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Eya

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« on: March 09, 2017, 08:04:01 AM »

Royal baby names and their meanings

http://us.hellomagazine.c...-origin-meaning-heritage/
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Principessa

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« Reply #1 on: March 09, 2017, 09:09:39 AM »

"....Young. King Henry II?s successor was known as Henry the Young King to differentiate between father and son. He lived from 1155-1183....."  Huh? Thinking

What about Alexia, related to the male form Alexander? Names which popped up frequently in royal circles in the past and present.
And further more Elisabeth, Juliana, Sophie/Sofie/Sofia, Emma....

Leonor and its related names can be current days found within several royal families:
- Leonor; oldest daughter of Felipe & Letizia of Spain
- Leonore; 2nd daughter of Constantijn & Laurentien of the Netherlands
- Leonore; daughter of Madeleine & Chris (Sweden)
- El?onore; 2nd daughter of Philippe & Mathilde of Belgium

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emtishell

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« Reply #2 on: April 02, 2017, 03:23:06 AM »

"....Young. King Henry II?s successor was known as Henry the Young King to differentiate between father and son. He lived from 1155-1183....."  Huh? Thinking

What about Alexia, related to the male form Alexander? Names which popped up frequently in royal circles in the past and present.
And further more Elisabeth, Juliana, Sophie/Sofie/Sofia, Emma....

Leonor and its related names can be current days found within several royal families:
- Leonor; oldest daughter of Felipe & Letizia of Spain
- Leonore; 2nd daughter of Constantijn & Laurentien of the Netherlands
- Leonore; daughter of Madeleine & Chris (Sweden)
- El?onore; 2nd daughter of Philippe & Mathilde of Belgium



My daughters name is Eleanor..... all the derivatives (including Ellen and Leonore) stem from the Greek "Helen" meaning "light"

It has been a popular name for royalty for a long time..... one of the earliest being Eleanor of Aquitaine, who was the wife of Henry II and mother of Richard the Lionheart
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« Reply #3 on: April 02, 2017, 08:37:05 AM »

"....Young. King Henry II?s successor was known as Henry the Young King to differentiate between father and son. He lived from 1155-1183....."  Huh? Thinking

What about Alexia, related to the male form Alexander? Names which popped up frequently in royal circles in the past and present.
And further more Elisabeth, Juliana, Sophie/Sofie/Sofia, Emma....

Leonor and its related names can be current days found within several royal families:
- Leonor; oldest daughter of Felipe & Letizia of Spain
- Leonore; 2nd daughter of Constantijn & Laurentien of the Netherlands
- Leonore; daughter of Madeleine & Chris (Sweden)
- El?onore; 2nd daughter of Philippe & Mathilde of Belgium



My daughters name is Eleanor..... all the derivatives (including Ellen and Leonore) stem from the Greek "Helen" meaning "light"

It has been a popular name for royalty for a long time..... one of the earliest being Eleanor of Aquitaine, who was the wife of Henry II and mother of Richard the Lionheart

Eleanor is not related to Helen.  Eleanor comes from the ancient Germanic Aenor.

Quote
From the Old French form of the Occitan name Alienor. It was first borne by the influential Eleanor of Aquitaine (12th century), who was the queen of Louis VII, the king of France, and later Henry II, the king of England. She was named Aenor after her mother, and was called by the Occitan phrase alia Aenor "the other AENOR" in order to distinguish her from her mother.
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« Reply #4 on: April 02, 2017, 11:17:19 AM »

Seems that I have a Royal name
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Harley
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« Reply #5 on: April 02, 2017, 11:26:49 AM »

So, according to the article, it's Derf and Mosh of Norway, huh? Well, Norway can have them Smiley

ETA: And, apparently, Thyra is pronounced Tara. Uhm, no.
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« Reply #6 on: April 02, 2017, 01:47:14 PM »

Speaking of Royal names does anyone know if there is a reason for Mary and Fred giving their kids English names and not Danish names, apart from Christian of course who they didn't have a choice with.Just wondering Thinking

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Harley
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« Reply #7 on: April 02, 2017, 02:21:47 PM »

All of their kids have completely normal Danish names. Except Vincent. But they're very trendy names here.

Christian was a given. Old, Danish king name. A classic name.

Isabella is a trendy name. She's most likely called that since it's a form of Elizabeth which is Mosh's middle name. It's not a royal name in Denmark, it's a a Top 20 name.

Josephine seems to be a name that's popular within the Danish nobility but it's not a royal name here. Again, it's a trendy Top 20 name.

Vincent is a name that I still can't perceive as Danish, even if it has gained a slight bit of popularity after Prince Vincent got his name. It's English sounding and sounds very very foreign and somewhat affected to my ears.

As to why they're called these things. Well, their mother doesn't speak Danish very well so...

For comparison: this is a Danish list of the 100 most popular names in 2016 for boys and girls.

http://voresborn.dk/babyn...0-de-mest-populaere-navne
« Last Edit: April 02, 2017, 04:13:36 PM by Harley » Logged

Diogenes
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« Reply #8 on: April 02, 2017, 02:39:36 PM »

Because Mosh doesn't read, speak or understand Danish ...?  Secret
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emtishell

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« Reply #9 on: April 02, 2017, 04:01:26 PM »

"....Young. King Henry II?s successor was known as Henry the Young King to differentiate between father and son. He lived from 1155-1183....."  Huh? Thinking

What about Alexia, related to the male form Alexander? Names which popped up frequently in royal circles in the past and present.
And further more Elisabeth, Juliana, Sophie/Sofie/Sofia, Emma....

Leonor and its related names can be current days found within several royal families:
- Leonor; oldest daughter of Felipe & Letizia of Spain
- Leonore; 2nd daughter of Constantijn & Laurentien of the Netherlands
- Leonore; daughter of Madeleine & Chris (Sweden)
- El?onore; 2nd daughter of Philippe & Mathilde of Belgium



My daughters name is Eleanor..... all the derivatives (including Ellen and Leonore) stem from the Greek "Helen" meaning "light"

It has been a popular name for royalty for a long time..... one of the earliest being Eleanor of Aquitaine, who was the wife of Henry II and mother of Richard the Lionheart

Eleanor is not related to Helen.  Eleanor comes from the ancient Germanic Aenor.

Quote
From the Old French form of the Occitan name Alienor. It was first borne by the influential Eleanor of Aquitaine (12th century), who was the queen of Louis VII, the king of France, and later Henry II, the king of England. She was named Aenor after her mother, and was called by the Occitan phrase alia Aenor "the other AENOR" in order to distinguish her from her mother.

http://www.thinkbabynames.com/meaning/0/Eleanor

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Harley
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« Reply #10 on: April 02, 2017, 05:01:25 PM »

All of their kids have completely normal Danish names. Except Vincent. But they're very trendy names here.

Christian was a given. Old, Danish king name. A classic name.

Isabella is a trendy name. She's most likely called that since it's a form of Elizabeth which is Mosh's middle name. It's not a royal name in Denmark, it's a a Top 20 name.

Josephine seems to be a name that's popular within the Danish nobility but it's not a royal name here. Again, it's a trendy Top 20 name.

Vincent is a name that I still can't perceive as Danish, even if it has gained a slight bit of popularity after Prince Vincent got his name. It's English sounding and sounds very very foreign and somewhat affected to my ears.

As to why they're called these things. Well, their mother doesn't speak Danish very well so...

For comparison: this is a Danish list of the 100 most popular names in 2016 for boys and girls.

http://voresborn.dk/babyn...0-de-mest-populaere-navne

In addition:

As of right now, there are this amount of people in Denmark called

Isabella: 7746
Josephine: 4325            Josefine: 7348
Christian: 37593            Kristian: 16295
Vincent: 806
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« Reply #11 on: April 02, 2017, 06:50:41 PM »

It's not at all surprising that Mosh and Fred gave their kids such trendy names.  Usually people who aren't smart copy trends.  If you read the book Freakonomics, there's an entire chapter on names and social class and education levels. 
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Hanimefendi

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So you're a royal highness by marriage, how droll.




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« Reply #12 on: April 03, 2017, 08:17:32 AM »

"....Young. King Henry II?s successor was known as Henry the Young King to differentiate between father and son. He lived from 1155-1183....."  Huh? Thinking

What about Alexia, related to the male form Alexander? Names which popped up frequently in royal circles in the past and present.
And further more Elisabeth, Juliana, Sophie/Sofie/Sofia, Emma....

Leonor and its related names can be current days found within several royal families:
- Leonor; oldest daughter of Felipe & Letizia of Spain
- Leonore; 2nd daughter of Constantijn & Laurentien of the Netherlands
- Leonore; daughter of Madeleine & Chris (Sweden)
- El?onore; 2nd daughter of Philippe & Mathilde of Belgium



My daughters name is Eleanor..... all the derivatives (including Ellen and Leonore) stem from the Greek "Helen" meaning "light"

It has been a popular name for royalty for a long time..... one of the earliest being Eleanor of Aquitaine, who was the wife of Henry II and mother of Richard the Lionheart

Eleanor is not related to Helen.  Eleanor comes from the ancient Germanic Aenor.

Quote
From the Old French form of the Occitan name Alienor. It was first borne by the influential Eleanor of Aquitaine (12th century), who was the queen of Louis VII, the king of France, and later Henry II, the king of England. She was named Aenor after her mother, and was called by the Occitan phrase alia Aenor "the other AENOR" in order to distinguish her from her mother.

http://www.thinkbabynames.com/meaning/0/Eleanor



Your link says it is sometimes taken as a form of Helen.  Not exactly definitive proof.
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