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« Reply #570 on: June 04, 2020, 12:41:33 PM »

Gottfried is a masculine German given name. It is derived from the Old High German name Godafrid, recorded since the 7th century. The name is composed of the elements god- (conflated from the etyma for 'God' and 'good', and possibly further conflated with gaut) and frid- ('peace, protection').

Gotfrid, Duke of Alemannia and Raetia (d. 709)

Godefrid (d. c. 720), son of Drogo of Champagne, Frankish nobleman.

Godfrid Haraldsson (d. c. 856), Danish Viking leader

Godfrid, Duke of Frisia (d. 885), Danish Viking leader

Godfrey, Count Palatine of Lotharingia (d. 949)

Godfrey I, Duke of Lower Lorraine (d. 964)

Geoffrey I "Greymantle", Count of Anjou (d. 987)

Geoffrey I, Duke of Brittany (d. 1008)

Godfrey II, Duke of Lower Lorraine (d. 1023)

Geoffrey II "the Hammer", Count of Anjou (d. 1060)

Godfrey III, Duke of Lower Lorraine (d. 1069)

Godfrey of Bouillon (Godefridus Bullionensis, Godefroy de Bouillon, d. 1100), Frankish knight and leader of the First Crusade

Gottfried II of Raabs (d. c. 1137), burgrave of Nuremberg

Gottfried of Admont (d. 1165), Benedictine abbot

Geoffrey II, Duke of Brittany (d. c. 1181)

Geoffrey of Clairvaux (d. after 1188), Cistercian abbot

Godfrey of Viterbo (Godefridus Viterbiensis, c. 1120 – c. 1196)

Geoffrey of Vinsauf (fl. 1200), medieval grammarian

Gottfried von Strassburg (d. 1210), author of a Middle High German courtly romance

Geoffrey of Villehardouin (d. c. 1212), knight and historian of the Fourth Crusade

Gottfried von Hohenlohe (1265–1310), Grand Master of the Teutonic Order

Gottfried von Hagenau (died 1313), poet, theologian and medical doctor from Alsace

Gottfried, 8th Prince of Hohenlohe-Langenburg (German: Gottfried Hermann Alfred Paul Maximilian Viktor Fürst zu Hohenlohe-Langenburg)(24 March 1897 – 11 May 1960) was the only surviving son of Ernst II, Prince of Hohenlohe-Langenburg. The first child of Ernst II, Prince of Hohenlohe-Langenburg (1863–1950, son of Hermann, Prince of Hohenlohe-Langenburg and Princess Leopoldine of Baden) and his wife, Princess Alexandra of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (1878–1942, daughter of Alfred, Duke of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha and Grand Duchess Maria Alexandrovna of Russia). Gottfried was briefly engaged during 1927-28 to marry Gloria Morgan Vanderbilt, the widow of Reginald Claypoole Vanderbilt. That engagement was however repudiated, and on 3 December 1930, Gottfried became engaged to Princess Margarita of Greece and Denmark. Margarita was the daughter of Prince Andrew of Greece and Denmark and his wife, Princess Alice of Battenberg. Gottfried and Margarita are second cousins once removed through Queen Victoria and third cousins through Nicholas I of Russia. Many years later, Margarita's much younger brother Philip would marry Gottfried's distant cousin Elizabeth, daughter of King George VI. Elizabeth would succeed her father to the throne of the United Kingdom as Queen Elizabeth II.Gottfried and Margarita had a generally harmonious marriage. They had six children

Archduke Gottfried of Austria (German: Gottfried Maria Joseph Peter Ferdinand Hubert Anton Rupert Leopold Heinrich Ignaz Alfons, Erzherzog von Österreich, Prinz von Toskana) (14 March 1902- 21 January 1984) was a member of the Tuscan line of the House of Habsburg-Lorraine and Archduke of Austria, Prince of Hungary, Bohemia, and Tuscany by birth. Gottfried was the titular Grand Duke of Tuscany from 8 November 1948 to 21 January 1984. The eldest child and son of Archduke Peter Ferdinand of Austria and his wife Princess Maria Cristina of Bourbon-Two Sicilies. Gottfried married Princess Dorothea of Bavaria, fifth child and fourth daughter of Prince Franz of Bavaria and his wife Princess Isabella Antonie of Croÿ in 1938. The couple had 4 children.

Gottfried (Maximilian Maria) Prinz zu Hohenlohe-Waldenburg-Schillingfürst, Ratibor und Corvey (8 November 1867 – 7 November 1932), was an Austro-Hungarian army officer and diplomat during World War I He was born to Lord High Steward Prince Konstantin of Hohenlohe-Schillingsfürst (1828–1896) and was the brother of Konrad Prinz zu Hohenlohe-Schillingsfürst, who was Prime Minister of Austria in 1906 and who too would become Lord High Steward in 1917. He married Archduchess Maria Henrietta, daughter of Archduke Friedrich who was the Supreme Commander of the Austro-Hungarian army during World War I, on 3 June 1908 in Baden. The couple had 3 children.

Count Gottfried Alexander Leopold von Bismarck-Schönhausen (Gottfried Alexander Leopold Graf von Bismarck-Schönhausen)(19 September 1962 – 29 June 2007) was a German businessman, socialite and member of the princely German House of Bismarck. Von Bismarck was noted for his flamboyant lifestyle, which the popular press were fond of characterising as “dissolute”. His homes were linked to two deaths from narcotics although he was not found to be for blame for either of the incidents which were twenty years apart. He died of a cocaine overdose in 2007. He was the second son of Ferdinand, Prince von Bismarck and grandson of Otto, Prince von Bismarck.

Count Gottfried von Bismarck-Schönhausen (9 March 1901 – 14 September 1949) was a German politician and German Resistance figure. Born in Berlin, Bismarck was a grandson of the Chancellor Otto von Bismarck.He was a member of the Nazi Party and in 1933 he was elected to the Reichstag as a Nazi member. In 1935 he became chairman of the regional council (Regierungspräsident) for Stettin, and later also for Potsdam. In 1937 he married a cousin, Countess Melanie Hoyos, in Vienna. By 1944 he held the rank of Brigadeführer (Brigade Leader/Major General) in the SS. From 1942, however, Bismarck had been opposed to the continuation of World War II, and had made contact with other members of the German aristocracy who were working against the Nazi regime – such as the Berlin police chief Wolf-Heinrich Graf von Helldorf, Colonel Claus Graf von Stauffenberg, and General Friedrich Olbricht – with the aim of starting negotiations with the western Allies. He was aware of preparations for the 20 July plot to assassinate Adolf Hitler, but was not directly involved in it.After the failure of the plot, Bismarck's connections to the plotters were discovered.[1] He was expelled from the SS and from the Reichstag. Because of his famous name and many powerful connections, however, he escaped the fate of most of the active plotters. He was not arrested until August and he was not tortured. In October he was acquitted of the charges against him by the People's Court, but was nevertheless sent to Sachsenhausen concentration camp, where he was relatively well treated. He was liberated by Soviet forces in April 1945. In September 1949 Bismarck and his wife were killed in a car accident


Godfrey, Count Palatine of Lotharingia (c. 905 – 1 Jun aft. 949) was count of the Jülichgau from at least 924 to 936 and probably even until 949. He was the son of Gerhard I of Metz and Oda of Saxony, a daughter of Otto I, Duke of Saxony from the family of the Liudolfings, and thus a nephew of King Henry the Fowler. Moreover, he was the younger brother of Wigfried, who was archbishop of Cologne from 924 to 953 and arch-chancellor of his cousin King Otto I from 941.It is thought that his wife Ermentrude (b. 908/9), was the eldest daughter of Charles the Simple, who probably owned the Duchy of Lorraine at the time and was thus his liege lord. The couple had 5 children.

Godfrey I (died 1002), called the Prisoner or the Captive (le Captif), sometimes the Old (le Vieux), was the count of Bidgau and Methingau from 959 and the sovereign count of VerdunHe was the son of Gozlin, Count of Bidgau and Methingau, and Oda of Metz. In 963, he married Matilda, daughter of Herman, Duke of Saxony, of the Billung family, a widow of Baldwin III of Flanders. They had issue.

Godfrey II (965–1023), called the Childless, son of Godfrey I, Count of Verdun, was the duke of Lower Lorraine after the death in 1012 of the Carolingian Otto, who left no sons.

Godfrey III (c. 997–1069), called the Bearded, was the eldest son of Gothelo I, Duke of Upper and Lower Lorraine. By inheritance, he was Count of Verdun and he became Margrave of Antwerp as a vassal of the Duke of Lower Lorraine. In 1053, his first wife Doda having died, Godfrey remarried Beatrice of Bar, the widow of Boniface III of Tuscany and mother of Matilda, Boniface's heir.By Doda, possibly a daughter of her namesake Dada and Manasses II of Rethel he had 4 children.

Godfrey IV (died 26 or 27 February 1076), known as the Hunchback, was a son of Godfrey the Bearded, whom he succeeded as Duke of Lower Lorraine in 1069, and DodaIn the year of his succession, he married Margravine Matilda of Tuscany, daughter of his stepmother Beatrice of Bar, and thus became margrave of Tuscany. Godfrey and Matilda had only one child, Beatrice, who was born in 1071 and died the same year. From 1071 on, Godfrey lived apart from his wife. The two spouses were on opposite sides in the Investiture Controversy: Matilda was a partisan of Pope Gregory VII and Godfrey of Emperor Henry IV.

Godfrey of Bouillon (French: Godefroy, Dutch: Godfried, German: Gottfried, Latin: Godefridus Bullionensis)(18 September 1060 – 18 July 1100) was one of the leaders of the First Crusade. He was the first ruler of the Kingdom of Jerusalem from 1099 to 1100. He apparently avoided using the title of king, choosing instead that of princeps

Godfrey I (died 964) was the count of Hainault from 958 and margrave or vice-duke of Lower Lorraine from 959, when that duchy was divided by Duke Bruno, who remained duke until his death in 965. Godfrey was the son of Godfrey, Count Palatine of Lotharingia, and Ermentrude. He was a sixth generation descendant of Charlemagne and was related, through blood and marriages, to the most important royal families in Europe.

Godfrey I (German: Gottfried, Dutch: Godfried)(c. 1060 - 25 January 1139), called the Bearded, the Courageous, or the Great, was the landgrave of Brabant, and count of Brussels and Leuven (Louvain) from 1095 to his death and duke of Lower Lorraine from 1106 to 1129. He was also margrave of Antwerp from 1106 to his death.Godfrey was the son of Henry II (c. 1020–1078) and Adela of Orthen (or Betuwe), a daughter of Count Everard of Orthen. He succeeded his brother Henry III who died wounded in a tournament in 1095, and only had young daughters. His widow Gertrude married Theodoric II, Duke of (upper) Lorraine. He married Ida of Chiny (1078–1117), daughter of Otto II, Count of Chiny, (c. 1065 – after 1131) and Adelaide of Namur. They had several children.


Godfrey II (c. 1110 – 13 June 1142) was the count of Louvain, landgrave of Brabant by inheritance from 23 January 1139. He was the son of Godfrey I and Ida of Chiny. He was also the duke of Lower Lorraine (as Godfrey VII), and as such also margrave of Antwerp, by appointment in 1139 after the death of Duke Waleran.He married Luitgarde, daughter of Berengar II of Sulzbach and sister of Gertrude von Sulzbach, wife of Conrad III of Germany, and Bertha, wife of Manuel I Comnenus, the Byzantine emperor. He was succeeded by his son Godfrey III in both the counties and the duchy.


Godfrey III (1142 – died 21 August 1190) was count of Louvain (or Leuven), landgrave of Brabant, margrave of Antwerp, and duke of Lower Lorraine (as Godfrey VIII) from 1142 to his death. He was the son of Godfrey II and Lutgarde of Sulzbach. He was still an infant at his succession (therefore called dux in cunis) of which a few Brabantian vassals sought to take advantage to become independent of the duke (Wars of Grimbergen, 1141–1159). Godfrey married twice. Firstly to Margaret of Limbourg, daughter of Henry II, Duke of Limburg, in 1158, by whom he had two children. Secondly Godfrey married Imagina of Loon, daughter of Louis I, Count of Loon, by whom he had two children.


Godfrey of Louvain (d.1226), son of Godfrey III and his 2nd wife Imagina of Loon. Who went to England in 1196 and became Senechal of the Honour of Eye. He married Alice de Hastings, daughter and heiress of Robert de Hastings (d.circa 1190), feudal baron of Little Easton in Essex,with whom he had a son


Godfrey (1209 – January 21, 1254), Son of Henry I, Duke of Brabant & his 1st wife Mathilde of Boulogne. Lord of Gaesbeek, married Marie van Oudenaarde

Godfrey of Brabant (died 1302), Belgian noble

Godfrey of Esch (11th century), Lord of Esch and crusader

Godred Crovan (died 1095), King of Dublin and the Isles

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« Reply #571 on: June 04, 2020, 12:57:39 PM »

Alonso is a Spanish name of Germanic origin that is a Galician-Portuguese variant of Adalfuns.

Don Alonso de Orléans-Borbón y Parodi-Delfino (1941-1975) Son of Álvaro de Orleans y Sajonia-Coburgo-Gotha, Duke of Galliera (20 April 1910  – 22 August 1997) and Carla Parodi-Delfino (13 December 1909 - 27 July 2000). Married Donna Emilia Ferrara Pignatelli, dei Principi di Strongoli ( 6 April 1940- 22 December 1999) in 1966. They had 2 sons.


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« Reply #572 on: June 04, 2020, 05:07:25 PM »

Alphons (Latinized Alphonsus, Adelphonsus, or Adefonsus) is a male given name recorded from the 8th century (Alfonso I of Asturias, r. 739-757) in the Christian successor states of the Visigothic kingdom in the Iberian peninsula. In the later medieval period it became a standard name in the Hispanic and Portuguese royal families. It is derived from a Gothic name, or a conflation of several Gothic names; from *Aþalfuns, composed of the elements aþal "noble" and funs "eager, brave, ready", and perhaps influenced by names such as *Alafuns, *Adefuns and *Hildefuns. Variants of the name include: Alfonso (Spanish and Italian), Alfons (Dutch, German, Catalan, Polish and Scandinavian), Afonso (Portuguese and Galician), Alphonse, Alfonse (Italian, French and English), etc.


Infante Alfonso of Spain (Don Alfonso Cristino Teresa Ángelo Francisco de Asís y Todos los Santos de Borbón y Borbón Dos-Sicilias)(3 October 1941 – 29 March 1956) was the younger brother of King Juan Carlos of Spain. The youngest son of the Infante Juan of Spain, Count of Barcelona and of his wife, Princess Maria Mercedes of Bourbon-Two Sicilies.  Alfonso died in a gun accident at his parents' home Villa Giralda in Estoril, Portugal

Alfonso, Prince of Asturias (10 May 1907 – 6 September 1938), was heir apparent to the throne of Spain from birth until he renounced his rights in 1933. He was the eldest son of Alfonso XIII and his wife Victoria Eugenie of Battenberg. He died at the age of 31 as a result of a car accident. Though appearing to have sustained minor injuries, his haemophilia, inherited by him from his great-grandmother Queen Victoria, led to fatal internal bleeding. There had been plans for young Alfonso's deposition from succession, but ultimately he himself renounced his rights to the then-defunct throne to marry a commoner, Edelmira Sampedro y Robato, on 21 June 1933, after which Alfonso took the courtesy title Count of Covadonga. This was required by the regulations for the succession set by the Pragmatic Sanction of Charles III. The couple divorced 8 May 1937, with Edelmira keeping the title Countess of Covadonga. Alfonso married to another commoner, Marta Esther Rocafort-Altuzarra in Havana on 3 July 1937. They divorced on 8 January 1938. He had no children by either of his wives. However, Alfonso de Bourbon, a resident of California, later claimed to be an illegitimate son of Alfonso.

Alfonso, Duke of Anjou, Duke of Cádiz, Grandee of Spain (Alfonso Jaime Marcelino Manuel Víctor María de Borbón y Dampierre, French citizen as Alphonse de Bourbon)( 20 April 1936 – 30 January 1989) was a grandson of King Alfonso XIII of Spain, a potential heir to the throne in the event of restoration of the Spanish monarchy, and a Legitimist claimant to the defunct throne of France as Alphonse II.  The elder son of Infante Jaime, Duke of Segovia, King Alfonso's second of four sons. His mother was Donna Emanuela de Dampierre, daughter of the Franco-Italian Duke of San Lorenzo and Donna Vittoria Ruspoli dei principi di Poggio Suasa. The king's eldest son, Alfonso, Prince of Asturias, had inherited hemophilia from his maternal great-grandmother Queen Victoria, yet had been considered Spain's heir apparent until the republic was established in 1931. In 1933 he renounced any claim to inherit the Spanish throne (in the event of a restoration) to marry a Cuban commoner, Edelmira Sampedro-Ocejo, and was dead of internal bleeding following a minor auto accident by September 1938. Next in the line of succession, Infante Don Jaime, deaf and largely mute, was persuaded to renounce his claim (and that of future descendants) at the same time as his elder brother, thereby assuming the Duke of Segovia title and clearing the way for King Alfonso's third son, Don Juan, Count of Barcelona to take up the monarchist cause on behalf of the banished dynasty In December 1949 Segovia retracted his renunciation as coerced and claimed that he was the rightful claimant to Spain's crown. In 1972 Alfonso married Doña María del Carmen Martínez-Bordiú y Franco, daughter of Don Cristóbal Martínez-Bordiú, 10th Marquis de Villaverde, and of his wife, Doña Carmen Franco y Polo (Franco's only daughter. Doña Carmen was granted a title in 1975 becoming the 1st Duchess de Franco after Franco's death). Alfonso and Carmen separated in 1979, received a civil divorce in 1982 and an ecclesiastical annulment in 1986. Also in 1972, General Franco awarded Alfonso the Spanish title Duque de Cádiz with the dignity Grandee of Spain, and he received the style of Royal Highness. The Cádiz title had been held by Alfonso's great-great-grandfather, the Infante Francisco de Asís. Since Alfonso's mother was not born a princess of royal descent, his grandfather Alfonso XIII did not consider young Alfonso in line to the Spanish throne in accordance with the Pragmatic Sanction of 1830. Alfonso's father Jaime, however, came to assert that his sons were French dynasts entitled to the style of Royal Highness.Alfonso and Carmen had two sons.

Alphonse (28 May 2010) third child and second son of Louis Alphonse of Bourbon (Spanish: Luis Alfonso Gonzalo Víctor Manuel Marco de Borbón y Martínez-Bordiú, French: Louis Alphonse Gonzalve Victor Emmanuel Marc de Bourbon)(25 April 1974) and María Margarita Vargas Santaella (21 October 1983). He is the twin of Prince Louis, Duke of Burgundy (Luis). In paternal line a grandson of Alfonso, Duke of Anjou, Duke of Cádiz, Grandee of Spain (20 April 1936 – 30 January 1989).

Alfonso XIII (17 May 1886 – 28 February 1941), also known as El Africano or the African, was King of Spain from 1886 until the proclamation of the Second Republic in 1931. He was the posthumous son of Alfonso XII of Spain, who had died in November 1885 (thus Alfonso became king upon birth) & Maria Christina of Austria. In 1906, Alfonso married British-born Princess Victoria Eugenie of Battenberg (1887–1969). Only entitled to the style of Serene Highness by birth, Ena, as she was known, was granted the higher honorific of Royal Highness one month before her wedding. Alfonso and Ena had seven children. On 10 May 1907, the couple's first child, Alfonso, Prince of Asturias, was born. However, Victoria was in fact a haemophilia carrier, and Alfonso inherited the condition.Neither of the two daughters born to the King and Queen were haemophilia carriers, but another of their sons, Gonzalo (1914–1934), had the condition. Alfonso distanced himself from his wife for transmitting the condition to their sons. From 1914 on, he had several mistresses, and fathered five illegitimate children. A sixth illegitimate child had been born before his marriage.

Alfonso XII (Alfonso Francisco de Asís Fernando Pío Juan María de la Concepción Gregorio Pelayo)(28 November 1857 – 25 November 1885), also known as El Pacificador or the Peacemaker, was King of Spain, reigning from 1874 to 1885. After a revolution that deposed his mother Isabella II from the throne in 1868, Alfonso studied in Austria and France. His mother abdicated in his favour in 1870, and he returned to Spain as king in 1874 following a military coup against the First Republic. Alfonso died aged 27 in 1885, and was succeeded by his unborn son, who became Alfonso XIII on his birth the following year. The eldest son of Queen Isabella II. Officially, his father was her husband, Infante Francis. Alfonso's biological paternity is uncertain: there is speculation that his biological father may have been Enrique Puigmoltó y Mayans (a captain of the guard). These rumours were used as political propaganda against Alfonso by the Carlists. In 1878 at the Basilica of Atocha in Madrid, Alfonso married his first cousin, Princess Maria de las Mercedes, but she died within six months of the marriage. 1879 at the Basilica of Atocha in Madrid, Alfonso married a much more distant relative, Archduchess Maria Christina of Austria. The couple had 3 children.

Infante Alfonso of Spain, Prince of the Two Sicilies, Duke of Calabria (30 November 1901 – 3 February 1964) was one of two claimants to the title of the head of the House of Bourbon-Two Sicilies from 1960 until his death in 1964. Alfonso was the son of Prince Carlos of Bourbon-Two Sicilies (1870–1949) and his wife, Mercedes, Princess of Asturias (1880–1904). In maternal line a grandson of Alfonso XII. Alfonso's mother was Mercedes, Princess of Asturias, but she died in childbirth in 1904. King Alfonso XIII of Spain was unmarried at the time so as the Princess of the Asturias' eldest son, Alfonso became heir-presumptive to the Spanish crown, though, unlike his mother, he never held the title of Prince of Asturias. He was heir-presumptive until the birth of his cousin, Alfonso in 1907, to Alfonso XIII and Queen Victoria Eugenie. He married Princess Alicia of Bourbon-Parma (1917-2017), his second cousin, daughter of Elias, Duke of Parma and Piacenza and his wife Archduchess Maria Anna of Austria, on 16 April 1936. Alfonso and Alicia had three children.

Alfonso Moreno y Borbón-Dos Sicilias (19 October 1965 - 18 May 2018), son of Princess Teresa María of Bourbon-Two Sicilies, Duchess of Salerno ( 6 February 1937) and Íñigo Moreno y Arteaga, 8th Marquess of Laula (18 April 1934)  He was married to Marta Calvo y Molezún (ca. 1970) with whom he had 2 children.

Infante Luis Alfonso of Spain (6 December 1906 - 14 May 1983) son of Infanta Maria Teresa of Spain (Spanish: María Teresa Isabel Eugenia del Patrocinio Diega de Borbón y Habsburgo, Infanta de España)(12 November 1882 – 23 September 1912 ) and husband her  first cousin, Prince Ferdinand of Bavaria, Infante of Spain, eldest son and child of Prince Ludwig Ferdinand of Bavaria and his wife Infanta María de la Paz of Spain. In maternal line a grandson of Alfonso XII.

Alfonso IX (15 August 1171 – 23 or 24 September 1230) was king of León and Galicia from the death of his father Ferdinand II in 1188 until his own death. He was the only son of King Ferdinand II of León and Urraca of Portugal Alfonso IX married twice, both times to near relatives, and remarkably, both of his marriages were annulled for consanguinity. Apart from the eight children born of these two marriages, Alfonso also fathered numerous progeny upon other women of lower rank. In 1191, Alfonso married his first cousin Theresa of Portugal, with issue. In 1197, Alfonso IX married his first cousin once removed, the infanta Berengaria of Castile, also with issue.

Alfonso (died in 1272), Lord of Molina jure uxoris due to his first marriage to Mafalda González de Lara. Son of Alfonso IX and his 2nd wife Infanta Berengaria of Castile.
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« Reply #573 on: June 04, 2020, 05:08:06 PM »

Alfonso X (also known as the Wise, Spanish: el Sabio)(23 November 1221  – 4 April 1284) was the king of Castile, León and Galicia from 30 May 1252 until his death in 1284. During the election of 1257, a dissident faction chose him to be king of Germany on 1 April. He renounced his claim to Germany in 1275, and in creating an alliance with the Kingdom of England in 1254, his claim on the Duchy of Gascony as well.Alfonso was the eldest son of Ferdinand III and Elizabeth (Beatrice) of Swabia. In 1249, Alfonso married Violant, the daughter of King James I of Aragon and Yolande of Hungary, although betrothed already in 1246.Violante was ten years old at the time of her marriage to Alfonso; she produced no children for several years and it was feared that she was barren. Alfonso almost had their marriage annulled, but they went on to have eleven children.

Alfonso of Valencia de Campos, son of Margaret, who died in 1286, daughter of William VII, Marquess of Montferrat) and Elizabeth of Gloucester & John of Castile, called the "el de Tarifa" (Spanish: Juan de Castilla "el de Tarifa"; 1262–25 June 1319)  He married as his first wife, Teresa, daughter of Juan Núñez I de Lara and in 1314, married Juana Fernández de Castro, daughter of Fernando Rodríguez de Castro and granddaughter of King Sancho IV of Castile

Alfonso de la Cerda, (1270 - 1333), called "the disinherited," was the elder son of Ferdinand de la Cerda and his wife Blanche of France, and was a grandson of Alfonso X of Castile. In 1290, Alfonso married Matilde of Brienne, daughter of John I of Brienne. They had seven children.

Alfonso de la Cerda, called of Spain ( 1289 - 1327) from the Castilian House of Ivrea was Archdeacon of Paris, baron of Lunel and Lord of Tafalla & Caparroso. He was the eldest son of Alfonso de la Cerda, called "the disinherited".


Alfonso of León, Lord of Molina (1202 – 6 January 1272) was an infante (prince) of León and Castile, the son of King Alfonso IX of León and his second wife Queen Berengaria of Castile. Alfonso of Molina married, in 1240, Mafalda González de Lara, Lady of Molina, daughter of Gonzalo Pérez de Lara, 3rd Lord of Molina and Mesa, and his wife, Sancha Gómez de Trava, they had 2 children. In 1244, widowed of his first wife, he married his second, Teresa González de Lara, daughter of Count Gonzalo Núñez de Lara, Lord of Belorado, and his wife María Díaz I de Haro. They had a daughter He married, in 1260 as this third wife, Mayor Alfonso de Meneses (c. 1230 – after 1265), Lady of Meneses and Villanueva, widow of Gonzalo Gil of Villalobos and daughter of Alfonso Téllez de Meneses "el Mozo", 4th Lord of Meneses, San Román and Villanueva, and his first wife María Yáñez de Lima. They had two children

Alfonso Téllez of Molina (1262–1314), 7th Lord of Meneses and Lord of Tiedra, Montealegre, Grajal, Alba de Liste, San Román and San Felices. He was also the proprietor of half of the lordship of Alburquerque. He was commander-in-chief for Sancho IV of Castile from 10 December 1288 to 25 April 1295. Alfonso was the son of Alfonso of Molina and his 3rd wife  Mayor Alfonso de Meneses. He married Teresa Pérez of Asturias, daughter of Pedro Álvarez of Asturias, Lord of Noreña, and his wife Sancha Rodríguez of Lara. They had at least a son, Tello Alfonso de Meneses, Lord of Meneses, who married Maria of Portugal, Lady of Meneses and Orduña.

Alfonso (1286–1291) son of María Alfonso Téllez de Meneses (c. 1265 – 1321), known as María de Molina & Sancho IV of Castile (12 May 1258 – 25 April 1295) called the Brave (el Bravo).


Alfonso XI (13 August 1311 – 26 March 1350), called the Avenger (el Justiciero), was the king of Castile, León and Galicia. He was the son of Ferdinand IV of Castile and his wife Constance of Portugal. Upon his father's death in 1312, several disputes ensued over who would hold regency, which were resolved in 1313. Alfonso XI first married Constanza Manuel in 1325, but had the union annulled two years later. His second marriage, in 1328, was to his double first cousin Maria of Portugal, daughter of Alfonso IV of Portugal. They had 2 sons.

Alfonso Enríquez (Gijón, 1355 – Marans or Portugal, c. 1400), Count of Noreña and of Gijón and lord of several places, was the eldest son of King Henry II of Castile and Elvira Íñiguez born before the king's marriage. As one of the most powerful feudal lords in Asturias, where he owned many properties, he attempted to declare the independence of this region from his brother King John I and then from his nephew, King Henry III of Castile. He and his Portuguese wife, Isabel of Portugal, a natural daughter of King Ferdinand I, are the ancestors of the Noronha lineage in Portugal.

Alfonso VIII (11 November 1155– 5 October 1214), called the Noble (El Noble) or the one of Las Navas (el de las Navas), was the King of Castile from 1158 to his death and King of Toledo Alfonso was born to Sancho III of Castile and Blanche He was named after his grandfather Alfonso VII of León and Castile, He married Eleanor of England, daughter of Henry II of England and Eleanor of Aquitaine. The couple had 11 children.

Alfonso de Ceballos-Escalera y Gila (born March 4, 1957) is a Spanish aristocrat, who holds the title of Marqués de la Floresta & Viscount of Ayala in the Kingdom of Spain and Duke of Ostuni of the former Kingdom of the Two-Sicilies (Italy). Alfonso Ceballos-Escallera was married to Ana Moyano y Vital, they had 4 children. He married secondly, María Jofre y Gómez, (1969) they have 2 children.

Alfonso III (c. 848 – 20 December 910), called the Great (Spanish: el Magno), was the king of León, Galicia and Asturias from 866 until his death. He was the son and successor of Ordoño I. In later sources he is the earliest to be called "Emperor of Spain." He was also titled "Prince of all Galicia" (Princeps totius Galletiae). He married Jimena of Pamplona, with whom he had issue.

Alfonso II of Asturias (c. 760 – 842), nicknamed the Chaste (Spanish: el Casto), was the king of Asturias during two different periods: first in the year 783 and later from 791 until his death in 842. Upon his death, Nepociano, a family member of undetermined relation, attempted to usurp the crown in place of the future Ramiro I. He was the son of Fruela I and Munia, a Basque woman captured and brought back to Asturias by the former following a military campaign.

Alfonso I of Asturias, called the Catholic (el Católico), (c. 693 – 757) was the third King of Asturias, reigning from 739 to his death in 757. As the son of Duke Peter of Cantabria, Alfonso held many lands in that region. He is said to have married Ermesinda, daughter of Pelagius, who founded Asturias after the Battle of Covadonga in which he reversed the Moorish conquest of the region. He succeeded Pelagius' son, his brother-in-law, Favila, on the throne after the latter's premature death. Alfonso had four children. Three were through his marriage to Ermesinda, and one, Mauregatus, was born to a Muslim slave, Sisalda

Alfonso IV (c. 890s – 933), called the Monk (Spanish: el Monje), was King of León from 925 (or 926) and King of Galicia from 929, until he abdicated in 931. When Ordoño II died in 924 it was not one of his sons who ascended to the throne of León but rather his brother Fruela II of Asturias. The exact circumstances of the succession upon Fruela's death one year later are unclear, but the son of Fruela, Alfonso Fróilaz, became king in at least part of the kingdom when his father passed. Sancho Ordóñez, Alfonso, and Ramiro, the sons of Ordoño II, claimed to be the rightful heirs and rebelled against their cousin. With the support of king Jimeno Garcés of Pamplona, they drove Alfonso Fróilaz to the eastern marches of Asturias, and divided the kingdom among themselves with Alfonso Ordóñez receiving the crown of León and his elder brother Sancho being acclaimed king in Galicia. Alfonso IV resigned the crown to his brother Ramiro in 931 and went into a religious house. One year later he took up arms with Fruela's sons Ordoño and Ramiro against his own brother Ramiro, having repented of his renunciation of the world. He was defeated, blinded, and sent back to die in the cloister of Sahagún Alfonso had married Oneca Sánchez of Pamplona, niece of his ally Jimeno Garcés and daughter of Sancho I of Pamplona by Toda of Navarre. He had two children: Ordoño IV of León, and perhaps another son, Fruela, who was involved in a land dispute during the reign of Ramiro III of León

Alfonso Fróilaz, called the Hunchback (Spanish el Jorobado) was briefly the king of the unified kingdom of Asturias, Galicia and León in 925. He succeeded his father, King Fruela II, in July 925 but was driven from the throne within the year by his cousins Sancho, Alfonso IV and Ramiro II, the sons of his uncle, Ordoño II. He was restored to a royal position in part of the kingdom after Alfonso IV took power in 926, but was violently deposed and forced into a monastery in 932. Alfonso was the eldest son of Fruela II and had at least two younger brothers, Ordoño and Ramiro. Alfonso's short reign is poorly known.

Alfonso V (994 – 7 August 1028), called the Noble, was King of León from 999 to 1028. Enough is known of him to justify the belief that he had some of the qualities of a soldier and a statesman. Like other kings of León, he used the title emperor to assert his standing among the Christian rulers of Spain He succeeded his father, Bermudo II, in 999. His mother Elvira García and count Menendo González, who raised him in Galicia, acted as his co-regents. Alfonso first married Elvira Menéndez in 1013, daughter of his tutor Menendo González at whose house he was raised as a child, with whom he had two children. After Elvira's death on 2 December 1022, Alfonso married Urraca Garcés, sister of King Sancho III of Pamplona, the couple had 1 daughter.

Alfonso VI (c. 1040/1041  – 1 July 1109), nicknamed the Brave (El Bravo) or the Valiant, was king of León (1065–1072) and of Galicia (1071–1109), and then king of the reunited Castile and León (1072–1109). The son of Ferdinand I, King of León and Count of Castile and his wife, Queen Sancha, Alfonso was a "Leonese infante [prince] with Navarrese and Castilian blood" According to Bishop Pelagius of Oviedo, contemporary of the king, in his Chronicon regum Legionensium ("Chronicle of the Kings of León"), Alfonso VI had five wives and two concubines nobilissimas (very noble). The wives were, according to the bishop, Agnes, Constance, Berta, Isabel, and Beatrice and the concubines Jimena Muñoz and Zaida. He had issue from at least 2 of his wifes.
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« Reply #574 on: June 04, 2020, 05:08:24 PM »

Alfonso, also called Anfuso or Anfusus (c. 1120 – 10 October 1144), was the Prince of Capua from 1135 and Duke of Naples from 1139. Alfonso was the third son of Count Roger II of Sicily, who became king in 1130, and his first wife, Elvira of Castile.

Alfonso VII (1 March 1105 – 21 August 1157), called the Emperor (el Emperador), became the King of Galicia in 1111 and King of León and Castile in 1126. Alfonso, born Alfonso Raimúndez, first used the title Emperor of All Spain, alongside his mother Urraca, once she vested him with the direct rule of Toledo in 1116 Son of Urraca, Queen of León and Castile and Raymond, Count of Calicia. In 1128, he married Berenguela, daughter of Ramon Berenguer III, Count of Barcelona She died in 1149. They had issue. In 1152, Alfonso married Richeza of Poland, the daughter of Ladislaus II the Exile. They also had issue.

Alfonso II (1–25 March 1157 – 25 April 1196), called the Chaste or the Troubadour, was the King of Aragon and, as Alfons I, the Count of Barcelona from 1164 until his death The eldest son of Count Ramon Berenguer IV of Barcelona and Queen Petronilla of Aragon, he was the first King of Aragon who was also Count of Barcelona Wife, Sancha of Castile, daughter of king Alfonso VII of Castile, b. 1155 or 1157, d. 1208. They had issue.

Alfonso II (1180 – February 1209) was the second son of Alfonso II of Aragon and Sancha of Castile His father transferred the County of Provence from his uncle Sancho to him in 1185. Alfonso II was born in Barcelona. In 1193, Alfonso married Gersenda II of Sabran, daughter of Rainou, Count of Forcalquier and Gersend of Forcalquier.[1] Their son was Ramon Berenguer IV as count of Provence.

Alfonso I (c. 1073/1074 – 7 September 1134), called the Battler or the Warrior (Spanish: el Batallador), was the king of Aragon and Navarre from 1104 until his death in 1134. He was the second son of King Sancho Ramírez and successor of his brother Peter I. With his marriage to Urraca, queen regnant of Castile, León and Galicia, in 1109, he began to use, with some justification, the grandiose title Emperor of Spain, formerly employed by his father-in-law, Alfonso VI.

Alfonso III (4 November 1265 – 18 June 1291), called the Liberal (el Liberal) or the Free (also "the Frank," from el Franc), was the King of Aragon, King of Valencia, Count of Roussillon, Count of Sardinia and Count of Barcelona (as Alfons II) from 1285. He conquered the Kingdom of Majorca between his succession and 1287.He was a son of King Peter III of Aragon and Constance, daughter and heiress of King Manfred of Sicily. During his lifetime a dynastic marriage with Eleanor, daughter of King Edward I of England, was arranged. However Alfonso died before meeting his bride.


Alfonso IV, called the Kind (also the Gentle or the Nice, Catalan: Alfons el Benigne) (2 November 1299 – 24 January 1336) was the King of Aragon[1] and Count of Barcelona (as Alfonso III) from 1327 to his death. His reign saw the incorporation of the County of Urgell, Duchy of Athens, and Duchy of Neopatria into the Crown of Aragon. Alfonso was born in Naples, the second son of James II and Blanche of Anjou In 1314, aged 14, he married Teresa d'Entença y Cabrera, heiress of Urgell, who was the same age as him. Alfonso and Teresa became the parents of seven children. Alfonso's father and first wife Teresa died within a few days of each other in 1327. Teresa died in childbirth on 20 October 1327, and James II died on 2 November 1327, whereupon Alfonso became king. In February 1329, Alfonso married Eleanor of Castile (1308–1359), the sister of king Alfonso XI of Castile. Eleanor had been briefly married to Alfonso's elder brother James the monk. That marriage, which James had refused to consummate, had been annulled in 1319–20. Eleanor had thereafter retired to a convent (although she never took the veil) and had remained unmarried. By December the same year, the couple were rejoiced to become the parents of a son, Ferdinand, who was followed five years later by another son, John.

Alfonso (1315–1317) son of Alfonso IV and his 1st wife Teresa d'Entença y Cabrera,

Alfonso the Magnanimous KG (also Alphonso; Catalan: Alfons)( 1396 – 27 June 1458) was the King of Aragon (as Alfonso V), Valencia (as Alfonso III), Majorca, Sardinia and Corsica (as Alfonso II), Sicily (as Alfonso I) and Count of Barcelona (as Alfonso IV) from 1416, and King of Naples (as Alfonso I) from 1442 until his death He was the son of Ferdinand of Trastámara and Eleanor of Alburquerque. Ferdinand was the brother of King Henry III of Castile, and Alfonso was betrothed to his uncle King Henry's daughter Maria in 1408. Alfonso and Maria's marriage was celebrated in Valencia on 12 June 1415. Alfonso's marriage with Maria was childless. His mistress Lucrezia d'Alagno served as a de facto queen at the Neapolitan court as well as an inspiring muse. With another mistress he had 3 children.

Alfonso II (4 November 1448 – 18 December 1495) was Duke of Calabria and ruled as King of Naples from 25 January 1494 to 23 January 1495  Alfonso was the eldest child of Ferdinand I of Naples by his first wife, Isabella of Clermont Alfonso's wife was Ippolita Maria Sforza, whom he married on 10 October 1465, the couple had 3 children.

Afonso I of Portugal - (1109–1185) nicknamed the Conqueror (Portuguese: O Conquistador), the Founder (O Fundador) or the Great (O Grande) by the Portuguese, and El-Bortukali ([in Arabic البرتقالي] "the Portuguese") and Ibn-Arrink or Ibn Arrinq ([in Arabic ابن الرَّنك or ابن الرَنْق] "son of Henry", "Henriques") by the Moors whom he fought, was the first king of Portugal. Afonso was the son of Teresa, the illegitimate daughter of King Alfonso VI of León and Castile, and her husband, Henry of Burgundy. In 1146 Afonso married Mafalda, daughter of Amadeus III, Count of Savoy and Mahaut of Albon, both appearing together for the first time in May of that year confirming royal charters. They had issue. Before his marriage to Mafalda, King Afonso fathered his first son with Chamoa Gómez, daughter of Count Gómez Núñez and Elvira Pérez, sister of Fernando and Bermudo Pérez de Traba

Fernando Afonso (1135–1207), was Grand Master of the Knights Hospitaller between 1202-1206. He was the oldest son of Afonso Henriques, the first king of the Kingdom of Portugal, though would never inherit the crown as he was born out of wedlock


Afonso II of Portugal - (1185–1223) or Affonso (Archaic Portuguese), Alfonso or Alphonso (Portuguese-Galician) or Alphonsus (Latin version), nicknamed the Fat (Portuguese o Gordo) He was the second but eldest surviving son of Sancho I of Portugal by his wife, Dulce, Infanta of Aragon. In 1206, he married Urraca, daughter of Alfonso VIII of Castile and Eleanor of England. The couple were both descendants of King Alfonso VI of León The couple had 4 children.

Afonso III of Portugal - (1210–1279) or Affonso (Archaic Portuguese), Alfonso or Alphonso (Portuguese-Galician) or Alphonsus (Latin), the Boulonnais (Port. o Bolonhês), King of Portugal (5 May 1210 – 16 February 1279) was the first to use the title King of Portugal and the Algarve, from 1249. He was the second son of King Afonso II of Portugal and his wife, Urraca of Castile; he succeeded his brother, King Sancho II of Portugal, who died on 4 January 1248 Afonso's first wife was Matilda II, Countess of Boulogne, daughter of Renaud, Count of Dammartin, and Ida, Countess of Boulogne. They had no surviving children. He divorced Matilda in 1253 and, in the same year, married Beatrice of Castile, illegitimate daughter of Alfonso X, King of Castile, and Mayor Guillén de Guzmán. He had 8 children by his second wife (besides children with mistresses and such)


Infante Afonso of Portugal (8 February 1263– 2 November 1312) (English: Alphonzo or Alphonse) was a Portuguese infante (prince), son of King Afonso III of Portugal and his second wife Beatrice of Castile. He was titled Lord of Portalegre, Castelo de Vide, Arronches, Marvão and Lourinhã. Afonso was born on 8 February 1263 and in 1287 married Violante Manuel, daughter of Castilian Infante Manuel of Castile. Afonso died on 2 November 1312 in Lisbon. By his wife Violante Manuel he had five children;


Afonso of Portugal (c. 1288 – , c. 1300) (English: Alphonzo or Alphonse) was a Portuguese noble, son of Afonso of Portugal, Lord of Portalegre and his wife Violante Manuel. He was granted the title of Lord of Leiria. Afonso of Portugal died in 1300 when he was about twelve years of age without having married and without leaving any offspring

Alfonso Téllez de Meneses, son of Maria of Portugal (born ca. 1290) and her 1st husband Tello Alfonso de Meneses, Lord of Meneses, son of Alfonso Téllez de Molina and the grandson of Alfonso of Molina. On the death of his father, he became lord of Meneses, Tiedra, Montealegre, Grajal de Campos, Alba de Liste, San Román and Villagarcía de Campos. He died young and his possessions were inherited by his sister.

Afonso IV of Portugal - (1291–1357) called the Brave (Portuguese: o Bravo), was King of Portugal from 1325 until his death. He was the only legitimate son of King Denis of Portugal by his wife Elizabeth of Aragon. In 1309 Afonso married Beatrice of Castile, daughter of Sancho IV of Castile, and María de Molina, and had four sons and three daughters. Afonso broke the tradition of previous kings and did not have any children out of wedlock.

Afonso (1315–1317), son of Afonso IV and his wife Beatrice of Castile. The heir to the throne, died in his infancy Buried at the disappeared Convento das Donas of the Dominican Order in Santarém;
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« Reply #575 on: June 04, 2020, 05:08:40 PM »

Afonso V of Portugal - (1432–1481) known by the sobriquet the African (Portuguese: o Africano), was King of Portugal. His sobriquet refers to his conquests in Northern Africa. As of 1471, Afonso V was the first king of Portugal to claim dominion over a plural "Kingdom of the Algarves", instead of the singular "Kingdom of the Algarve". Territories added to the Portuguese crown lands in North Africa during the 15th century came to be referred to as possessions of the Kingdom of the Algarve (now a region of southern Portugal), not the Kingdom of Portugal. The "Algarves" then were considered to be the southern Portuguese territories on both sides of the Strait of Gibraltar. The second son of King Edward of Portugal by his wife Eleanor of Aragon. Following the death of his older brother, Infante João (1429-1433), Afonso acceded to the position of heir apparent and was made the first Prince of Portugal by his father Afonso married firstly, in 1447, Isabella of Coimbra, with whom he had three children Afonso married secondly, in 1475, his niece Joanna of Castile, known as "La Beltraneja"

Afonso, Prince of Portugal (18 May 1475 – 13 July 1491) was the heir apparent to the throne of Portugal. He was born in Lisbon, Portugal, and died in a horse-riding accident on the banks of the river Tagus. Afonso, named after his grandfather, King Afonso V, was the only son of King John II and Eleanor of Viseu The king was very fond of him and named the island of Príncipe after him (príncipe meaning "prince" in the Portuguese language).


Afonso VI of Portugal - (1643–1683) known as "the Victorious" (o Vitorioso), was the second King of Portugal of the House of Braganza from 1656 until his death. He was initially under the regency of his mother, Luisa of Medina-Sidonia, until 1662, when he removed her to a convent and took power with the help of his favourite, the Count of Castelo Melhor. Son of Joao IV of Portugal and Luisa de Guzmán.  At the age of three, Afonso suffered an illness that left him paralyzed on the left side of his body, also leaving him mentally unstable. His father created him 10th Duke of Braganza. After the death of his eldest brother Teodósio, Prince of Brazil in 1653, Afonso became the heir apparent to the throne of the kingdom. He received also the crown-princely title 2nd Prince of Brazil. He succeeded his father (João IV) in 1656 at the age of thirteen. His mother, Luisa of Medina-Sidonia, was named regent in his father's will. His mental instability and paralysis, plus his lack of interest in government, left his mother as regent for six years, until 1662. Afonso married Marie Françoise of Nemours, the daughter of the Duke of Savoy in 1666, but the marriage was short-lived. Marie Françoise, or Maria Francisca in Portuguese, filed for an annulment in 1667 based on the impotence of the king. The Church granted her the annulment, and she married Afonso's brother, Pedro, Duke of Beja (the future Peter II/ Pedro II). That same year, Pedro managed to gain enough support to force Afonso to relinquish control of the government to him, and he became Prince Regent in 1668. While Pedro never formally usurped the throne, Afonso was king in name only for the rest of his life. For seven years after Pedro's coup, Afonso was kept on the island of Terceira in the Azores. His health broken by this captivity, he was eventually permitted to return to the Portuguese mainland, but he remained powerless and kept under guard. At Sintra he died in 1683.


Alfonso Jordan, also spelled Alfons Jordan or Alphonse Jourdain (1103–1148), was the Count of Tripoli (1105–09), Count of Rouergue (1109–48) and Count of Toulouse, Margrave of Provence and Duke of Narbonne (1112–48). He was the son of Raymond IV of Toulouse by his third wife, Elvira of Castile. By his wife since 1125, Faydiva d'Uzès, he left two sons and three daughters: Raymond, who succeeded him, Alphonse, Faydiva (died 1154) married to Count Humbert III of Savoy, Agnes (died 1187) and Laurentia, who married Count Bernard III of Comminges. He also had an illegitimate son


Alphonse or Alfonso (11 November 1220 – 21 August 1271) was the Count of Poitou from 1225 and Count of Toulouse (as Alphonse II) from 1249. As count of Toulouse, he also governed the Marquisate of Provence. Alphonse was a son of Louis VIII, King of France and Blanche of Castile. He was a younger brother of Louis IX of France and an older brother of Charles I of Sicily.He was married to Joan, the only surviving child and heiress of Raymond VII, Count of Toulous, Duke of Narbonne and Marquis of Provence. No issue.


Alphonso or Alfonso (24 November 1273 – 19 August 1284), also called Alphonsus and Alphonse and styled Earl of Chester, was an heir apparent to the English throne who never became king Alphonso was the ninth child of King Edward I of England and his Castilian wife Eleanor. He was born in Bayonne, Gascony, a duchy claimed by his maternal uncle King Alphonso X of Castile until his parents' marriage in 1254. Edward and Eleanor's friendship with the King of Castile was also confirmed when they named their son in his honour, a "remarkable choice" given the name's rarity in England. Alphonso's eldest brother, John, had died in 1271; the death of another older brother, Henry, in 1274, made Alphonso the couple's only son up until the last months of his life At the age of ten, Alphonso was engaged to Margaret, daughter of Floris V, Count of Holland. An opulent psalter was being prepared for the marriage when he fell ill and died a few months before the wedding was to take place. Alphonso's death at Windsor occurred shortly after the birth of his younger brother Edward, who became the oldest surviving male heir of Edward I.

Mvemba a Nzinga or Nzinga Mbemba (c. 1456–1542 or 1543), also known as King Afonso I, was a ruler of the Kingdom of Kongo in the first half of the 16th century. He reigned over the Kongo Empire from 1509 to late 1542 or 1543 Born Mvemba a Nzinga, he was the son of Manikongo (Mwene Kongo) (king) Nzinga a Nkuwu, the fifth king of the Kongo dynasty. At the time of the first arrival of the Portuguese to the Kingdom of the Kongo's capital of M'banza-Kongo in 1491, Mvemba a Nzinga was in his thirties, and was the ruler of Nsundi province in the northeast, and the likely heir to the throne. He took the name Afonso when he was baptized after his father decided to convert to Christianity. In 1506 King João I of Kongo (the name Nzinga a Nkuwu took upon his conversion) died, and potential rivals lined up to take over the kingdom. Kongo was an elective rather than a hereditary monarchy, so Afonso was not guaranteed the throne. Afonso was assisted in his attempt to become king by his mother, who kept news of João's death a secret, and arranged for Afonso to return to the capital city of Mbanza Kongo and gather his followers. When the death of the king was finally announced, Afonso was already in the city. Afonso is best known for his vigorous attempt to convert Kongo to a Catholic country, by establishing the Roman Catholic Church in Kongo, providing for its financing from tax revenues, and creating schools. Toward the end of his life, Afonso's children and grandchildren began maneuvering for the succession, and in 1540 plotters that included Portuguese residents in the country made an unsuccessful attempt on his life. He died toward the end of 1542 or perhaps at the very beginning of 1543, leaving his son Pedro to succeed him. Although his son was soon overthrown by his grandson Diogo (in 1545) and had to take refuge in a church, the grandchildren and later descendants of three of his daughters provided many later kings.


Afonso II Mpemba a Nzinga was a ruler of the Kingdom of Kongo in 1561. Little is known about Afonso II or his reign. He may have been the illegitimate son of Diogo I Six years earlier, King Diogo had cut off all relations with Portugal and expelled them from the kingdom. The Portuguese attempted to return by plotting with another claimant for the throne to assassinate the king. Shortly after Afonso II took the throne, Bernardo I murdered him and took the throne. The plot backfired for the Portuguese, however; and all were driven out or killed by popular riots that same year.

Afonso III Mvemba a Nimi (also spelt Affonso III) was a ruler of the kingdom of Kongo during its civil war period. King Afonso III first enters written record as the ruler of the Marquisate of Nkondo. He governed that area from late 1669 until mid-1673. After which, he claimed the throne of divided Kongo. His reign was short and lasted only until the middle of 1674.

Pierre Alphonse de Tonty, or Alphonse de Tonty, Baron de Paludy (ca. 1659 – 10 November 1727) was an officer who served under the French explorer Cadillac and helped establish the first European settlement at Detroit, Michigan, Fort Pontchartrain du Detroit on the Detroit River in 1701 He was born in Paris, ca. 1659, to Lorenzo de Tonti who was a financier and former governor of Gaeta who was in France in exile. Tonty was married twice. His first marriage in 1689 was to Marie Anne Picoté de Belestre with whom he had 13 children. She was the daughter of Pierre Picoté de Belestre.


Dom Afonso I of Braganza (10 August 1377 – 15 December 1461) was the first Duke of Braganza and the eighth Count of Barcelos. He would start a dynasty, the House of Braganza, that would end up being the most powerful and wealthy in all of Portugal. His descendants would go on to become high-ranking nobles, imperial officials, and even the Kings of Portugal and the Emperors of Brazil. Historians believe he was born in Veiros, Estremoz, Alentejo, as a natural son of Portuguese King John I and Inês Peres. He married the heiress Beatriz Pereira de Alvim, daughter of Nuno Álvares Pereira, a general and the wealthiest man in the kingdom. With whom he had 3 children. Afonso married a second time, to his first cousin once removed, Constance of Noronha, daughter of Alfonso Enríquez, Count of Gijón and Noreña (a natural son of Henry II of Castile), and of Isabel of Portugal (a natural daughter of Fernando I of Portugal). They had no issue.


Alphonse of Braganza (in Portuguese Afonso) (1402?–1460) was the eldest son of Afonso, 1st Duke of Braganza, natural son of King John I of Portugal, and of his wife, Beatriz Pereira Alvim, the only daughter of Nuno Álvares Pereira and Leonor de Alvim Alphonse had a natural son with Dona Beatriz de Sousa (it is said that they were secretly married). This son, Afonso de Portugal, was required to join the clergy by King John II of Portugal. Afonso de Portugal was appointed Bishop of Évora. He had a natural son named Francisco de Portugal (Francis of Portugal) who was later appointed as Francis I, 1st Count of Vimioso, from whom Counts of Vimioso descend.


Afonso of Braganza (1435-?) 1st count of Faro, son of Dom Fernando I of Braganza (1403 – 1 April 1478) was the 2nd Duke of Braganza and the 1st Marquis of Vila Viçosa, among other titles &  Joana de Castro [pt], Lady of Cadaval (1410 – 14 February 1479).
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« Reply #576 on: June 04, 2020, 05:08:57 PM »

Afonso de Lencastre, son of Beatriz de Castro Osório, 6th Countess of Lemos & Dinis of Braganza (1481–1516), the younger son of Fernando II, Duke of Braganza and Isabella of Viseu

Infante D. Afonso of Braganza, Duke of Porto (Portuguese pronunciation: [ɐˈfõsu]; 31 July 1865 in Palace of Ajuda, Lisbon – 21 February 1920 in Naples, Italy) was a Portuguese Infante of the House of Braganza, the son of King Dom Luis I of Portugal and his wife, Dona Maria Pia of Savoy. From 1908 to the abolition of the Portuguese Monarchy in 1910 he was the Prince Royal of Portugal as heir presumptive to his nephew, King Dom Manuel II. Suffering, like his mother, the dowager Queen Maria Pia of Savoy, from debilitating mental and emotional health after the ferocious 1908 attack on their family, Afonso de Bragança married, in 1917, a twice-divorced, and once-widowed, American heiress Nevada Stoody Hayes. This was a politically significant event, at least to those Portuguese royalists who clung to the hope of a restoration of the House of Braganza: as significant funding for any power grab was urgently needed. In Portugal, morganatic marriage was not recognized. Any legitimate child of Afonso and Nevada could become the lawful heir to the Portuguese throne. Nearly as disturbing was the prospect that both Manuel and Afonso would fail to produce an heir. In this event, the claimant to the Portuguese throne would be a descendant of Miguel I, the absolutist king who, in 1834, lost the Portuguese War of the Two Brothers to the liberal line of constitutional monarchs. Dom Afonso was the fourth husband of Nevada Stoody Hayes. The Prince had previously tried to get the king's approval for his marriage, but he found that his nephew and the rest of the royal family were vehemently opposed to it. After his marriage, his pension was cut by Manuel II, and Dom Afonso, also rejected by his relatives in the Italian royal family, began to live in obscurity and sickness during his final days. He finally died alone, in Naples, on 21 February 1920. Only one Portuguese servant remained with him until the end. Even though the terms of a morganatic marriage exclude the surviving spouse from inheriting any of the titles or privileges that are the prerogatives of royalty, they do not exclude the survivor from inheriting property. In his will, Dom Afonso left his entire estate to Nevada Stoody Hayes. After he and Manuel II had both died (1932), his widow demanded that the Portuguese government recognize her rights to a substantial part of the House of Braganza's patrimony. Her husband had named her his sole legal heir in his last will. As the marriage, and the will, was legally disputed in Lisbon, Nevada was briefly arrested shortly after she arrived at Lisbon to claim her inheritance. Eventually, however, she proved a substantial portion of her claim, and she was officially granted the right to remove many objects of art and expensive goods from the Portuguese royal palaces. The 35-year-old former Duchess of Porto traveled to Portugal from Italy with the body of her late husband, and she arranged for its installation in the Braganza pantheon in the Monastery of São Vicente de Fora in Lisbon.


Alfonso d'Este (21 July 1476 – 31 October 1534) was Duke of Ferrara during the time of the War of the League of Cambrai. He was the son of Ercole I d'Este, Duke of Ferrara and Eleanor of Naples and became duke on Ercole's death in June 1505. 1491, Alfonso was married to Anna Sforza, the niece of Ludovico Sforza, Duke of Milan. In the same ceremony, Ludovico was married to Alfonso's younger sister, Beatrice d'Este, in a double wedding orchestrated by Leonardo da Vinci. Politically, the wedding was designed to cement ties between the two families. Anna Sforza's death, on 30 November 1497, marked the end of those ties, as Beatrice d'Este had died in January of that same year. Alfonso later remarried, to Lucrezia Borgia, in 1502.After Lucrezia's death on 24 June 1519, he married Laura Dianti by whom he had an illegitimate son, Alfonso d'Este (later legitimized).


Alfonso II d'Este (24 November 1533 – 27 October 1597) was Duke of Ferrara from 1559 to 1597. He was a member of the House of Este. He was the elder son of Ercole II d'Este and Renée de France, the daughter of Louis XII of France and Anne of Brittany and was the fifth and last Duke of Ferrara He married three times; firstly in 1558 Lucrezia di Cosimo de' Medici (14 February 1545 – 21 April 1561), a daughter of Cosimo I de' Medici, Grand Duke of Tuscany and Eleonora di Toledo. She died two years afterwards; poisoning has been suspected, the Duke poisoned her and she died at the age of just 16. Secondly in 1565 Barbara of Austria (30 April 1539 – 19 September 1572), eighth daughter of Ferdinand I, Holy Roman Emperor and Anna of Bohemia and Hungary. Thirdly in 1579  Margherita Gonzaga (27 May 1564 – 6 January 1618). She was the eldest daughter of William I, Duke of Mantua and Eleonora of Austria. Margherita was the niece of his second wife Barbara. He had no known children, legitimate or otherwise.


Alfonso III d'Este (22 October 1591 – 26 May 1644) was Duke of Modena and Reggio from 1628 to 1629. He was the husband of Princess Isabella of Savoy, daughter of Charles Emmanuel I, Duke of Savoy and his wife Infanta Catherine Michelle of Spain. Born in Ferrara, he was the first son of Cesare d'Este, Duke of Modena and Virginia de' Medici In 1608 he was married to Isabella of Savoy, daughter of Charles Emmanuel I of Savoy, they had issue Profoundly in love with her, when she died in 1626 he started to think to take religious vows. When his father died in 1628, Alfonso became Duke of Modena and Reggio. However, in July 1629 he announced his abdication from the Castle of Sassuolo. On September 8 of the same year he entered the Capuchin friars at Merano under the name of fra' Giambattista da Modena. He was distinguished as a preacher and helper of dying people during the pestilence which struck the Duchy in 1630–1631. In the following year he returned to Modena, but his discourses against the costumes of the court made him unwelcome, so he retired to a convent in Castelnuovo di Garfagnana, built by his son, Duke Francesco I, where he died in 1644.


Alfonso IV d'Este (14 October 1634 – 16 July 1662) was Duke of Modena and Reggio from 1658 until his death. He was the father of Mary of Modena, consort of James II of   England. Alfonso was born in Modena, the eldest son of Francesco I d'Este, Duke of Modena, and his first wife, Maria Caterina Farnese. He became Duke of Modena and Reggio after his father's death in 1658. Alfonso's health was poor and he suffered from gout and tuberculosis. He died four years into his reign In 1655 he married Laura Martinozzi, Cardinal Mazarin's niece, thus strengthening his alliance with France. On Laura's sixteenth birthday, 27 May 1655, she was married to the Duke of Modena by proxy at the Palace of Compiègne, with the Count of Soissons standing in the place of the Duke of Modena. They had two children, Maria and Francesco, who went on to become Queen of England and Duke of Modena respectively.In 1659 the Franco-Spanish War came to an end and Modena was rewarded with the town of Correggio for supporting France. He was succeeded by his two-year-old son, under the regency of his widow.



Cardinal-Infante Afonso (23 April 1509–21 April 1540)( English: Alphonzo) was a Portuguese infante (prince), son of King Manuel I of Portugal and his wife Maria of Aragon. Because he was the fourth son, after the infantes John, Luís, and Ferdinand, he was assigned by his father to religious life, and he accumulated numerous ecclesiastical benefits even though he did not have the canonical age required to exercise these dignities. He was successively bishop of Guarda, cardinal, bishop of Viseu, bishop of Évora and finally archbishop of Lisbon.

Alfonso the Innocent (17 November 1453 – 5 July 1468) was the figurehead of rebelling Castilian magnates against his half-brother Henry IV, who had recognized him as heir presumptive with the title of Prince of Asturias. Alfonso was the only surviving son of John II by his second wife, Isabella of Portugal. Alfonso's sister, the future Isabella I of Castile, was also the product of this second marriage. However, in 1468 at the age of only 14, Alfonso suddenly died. The cause of death is not known, but it likely to have been an illness such as consumption or plague (although it is rumored that he had been deliberately poisoned by his enemies).

Dom Afonso de Santa Maria, Prince of Beira (born 25 March 1996) is a Portuguese prince Afonso de Santa Maria Miguel Gabriel Rafael was born in Lisbon, the eldest child of Duarte Pio, Duke of Braganza, and Dª. Isabel Inês Castro Curvello de Herédia.

Prince Alfons of Bavaria (German: Alfons Maria Franz von Assisi Klemens Max Emanuel Prinz von Bayern)(24 January 1862 – 8 January 1933) was a member of the Bavarian Royal House of Wittelsbach and a General of Cavalry. Alfons was born in Munich, Bavaria. He was the second son of Prince Adalbert of Bavaria and his wife Infanta Amalia of Spain. In 1891 Prince Alfons married Princess Louise Victoire d'Orléans-Alençon, the daughter of Duke Ferdinand of Alençon and Duchess Sophie Charlotte in Bavaria. The couple had two children.

Prince Alfons Constantin Maria of Liechtenstein (18  May 2001), only child of Prince Maximilian Nicholas Maria of Liechtenstein (1969) (2nd son of Hans Adam II) and his wife Angela Brown (1958).

Prince Alfonso, Count of Caserta (28 March 1841 – 26 May 1934) was the third son of Ferdinand II of the Two Sicilies and Archduchess Maria Theresa of Austria.He was pretender to the throne of the Two Sicilies in succession of his older half-brother, Francis II of the Two Sicilies. He was succeeded by his eldest son, Ferdinand Pius. Alfonso was married to his cousin, Princess Maria Antonietta of Bourbon-Two Sicilies (16 March 1851 – 12 September 1938) on 8 June 1868. She was a daughter of Prince Francis, Count of Trapani and his wife Archduchess Maria Isabella of Austria, Princess of Tuscany. They had twelve children.


Dom Afonso (23 February 1845 – 11 June 1847) was the Prince Imperial and heir apparent to the throne of the Empire of Brazil. Born in Rio de Janeiro, he was the eldest child of Emperor Dom Pedro II and Dona Teresa Cristina of the Two Sicilies, and thus a member of the Brazilian branch of the House of Braganza. Afonso died from epilepsy at the age of two


Dom Pedro Afonso (19 July 1848 – 10 January 1850) was the Prince Imperial and heir apparent to the throne of the Empire of Brazil. Born at the Palace of São Cristóvão in Rio de Janeiro, he was the second son and youngest child of Emperor Dom Pedro II and Dona Teresa Cristina of the Two Sicilies, and thus a member of the Brazilian branch of the House of Braganza. Pedro Afonso was seen as vital to the future viability of the monarchy, which had been put in jeopardy by the death of his older brother Dom Afonso almost three years earlier. Pedro Afonso's death from fever at the age of one devastated the Emperor, and the imperial couple had no further children.
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« Reply #577 on: June 04, 2020, 05:09:21 PM »

Alphonse, prince de Chimay (1844–1928) Prince de Chimay is a title of Belgian nobility that is associated with the town of Chimay in what is now Belgium

Alphonse, prince de Chimay (1899–1973) Prince de Chimay is a title of Belgian nobility that is associated with the town of Chimay in what is now Belgium

Alphonse de Polignac (1826–1863) was a French mathematician. In 1849, the year he was admitted to Polytechnique, he made what's known as Polignac's conjecture Polignac is the name of an ancient French noble family that took its name from the château de Polignac, of which they had been sieurs since Carolingian times. In 1385, the male line became extinct, but the heiress married Guillaume, sire de Chalancon, who assumed the name and arms of Polignac. Jules de Polignac (1746–1817) became the first Duke of Polignac in 1780.

Alphonse (b. and d. 26 January 1213), twin of John. Son of  Blanche of Castile (4 March 1188 – 26 November 1252) & Louis VIII (5 September 1187 – 8 November 1226), called the Lion (French: le Lion), who was King of France from 1223 to 1226.

Alphonse or Alfonso (11 November 1220 – 21 August 1271) was the Count of Poitou from 1225 and Count of Toulouse (as Alphonse II) from 1249. As count of Toulouse, he also governed the Marquisate of Provence. Alphonse was a son of Louis VIII, King of France and Blanche of Castile.


Alphonse Henri de Lorraine (Alphonse Henri Charles)(14 August 1648 – 19 October 1718) was a member of the House of Lorraine and Count of Harcourt. Born to François Louis, Count of Harcourt and his wife, Anne d'Ornano, he was the couple's third child. His older brother, François de Lorraine, Batard d'Harcourt, was illegitimate, having been born before his parents were married. As such, François was not entitled to inherit his father's land and titles. At the age of eighteen, he married Marie Françoise de Brancas on 21 February 1667 in Paris. The couple had three children, two sons and a daughter.


Alphonse or Alfons, Count de Berghes - Glymes (1624 – 7 June 1689) was Archbishop of Mechelen, Belgium. He was appointed 7th Archbishop in 1670. He was the son of Godefroi de Glymes, 1st Count of Grimberghen, named de Berghes, died 1635.


Alphonse Charles Comte de Toulouse-Lautrec-Monfa (1838–1913), the father of painter Henri de Toulouse Lautrec Descendants of the Counts of Toulouse and Odet de Foix, Vicomte de Lautrec and the Viscounts of Montfa, a village and commune of the Tarn department of southern France, close to the cities of Castres and Toulouse. Married to Adèle Zoë Tapié de Celeyran (1841–1930).  If Henri had outlived his father, he would have been accorded the family title of Comte de Toulouse-Lautrec. Toulouse-Lautrec's parents, the Comte and Comtesse, were first cousins (his grandmothers were sisters), and Henri’s congenital health conditions were attributed to a family history of inbreeding.


Jean Alphonse, 1st Count de Coloma (28 January 1677 – 7 January 1739), was a Flemish noble lord of Spanish descent, a member of the House of Coloma. He was a councillor on the Great Council of Mechelen and the supreme council in Vienna, and president of the Brussels Privy Council. Coloma was born in Antwerp, the great-grandson of Pedro Coloma, Baron of Bornhem, grandson of Pedro Coloma, Viscount of Dourlens, and the third son – born postmortem – of Pierre Coloma, 1st Baron of Moriensart and his wife Anne-Elisabeth de Bejar, Lady of Westackerre. He was the uncle of Rosa Alexandra Coloma, who married Nicolas vander Dilft, mayor of Brussels. In 1705 he married Barbe le Poyvre, who died in Mechelen in 1724. After her death he married Lady Maria Claire de Romree, Lady of the Starry Cross and widow of his brother, the 2nd Baron of Moriensart, who had died in 1714.


Pierre Alphonse Liévin, 2nd Count de Coloma. (1707-1745), son of Jean Alphonse. He married. Agathe van der Laan and has issue.


Alphonso of Brienne or Alphonse I de Brienne, called Alphonse d'Acre (c. 1228 – August 25, 1270) was the son of John of Brienne and Berengaria of León He was the Grand Butler of France in 1258.By his marriage (bef. 1250) to Marie, Countess of Eu he became Count of Eu.[1] He was also Grand Chamberlain of France, and died in Tunis on the Eighth Crusade. He had at least two children by Marie.


Prince Paul Alfons von Metternich-Winneburg, in full: Paul Alfons Maria Clemens Lothar Philippus Neri Felix Nicomedes Prinz von Metternich-Winneburg (26 May 1917 – 21 September 1992) was a German-Austrian racing driver and President of the Commission Sportive Internationale (CSI), before becoming President of the FIA in 1975. Paul Alfons von Metternich-Winneburg, known informally as Paul Metternich, was born in Vienna in the noble diplomatic family of Metternich and was a great-grandson of the Austrian statesman Klemens von Metternich. He attended the Institut Le Rosey in Switzerland.In 1940 in Berlin, where he belonged to a circle of opponents of the Nazi regime, he met his future wife Tatiana Vassiltschikov, who had a position in the foreign office. They were married in Berlin-Grunewald on 6 September 1941 and lived initially at Kynžvart Castle (Schloss Königswart) in Egerland (now in the Czech Republic).In 1945 he was expelled from Czechoslovakia and lost his property there. He moved to another family estate (from 1816), the winery Schloss Johannisberg in the Rheingau, which had been destroyed in the war. He later rebuilt it and ran the winery with his wife. He also became a racing car driver. Among other contests, he participated in the Monte Carlo Rally and the 1956 24 Hours of Le Mans. From 1960 he was President of the Automobilclub von Deutschland. From 1975 until 1985 he was President of the worldwide automobile club FIA. With his death in Geneva, the main line of the Metternich family became extinct. His widow was the last representative of the House Metternich-Winneburg.




Baron Luitbert Alexander George Lionel Alphons von Pawel-Rammingen, KCB, KCVO, KCH, VD (German: Luitbert Alexander Georg Lionel Alfons Freiherr von Pawel-Rammingen)( 27 July 1843 – 20 November 1932) was a German-born nobleman who became a naturalised British subject in 1880 when he married Princess Frederica of Hanover. T he eldest son of Karl Julius August Plato Emil, Baron von Pawel-Rammingen (1807–1886) and his wife Luitgarde von Friesen (b. 1819) In 1880, Pawel-Rammingen married Princess Frederica Sophia Maria, daughter of King George V of Hanover; he had been naturalised as a British Subject by Act of Parliament on 19 March 1880 (she was also a British princess) Frederica and Alfons had one daughter who was born and died at Hampton Court Palace: Victoria Georgina Beatrice Maud Anne (7 March 1881 – 27 March 1881)


Philipp Alfons Freiherr Mumm von Schwarzenstein (19 March 1859 – 10 July 1924) (also known as Alfons von Mumm) was a diplomat of the German Empire. He succeeded the murdered Baron Clemens von Ketteler as ambassador in Beijing in 1900. In 1911 he bought and restored a medieval castle in the small village of Portofino, Italy, where he eventually retired in 1920 with his wife Jeannie von Mumm.  Jeannie is now considered "the saviour" of Portofino because she persuaded the SS Lieutenant Ernst Reimers not to ignite the charges the Germans planned to detonate during their retreat from the village.


Baron Alfons von Gecmen-Waldeck (Austria ??) married Lisl Marischka, actress, (1908–1945)

Alfons von Kloss (1920–unknown); son of Archduchess Eleonora of Austria and her morganatic husband Alfons von Kloss. He married Theresia von Coreth zu Coredo and had three sons.


Hugo Alfons Eduard Emanuel Joseph Johann Wenzeslaus, Prince of Dietrichstein (1858–1920), son of Count Alexander Konstantin Albrecht von Mensdorff-Pouilly, 1st Prince von Dietrichstein zu Nikolsburg (4 August 1813 – 14 February 1871) and Alexandrine "Aline" von Dietrichstein (1824–1906), daughter of Joseph, 9th Prince von Dietrichstein (1798–1858) (Dietrichstein was the name of one of the most prominent Austrian noble families originating from Carinthia. The family belonged to the High Nobility, the Hochadel. The Nikolsburg (Mikulov) branch was elevated to Princes of the Holy Roman Empire in 1624, while a member of the Hollenburg branch was elevated to the same dignity in 1684. In 1857, Alexandrine, daughter of Prince Joseph Franz, married Count Alexander von Mensdorff-Pouilly. He served as Foreign Minister and briefly Minister-President of Austria in the 1860s, and in 1868 was created Fürst von Dietrichstein zu Nikolsburg, reviving the title held by his wife's family.)


Alfons, Freiherr von Pereira-Amstein (1887–1978), son of Austrian Hungarian diplomat (from Bohemian origin) Siegfried (Franz Johann Carl) Graf (from 1920, Fürst) von Clary und Aldringen (14 October 1848 – 11 February 1929) and his wife Therese (née Gräfin Kinsky von Wchinitz und Tettau) Alfons became the seventh prince, but lost his property in the Czechoslovak Republic in 1945.


Alfons Julius Anton, Baron von Wrede (4 January 1843 - ?) son of Moritz, Baron von Wrede (24 April 1811-18 May 1877) and is wife Natalia Tallián de Vizék (1 November 1818-13 September 1885) He married in Graz in 1880 Eleonore Filomene Edlauer (20 February 1852-?) They had 2 daughters.
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« Reply #578 on: June 04, 2020, 09:31:35 PM »

Principessa, Do you know why Holy Roman Emperor Leopold II was given the first name of Peter?

No, not by head, I should look that one up? Do you know?
   
No, I do not know. Did Empress Maria Theresa and Holy Roman Emperor Francis I have a royal relative named Peter?

After the one and only Tsar Peter I. (the Great) of Russia.

At the time Austria was still at war with Prussia (and others) over the rightful heiress. Russia was on Austria's side.

So little Leopold was given the name of the then Tsarina Elizabeth's father as first name.
« Last Edit: June 04, 2020, 09:37:58 PM by Kristallinchen » Logged
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« Reply #579 on: June 04, 2020, 11:14:30 PM »

Principessa, Do you know why Holy Roman Emperor Leopold II was given the first name of Peter?

No, not by head, I should look that one up? Do you know?
   
No, I do not know. Did Empress Maria Theresa and Holy Roman Emperor Francis I have a royal relative named Peter?

After the one and only Tsar Peter I. (the Great) of Russia.

At the time Austria was still at war with Prussia (and others) over the rightful heiress. Russia was on Austria's side.

So little Leopold was given the name of the then Tsarina Elizabeth's father as first name.

Thank you Kristallinchen  Thumb up Star
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« Reply #580 on: June 05, 2020, 09:52:19 AM »

Principessa, Do you know why Holy Roman Emperor Leopold II was given the first name of Peter?

No, not by head, I should look that one up? Do you know?
   
No, I do not know. Did Empress Maria Theresa and Holy Roman Emperor Francis I have a royal relative named Peter?

After the one and only Tsar Peter I. (the Great) of Russia.

At the time Austria was still at war with Prussia (and others) over the rightful heiress. Russia was on Austria's side.

So little Leopold was given the name of the then Tsarina Elizabeth's father as first name.

Thank you Kristallinchen  Thumb up Star
   
Thank you, Kristallinchen!
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« Reply #581 on: June 08, 2020, 04:34:04 PM »

Louise and Luise are, respectively, French and German feminine forms of Louis. Louise has been regularly used as a female name in English speaking countries since the middle of the 19th century. It has ranked among the top 100 names given to girls in France, England, Ireland, Scotland, Sweden and Wales in recent years. It last ranked among the top 1,000 first names for girls born in the United States in 1991, but remains a more common middle name.


Marie Luise von Degenfeld, countess. (28 November 1634 – 18 March 1677) She was the morganatic second wife of Charles I Louis, Elector Palatine. Born Maria Susanne Luise von Degenfeld in Strasbourg, she was the daughter of an impoverished baron, Martens-Christof von Degenfeld and his wife, Maria Anna Adelmann von Adelmannsfelden. Thirteen children were born to the Elector and the Raugravine between October 1658 and April 1675. The only one of her children to marry and have children was the Raugravine Caroline Elisabeth (1659-1696), who married an ardent suitor, Meinhard, 3rd Duc de Schomberg, 1st Duke of Leinster in 1683.

Louise (25 January 1661 – 6 February 1733) daughter of Marie Luise von Degenfeld and Charles I Louis.

Louise of Hesse-Kassel  (German: Luise Wilhelmine Friederike Caroline Auguste Julie von Hessen-Kassel, Danish: Louise Wilhelmine Frederikke Caroline Auguste Julie)(7 September 1817 – 29 September 1898) She was a daughter of Prince William of Hesse-Kassel and Princess Charlotte of Denmark. As a niece of King Christian VIII, who ruled Denmark between 1839 and 1848, Louise was very close to the succession after several individuals of the royal house of Denmark who were elderly and childless. As children, her brother Frederik Wilhelm, her sisters and she were the closest relatives of King Christian VIII who were likely to produce heirs. It was easy to see that the agnatic succession from King Frederick III of Denmark would probably become extinct within a generation. Louise was one of the females descended from Frederick III of Denmark, and she enjoyed the remainder provisions of the succession (according to the Semi-Salic Law) in the event that his male line became extinct. She and her siblings were not agnatic descendants of the House of Oldenburg and the Dukes of Schleswig-Holstein, thus ineligible to inherit the twin duchies, since there existed a number of agnatic lines eligible to inherit those territories. Louise was married at the Amalienborg Palace in Copenhagen on 26 May 1842 to her second cousin Prince Christian of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glucksburg. He was soon selected as hereditary prince of Denmark and later ascended the throne of Denmark as King Christian IX. The marriage greatly strengthed Christian's efforts to secure the Danish throne, since it joined two competing claimants whose children would have an enhanced connection to the ancient bloodlines of the Danish monarchy. Louise and Christian lived a quiet family life. Louise's mother and siblings renounced their rights to the Danish throne to her. Louise herself in turn renounced her rights to the throne to her spouse Christian. In 1852, this succession order was confirmed by the Nordic countries and foreign powers in London. In 1847, Prince Christian was, with the approval of Europe's Great Powers, chosen as successor to the Danish throne by Christian VIII (who did not expect his only surviving son, the future Frederick VII, to father dynastic sons). This choice of heir was made more dynastically palatable by the fact that, thanks to the mass renunciations of the Hesses, Christian's wife Louise became the heiress eventual to the crown, meaning that the couple's children would be heirs to the throne both by right of international treaty and by compliance with the Lex Regia. This resolved the succession to the Danish crown, but not Denmark's claim on the twin duchies of Schleswig and Holstein. On 15 November 1863, Louise and Christian became Queen and King of Denmark. The relationship between Louise and Christian seems to have been at least partially a marriage of love, and is described as happy: she supported him in his struggle to be acknowledged as heir to the throne of Denmark, and the couple became strongly attached to each other during the years of succession struggle. Her loyalty is said to have been of great importance to him, and Christian is described as dependent upon her intelligence, judgment and psychological strength, all of which were considered to be superior to his own. Their life style is described as simple and puritan, and as this suited the contemporary view of an exemplary family life, the royal family was regarded as a morally correct role model. The couple had 6 children, who where married off rather well.

Louise of the Netherlands (Wilhelmina Frederika Alexandrine Anna Louise)( 5 August 1828 – 30 March 1871) was Queen of Sweden and Norway as the consort of King Charles XV / IV. Her father was Prince Frederick of the Netherlands, the second child of King William I of the Netherlands and Wilhelmina of Prussia. Her mother Louise was the eighth child of King Frederick William III of Prussia and Louise of Mecklenburg-Strelitz. In 1849, Louise was selected as a suitable spouse for Crown Prince Charles, the son of King Oscar I of Sweden and Norway and Josephine of Leuchtenberg. The marriage was arranged after the negotiations to arrange a marriage between Charles and her cousin Princess Louise of Prussia had failed. King Oscar I of Sweden wished to secure royal family connections between the new Bernadotte dynasty and the old royal dynasties of Europe, and a Protestant princess was also seen as a necessary queen of the Protestant Sweden-Norway after two Catholic predecessors. Louise fulfilled these credentials, and a great dowry was expected from the rich House of Orange-Nassau. Reportedly, Louise fell in love with Charles and felt an immediate attraction, while Charles in contrast was disappointed in her appearance. Charles, however, was convinced to agree to the marriage by the King. Louise bore two children; Princess Louise in 1851, and Prince Carl Oscar in 1852. Due to complications that arose at the birth of Prince Carl Oscar, Louise was unable to have any more children. In 1854, her 2-year-old son, Carl Oscar, died of pneumonia. As the Salic law prevailed at that time in Sweden (having been introduced by the constitution of 1809), Louise's daughter was not eligible to ascend the throne. Charles was very chagrined and disappointed because this meant that his progeny would not be the next monarch of Sweden; his heir would be his brother Oscar. Louise offered Charles a divorce so he could remarry and produce a male heir, but he declined the offer Crown Princess Louise was not considered a social success, and her timid and shy nature was not appreciated in society because of her official position

Louise of Sweden (Louise Josephine Eugenie (Swedish: Lovisa Josefina Eugenia))( 31 October 1851 – 20 March 1926), was Queen of Denmark as the spouse of King Frederick VIII. She was the only surviving child of Charles XV of Sweden and his consort, Louise of the Netherlands. She was the mother of both King Christian X of Denmark and King Haakon VII of Norway

Princess Louise of Denmark (Louise Caroline Josephine Sophie Thyra Olga) (17 February 1875 – 4 April 1906) was a Danish princess, the third child and oldest daughter of Frederick VIII of Denmark and his wife, Princess Louise of Sweden and Norway. She married Prince Frederick of Schaumburg-Lippe (1868–1945) at Amalienborg Palace in Copenhagen on 5 May 1896. They had three children.

Princess Marie Luise Dagmar Bathildis Charlotte of Schaumburg-Lippe (10 February 1897 – 1 October 1938), daughter of Princess Louise of Denmark and Prince Frederik of Schaumburg Lippe.  She married Prince Friedrich Sigismund of Prussia and had issue. Prince Friedrich died in a riding accident after a fall from his horse.

Louise, Princess Royal and Duchess of Fife VA, CI (Louise Victoria Alexandra Dagmar)(20 February 1867 – 4 January 1931) was the third child and the eldest daughter of the British king Edward VII and Alexandra of Denmark; she was a younger sister of George V.  In 1889, Princess Louise married Alexander Duff, 1st Duke of Fife. The Duke and Duchess of Fife had three children.


Princess Marie Louise of Hanover and Cumberland (11 October 1879 – 31 January 1948) was the eldest child of Ernest Augustus, Crown Prince of Hanover, and Princess Thyra of Denmark, the youngest daughter of Christian IX of Denmark and Louise of Hesse-Kassel. Marie Louise married on 10 July 1900 in Gmunden, Austria-Hungary to her third cousin twice removed Prince Maximilian of Baden (1867–1929). Marie Louise and Maximilian had one daughter and one son


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« Reply #582 on: June 08, 2020, 04:34:25 PM »

Princess Louise Margaret of Prussia (1860–1917), daughter of Prince Frederick Charles of Prussia and wife of Prince Arthur, Duke of Connaught. Her father was Prince Friedrich Karl of Prussia (1828–1885), the son of Karl of Prussia (1801–1883) and his wife Princess Marie of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach (1808–1877). Her mother was Princess Maria Anna of Anhalt (1837–1906), daughter of Leopold IV of Anhalt-Dessau. In 1879, Princess Luise Margarete married Prince Arthur, Duke of Connaught and Strathearn The couple had 3 children.

Princess Victoria Louise of Prussia (1892–1980), was the only daughter and the last child of German Emperor Wilhelm II and Augusta Victoria of Schleswig-Holstein. In 1913 she married Ernest Augustus, Duke of Brunswick The couple had 5 children.

HRH Princess Caroline-Luise Mireille Irene Sophie of Hanover (born 3 May 1965) Daughter of Prince Christian Oscar of Hanover (1 September 1919 – 10 December 1981) and his morganatic bride Mireille Dutry (born 10 January 1946) (married in 1963; divorced 1976) She married Bryan Samuel Goswick in 2014.

Louise of Lorraine (1553–1601), Queen consort of France

Louise of Mecklenburg-Güstrow (1667–1721), Queen consort of Denmark and Norway

Louise of Great Britain (1724–1751), Queen consort of Denmark and Norway

Louise of Orléans (Louise-Marie Thérèse Charlotte Isabelle)( 3 April 1812 – 11 October 1850) was a French princess who became the first Queen of the Belgians as the second wife of King Leopold I. She was also known as Louise-Marie. She was the eldest daughter of the future Louis-Philippe I, King of the French, and of his wife Maria Amalia of the Two Sicilies. On 9 August 1832, the twenty-year-old Louise married King Leopold I of the Belgians, who was twenty-two years her senior. Leopold had been widowed by his wife, Princess Charlotte of Wales after her death in childbirth in 1817. Since Leopold was a Protestant, they had both a Catholic and a Calvinist ceremony. Louise and Leopold had four children. Although never faithful to Louise, Leopold respected her and their relationship was a harmonious one Queen Louise-Marie died of tuberculosis in the former Royal palace of Ostend on 11 October 1850. Her husband would survive her by approx. 15 years.

Princess Marie Louise of Orléans (31 December 1896 – 8 March 1973); daughter of Princess Henriette of Belgium, later Princess Henriette of Orléans, Duchess of Vendôme (30 November 1870 – 28 March 1948) and Prince Emmanuel of Orléans, 8th Duke of Vendôme (18 January 1872 – 1 February 1931) She married Prince Philip of Bourbon-Two Sicilies on 12 January 1916 and they were divorced in 1925. They have one son. She remarried to Walter Kingsland on 12 December 1928

Duchess Louise of Mecklenburg-Strelitz (Luise Auguste Wilhelmine Amalie; 10 March 1776 – 19 July 1810) was Queen of Prussia as the wife of King Frederick William III. The couple's happy, though short-lived, marriage produced nine children, including the future monarchs Frederick William IV of Prussia and German Emperor Wilhelm I. She was the fourth daughter and sixth child of Duke Charles of Mecklenburg and his wife Princess Friederike of Hesse-Darmstadt.

Princess Louise of Prussia (German: Luise Auguste Wilhelmine Amalie von Preußen)( 1 February 1808 – 6 December 1870) was the third surviving daughter and ninth child of Frederick William III of Prussia and Louise of Mecklenburg-Strelitz. In 1825 she married  Prince Frederik of the Netherlands. They had four children, among others Louise who would become Queen of Sweden & Norway (see above).

Princess Louise of Wied (24 October 1880 – 29 August 1965) daughter of  William, Prince of Wied (1845–1907), elder son of Hermann, Prince of Wied and Princess Marie of Nassau and Princess Marie of the Netherlands (a daughter of Princess Louise of Prussia and Prince Frederik of the Netherlands).

Lady Louise Alexandra Marie Irene Mountbatten (13 July 1889 – 7 March 1965), born Princess Louise of Battenberg, was Queen of Sweden as the wife of King Gustaf VI Adolf. A member of the House of Battenberg, Louise was closely related to the ruling families of Britain and Russia.  Louise was born a Princess of Battenberg at Schloss Heiligenberg, Seeheim-Jugenheim, in the Grand Duchy of Hesse. Her father, Prince Louis of Battenberg, who was an admiral in the British Royal Navy, renounced his German title during the First World War and anglicised his family name to "Mountbatten" at the behest of King George V. He was then created the first Marquess of Milford Haven in the peerage of the United Kingdom. From 1917, therefore, his daughter was known as "Lady Louise Mountbatten". Her mother was Princess Victoria of Hesse and by Rhine, a granddaughter of Queen Victoria. In 1909, Louise received a proposal from King Manuel II of Portugal. Her grand-uncle, King Edward VII, the British monarch, was in favour of the match, but Louise declined, as she wished to marry for love. At the age of twenty, Louise became secretly engaged to Prince Christopher of Greece, but they were forced to give up their relationship for financial reasons. Shortly before World War I broke out, Louise fell in love with a man of whom her parents approved but he was killed in the early days of the war.Later during the war, while she volunteered as a nurse in Nevers, she began a relationship with Alexander Stuart-Hill, a Scottish artist living in Paris. Anticipating that her parents would be disappointed in her choice, Louise kept their engagement a secret. Eventually, she confided in her parents, who were initially understanding, and invited Stuart-Hill for visits at Kent House twice.[2] In fact, her family, referring to him as "Shakespeare" because of his odd appearance, found him "eccentric" and "affected". Lacking resources, the engaged couple agreed to postpone marriage until after the war. But in 1918 Louise's father explained to her that Stuart-Hill was most likely homosexual, and that a marriage with him was impossible.In 1923 Crown Prince Gustaf Adolf of Sweden, having been for three years the widower of Louise's mother's cousin Princess Margaret of Connaught, paid a visit to London and, to Louise's surprise, began to court her. Although as a young woman Louise had said that she would never marry a king or a widower, she accepted the proposal of a man destined to be both.On 3 November 1923, at age 34, Louise married Crown Prince Gustaf Adolf The marriage between Louise and Gustav Adolf was by all accounts a love match and described as very happy Louise's only child, a daughter, was stillborn on 30 May 1925.

Louise of Savoy (11 September 1476 – 22 September 1531) was a French noble and regent, Duchess suo jure of Auvergne and Bourbon, Duchess of Nemours, and the mother of King Francis I. She was politically active and served as the regent of France in 1515, in 1525–1526 and in 1529.
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« Reply #583 on: June 08, 2020, 04:34:48 PM »

Louise of Tuscany (2 September 1870 – 23 March 1947), was by marriage Crown Princess of Saxony as the wife of the future King Frederick Augustus III. the second child of Ferdinand IV, the last Grand Duke of Tuscany and his second wife, Princess Alice of Bourbon-Parma. The 17-year-old princess attracted the attention of potential suitors, like Prince Pedro Augusto of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (grandson of Emperor Pedro II of Brazil) or Prince Ferdinand of Bulgaria, but none of them found favor in the eyes of the spoiled Louise. Finally, in the summer of 1887 at Pillnitz Castle she met Prince Frederick Augustus of Saxony (eldest son of Prince George, who became King of Saxony in June 1902). They married at Vienna on 21 November 1891. She bore him six children; however, she did not follow etiquette at the strict Dresden court, which resulted in arguments with her father-in-law, the Interior Minister Georg von Metzsch-Reichenbach and especially with her sister-in-law Princess Mathilde. As her popularity among the people by far exceeded the rest of the Saxon Royal Family, they made her life difficult with big and small intrigues. Soon rumours began to circulated that Louise had an affair with a dentist named O'Brian and with French tutor of her children, André Giron. When in desperation, she sent a telegram to Giron, this was intercepted by the secret police and it turned out that she actually begun an affair with him. This was raised by her biographer Erika Bestenreiner, who described the French tutor as a slender black-haired man with a small dark mustache, of a lively nature, perfect manners and good taste for clothes. Threatened by her father-in-law to being interned at Sonnestein Mental Asylum for life, on 9 December 1902 and with the help of two of her maids, sisters Sidonie and Maria Beeger –daughters of the royal court architect Eduard Beeger–, Louise (pregnant with her seventh child) fled from Dresden towards Lake Geneva, where André Giron was waiting for her. At first, in the Saxon court was believed that this trip was for recreation, but in fact there she met with her older brother Archduke Leopold Ferdinand of Austria, who began a liaison (and shortly after married with) Wilhelmine Adamović, a prostitute and daughter of a postman. The escape of the Crown Princess of Saxony was the first scandal of the German nobility in the 20th century, especially hurtful for the Saxon Royal Family, who were deeply Catholic.Without consulting his son, King George of Saxony officially declared the civil divorce of the Crown Princely couple on 11 February 1903 by a special court, which he had set up on 31 December 1902 One year later, on 15 October 1904, the Saxon monarch died after obliged his son and new King Frederick Augustus III to forbade the return of Louise to the Dresden court. In Geneva, the former Crown Princess led a happy life and even dared to show up with her lover in public, but unexpectedly a few days before the divorce was declared she separated from Giron for unknown reasons. However, the paternity of her daughter Anna Monika Pia, born on 4 May 1903 at Lindau remained unclear. The Saxon court sent the director of the Dresden maternity hospital, Dr. Leopold, to Lindau to examine the newborn and establish her true parentage. Due to her physical appearance and the bright color of eyes and hair, he declared that the Crown Prince was the father of the child. The doctor, however, refused to admit further medical opinions. In consequence, Anna Monika Pia was recognized by Frederick Augustus as his own. King George gave Louise an allowance and granted her the title of Countess of Montignoso (in allusion of her Tuscan ascendancy) on 13 July 1903; in turn, he demanded that Anna Monika Pia must be sent to Dresden to be raised with the other royal children, but Louise adamantly refused. In 1907 Louise married the Italian musician Enrico Toselli, 12 years younger than her. They had one son, Carlo Emmanuele Filiberto, born on 7 May 1908. Shortly after her wedding (26 October 1907), King Frederick Augustus III finally located Anna Monika Pia, who was sent to Dresden to live with her siblings and be raised as a member of the Saxon royal house. In 1908 Louise separated from Toselli, and they divorced in 1912; their son remained with his father. In 1911, Louise broke her silence and published a memoir blaming her disgrace on her late father-in-law and Saxon politicians, whom she claimed feared that when she became queen, she would use her influence to dismiss them from office. Throughout the book, she claimed that her popularity exceeded that of her father-in-law, King George of Saxony, and her husband, the future king. Louise implied that her popularity had alienated her from the royal family and politicians. She was indeed popular with the Saxon people. She ascribed her popularity to her insistence on ignoring the etiquette of the Saxon court and, perhaps to cast herself as a victim, compared herself to her Habsburg relative, Marie Antoinette, who disliked court rituals at Versailles and, like Louise, had avoided the noble courtiers who depended on those rituals to affirm their places at court. After the Habsburg monarchy collapsed in 1918, Louise called herself "Antoinette Maria, Comtesse d'Ysette"; after some time in Mallorca with her uncle Archduke Ludwig Salvator of Austria, she moved to Brussels, where she initially lived in the suburb of Ixelles. Stripped of her imperial titles and dignities after her second marriage, she could no longer bear the surname of Habsburg. After the German invasion ended the little support that she received from some relatives, she suddenly became penniless. She died in poverty as a flower seller on 23 March 1947.

Lady Louise Alice Elizabeth Mary Mountbatten-Windsor (born 8 November 2003) is the elder child and only daughter of Prince Edward, Earl of Wessex, and Sophie, Countess of Wessex. She is the youngest granddaughter of Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh. She is 13th in the line of succession to the British throne.

Princess Märtha Louise of Norway (born 22 September 1971) is a Norwegian self-described clairvoyant and the only daughter and elder child of King Harald V and Queen Sonja. She was married to the late writer and visual artist Ari Behn from 2002 to 2017, with whom she had 3 daughters.

Luise of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel (Luise Amalie)(29 January 1722 – 13 January 1780) was daughter of Ferdinand Albert II, Duke of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel and his wife Duchess Antoinette of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel. In 1742 she married Prince Augustus William of Prussia, second son of King Frederick William I of Prussia and Sophia Dorothea of Hanover. The couple had 4 children.

Princess Louise, Duchess of Argyll, VA, CI, GCVO, GBE, RRC, GCStJ (Louisa Caroline Alberta)(18 March 1848 – 3 December 1939) was the sixth child and fourth daughter of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert. Various suitors were proposed by the leading royal houses of Europe: Princess Alexandra proposed her brother, the Crown Prince of Denmark, but the queen was strongly opposed to another Danish marriage that could antagonise Prussia at a time of diplomatic tension over the Schleswig-Holstein question. Victoria, Louise's eldest sister, proposed the tall and rich Prince Albert of Prussia, but Queen Victoria disapproved of another Prussian marriage that would have been unpopular in England. Prince Albert was also reluctant to settle in England as required. William, Prince of Orange, was also considered a suitor, but because of his extravagant lifestyle in Paris, where he lived openly with a lover, the queen quickly vetoed the idea. Louise viewed marriage to any prince as undesirable, and announced that she wished to marry John Campbell, Marquess of Lorne, heir to the Dukedom of Argyll. No marriage between a daughter of a monarch and a British subject had been given official recognition since 1515, when Charles Brandon, 1st Duke of Suffolk, married King Henry VIII's sister Mary  Louise's brother, the prince of Wales, was strongly opposed to a marriage with a non-mediatized noble. Furthermore, Lorne's father, George Campbell, was an ardent supporter of William Ewart Gladstone, and the prince of Wales was worried that he would drag the royal family into political disputes. Nevertheless, the opposition was crushed by the queen, In 1871 Louise and John Campbell married. The couple had no children and it was rumoured that John was homosexual.

Princess Louise of Denmark (1726–1756), daughter of Christian VI of Denmark and wife of Ernest Frederick III, Duke of Saxe-Hildburghausen

Princess Louise of Denmark (1750–1831), daughter of Frederick V of Denmark and wife of Landgrave Charles of Hesse-Kassel

Princess Louise Auguste of Denmark (1771–1843), daughter of Christian VII of Denmark and wife of Frederick Christian II, Duke of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Augustenburg

Louisa Maria Teresa Stuart (28 June 1692 – 18 April 1712), known to Jacobites as Princess Royal, was the last child of James II and VII (1633–1701), the deposed king of England, Scotland, and Ireland, and of his queen, Mary of Modena. In English, she was called Louisa Maria and Louise Marie in French.

Princess Louise Marie Amélie of Belgium (18 February 1858 – 1 March 1924) was the eldest daughter of Leopold II and his wife, Marie Henriette of Austria. In 1875 she married Philipp, Prince of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, her second cousin. Philipp was thirty-one at the time of the marriage; his new bride was seventeen. The couple had two children The marriage was disliked by her father, who regarded it as an unwelcome alliance with Prussia, but her mother approved of it because Philipp lived in Hungary. The relationship between Louise and Philip was not happy. Louise later wrote that she had fled the bedchamber as soon as possible the morning after her wedding, due to her extreme distress.Philipp is said to have been controlling, and Louise responded by living a lavish lifestyle at the court of Vienna, where she attracted much attention.In 1895, Louise became romantically involved with Count Geza Mattachich (1868–1923), stepson of Oskar Keglevich, Count of Buzin. Mattachich was a lieutenant in a Croatian regiment of the Austrian army. In January 1897, she scandalized Vienna by permanently leaving her husband, Prince Philipp, for Mattachich and taking her daughter with her. In 1898, Prince Philipp and Mattachich fought a duel in Vienna, first with guns, then with swords, in which the prince was injured.Mattachich had been arrested in Zagreb and imprisoned for four years for forgery. Louise and Prince Philipp were finally divorced in Gotha on 15 January 1906, almost eight years after Louise had begun divorce proceedings. Estranged from her father, her husband, and her children, Louise's extravagant expenses brought her deeper and deeper into debt. Despite being the daughter of arguably the wealthiest king of the age, she was forced to claim bankruptcy after it became known that Mattachich had forged the signature of Louise's sister, Princess Stéphanie, on promissory notes for jewelry worth about $2,500,000. As a result of this episode, in May 1898 she was interned in an asylum for six years. Mattachich was sentenced to four years in prison for forgery. Once his sentence was over, he helped Louise escape from the asylum in 1904; they were together until his death in Paris. After Mattachich's death she was given a home by Queen Elisabeth, the wife of her cousin, King Albert I of Belgium.
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« Reply #584 on: June 08, 2020, 04:35:11 PM »

Princess Marie Luise (1908–1969), the adoptive daughter of Princess Dorothea Maria Henriette Auguste Louise of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (30 April 1881 – 21 January 1967) and Ernst Gunther, Duke of Schleswig-Holstein. A daughter of Prince Albrecht of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg and his wife Countess Ortrud of Ysenburg und Büdingen.


Princess Louise of Belgium (Louise Sophie Mary)( born 6 February 2004) is the first child and only daughter of Prince Laurent and Princess Claire. She is currently 14th in the line of succession to the Belgian throne.


Princess Louise Dorothea of Prussia (1680–1705), daughter of Frederick I of Prussia and wife of Frederick I of Sweden

Louisa Ulrika of Prussia (1720–1782), daughter of Frederick William I of Prussia and wife of Adolf Frederick of Sweden

Princess Louise of Prussia (1770–1836), daughter of Prince Augustus Ferdinand of Prussia and wife of Prince Anton Radziwill

Queen Louise of Prussia (1776–1810), daughter of Charles II, Grand Duke of Mecklenburg-Strelitz and wife of Frederick William III of Prussia


Princess Louise of Prussia (1829–1901), She was the second child and eldest daughter of Prince Charles of Prussia and Princess Marie of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach. There were failed negotiations for a marriage between her and King Charles XV of Sweden. On 27 June 1854 she married Alexis, Landgrave of Hesse-Philippsthal-Barchfeld at Charlottenburg Palace. The marriage remained childless and ended with a divorce on 6 March 1861

Princess Louise of Prussia (German: Luise Marie Elisabeth von Hohenzollern)( 3 December 1838 – 23 April 1923) was the second child and only daughter of German Emperor Wilhelm I and Augusta of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach. She was the younger sister of Frederick III of Germany ("Fritz") and aunt of Wilhelm II of Germany. Louise was betrothed to Frederick, Prince Regent of Baden in 1854, and they married 20 September 1856. The couple had 3 children.
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