthread.  Cute little three year old girl disappears, with speculation that she's been stolen for child sex abuse or on demand for someone wanting a cute little blonde daughter.  It became a huge media circus.  At some point, it was pointed out that Ben Needham, a cute little blonde nearly-two year old who went missing in Greece hadn't received nearly as much attention.  The year after Madeleine McCann went missing, a woman and her partner staged the kidnapping and disappearance of her daughter, Shannon Matthews.  She was a little older so not as cute, and the family were working class.  It didn't receive the same attention, and in fact much of the national newspaper coverage focused on the class difference and attributed that to the differing coverage.  So even within the relatively narrow scope of missing white British child, only one - the middle class blonde girl from a married couple - received huge attention.  Sadly, there's any number of children who weren't white and the attention has been sparse at best - and when they do get attention it's in comparison to the cases I've mentioned above, however uneven they were.  It's a very sad story that attention gets focused in such a narrow way - whether that's because it's assumed readers/viewers etc won't be interested or experience has shown that will be the case who knows at this stage.

How very sad. Im so glad to be in Australia where any missing child is regarded as a tragedy regardless of background, and the whole community pitches in with volunteer searches, backed by all media. Everyone engages. The only exception I can think of is a real black mark on us - where middle-class journalists mocked the “bogan” names in a missing child’s family. 😭
Logged
Miss Marple

Humongous Member
**********

Reputation: 1792

Offline Offline

Germany Germany

Posts: 6727





Ignore
« Reply #26 on: October 23, 2021, 11:27:19 PM »

I agree with Fairy, it is also a social class problem: you have to fit into a pattern, then you are absolutely news worthy.

Might not be fitting all the topic but not far from where I live in 2012 a 45 year old woman went for her (nearly daily) walk and disappeared. There was -before her disappearance- nothing out of the ordinary, she left mobile and purse at home (she always did) and several people saw her at the beginning of her walk.

I was a bit shocked how reluctantly that came to the news and then it was "old news" and it was not mentioned again. Well, every now and then it is mentioned and she was looked for in the German Crime line series ... but it is sad that she did not get much attention at all (thinking of it there is a possibility that she was murdered and so it would be good to issue warnings).
Logged
RainbowUnicorn68

Micro Member
**

Reputation: 62

Offline Offline

Denmark Denmark

Posts: 135





Ignore
« Reply #27 on: October 24, 2021, 08:44:56 AM »

It is sad that things haven't changed at all. Back in the sixties a Danish baby was kidnapped from a pram. The baby was later found. The press was all over it. Not long after that, another baby was kidnapped. The mother was single, and the story was not as interesting to the press. If I remember correctly that baby was never found. A child is a child. And frankly, being from a so called higher class doesn't mean you are better than other people.
Logged
Miss Marple

Humongous Member
**********

Reputation: 1792

Offline Offline

Germany Germany

Posts: 6727





Ignore
« Reply #28 on: October 24, 2021, 10:17:05 AM »

The question is if it is a "news problem" or a "society problem". Basically the newspapers are reporting stories they make money with and stick to that narrative. So the readers and other media users seem to be very interested in capital crimes in one social layer. That was discussed with the McCanns: If they had lived on a housing estate - would they had gotten so much sympathy for leaving their kids in the apartment (I don't want to go down that discussion road, it is merely an example).

I think there are (and I am not innocent of it) certain mechanisms when you value the fate of one person different than the exact same fate of someone else. I miscarried my third child and ended up in the ER. The midwife came to see me, flicked through my papers and said "well, at least you have two living children". Yes, still I was a grieving mom because I had been all excited about that pregnancy. And in that very emotional moment it made me wonder "what did she mean?". That it would have been worse if it had been my first? That I should be happy to have to healthy children and not tempt fate again? That I overstepped a secret line in wanting another one?

My daughers friend died a while back of completely natural causes. She had been sick since kindergarten, but everything had been under control, things did not worsen for a decade, so everyone hoped against the odds she would be fine. Well ... about a year before she died things got worse and even though you hoped that things would stop again like before you knew it could end up in her death, which sadly is what happened. The girl was so full of plans, energy and zest for life and it felt she was especially cheated. The night before she died she felt better and insisted to go to school and catch up with a Maths exam she had missed because of poor health. She got 100/100 points and she died the very next afternoon. She was a very special girl - yet I was a bit irritated that people pointed out how especially unfair it had been because she was so friendly, intelligent and full of plans. Needless to say: She would have had more likely a very interesting life but was her life worth more than of the girl that dropped out at 16? It felt a bit strange.

I think the same happens to many of the missing white women. It is a tragedy - but every time a person is murdered it is.



Logged
minimoos

Mini Member
***

Reputation: 90

Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 294





Ignore
« Reply #29 on: October 30, 2021, 04:21:50 AM »

One thing that I have seen in the coverage of this case is that the bodies of nine (IIRC) missing people have been found in the search for her and then for him. A sad ending, but hopefully some closure for each of their families.

I also think that their social media presence and the ‘true crime’ fandom brought a lot of attention to the case, on top of the ‘pretty, blonde, white influencer’ aspects that many have mentioned.
Logged
Pages: 1 [2]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to: