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Kristallinchen

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« Reply #45 on: May 31, 2020, 02:35:30 PM »

Grand Duchess Victoria Melita of Hesse and by Rhine caught her husband, Grand Duke Ernest Louis in bed with a male servant when, in 1897, she returned home from a visit to her sister Queen Marie of Romania.

Those two clearly never worked it out together, but I'm happy that both had fulfilling second marriages.
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« Reply #46 on: May 31, 2020, 02:37:58 PM »

Maria Theresia's firstborn son Joseph was married to Isabella von Bourbon-Parma who was in love with his sister Christine. Christine's love letters got destroyed, but Isabella's love letters to Christine survived.


It's doubtable that MC was in love with Isabella as much as the other. I do believe that for her Isabella was a very special friend, whom she wanted to adjust to the family and court (which Isabella most likely misunderstood).

MC had a loving marriage later on. It's highly unlikely she was lesbian herself.
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #47 on: June 01, 2020, 09:19:59 AM »

Grand Duchess Victoria Melita of Hesse and by Rhine caught her husband, Grand Duke Ernest Louis in bed with a male servant when, in 1897, she returned home from a visit to her sister Queen Marie of Romania.

Those two clearly never worked it out together, but I'm happy that both had fulfilling second marriages.
   
Grand Duke Ernest Louis truly loved his daughter Princess Elizabeth that he and Victoria Melita had.
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« Reply #48 on: June 02, 2020, 10:44:58 AM »

Grand Duchess Victoria Melita of Hesse and by Rhine caught her husband, Grand Duke Ernest Louis in bed with a male servant when, in 1897, she returned home from a visit to her sister Queen Marie of Romania.

Those two clearly never worked it out together, but I'm happy that both had fulfilling second marriages.
   
Grand Duke Ernest Louis truly loved his daughter Princess Elizabeth that he and Victoria Melita had.

They both did (Ernest and Victoria Melita) IMO, and both were devestated when she died.
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« Reply #49 on: June 02, 2020, 10:45:34 AM »

Maria Theresia's firstborn son Joseph was married to Isabella von Bourbon-Parma who was in love with his sister Christine. Christine's love letters got destroyed, but Isabella's love letters to Christine survived.


It's doubtable that MC was in love with Isabella as much as the other. I do believe that for her Isabella was a very special friend, whom she wanted to adjust to the family and court (which Isabella most likely misunderstood).

MC had a loving marriage later on. It's highly unlikely she was lesbian herself.

Interesting view!
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« Reply #50 on: June 02, 2020, 03:53:59 PM »

There are also two very interesting theories about those same sex friendships:
Firstly, especially in letter writing people in earlier times would write a lot more emotionally and sensually compared to today. We have engagement letters from couples that hardly knew eachother and turned out to have disastrous marriages, that were almost syruppy sweet to our ears today. They declare love and devotion and tenderness, that quite frankly none of the writers or readers could have genuinely felt. Letters between friends speak of "sharing tender kisses" from "your most loving and devoted friend", some writers call their intimate bossom friend lover.
So was that simply the style of the time  - just as children would address their parents in letter with Darling Father, most beloved Mother, sign off with "your most adoring XX" when in reality (e.g. King Edward the VII) they confessed to others how they hated their parents or didn't  know them like the many children of the Raj?

Another interesting aspect is opportunity or availability.
In many of those circles for centuries, the genders were very separated from eachother. More often then not even children would be separated, with the boys being sent to school very young, while the girls were stuck in the nursery (and another school) until ready for marriage. During the hormonal uproar of puberty and adolescence, there were few young men for whom the young girls could form a bit of a crush.
Add to that the enormous lack of knowledge and information and the abundance of taboo, few girls could even imagine kissing a boy. But up to a certain very strictly enforced, but never talked about point, affection ,caresses and tenderness between girl friends were encouraged. The idea that such a tender loving friendship could suddenly turn sexual probably escaped those very naive and innocent young girls and the parents simply shied away from any taboo subject. So as long as they were not caught in flagranti, everything was fine.
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« Reply #51 on: June 03, 2020, 08:49:08 AM »

There are also two very interesting theories about those same sex friendships:
Firstly, especially in letter writing people in earlier times would write a lot more emotionally and sensually compared to today. We have engagement letters from couples that hardly knew eachother and turned out to have disastrous marriages, that were almost syruppy sweet to our ears today. They declare love and devotion and tenderness, that quite frankly none of the writers or readers could have genuinely felt. Letters between friends speak of "sharing tender kisses" from "your most loving and devoted friend", some writers call their intimate bossom friend lover.
So was that simply the style of the time  - just as children would address their parents in letter with Darling Father, most beloved Mother, sign off with "your most adoring XX" when in reality (e.g. King Edward the VII) they confessed to others how they hated their parents or didn't  know them like the many children of the Raj?

Another interesting aspect is opportunity or availability.
In many of those circles for centuries, the genders were very separated from eachother. More often then not even children would be separated, with the boys being sent to school very young, while the girls were stuck in the nursery (and another school) until ready for marriage. During the hormonal uproar of puberty and adolescence, there were few young men for whom the young girls could form a bit of a crush.
Add to that the enormous lack of knowledge and information and the abundance of taboo, few girls could even imagine kissing a boy. But up to a certain very strictly enforced, but never talked about point, affection ,caresses and tenderness between girl friends were encouraged. The idea that such a tender loving friendship could suddenly turn sexual probably escaped those very naive and innocent young girls and the parents simply shied away from any taboo subject. So as long as they were not caught in flagranti, everything was fine.

Logical explanations.

I often have to think about a remark of a (married into the family) aunt of mine. She simply commented that in her opinion in previous times a lot of LGBT kids in Catholic families were "put away" in the clergy and monestaries. This was about regular commoners families, but I wouldn't be surprised if similar actions happened in royal and nobel circles.

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« Reply #52 on: June 03, 2020, 08:51:26 AM »

According to some info found on Wikipedia:

"...Several Chinese emperors had openly homosexual relationships, even though most also had active heterosexual relationships as well. ..."

"..A significant event in LGBT aristocracy occurred in 2006, when Manvendra Singh Gohil, a prince of the former princely state of Rajpipla in Gujarat, India, came out as gay to Indian media; the event caused controversy both in India and abroad, and his family unsuccessfully attempted to disinherit him..."

"...On 7 March 2008 Luisa Isabel Álvarez de Toledo, 21st Duchess of Medina Sidonia, a Spanish aristocrat, married Liliana Maria Dahlmann in a civil ceremony on her deathbed. Today, the Dowager Duchess is Liliana Maria.."


"..It was rumored to be an open secret that late Sultan Qaboos of Oman was the only gay ruling monarch.."


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« Reply #53 on: June 03, 2020, 10:34:49 AM »

Ivar Mountbatten:
"..Lord Ivar Alexander Michael Mountbatten, DL (born 9 March 1963) is a British aristocrat, farmer and geologist. He is a third cousin, once removed of Queen Elizabeth II and a first cousin, once removed of Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh. Although he is not a member of the British royal family proper, he is the first member of the British monarch's extended family openly in a same-sex relationship, and upon marrying his partner James Coyle in 2018 was the first to have a same-sex wedding...."

Count Gottfried Alexander Leopold von Bismarck-Schönhausen (Gottfried Alexander Leopold Graf von Bismarck-Schönhausen)( 19 September 1962 – 29 June 2007)
"...He was a member of the exclusive Piers Gaveston Society, "noted for its predilection for rubber wear and whips, which he embellished with his androgynous apparel and lipstick", as well as the prohibitively expensive Bullingdon Club, known for its members' wealth and destructive binges, alongside friends like Darius Guppy..."
"...The death of heiress Olivia Channon, the daughter of the English Conservative politician Paul Channon, would have a huge and devastating effect on Bismarck’s life. She was found dead from a heroin overdose in his rooms at Christ Church, in 1986 although he was not present at the time..."
"...In August 2006, Anthony Casey, 41, fell 20 m (60 ft) from Graf von Bismarck's Chelsea flat and died. Bismarck was not arrested and the police said there were no drugs found in his flat. Nevertheless, the event re-awakened the so-called "curse" from the past, and triggered speculation from the tabloid press. An article in London's Daily Mail claimed that the incident occurred during a cocaine-fueled orgy. The coroner's report had found no alcohol in Casey's body, but did find a significant amount of cocaine. The accusation of a 'gay orgy' was officially denied by von Bismarck, though the coroner, Dr Paul Knapman, told The Guardian that a great deal of sexual paraphernalia was discovered in the flat, including sex toys and lubricants. "In common parlance, in the early hours of the morning, there was a gay orgy going on", Dr. Knapman told the newspaper. "Nevertheless, this was conducted by consenting males in private."..."


Antony Charles Robert Armstrong-Jones, 1st Earl of Snowdon GCVO FRSA RDI (7 March 1930 – 13 January 2017)
"..The marriage (RED: princess Margaret and Antony) began to collapse early and publicly; various causes may have been behind the failure. On her side, there was a penchant for late-night partying, while on Snowdon's part there was undisguised sexual profligacy. ("'If it moves, he'll have it', was the summing-up of one close friend.") "'To most of the girls who worked in the Pimlico Road studio, there seemed little doubt that Tony was gay'. To which Tony responds: 'I didn't fall in love with boys – but a few men have been in love with me.'" The authorised biography by Anne de Courcy (2008) reveals a series of affairs with women, including a 20-year relationship with his mistress Ann Hills, and that Armstrong-Jones did not deny that he was bisexual...."


Johannes, 11th Prince of Thurn and Taxis (5 June 1926 – 14 December 1990)
"...In the 1970s Johannes threw avant-garde parties and, because he was bisexual, he was often seen in gay discos..."


Robert John Graham Boothby, Baron Boothby, KBE (12 February 1900 – 16 July 1986)
"...often known as Bob Boothby, was a British Conservative politician..."
"...Partly because of his support for homosexual law reform, Boothby was subject to public rumours about his sexuality, although he insisted publicly in 1954 that he was 'not a homosexual'. He did, however, comment that 'sub-conscious bi-sexuality is a component part of all of us [and] the majority of males pass through a homosexual period'. While an undergraduate at Magdalen College, Oxford, Boothby earned the nickname 'the Palladium', because 'he was twice nightly'. He later spoke about the role of a speculated homosexual relationship in the drowning of his friend Michael Llewelyn Davies (one of the models for Peter Pan) and fellow Oxonian Rupert Buxton. In a Channel 4 documentary broadcast in 1997, it was claimed that he did not begin to have physical relationships with women until the age of 25. In 1963, Boothby began an affair with East End cat burglar Leslie Holt (d. 1979), a younger man he met at a gambling club. Holt introduced him to the gangster Ronald Kray, the younger Kray twin, who (allegedly) supplied Boothby with young men and arranged orgies in Cedra Court, receiving favours from Boothby in return. When Boothby's underworld associations came to the attention of the Sunday Express, the Conservative-supporting paper opted not to publish the damaging story. The matter was eventually reported in 1964 in the Labour-supporting Sunday Mirror tabloid and the parties subsequently named by the German magazine Stern.Boothby denied the story and threatened to sue the Mirror. Because Boothby's close friend Tom Driberg—a senior Labour MP, and also homosexual—also associated with the Krays, neither of the major political parties had an interest in publicity and the paper's owner Cecil King came under pressure from the Labour leadership to drop the matter. The Mirror backed down, sacked its editor, apologised and paid Boothby £40,000 in an out-of-court settlement. Other newspapers became less willing to cover the Krays' criminal activities, which continued for three more years. The police investigation received no support from Scotland Yard, while Boothby embarrassed his fellow peers by campaigning on behalf of the Krays in the Lords, until their increasing violence made association impossible. It has been claimed that journalists who investigated Boothby were subjected to legal threats and break-ins and that much of this suppression was directed by Arnold Goodman..."


Prince George, Duke of Kent, KG, KT, GCMG, GCVO (George Edward Alexander Edmund; 20 December 1902 – 25 August 1942)
"...There were "strong rumours" that he had affairs with musical star Jessie Matthews, writer Cecil Roberts and Noël Coward, a relationship which Coward's long-term boyfriend, Graham Payn, denied..."


Philipp, Prince and Landgrave of Hesse (6 November 1896 – 25 October 1980)
"...According to biographer Jonathan Petropoulos, Philipp was probably bisexual, and his lovers included the British poet Siegfried Sassoon..."


Umberto II (Italian: Umberto Nicola Tommaso Giovanni Maria di Savoia)(15 September 1904 – 18 March 1983)
"...As early as the 1920s, Mussolini had collected a dossier on his private life for purposes of blackmail. Certainly during the war, newspapers asserted that Umberto was homosexual, and information continued to be spread in the lead-up to the post-war referendum on the monarchy in the hope of influencing the outcome. It is, however, unclear to what extent such rumours could be substantiated. Umberto's custom of giving a fleur-de-lis made of precious stones to favoured young officials in his entourage was well known, and Umberto's lovers may have included Jean Marais; there was a former army lieutenant who published details of Umberto's advances to him. Except for public appearances, Umberto and Maria José generally lived apart.As a young man, the epicene Umberto was mostly noted for his pursuit of handsome young officers. One of his lovers, Enrico Montanari, remembered as a lieutenant in 1927 Turin that the prince gave him a silver cigarette lighter with the inscription reading "Dimmi di si!" ("Say yes to me!"). Montanari recalled that he was "seduced" by the lavish gifts Umberto gave him. In a break with the traditions of the House of Savoy, Umberto was an intense Catholic, described by his biographer Domenico Bartoli as "almost to the point of fanaticism", but he was unable to resist what he called his "satanic" homosexual urges.Umberto was described as a "sensuous" man who constantly craved sex, but he always felt very guilty and tormented afterward for violating the Catholic teaching that homosexuality and unchastity are sins. To make up for what he called the "devastating burden" of his life, Umberto spent much time praying for divine forgiveness for his homosexuality. One biographer wrote of Umberto that he was "forever rushing between chapel and brothel, confessional and steam bath." He had a fondness for officers from well-off families. According to the film director and aristocrat Luchino Visconti's autobiography, he and Umberto had a homosexual relationship during their youth in the 1920s...."


Prince Pierre of Monaco, Duke of Valentinois (Count Pierre Marie Xavier Raphaël Antoine Melchior de Polignac)( 24 October 1895 – 10 November 1964)
"..According to James Lees-Milne, a British writer and friend of Pierre's, his unhappy arranged marriage was complicated by his homosexuality and Princess Charlotte's affairs. (Red: the marriage between Pierre and Princess Charlotte of Monaco)..."


Prince George of Greece and Denmark (Greek: Πρίγκιπας Γεώργιος)(24 June 1869 – 25 November 1957)
"... When George brought his bride to Bernstorff for the first family visit, Valdemar's wife Marie d'Orléans was at pains to explain to Marie Bonaparte the intimacy which united uncle and nephew, so deep that at the end of each of George's several yearly visits to Bernstorff, he would weep, Valdemar would take sick, and the women learned the patience not to intrude upon their husbands' private moments (Red Valdemar = prince Valdemar of Denmark, an uncle of George)..."


Prince Valdemar of Denmark (27 October 1858 – 14 January 1939)
see the comment about prince George above ^


Gustaf V of Sweden (Oscar Gustaf Adolf)(16 June 1858 – 29 October 1950)
"...Following his death at age 92, he was implicated in a homosexual affair in the Haijby affair. His alleged lover Kurt Haijby was imprisoned in 1952 for blackmail of the court in the 1930s. (Homosexuality was a criminal offense in Sweden until 1944, though Gustaf's position would have granted automatic immunity.)...."
The Haijby affair: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haijby_affair


Ferdinand I (Bulgarian: Фердинанд I)(26 February 1861 – 10 September 1948)
"....In his private relations, Ferdinand was a somewhat hedonistic individual. Bisexual throughout his life, up until early middle age his inclination was more towards women. He enjoyed affairs with a number of women of humble position, siring a number of illegitimate children whom he then supported financially. In his later life, rumours abounded of Ferdinand's trysts with lieutenants and valets. His regular holidays on Capri, then a popular holiday destination with wealthy epicenes, were common knowledge in royal courts throughout Europe. In 1895 an interview given by the embittered former Prime Minister, Stefan Stambolov to the Frankfurter Zeitung created a nine-day scandal across Europe, when he focused strongly on his personal witness of Ferdinand's homosexual interests...."

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« Reply #54 on: June 03, 2020, 10:35:31 AM »

Prince Francis Joseph of Braganza (Portuguese: Príncipe Francisco José de Bragança)( 7 September 1879 – 15 June 1919)
"...On 11 September 1902 he was indicted in the Central Criminal Court on a charge that he had committed an act of gross indecency with a fifteen-year-old boy. A 24-year-old man and a seventeen-year-old boy were also charged with conspiring together to procure the commission of an act of gross indecency. In opening the case, the prosecution said "the offense with which the prince was charged was far too common in London." The Prince was defended by Sir Edward Clarke, the former Solicitor General. A witness falsely claimed that he had made a hole in a bedroom door and that through the hole he had seen Francis Joseph and the fifteen-year-old boy engaged in sexual activity in a house in Lambeth. The witness's lies were undone by the police investigation. The police found that only nine inches of the bed were visible through the hole and therefore the witness could not have seen the matters as to which he had testified. The prosecutors therefore moved for a verdict of no guilt declaring that there was no evidence of guilt and the jury indeed pronounced Prince Francis Joseph not guilty...."
"...Francis Joseph was later implicated in another homosexual incident in Austria...."


Lord Alfred Bruce Douglas (22 October 1870 – 20 March 1945)
"...was a British poet and journalist best known as the lover of Oscar Wilde...."
"...While studying at Oxford, he edited an undergraduate journal, The Spirit Lamp, which carried a homoerotic subtext, and met Wilde, with whom he started a close but stormy relationship. Douglas' father, the Marquess of Queensberry, disapproved strongly of the affair, and set out to humiliate Wilde, publicly accusing him of homosexuality. Wilde sued him for criminal libel, but some of his intimate notes were discovered, and he was duly jailed. On his release, Wilde briefly lived with Douglas in Naples, but they were separated by the time Wilde died in 1900..."
"...When Douglas's eldest brother Francis Viscount Drumlanrig died in a suspicious hunting accident in October 1894, rumours circulated that he had been having a homosexual relationship with the Prime Minister, Lord Rosebery, and that the cause of death was suicide. The Marquess of Queensberry thus embarked on a campaign to save his other son, and began a public persecution of Wilde..."
"...After Wilde's death, Douglas established a close friendship with Olive Custance, a bisexual heiress and poet.They married on 4 March 1902. Olive Custance was in a relationship with the writer Natalie Barney when she and Douglas first met. Barney and Douglas eventually became close friends and Barney was even named godmother to their son..."

Francis Archibald Douglas, Viscount Drumlanrig (3 February 1867 – 18 October 1894
The elder brother of Lord Alfred Bruce Douglas, who is mentioned above ^
"...On 18 October 1894, sixteen months after his ennoblement, Drumlanrig died at Quantock Lodge, Somerset, from injuries received during a shooting party. The inquest returned a verdict of "accidental death",but his death was also rumoured to be suicide or murder. He was buried in the family burial ground at Kinmount, Dumfriesshire. He was unmarried and his younger brother Lord Percy Douglas became heir to his father's titles. It was speculated at the time, and evidence suggests, that Drumlanrig may have had a homosexual relationship with Rosebery. It has been further suggested that Queensberry had threatened to expose the Prime Minister's supposed proclivities if his government did not vigorously prosecute Oscar Wilde for Wilde's relationship with Drumlanrig's younger brother, Lord Alfred Douglas. Rosebery was, by most accounts, happily married until the death of his wife in 1890, though gossip that Rosebery was homosexual or bisexual was widespread. Queensberry believed, as he put it in a letter, that "Snob Queers like Rosebery" had corrupted his sons, and he held Rosebery indirectly responsible for Drumlanrig's death..."


Duke Peter Alexandrovich of Oldenburg (21 November 1868 – 11 March 1924)
"...In 1900, he began to escort the 18-year-old Grand Duchess Olga Alexandrovna (1882–1960), the youngest daughter of the late Tsar Alexander III and younger sister to the reigning Tsar Nicholas II, to the theatre and opera. His proposal of marriage the following year came as a surprise to Olga, who later explained, "I was so taken aback that all I could say was 'thank you'". She assumed that Oldenburg was pushed into proposing by his ambitious mother. Perhaps Olga accepted his proposal to gain independence from her mother, or avoid marriage into a foreign court.[1] The marriage was announced in May 1901, and was unexpected by many, as Oldenburg had shown no prior interest in women. The Dowager Empress Maria Feodorovna wrote to her son, Tsar Nicholas II, "I am sure you won't BELIEVE what has happened. Olga is engaged to PETYA and BOTH are very happy. I had to consent, but it was all done so quickly and unexpectedly that I still cannot believe it." Tsar Nicholas replied to his mother, "...I cannot believe Olga is actually ENGAGED to Petya. They were probably both drunk yesterday. ... We both laughed so much reading your note that we have not recovered yet."..."
"...Their marriage remained unconsummated, and Oldenburg was believed by family and friends to be homosexual...."


Prince Aribert Joseph Alexander of Anhalt (18 June 1866 - 24 December 1933)
"...On 6 July 1891, he married Princess Marie Louise of Schleswig-Holstein..."
"...In December 1900, the Duke of Anhalt used his prerogative as reigning Duke to annul the marriage. Princess Marie Louise, on an official visit to Canada at the time, immediately returned to England. According to her memoirs, she regarded her marriage vows as binding, so she never remarried. Her memoirs do, however, indicate rage over her marital experience and an obvious dislike of her former husband. Though contemporary sources did not directly suggest it was a cause of his marriage dissolution, a number of contemporaries and subsequent historical accounts suggest Aribert was bisexual or homosexual, and some have suggested an indiscretion with a male attendant was the catalyst for the dissolution and that the marriage had never been consummated. However, other sources later suggested he was planning to remarry.Certainly, Aribert was known to holiday on Capri, an island with a reputation for attracting homosexual liaisons...."

Grand Duke Konstantin Konstantinovich of Russia (Russian: Константи́н Константи́нович )( 22 August 1858 – 15 June 1915)
"....As exemplary and dedicated (and even conservative) as KR's public life was, his private turmoil was intense. Had it not been for the publication of KR's strikingly candid diaries long after his death, the world would have never known that this most prolific of Grand Dukes, the father of nine children, was tormented by his homosexual feelings..."
"...KR's first homosexual experiences occurred in the Imperial Guards. The Grand Duke made great efforts to repress his feelings. But despite his love for his wife, KR could not resist the temptations offered to a person of his exalted state. KR claimed in his diary that between 1893 and 1899 he remained away from the practice of what he called his "main sin." Yet by the birth of his seventh child, KR had become a steady visitor to several of the male brothels of St. Petersburg. In 1904 he wrote in his diary that he "ordered my coachman...to go, and continued on foot past the bath-house. I intended to walk straight on... But without reaching the Pevchesky Bridge, I turned back and went in. And so I have surrendered again, without much struggle, to my depraved inclinations." The cycle of resistance and capitulation to temptation is a common theme of KR's diaries..."
"...By the end of 1904, KR became somewhat attached to an attractive young man by the name of Yatsko. "I sent for Yatsko and he came this morning. I easily persuaded him to be candid. It was strange for me to hear him describe the familiar characteristics: he has never felt drawn to a woman, and has been infatuated with men several times. I did not confess to him that I knew these feelings from my own personal experience. Yatsko and I talked for a long time. Before leaving he kissed my face and hands; I should not have allowed this, and should have pushed him away, however I was punished afterwards by vague feelings of shame and remorse. He told me that, ever since the first time we met, his soul has been filled with rapturous feelings towards me, which grow all the time. How this reminds me of my own youth." A few days later, KR and Yatsko met again, and a relationship developed between the two. In KR's final years, he wrote of his homosexual urges less and less, whether from having reached some arrangement with his conscience, or from the natural advance of age and ill health...."


Philipp Friedrich Alexander, Prince of Eulenburg and Hertefeld, Count of Sandels (German: Philipp Friedrich Alexander Fürst zu Eulenburg und Hertefeld Graf von Sandels)(12 February 1847 – 17 September 1921)
"...Although he was married, Eulenburg was connected in homosexual liaisons with members of the Kaiser's inner circle, including Count Kuno von Moltke, the military commander of Berlin. Sources say that he continued to have homosexual relationships even after the marriage. The public exposure of these liaisons in 1906 led to the Harden-Eulenburg Affair. The scandal was caused by the growing power of the Bülow-Eulenburg clique within the Auswärtiges Amt at the expense of the Holstein faction..."
"...Holstein decided to destroy Eulenburg by attacking him in his Achilles heel, namely by exposing his homosexuality. To that end, Holstein contacted the crusading journalist Maximilian Harden to inform him that Eulenburg was gay. Holstein had known Eulenburg since June 1886, and had on some point along the line learned of Eulenburg's sexual orientation. After being tipped off by Holstein, Harden started to run a series of articles in his newspaper Die Zukunft charging the "Liebenberg Round Table", a clique of homosexuals obsessed with the occult headed by Eulenburg, were dominating the Imperial court. Röhl wrote that Harden used terribly homophobic language in his attacks on Eulenburg, but the essence of his articles alleging the existence of a "Liebenberg Round Table" at the court was indeed correct. In the aftermath of the First Moroccan Crisis which ended with the Reich humiliated at the Algeciras Conference, Harden's accusations that German foreign policy was being run by a clique of homosexuals who were too "soft" to make the necessary decisions to go to war had a wide resonance...."
"...In November 1906, Harden ran an article about an unnamed senior German diplomat being gay who was clearly meant to be Eulenburg whom Harden called "the Harpist", and accused him of having a relationship with an unnamed senior French diplomat, stating the two frequently went on hunting trips together...."
"...Harden's initial target was not Wilhelm, but Eulenburg; Harden believed that the Kaiser would have gone to war with France in 1905 on his own, and it was Eulenburg who had supposedly held him back. The American historian Elena Mancini argued that the relentless way that Harden pursued Eulenburg despite constant harassment from the Prussian authorities was due to more than his ultra-nationalism, and that the root reason was Harden's "...thoroughly masculine idea of politics, which was distilled in images of decisiveness and a readiness for war". Mancini further suggested that Harden himself was gay, and that as a repressed homosexual, attacking another homosexual was his way of validating himself as heterosexual. Despite his homophobic attacks on the Liebenberg Round Table as a degenerate gay clique mismanaging foreign policy, Harden had surprisingly liberal views on homosexuality and often called for the repeal of Paragraph 175..."
"...In 1907 Moltke sued Harden for libel after the latter ran an article accusing him and Eulenburg of having a sexual relationship and lost. At the trial, the sexologist and early gay rights advocate Magnus Hirschfeld testified for Harden, stating that Moltke was gay. The homosexual Hirschfeld-who passionately wanted to make homosexuality legal in Germany-believed that proving that Army officers like Moltke were gay would help his case for legalization, and as such he also testified that he believed there was nothing wrong with Moltke..."
"...After the jury ruled in favor of Harden, Judge Hugo Isenbiel was enraged by the jury's decision, which he saw as expressing approval for Hirschfeld, and overturned the verdict under the grounds that homosexuals "have the morals of dogs"..."
See more with regard to this scandal on: https://en.wikipedia.org/...ince_of_Eulenburg#Scandal
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« Reply #55 on: June 03, 2020, 10:35:41 AM »

Ludwig II of Bavaria (German: Ludwig Otto Friedrich Wilhelm)( 25 August 1845 – 13 June 1886)
"...Ludwig never married nor had any known mistresses. It is known from his diary (which began in the 1860s), private letters, and other surviving personal documents that he had strong homosexual desires. He struggled all his life to suppress those desires and remain true to the teachings of the Catholic Church. Homosexuality had not been punishable in Bavaria since 1813, but the Unification of Germany in 1871 instated Paragraph 175, which criminalized homosexual acts between males under Prussian hegemony. In intensely Catholic and socially conservative 19th-century Bavaria, the scandal of a homosexual monarch would have been intolerable..."
"...Throughout his reign, Ludwig had a succession of close friendships with men, including his chief equerry and master of the horse, Richard Hornig (1843–1911), the Bavarian prince Paul von Thurn und Taxis, the Hungarian theater actor Josef Kainz, and his courtier Alfons Weber (b. 1862)...."


Archduke Ludwig Viktor Joseph Anton of Austria (15 May 1842 – 18 January 1919)
"...Despite his mother's attempts to arrange a marriage for him with Duchess Sophie Charlotte in Bavaria, youngest sister of Empress Elisabeth, he remained a bachelor all his life. As a result of his very public homosexuality and transvestitism, culminating in a brawl at the Central Bathhouse Vienna, his brother Emperor Franz Joseph finally forbade him to stay in Vienna. The same emperor joked that he should be given a ballerina as adjutant to keep him out of trouble...."


Charles I of Württemberg (German: Karl Friedrich Alexander)(6 March 1823 – 6 October 1891)
"...On 13 July 1846 Karl married Grand Duchess Olga Nikolaievna of Russia, the daughter of Tsar Nicholas I and Charlotte of Prussia..."
"...The couple had no children, perhaps because of Karl's homosexuality. Karl became the object of scandal several times for his closeness with various men - most notoriously with the American Charles Woodcock, a former chamberlain whom Karl elevated to Baron Savage in 1888. Karl and Charles became inseparable, going so far as to appear together in public dressed identically. The resulting outcry forced Karl to renounce his favorite. Woodcock returned to America, and Karl found private consolation some years later with the technical director of the royal theater, Wilhelm George..."

Sir James Brooke, Rajah[note] of Sarawak, KCB (29 April 1803 – 11 June 1868)
"...Among his alleged relationships was one with Badruddin, a Sarawak prince, of whom he wrote, "my love for him was deeper than anyone I knew." This phrase led to some considering him to be either homosexual or bisexual. Later, in 1848, Brooke is alleged to have formed a relationship with 16‑year‑old Charles T. C. Grant, grandson of the seventh Earl of Elgin, who supposedly 'reciprocated'. Whether this relationship was purely a friendship or otherwise has not been fully revealed. One of Brooke's recent biographers wrote that during Brooke's final years in Burrator in Devon "there is little doubt ... he was carnally involved with the rough trade of Totnes." However, Barley does not note from where he garnered this opinion. Others have suggested Brooke was instead "homo-social" and simply preferred the social company of other men, disagreeing with assertions he was a homosexual..."


Willem II of the Netherlands (Willem Frederik George Lodewijk, anglicized as William Frederick George Louis)(6 December 1792 – 17 March 1849)
"...Already in 1819, he was blackmailed over what Minister of Justice Van Maanen termed in a letter his "shameful and unnatural lusts": presumably bisexuality. Also his signing the constitutional reform of 1848, enabling a parliamentary democracy, may have been partly influenced by blackmail. He may also have had a relationship with a dandy by the name of Pereira..."

George Gordon Byron, 6th Baron Byron, FRS (22 January 1788 – 19 April 1824), known simply as Lord Byron
"...Byron's personality has been characterised as exceptionally proud and sensitive, especially when it came to his deformity..."
"....Scholars acknowledge a more or less important bisexual component in Byron's very complex sentimental and sexual life...."


Jean-Jacques-Régis de Cambacérès, duc de Parme (18 October 1753 – 8 March 1824), was a French nobleman, lawyer and statesman during the French Revolution and the First Empire
"....The common belief that Cambacérès is responsible for decriminalizing homosexuality in France is in error. Before the French Revolution, sodomy had been a capital crime under royal legislation. The penalty was burning at the stake. Very few men, however, were ever actually prosecuted and executed for consensual sodomy (no more than five in the entire eighteenth century). Sodomites arrested by the police were more usually released with a warning or held in prison for, at most, a few weeks or months. The National Constituent Assembly revised French criminal law in 1791 and got rid of a variety of offenses inspired by religion, including blasphemy. Sodomy was not specifically mentioned but was covered under the umbrella of 'religious crimes'. Since there was no public debate, its motives remain unknown (a similar state of affairs occurred during the early years of the Russian Revolution). Cambacérès was a homosexual, his sexual orientation was well-known, and he does not seem to have made any effort to conceal it. He remained unmarried, and kept to the company of other bachelors. Napoleon is recorded as making a number of jokes on the subject. Upon hearing that Cambacérès had recruited a woman for a mission, Napoleon responded with, "my compliments, so you have come closer to women?". Robert Badinter once mentioned in a speech to the French National Assembly, during debates on reforming the homosexual age of consent, that Cambacérès was known in the gardens of the Palais-Royal as "Tante Urlurette".In fact, however, Cambacérès was not responsible for ending the legal prosecution of homosexuals. He did play a key role in drafting the Code Napoléon, but this was a civil law code. He had nothing to do with the Penal Code of 1810, which covered sexual crimes..."


Henry Benedict Thomas Edward Maria Clement Francis Xavier Stuart, Cardinal Duke of York (6 March 1725 – 13 July 1807)
"...Historians have drawn upon contemporary perceptions to explore the suggestion that Henry was homosexual. These accounts include the writings of Hester Lynch Thrale[11] (1741–1821), and the diplomat and writer Giuseppe Gorani (1740–1819). Gorani admitted to having gathered evidence insufficient to confirm his suspicions either way, but drew attention to the number of handsome clerics that were to be found in Henry's palace. The historian Andrew Lang alluded to James's comment that his younger son would never marry although many marriages had been planned for him.The writer Gaetano Moroni provides the lengthiest account of Henry's close attachment with his majordomo Monsignor Giovanni Lercari (1722–1802), whom Henry was said to have "loved beyond measure". This closeness led to serious tensions between the cardinal and his father who in 1752 eventually tried to have Lercari dismissed from service and sent from Rome. ..."
"...Things became easier after the death of James in 1766. From 1769 onwards Henry remained close to Monsignor Angelo Cesarini, a nobleman from Perugia, who thanks to Henry's protection, won various honours, was made canon of the cathedral in Frascati, and finally in 1801 became Bishop of Milevi. When Henry died, Cesarini was still at his side, as he had been for 32 years. Cesarini was later buried in the church of Santa Maria in Vallicella.Caution should nevertheless be given against assuming any active sexual relationships, even if they may have had a romantic element, because equally clear in contemporary sources is York's horror of all impropriety..."

Frederick II of Prussia (Frederick the Great) (German: Friedrich II.)( 24 January 1712 – 17 August 1786)
"... At age 16, Frederick formed an attachment to the king's 17-year-old page, Peter Karl Christoph von Keith [de]. Wilhelmine recorded that the two "soon became inseparable. Keith was intelligent, but without education. He served my brother from feelings of real devotion, and kept him informed of all the king's actions." The friendship was apparently of a homosexual nature, and as a result thereof, Keith was sent away to an unpopular regiment near the Dutch frontier, while Frederick was temporarily sent to his father's hunting lodge at Königs Wusterhausen in order "to repent of his sin.".."
"...Soon after his previous affair, he became close friends with Hans Hermann von Katte, a Prussian officer several years older than Frederick who served as one of his tutors. When he was 18, Frederick plotted to flee to England with Katte and other junior army officers. While the royal retinue was near Mannheim in the Electorate of the Palatinate, Robert Keith, Peter Keith's brother, had an attack of conscience when the conspirators were preparing to escape and begged Frederick William for forgiveness on 5 August 1730; Frederick and Katte were subsequently arrested and imprisoned in Küstrin. Because they were army officers who had tried to flee Prussia for Great Britain, Frederick William leveled an accusation of treason against the pair. The king briefly threatened the crown prince with execution, then considered forcing Frederick to renounce the succession in favour of his brother, Augustus William, although either option would have been difficult to justify to the Imperial Diet of the Holy Roman Empire. The king forced Frederick to watch the beheading of his confidant Katte at Küstrin on 6 November, leading the crown prince to faint just before the fatal blow. Frederick was granted a royal pardon and released from his cell on 18 November, although he remained stripped of his military rank..."
"...Most modern biographers agree that Frederick was primarily homosexual, and that his sexual orientation was central to his life. After a dispiriting defeat on the battlefield, Frederick wrote: "Fortune has it in for me; she is a woman, and I am not that way inclined..."
"...Frederick's physician Johann Georg Ritter von Zimmermann claimed that Frederick had suffered a minor deformity during an operation to cure gonorrhea in 1733, and convinced himself that he was impotent, but pretended to be homosexual in order to appear that he was still virile and capable of intercourse, albeit with men. This story is doubted by Wolfgang Burgdorf, who is of the opinion that "Frederick had a physical disgust of women" and therefore "was unable to sleep with them."..."
"...In 1733, Frederick was forced to marry Elisabeth Christine of Brunswick-Bevern, with whom he had no children. He immediately separated from his wife when his father died seven years later..."


Prince Eugene Francis of Savoy–Carignano[1] (18 October 1663 – 21 April 1736)
"...Despite being one of the richest and most celebrated men of his age, Eugene never married and the suggestion is that he was predominantly homosexual. History knows little of his life before 1683. In his early boyhood in Paris "he belonged to a small, effeminate set that included such unabashed perverts as the young abbé de Choisy who was invariably dressed as a girl" wrote historian Nicholas Henderson. The Duchess of Orléans, who had known Eugene from those days, would later write to her aunt, Princess Sophia of Hanover, describing Eugene's antics with lackeys and pages. He was "a vulgar whore" along with the Prince of Turenne, and "often played the woman with young people" with the nickname of 'Madame Simone' or 'Madam l'Ancienne'. He preferred a "couple of fine page boys" to any woman, and was refused an ecclesiastical benefice due to his "depravity"...."


Philippe of Lorraine (1643 – 8 December 1702), known as the Chevalier de Lorraine
"...was a French nobleman and member of the House of Guise, cadet of the Ducal House of Lorraine. He was the renowned lover of Philippe I, Duke of Orléans, brother of Louis XIV...."
"...Known to be "as beautiful as an angel", Philippe became Monsieur's lover in 1658, while living at the Palais-Royal in Paris, where the young Princess Henriette Anne of England was living with her mother Queen Henriette Marie. The two Henriettes had fled England due to the English Civil War and had lived at the Palais-Royal as a grace and favour residence. Lorraine and Henriette would later live together under closer circumstances; Monsieur married Henriette Anne at the Palais-Royal in 1661. Monsieur openly flaunted his affairs at court, especially his long term lover Lorraine. In 1670, Henriette Anne died suddenly and mysteriously at Saint-Cloud, and it was suspected that Lorraine had poisoned her, even though the autopsy performed reported that Henrietta-Anne had died of peritonitis caused by a perforated ulcer...."
"...Monsieur even told Henriette Anne that he could not love her without Lorraine's permission. Monsieur's first marriage was not a happy one. In January 1670, his wife prevailed upon the King to imprison the chevalier, first near Lyon, then in the Mediterranean island-fortress of the Château d'If, and finally he was banished to Rome. But by February, Monsieur's protests and pleas persuaded the King to restore him to his brother's entourage. In 1682, Lorraine was exiled again, having been accused of seducing the young Count of Vermandois (son of Louis XIV and Louise de La Vallière) with his set (including the Prince of Conti) and began practising le vice italien (the contemporary term for homosexuality). Having been allowed to return to court, he was then blamed for helping to instigate the marriage between Philippe d'Orléans, duc de Chartres and Mademoiselle de Blois in 1692. Chartres was the son of Monsieur and his second wife Elizabeth Charlotte of the Palatinate, who did not get on with Lorraine at all and merely "tolerated his existence". Monsieur and Elizabeth Charlotte married in 1671...."


Guy Armand de Gramont, Count of Guiche (November 25, 1637 – November 29, 1673)
"...was a French nobleman, adventurer and one of the greatest playboys of the 17th century..."
"...Armand was bisexual. He was part of the entourage of Philippe de France, who was gay, where many reckoned him the handsomest man at court. He was known for being vain, overbearing, and somewhat contemptuous, but many lovers of both sexes often overlooked these flaws.[citation needed] It is generally accepted that he became the lover of Princess Henrietta, Philippe's wife, but for a time he also paid court to Louise de La Vallière. Guiche was, however, not sufficiently enamored with Louise to challenge King Louis XIV's affections for her. He was exiled in 1662 for conspiring with the jealous Henrietta to drive a wedge between Louis XIV and Louise...."


Louis XIII (sometimes called the Just; 27 September 1601 – 14 May 1643) was King of France from 1610 to 1643 and King of Navarre (as Louis II)
"....There is no evidence that Louis kept mistresses (a distinction that earned him the title "Louis the Chaste"), but several reports suggest that he may have been homosexual. The prolonged temporal gap between the queen's pregnancies may have been a result of Louis XIII's aversion to heterosexuality, a matter of great political consequence, since it took the couple more than 20 years of marriage before Louis XIV's birth. His interests as a teenager were focused on male courtiers and he developed an intense emotional attachment to his favourite, Charles d'Albert, although some say there is no clear evidence of a physical sexual relationship...."
"...A further liaison with an equerry, François de Baradas, ended when the latter lost favour fighting a duel after duelling had been forbidden by royal decree..."
"...Louis was also captivated by Henri Coiffier de Ruzé, Marquis of Cinq-Mars, who was later executed for conspiring with the Spanish enemy in time of war. Tallemant described how on a royal journey, the King "sent M. le Grand [de Cinq-Mars] to undress, who returned, adorned like a bride. 'To bed, to bed' he said to him impatiently... and the mignon was not in before the king was already kissing his hands."..."


Scipione Borghese ( 1 September 1577 – 2 October 1633)
"...Contemporaries commented on the near-public scandals that resulted on occasions from Scipione's possible homosexuality, reflected in his taste for collecting art with strong homoerotic overtones. In 1605, Scipione allegedly angered his uncle the pope by bringing Stefano Pignatelli, to whom Scipione was closely attached, to Rome.."
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #56 on: June 23, 2020, 01:31:38 AM »

King Edward II of England was interested in Piers Gaveston. King Edward I had banished Gaveston. The younger Edward had asked his father to bestow the title of Count of Ponthieu on Piers.
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