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« Reply #765 on: August 05, 2021, 05:33:20 PM »

Helene Dolgoruki, more correctly Elena Pavlovna Dolgorukaya (Russian: Елена Павловна Долгорукая), married name Fadeeva (Russian: Фадеева) (1789–1860), was a Russian noblewoman who was the grandmother of both Sergei Witte and Madame Blavatsky.Helene was the daughter of Prince Paul Vassilyevich Dolgorukov (1755–1837) and Henrietta Adolfovna de Bandre du Plessis (d. 1812).In 1813 she married Andrei Mikhailovich Fadeyev (1789–1867) and the family resided near the village of Rzhishchevo, in the Province of Kiev, where the estate of the Dolgorukovs was located.

Helen of Sweden (c. 1190 – 1247, Swedish: Helena) was a Swedish princess and daughter of King Sverker II of Sweden. She was the mother of Queen Catherine of Sweden. She was later Abbess of Vreta Abbey Helen was born in Denmark, the daughter of King Sverker II and Queen Benecicta. Her father was an exile there at that time. In 1195 or 1196, he was crowned King of Sweden. In 1208, he was deposed, and in 1210, he died in battle. Helen Sverkersdotter, the only daughter of the deposed king, was educated at Vreta Abbey at the time of her father's death. Around 1210, Helen was one of the victims of the Vreta abductions.Sune Folkesson was of one of the two dynasties that been rivals for the Swedish throne since 1130 while Helen was from the other, the Sverker dynasty. Her relatives would not approve of the proposal of Sune Folkason who was the son of an earl who had been among Sverker's opponents in the battle in which he himself fell. According to folklore, Sune Folkason abducted Helena and took her to the Ymseborg Castle. They married and two daughters survived from their marriage; Benedicta of Bjelbo and Catherine Sunesdotter.


Helen of Greece and Denmark (Greek: Ελένη, Eleni; Romanian: Elena)(2 May 1896 – 28 November 1982)The third child and eldest daughter of Crown Prince Constantine of Greece and Princess Sophia of Prussia,[1] Helen was born on 2 May 1896 in Athens during the reign of her grandfather, King George I. From birth, she received the nickname "Sitta" as her brother Alexander failed to correctly pronounce the English word "sister". Growing up, Helen developed a special affection for Alexander, only three years her senior. In 1921 she married Carol II of Romania (an unhappy marriage). They would have 1 child, a son Michael.


Princess Elena of Romania (15 November 1950) is the second eldest daughter of King Michael I and Queen Anne of Romania. On 20 July 1983, Elena married Robin Medforth-Mills (1942–2002). Elena and Robin had two children. They were divorced on 28 November 1991 after 8 years of marriage. Elena was remarried on 14 August 1998 in a civil ceremony at Peterlee to Alexander Philips Nixon McAteer (22 October 1964), The marriage was private. Elena and Alexander married religiously at the Coronation Cathedral, Alba Iulia, on 11 September 2013, privately. The groom was given the style His Excellency Domnul Alexander McAteer. For deeply personal reasons, Alexander changed his surname to Nixon. He is a Knight of the Sacred Military Constantinian Order of Saint George, and holds a number of Romanian decorations. He has consistently refused to take any royal title.


Duchess Helena Eugenie Maria Donatha Mechthild in Bavaria (6 May 1972), 3rd daughter of Max-Emanuel Ludwig Maria Herzog in Bayern (sometimes styled Prince Max of Bavaria, Duke in Bavaria)(21 January 1937) and Swedish Countess Elisabeth Douglas (31 December 1940)

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« Reply #766 on: August 05, 2021, 06:11:53 PM »

Sophie is a version of the female given name Sophia, meaning "wisdom (also spelled as Sofie and Sofia):


Princess Sophia of Greece and Denmark (Greek: Σοφία) the first child of King Paul of Greece and Frederica of Hanover. Sofía met her paternal third cousin the then Infante Juan Carlos of Spain on a cruise in the Greek Islands in 1954; they met again at the wedding of the Duke of Kent, her paternal second cousin, at York Minster in June 1961. Sofia and Juan Carlos married on 14 May 1962, at the Catholic Cathedral of Saint Dionysius in Athens.Sofia converted from Greek Orthodoxy to Roman Catholicism to become more palatable to Catholic Spain, and thus relinquished her rights to the Greek throne. Along with this, the usual Latinisation of her Greek name (Σοφία) was changed from Sophia to the Spanish variant, Sofía. The couple had 3 children.


Infanta Sofía of Spain (Sofía de Todos los Santos de Borbón y Ortiz)(29 April 2007) is the younger daughter of King Felipe VI and Queen Letizia. Sofía was named after her paternal grandmother, Queen Sofía of Spain.


Sophie of Bar (c. 1004 or 1018 – January 21 or June 21, 1093) was sovereign Count of Bar and lady of Mousson between 1033 and 1093. She succeeded her brother, Frederick III, Duke of Upper Lorraine, ruled in co-regency with her spouse Louis, Count of Montbéliard, and was succeeded by her son Frederick of Montbéliard.


Sophie of Thuringia (20 March 1224 – 29 May 1275) was the second wife and only Duchess consort of Henry II, Duke of Brabant and Lothier. She was the heiress of Hesse which she passed on to her son, Henry upon her retention of the territory following her partial victory in the War of the Thuringian Succession in which she was one of the belligerents. Sophie was the founder of the Brabant dynasty of Hesse.


Catherine II of Russia (born Sophie of Anhalt-Zerbst)(2 May 1729 in Stettin – 17 November 1796), most commonly known as Catherine the Great. Catherine was born in Stettin, Pomerania, Kingdom of Prussia (now Szczecin, Poland) as Princess Sophie Friederike Auguste von Anhalt-Zerbst-Dornburg. Her father, Christian August, Prince of Anhalt-Zerbst, belonged to the ruling German family of Anhalt.[4] He tried to become the duke of Duchy of Courland and Semigallia but in vain and at the time of his daughter's birth held the rank of a Prussian general in his capacity as governor of the city of Stettin. But because of conversion of her second cousin Peter III to Orthodox Christianity, two of her first cousins became Kings of Sweden: Gustav III and Charles XIII. She married the later Peter III of Russia and became Empress regnant after the coupe on her husband.


Sophie Amalie of Brunswick-Calenberg (24 March 1628 – 20 February 1685) Her parents were George, Duke of Brunswick-Calenberg, and Anne Eleonore of Hesse-Darmstadt.Sophie Amalie married Prince Frederick in Castle Glücksburg on 1 October 1643. The marriage was arranged in 1640, as it was considered suitable for the current situation of the groom: he was, at that point, archbishop of Bremen and not heir to the throne, and was not expected to succeed to the throne. It is believed to be a political match, though the exact purpose of it is unknown. They had eight children.


Princess Sophia Hedwig of Denmark and Norway (28 August 1677 – 13 March 1735) was a Danish princess, the daughter of King Christian V and his queen-consort, Charlotte Amalie of Hesse-Kassel. Sophia Hedwig remained officially unwed, although they were rumors that she entered a secret marriage with her courtier, the noble Carl Adolph von Plessen (1678-1758).


Princess Anna Sophie of Denmark and Norway (1 September 1647 – 1 July 1717) was the eldest daughter of King Frederick III of Denmark and Sophie Amalie of Brunswick-Lüneburg. In 1662, the negotiations about her marriage were initiated, and she met with John Georg, who visited the Danish court with his mother.[3] In 1663, a celebration was held at Copenhagen Castle honouring the fifteen-year-old princess's engagement to John George III, Elector of Saxony. John Georg and his mother once again visited Denmark in person to be present.[Anna Sophie and John George were married three years later, on 9 October 1666. The couple had 2 children.


Sophie Amalie (19 January 1670 – 27 February 1710), daughter of Christian Albert, Duke of Holstein-Gottorp, and Princess Frederica Amalia of Denmark She married on 7 July 1695 to Duke Augustus William of Brunswick-Lüneburg. No issue.


 Princess Sophie Charlotte of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Beck, was the daughter of Frederick William II, Duke of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Beck, She married  in 1750 Prince Georg Ludwig of Holstein-Gottorp. They had 3 children.


Princess Sophia Albertina of Sweden (Sophia Maria Lovisa Fredrika Albertina; 8 October 1753 – 17 March 1829) was the last Princess-Abbess of Quedlinburg Abbey, and as such reigned as vassal monarch of the Holy Roman Empire.


Sophia Albertina was the daughter of King Adolf Frederick of Sweden and Louisa Ulrika of Prussia. She was thus a princess of Sweden, a princess of Holstein-Gottorp and a sister to Gustav III of Sweden. She never married, but there were certainly rumours of a love life and illigitemate children.


Maria Feodorovna (Russian: Мария Фёдоровна; née Duchess Sophie Dorothea of Württemberg)(25 October 1759 – 5 November 1828 [OS 24 October]) became Empress consort of Russia as the second wife of Emperor Paul I.Daughter of Duke Frederick Eugene of Württemberg and Princess Friederike of Brandenburg-Schwedt. In 1776 she married Paul I of Russia (son of Catherine the Great). Throughout her marriage with Paul I of Russia, Maria Feodorovna had ten children.


Sophie of Württemberg (Sophie Emma Matilda)(17 June 1818 – 3 June 1877) Sophie was born in Stuttgart; her parents were King William I of Württemberg and Grand Duchess Catherine Pavlovna of Russia, the fourth eldest daughter of Tsar Paul I. Shortly after Sophie's birth, her mother died, and she was cared for by her aunt, Catharina of Württemberg. She was niece of tsars Alexander I and Nicholas I of Russia.Sophie married her maternal first cousin, the future Prince of Orange (later King Willem III), in Stuttgart on 18 June 1839 with the idea that she would in the end succeed in dominating him. The marriage was an unhappy one. The couple would have 3 sons, who all died before their father.


Princess Sophie of the Netherlands (Wilhelmine Marie Sophie Louise)(8 April 1824 – 23 March 1897) was the only daughter and last surviving child of King Willem II of the Netherlands and of his wife Grand Duchess Anna Pavlovna of Russia. She was heir presumptive to her niece, Queen Wilhelmina of the Netherlands, for seven years, from the death of her brother until her own death.Princess Sophie married her first cousin, Charles Alexander, Hereditary Grand Duke of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach, at Kneuterdijk Palace in The Hague on 8 October 1842. Their mothers were sisters, and daughters of Tsar Paul I of Russia.They had four children.


Princess Sophie Louise of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach (20 March 1911 – 21 November 1988) was a princess of the House of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach. She was born in Weimar, the eldest child and only daughter of William Ernest, Grand Duke of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach, by his second wife, Princess Feodora of Saxe-Meiningen. She was a granddaughter of Princess Sophie of the Netherlands. On 7 March 1938 at Heinrichau, Sophie married Friedrich Günther, Prince of Schwarzburg. The marriage would prove short lived and less than a year later on 1 November 1938 they were divorced.Friedrich Günther never remarried nor produced legitimate issue. Consequently, his sister Marie Antoinette controversially succeeded him as Princess of Schwarzburg.


Princess Sofie Renate Reuß (27 June 1884 – 19 January 1968) was the third child and only daughter of Prince Heinrich VII Reuß, J.L., proprietor of the Köstritz paragium, and Princess Marie of Saxe-Weimar. Her mother was the daughter of Charles Alexander, Grand Duke of Saxe-Weimar by his wife, Princess Sophie of the Netherlands.On 12 December 1909 the princess married her cousin, Prince Heinrich XXXIV Reuß, J.L. (1887–1956). They had 3 children.


Duchess Sophie Charlotte Augustine in Bavaria (23 February 1847 – 4 May 1897) was a daughter of Duke Maximilian Joseph in Bavaria (1808–1888) and Princess Ludovika of Bavaria. The ninth of ten children born to her parents, she was known as Sopherl within the family. She was engaged to her cousin King Ludwig II of Bavaria. Their engagement was publicised on 22 January 1867, but after having repeatedly postponed the wedding date, Ludwig finally cancelled it in October, as it seemed Sophie had fallen in love with the court photographer, Edgar Hanfstaengl. Other proposed husbands included the renowned homosexual Archduke Ludwig Viktor of Austria, brother of both Franz Joseph I of Austria and Maximilian I of Mexico, as well as the future Luís I of Portugal. Another candidate was Duke Philipp of Württemberg,[1] the first cousin of her eventual husband.She refused all the candidates. She was sent to stay with her aunt, Amalie Auguste, then the Queen of Saxony as wife of King John of Saxony. It was in Saxony Sophie Charlotte met Prince Ferdinand of Orléans (12 July 1844 – 29 June 1910), Duke of Alençon, the son of Prince Louis, Duke of Nemours and grandson of the late King Louis Philippe (died 1850). Soon after, on 28 September 1868, she married him at Possenhofen Castle, near Starnberg. They had 2 children.


Princess Sophie (1898–1928), daughter of Prince Emmanuel of Orléans, Duke of Vendôme (Philippe Emmanuel Maximilien Marie Eudes)( 18 January 1872 – 1 February 1931) and Princess Henriette of Belgium (1870–1948) She died unmarried in Lugrin in 1928. In 1921, she was rumored to have been engaged to the Crown Prince and Regent of Serbia (Alexander I)
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« Reply #767 on: August 05, 2021, 06:48:53 PM »

Princess Sophie of Bavaria (Sophie Friederike Dorothea Wilhelmine)(27 January 1805 – 28 May 1872) was born to King Maximilian I Joseph of Bavaria and his second wife Caroline of Baden. She was the identical twin sister of Princess Maria Anna of Bavaria, Queen of Saxony as wife of Frederick Augustus II of Saxony. On 4 November 1824, she married Archduke Franz Karl of Austria. They would have 6 children, among others the future Emperor Franz Joseph I


Archduchess Sophie of Austria (German: Sophie, Erzherzogin von Österreich)(5 March 1855 – 29 May 1857) was the first child and first of three daughters born to Franz Joseph I, Emperor of Austria, and Elisabeth of Bavaria. She died aged two.


Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg (Czech: Žofie Marie Josefína Albína hraběnka Chotková z Chotkova a Vojnína; German: Sophie Maria Josephine Albina Gräfin Chotek von Chotkow und Wognin)(1 March 1868 – 28 June 1914) was the wife of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria, the heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne. Their assassination in Sarajevo sparked a series of events that eventually led to World War I.Sophie was born in Stuttgart as the fourth daughter of Count Bohuslav Chotek von Chotkow und Wognin, a Bohemian aristocrat and Ambassador, and his wife Countess Wilhelmine Kinsky von Wchinitz und Tettau. It is unknown where Sophie first met Archduke Franz Ferdinand, although it may have been at a ball in Prague in 1894. Franz Ferdinand, who was stationed at a military garrison in Prague, paid frequent visits to Halbturn Castle, the home of Archduke Friedrich, and it was assumed that he had fallen in love with Friedrich's eldest daughter, Archduchess Marie Christine.The liaison was discovered by Archduchess Isabella, herself only born into a mediatised family (the House of Cro˙). Franz Ferdinand had become heir presumptive to the throne, after the suicide of his cousin Crown Prince Rudolf in 1889 and the death of his father Karl Ludwig of typhoid in 1896. As such his uncle, the Emperor Franz Joseph, informed him that he could not marry Sophie, who could not become an empress consort Franz Ferdinand refused to renounce Sophie to marry equally and beget an heir to the throne, compounding the scandal surrounding the death and illicit affair of the emperor's previous heir.In 1899, under pressure from family members (especially the Archduchess Maria Theresa, the emperor's formidable sister-in-law and Franz Ferdinand's stepmother) the couple were granted permission to wed.Franz Ferdinand was allowed to retain his place in the order of succession and a suitable title was promised for his future wife. Sophie and Franz Ferdinand were married on 1 July 1900 at Reichstadt (now Zákupy) in Bohemia. Upon her marriage, Sophie was given the title Fürstin von Hohenberg ("Princess of Hohenberg") with the style of Durchlaucht ("Serene Highness"). In 1909, she was elevated to Herzogin (Duchess) and accorded the higher style of Hoheit ("Highness").Nonetheless, all of the archduchesses, mediatized princesses and countesses of Austria and Hungary took precedence before her. For the fourteen years of their marriage, Sophie never shared her husband's rank, title, or precedence.The couple had four children.


Princess Sophie of Hohenberg (Sophie Marie Franziska Antonia Ignatia Alberta von Hohenberg)(24 July 1901 – 27 October 1990) was the only daughter of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and his wife Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg, both of whom were assassinated at Sarajevo on 28 June 1914. On 8 September 1920, Sophie married Count Friedrich von Nostitz-Rieneck (1 November 1893 in Prague – 29 December 1973 in Graz), son of Count Erwein Felix von Nostitz-Rieneck and Countess Amalia Podstatzky-Lichtenstein, in Tetschen. They had four children.


Countess Sophie von Nostitz-Rieneck (4 June 1929), daughter of Princess Sophie of Hohenberg and Count Friedrich von Nostitz-Rieneck. She married Baron Ernst von Gudenus (26 March 1916 in Madrid – 7 December 1972 in Weiz), son of Baron Erwein von Gudenus and Baroness Sidonia von Morsey gennant Picard. They have four children.


Princess Sophie Felicitas Elisabetha Bona Maria Antonia of Hohenberg (10 May 1960), daugher of Franz Ferdinand, Duke of Hohenberg (13 September 1927 – 16 August 1977), and Princess Elisabeth of Luxembourg. She married Jean-Louis de Potesta on 18 June 1983. They have three children.


Princess Sophie of Sweden (Sofia Vilhelmina Katarina Maria Lovisa Charlotta Anna) ( 21 May 1801 – 6 July 1865)was the daughter of King Gustav IV Adolf of Sweden and his wife, Frederica of Baden. On 25 July 1819 in Karlsruhe, Sophie married her half-grand-uncle Leopold I of Baden. They had 8 children.


Duchess Sophie in Bavaria (German: Sophie Adelheid Ludovika Maria Herzogin in Bayern)(22 February 1875 – 4 September 1957) Her parents were Karl Theodor, Duke in Bavaria, head of a cadet branch of the Bavarian royal family, and an ophthalmologist of recognized reputation, and his second wife, the Infanta Maria José of Braganza, third daughter of King Miguel I, exiled monarch of Portugal. On 26 July 1898 in Bavaria's capital, Munich, Sophie Adelheid married Count Hans Veit (7 April 1862 –29 October 1929), head of the mediatized House of Toerring-Jettenbach. They had three children.


Duchess Sophie in Bavaria (28 October 1967) was born a Duchess in Bavaria, a member of the House of Wittelsbach, and second in line for the Jacobite succession. Princess Sophie was born in Munich, the eldest of the five daughters of Prince Max, Duke in Bavaria, and Princess Elisabeth, Duchess in Bavaria (née Countess Douglas). Sophie married Hereditary Prince Alois of Liechtenstein on 3 July 1993 at St. Florin's in Vaduz, Liechtenstein. They have four children.


Duchess Sophie Anastasia Assunta Marie Pauline of Württemberg (15 January 1994), the daughter of Duchess Marie-Caroline Hedwig Eleonore in Bavaria (23 June 1969) and Duke Philipp of Württemberg (1 November 1964) She married on 15 September 2018 in Altshausen, Count Maximilien d'Andigné (born 19 March 1989), son of Count Hervé d'Andigné and Marie-Adélaďde de la Barre de Nanteuil


Sophie, Princess of Isenburg (7 March 1978), daughter of Franz-Alexander, Prince of Isenburg and his wife, née Countess Christine von Saurma zu der Jeltsch. In 2011 she married Georg Friedrich, Prince of Prussia (10 June 1976). The couple has 3 sons and a daughter.


Sophie Franziska Maria Germaine Habsburg also known as Archduchess Sophie of Austria (19 January 1959) is a French-born Italian designer and former model.Sophie Habsburg was born in Paris on 19 January 1959, the daughter of Archduke Ferdinand Karl Max of Austria and Countess Helene of Törring-Jettenbach.On 11 February 1990 in Salzburg, Sophie Habsburg married the Austrian-Italian Prince Mariano Hugo of Windisch-Graetz. They had three children, one of whom died in a car accident in 2010.


Sophie Helen Rhys-Jones (20 January 1965)  Her father, Christopher Bournes Rhys-Jones (born 1931), is a retired sales director for an importer of industrial tyres and rubber goods. Her mother was Mary (née O'Sullivan; 1934–2005), a charity worker and secretary. While working at Capital Radio, Rhys-Jones met Prince Edward, the youngest son of the Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh, for the first time in 1987 when he was dating her friend. he met Prince Edward again at a charity event in 1993, and the two began their relationship soon afterwards. Their engagement was announced on 6 January 1999. The wedding took place on 19 June of the same year at St George's Chapel at Windsor Castle. The couple has 2 children.


 Sofia Kristina Hellqvist (6 December 1984),daughter  of Marie Britt Rotman (1957) and a Danish–Swedish father, Erik Oscar Hellqvist (1949). In July 2010, the Swedish Royal Court confirmed the relationship between Hellqvist and Prince Carl Philip. On 27 June 2014, the couple's engagement was announced. The couple married at Slottskyrkan in Stockholm on 13 June 2015. The couple has 3 sons.


Sofia of Bavaria Wittelsbach (1376–1425), Queen of Bohemia

Sophia Palaiologina (1455–1503), Grand Duchess of Moscow


Safiye Sultan (1550–1619), wife of Murad III, mother of Mehmed III; originally named Sofia


Sophia of Hanover (born Princess Sophia of the Palatinate)(14 October 1630 – 8 June 1714) was the Electress of Hanover by marriage to Elector Ernest Augustus, and later the heiress presumptive to the thrones of England and Scotland (later Great Britain) and Ireland under the Act of Settlement 1701. She died less than two months before she would have become queen. Consequently, it was her son George I who succeeded her first cousin once removed, Anne.The twelfth[2] child of Frederick V of the Palatinate and Elizabeth Stuart, also known as the "Winter King and Queen of Bohemia" for their short rule in that country, Sophia was born in The Wassenaer Hof, The Hague, Dutch Republic, where her parents had fled into exile after the Battle of White Mountain. Through her mother, she was the granddaughter of James VI and I, king of Scotland and England in a personal unionBefore her marriage, Sophia, as the daughter of Frederick V, Elector Palatine of the Rhine, was referred to as Sophie, Princess Palatine of the Rhine, or as Sophia of the Palatinate. The Electors of the Palatinate were the Calvinist senior branch of House of Wittelsbach, whose Catholic branch ruled the Electorate of Bavaria.On 30 September 1658, she married Ernest Augustus, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg, at Heidelberg, who in 1692 became the first Elector of Hanover. Ernest August was a second cousin of Sophia's mother Elizabeth Stuart, Queen of Bohemia, as they were both great-grandchildren of Christian III of Denmark.Sophia had seven children who reached adulthood.


Sophia Charlotte of Hanover (30 October 1668 – 1 February 1705) was the first Queen consort in Prussia as wife of King Frederick I. She was the only daughter of Elector Ernest Augustus of Hanover and his wife Sophia of the Palatinate. Her eldest brother, George Louis, succeeded to the British throne in 1714 as King George I. She married Frederick I (German: Friedrich I.)(11 July 1657 – 25 February 1713), of the Hohenzollern dynasty, was (as Frederick III) Elector of Brandenburg (1688–1713) and Duke of Prussia in personal union (Brandenburg-Prussia). They had issue.


Sophia Dorothea of Hanover (26 March [O.S. 16 March] 1687 – 28 June 1757) was a Queen consort in Prussia as spouse of Frederick William I. She was the sister of George II, King of Great Britain. Sophia Dorothea was born on 16 March 1687 (O.S.), in Hanover. She was the only daughter of George Louis of Hanover, later King George I of Great Britain, and his wife, Sophia Dorothea of Celle. Sophia Dorothea married her cousin, Crown Prince Frederick William of Prussia, heir apparent to the Prussian throne, on 28 November 1706. They had 10 children.


Sophie Magdalene of Brandenburg-Kulmbach (28 November 1700 – 27 May 1770) was queen-consort of Denmark and Norway by marriage to King Christian VI of Denmark and Norway.She was born in Castle Schonberg, Bavaria, to Christian Heinrich, Margrave of Brandenburg-Bayreuth-Kulmbach by his wife, Countess Sophie Christiane of Wolfstein. She was raised at the court of the Queen of Poland, Christiane Eberhardine of Brandenburg-Bayreuth, in Saxony. The couple had 3 children.


Sophia Dorothea of Brunswick-Lüneburg-Celle (15 September 1666 – 13 November 1726) was the repudiated wife of future King George I of Great Britain, and mother of George II. The union with her first cousin was a marriage of state, arranged by her father George William, her father-in-law the Elector of Hanover, and her mother-in-law, Electress Sophia of Hanover, first cousin of King Charles II of England. She is best remembered for her alleged affair with Count Philip Christoph von Königsmarck that led to her being imprisoned in the Castle of Ahlden for the last thirty years of her life.


Princess Sophia Dorothea of Prussia (German: Sophia Dorothea Marie von Preußen)(25 January 1719 – 13 November 1765) was the ninth child and fifth daughter of Frederick William I of Prussia and Sophia Dorothea of Hanover. By marriage, she was a Margravine of Brandenburg-Schwedt.On 10 November 1734 in Potsdam, Sophia Dorothea married her Hohenzollern kinsman Frederick William, Margrave of Brandenburg-Schwedt, son of Philip William, Margrave of Brandenburg-Schwedt, and Princess Johanna Charlotte of Anhalt-Dessau, daughter of John George II, Prince of Anhalt-Dessau. They had five children.


Princess Sophia Matilda of the United Kingdom (3 November 1777 – 27 May 1848) was the twelfth child and fifth daughter of King George III and Queen Charlotte. Sophia is perhaps best known for the rumours surrounding a supposed illegitimate child to whom she gave birth as a young woman.


Princess Sophia Matilda of Gloucester (29 May 1773 – 29 November 1844) was a great-granddaughter of King George II of Great Britain and niece of King George III.Her father was Prince William Henry, Duke of Gloucester and Edinburgh, the third son of The Prince Frederick, Prince of Wales. Her mother, the Duchess of Gloucester, born Maria Walpole, was the illegitimate daughter of Sir Edward Walpole.


Sophia Sidney, Baroness De L'Isle and Dudley (née FitzClarence; August 1796 – 10 April 1837) was the eldest illegitimate daughter of William IV of the United Kingdom and his longtime mistress Dorothea Jordan. She was married to Philip Sidney, 1st Baron De L'Isle and Dudley, and had four surviving children. Shortly before her death in 1837, she served as State Housekeeper in Kensington Palace.


Sophia of Nassau (Sophia Wilhelmine Marianne Henriette)(9 July 1836 – 30 December 1913) was the youngest daughter of Wilhelm, Duke of Nassau, by his second wife Princess Pauline Friederike Marie of Württemberg.Her father died when she was three and was succeeded by her half-brother the later Adolphe, Grand Duke of Luxembourg. In 1857 she married the later King Oscar II of Sweden (Oscar Fredrik)(21 January 1829 – 8 December 1907). The couple had 4 children.



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« Reply #768 on: August 18, 2021, 01:38:31 AM »

How often is a Royal named Fastrada?   
Fastrada (c. 765-794) was queen consort of East Francia by marriage to Charlemagne, as his third wife.
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« Reply #769 on: August 19, 2021, 01:05:54 AM »

How often is a Princess named Esperanza?   
Princess Maria de la Esperanza (1914-2005) was the daughter of Prince Carlos of Bourbon-Two Sicilies.
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« Reply #770 on: August 26, 2021, 01:48:19 AM »

How often is a Royal named Radbot? Radbot (985-1045) was the son of Kanzelin of Habsburg.
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« Reply #771 on: August 31, 2021, 10:12:41 AM »

Bernard (Bernhard) is a French and West Germanic masculine given name. The name is attested from at least the 9th century. West Germanic Bernhard is composed from the two elements bern "bear" and hard "brave, hardy". The name Bernhard was notably popular among Old Frisian speakers.


Bernard or Bernhard (c. 870 – 891/2) was the only child of Emperor Charles the Fat. He was born of an unknown concubine and was thus considered illegitimate. Charles tried to make him his heir, but failed in two attempts.


Bernard of Saxe-Weimar (German: Bernhard von Sachsen-Weimar)(16 August 1604 – 18 July 1639) was a German prince and general in the Thirty Years' War. Born in Weimar within the Duchy of Saxe-Weimar, Bernard was the eleventh son of Johann, Duke of Saxe-Weimar, and Dorothea Maria of Anhalt.


Bernhard I, Duke of Saxe-Meiningen (10 September 1649 – 27 April 1706) was a duke of Saxe-Meiningen. He was the sixth but third surviving son of Ernst I, Duke of Saxe-Coburg-Altenburg and Elisabeth Sophie of Saxe-Altenburg.He married in Schloss Friedenstein, Gotha, on 20 November 1671 Marie Hedwig of Hesse-Darmstadt. They had seven children. He married secondly in Schöningen on 25 January 1681 Elisabeth Eleonore of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel daughter of Anthony Ulrich, Duke of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel. They had five children


Bernhard (28 October 1673 – 25 October 1694), son of Bernhard I, Duke of Saxe-Meiningen and Marie Hedwig of Hesse-Darmstadt.


Bernhard II (17 December 1800 – 3 December 1882) was a Duke of Saxe-Meiningen. He was the only son of Georg I Frederick Karl, Duke of Saxe-Meiningen and Luise Eleonore of Hohenlohe-Langenburg. Bernhard was a younger brother of Queen Adelaide of the United Kingdom and Ida, Princess Bernhard of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach. In Kassel on 23 March 1825, Bernhard II married Princess Marie Frederica of Hesse-Kassel (or Hesse-Cassel). They had two children.


Bernhard III, Duke of Saxe-Meiningen (1 April 1851 – 16 January 1928), was the last reigning duke of Saxe-Meiningen. Bernhard was born on 1 April 1851 at Meiningen in what was then the German Confederation, as the eldest son of Georg II, Duke of Saxe-Meiningen and his first wife Princess Charlotte of Prussia. He married in Berlin on 18 February 1878 Princess Charlotte of Prussia, his second cousin, daughter of Frederick III, German Emperor and granddaughter of the Queen Victoria. They had one daughter: Princess Feodora of Saxe-Meiningen (12 May 1879 - 26 August 1945).


Bernhard, Prince of Saxe-Meiningen (German: Bernhard, Prinz von Sachsen-Meiningen)(30 June 1901 – 4 October 1984) was the head of the House of Saxe-Meiningen from 1946 until his death. Bernhard was born in Köln the third son of Prince Frederick Johann of Saxe-Meiningen and Countess Adelaide of Lippe-Biesterfeld. His father was the second son of Georg II, Duke of Saxe-Meiningen and his mother a daughter of Count Ernst of Lippe-Biesterfeld. After the death of his older brother Prince Georg in 1946 his nephew Prince Frederick Alfred renounced his succession rights and so Bernhard succeeded to the headship of the house of Saxe-Meiningen and the nominal title of Duke of Saxe-Meiningen (as Bernhard IV). Bernhard was married morganatically to Margot Grössler (1911–1998), a merchant's daughter from Breslau on 25 April 1931. This union ended in divorce on 10 June 1947. They had two children, both of whom had no succession rights. Bernhard married secondly in Ziegenberg über Bad Nauheim on 11 August 1948 to Baroness Vera Schäffer von Bernstein (1914–1994). They had three children, whose son Konrad with full rights to the succession to the house of Saxe-Meiningen.


Bernard II (German: Bernhard II. Herr zur Lippe)( c. 1140 – 30 April 1224) was Lord of Lippe from 1167 until 1196. He founded the towns of Lippstadt and Lemgo. In 1167, Bernard married Heilwig (1150–1196), likely the daughter of Otto, Count of Are-Hochstaden. They had eleven children who survived into adulthood.


Bernard III, Lord of Lippe (c. 1194 – c. 1265) was a German nobleman. He was the ruling Lord of Lippe from 1229 until his death. Bernard III was the son of Lord Herman II and his wife, Oda of Tecklenburg. Bernard III married twice. Around 1230, he married Sophie of Cuijck-Arnsberg (c. 1210 – c. 1245). She was the daughter of Count Gottfried II of Arnsberg and Rietberg and his wife Elisabeth. They had 5 children. Bernard remarried after Sopie's death; in 1248 he married Sophie of Ravensberg-Vechta c. 1220 – after 3 June 1285), a daughter of Count Otto II of Ravensberg and Countess Sophie of Oldenburg. From this marriage, Bernard had four more children.


Bernhard IV, Lord of Lippe (c. 1230 in Brake – June 1275) was a ruling Lord of Lippe. He was the eldest son of Bernard III and his wife, Sofie of Cuijck-Arnsberg.In 1260, Bernard married Agnes (c. 1232 – c. 1 August 1285), a daughter of Count Dietrich V of Cleves and Hedwig of Meißen. They had 2 children.


Bernhard of Lippe (1277-1341) was a German nobleman. He was Prince-Bishop of Paderborn as Bernard V. He is considered the founder of the medieval Prince-bishopric. His territoriality focused policies are characterized by the fact that he was the first bishop who used his family name in his seal, instead of the episcopal title.Bernhard was a member of the House of Lippe. His parents were Simon I and Adelaide, a daughter of Henry III of Waldeck.


Bernhard VI, Lord of Lippe (c. 1370 – 1415) was a German nobleman. He was the ruling Lord of Lippe from 1410 until his death. He was the son of Simon III and his wife, Irmgard of Hoya On 28 June 1393, he married Margaret, the daughter of Count Henry VI of Waldeck-Landau. This marriage remained childless. He remarried in 1403, to Elisabeth of Moers. They had four children together


Bernard VII of Lippe (4 December 1428 – 2 April 1511) was the ruler of the Lordship of Lippe from 1429 until his death. Because of the many bloody feuds in which he was involved, he was nicknamed "the Bellicose". He is the longest-ever ruling European nobleman He was the eldest son of Lord Simon IV of Lippe and his wife, Margaret of Brunswick-Grubenhagen. He inherited Lippe in 1429, before his first birthday. From his marriage to Anna, the daughter of Count Otto II of Holstein-Schauenburg, he had 7 children


Bernard (?), youngest son of Bernhard VII and Anna.



Bernhard VIII, Count of Lippe (6 December 1527 – 15 April 1563) was from 1547 until his death in 1563 ruling the County of Lippe.Bernard's father, the reigning Count Simon V of Lippe, died in 1536, when Bernard was eight years old. His marriage to Catherine (1524–1583), daughter of the Count Philip III of Waldeck-Eisenberg produced 4 children.


Bernhard (1586–1602), eldest son of Count Simon VI of Lippe and his 2nd wife  Elisabeth, a daughter of Count Otto IV of Schaumburg and Holstein-Pinneberg.


John Bernard, Count of Lippe (18 October 1613 - 10 June 1652) was a ruling Count of Lippe-Detmold from 1650 until his death. He was the second eldest son of Count Simon VII of Lippe and his wife Anne Catherine of Nassau-Wiesbaden-Idstein (1590-1622). After the death of his nephew Simon Philip in 1650, he inherited Lippe-Detmold. He died childless in 1652. His younger brother Herman Adolph inherited Lippe-Detmold.



Prince Bernhard of Lippe (Bernhard Kasimir Wilhelm Friedrich Gustav Heinrich Eduard)(26 August 1872 – 19 June 1934) was a member of the Lippe-Biesterfeld line of the House of Lippe. He was the father of Prince Bernhard of Lippe-Biesterfeld. Prince Bernhard of Lippe, born as Count of Lippe-Biesterfeld in Oberkassel on 26 August 1872, was the 2nd son of Ernest II, Count of Lippe-Biesterfeld, regent (1897–1904) of Principality of Lippe, and his wife Countess Karoline von Wartensleben. He was a younger brother of Leopold IV, Prince of Lippe, who succeeded as reigning Prince of Lippe in 1905. He pursued a career as a soldier, serving in the Prussian Army, and attaining the rank of major. On 4 March 1909, Bernhard entered into a morganatic marriage with Baroness Armgard von Sierstorpff-Cramm, widowed Countess von Oeynhausen. Before this marriage, his wife was granted the title Countess of Biesterfeld (Gräfin von Biesterfeld) on 8 February 1909. She and her two sons Bernhard and Aschwin were created Princess (Prince) of Lippe-Biesterfeld (Prinzessin (Prinz) zur Lippe-Biesterfeld) on 24 February 1916 with the style Serene Highness, which brought their children into a more senior place in the line of succession, in which they hitherto had been the very last. The suffix Biesterfeld was revived to mark the beginning of a new cadet line. They had 2 sons.




Prince Bernhard of Lippe-Biesterfeld (later Prince Bernhard of the Netherlands, German: Bernhard Leopold Friedrich Eberhard Julius Kurt Karl Gottfried Peter Prinz zur Lippe-Biesterfeld)(29 June 1911 – 1 December 2004) was a German-born nobleman. Bernhard was born Bernhard Leopold Friedrich Eberhard Julius Kurt Karl Gottfried Peter, Count of Biesterfeld in Jena, Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach, German Empire on 29 June 1911, the elder son of Prince Bernhard of Lippe and his wife, Baroness Armgard von Sierstorpff-Cramm. He was a grandson of Ernest, Count of Lippe-Biesterfeld, who was regent of the Principality of Lippe until 1904. He was also a nephew of the principality's last sovereign, Leopold IV, Prince of Lippe. Because his parents' marriage did not conform with the marriage laws of the House of Lippe, it was initially deemed morganatic, so Bernhard was granted only the title of Count of Biesterfeld at birth. He and his brother could succeed to the Lippian throne only if the entire reigning House became extinct. In 1916, his uncle Leopold IV as reigning Prince raised Bernhard and his mother to Prince and Princess of Lippe-Biesterfeld, thereby retroactively according his parents' marriage dynastic status. The suffix Biesterfeld was revived to mark the beginning of a new cadet line of the House of Lippe. Bernhard met then-Princess Juliana at the 1936 Winter Olympics at Garmisch-Partenkirchen. Juliana's mother, Queen Wilhelmina, had spent most of the 1930s looking for a suitable husband for Juliana. As a Protestant of royal rank (the Lippes were a sovereign house in the German Empire), Bernhard was deemed acceptable for the devoutly religious Wilhelmina. They were distantly related, 7th cousins in particular, both descending from Lebrecht, Prince of Anhalt-Zeitz-Hoym. Wilhelmina left nothing to chance, and had her lawyers draft a very detailed prenuptial agreement that specified exactly what Bernhard could and could not do. The couple's engagement was announced on 8 September 1936, and they were married at The Hague on 7 January 1937. Earlier, Bernhard had been granted Dutch citizenship and changed the spelling of his names from German to Dutch. Previously styled as Serene Highness, he became a Royal Highness by Dutch law. His appropriateness as consort of the future Queen would later become a matter of some public debate. Prince Bernhard fathered six children, four of them with Queen Juliana. The eldest daughter is Beatrix, (born 1938), who later became Queen of the Netherlands. His other daughters with Juliana are Irene (born 1939), Margriet (born 1943) and Christina (1947–2019).He had two "natural", or illegitimate, daughters. The first is Alicia von Bielefeld (born in San Francisco on 21 June 1952), whose mother has been identified as Alicia Webber, a 19 years old German national, illegitimate daughter of German aviator and test pilot Hanna Reitsch. Von Bielefeld has become a landscape architect and lives in the United States. His sixth daughter, Alexia Grinda (a.k.a. Alexia Lejeune or Alexia Grinda-Lejeune, born in Paris on 10 July 1967), is his child by Hélčne Grinda, a French socialite and fashion model. Although rumours about these two children were already widespread, their status as his daughters was made official after his death.



Bernardo Federico Thomas Guillermo (17 June 1977), eldest son of Princess Christina (1947-2019) and Cuban exile Jorge Guillermo. He married 2 March 2009, New York City (USA), Eva Marie Prinz Valdes (2 August 1979) and has two children. According to the rumours the couple has separated.



Bernhard Lucas Emmanuel, Prince of Orange-Nassau, van Vollenhoven (25 December 1969) is the second son of Princess Margriet of the Netherlands and Pieter van Vollenhoven. Before the succession of his cousin Willem-Alexander as King, he was a member of the Dutch Royal House and eleventh in the line of succession to the Dutch throne. With Willem-Alexander's succession however, he is no longer a member of the Dutch Royal House, and is no longer in line to direct succession to the Dutch throne, but still retains his membership of the Dutch Royal Family. While studying in Groningen, Prince Bernhard met Annette Sekrčve, (18 April 1972). The couple announced their engagement on 11 March 2000. They married in July 2000. Prince Bernhard and Princess Annette have three children: Isabella Lily Juliana (born 2002), Samuel Bernhard Louis (born 2004), and Benjamin Pieter Floris (born 2008). According to a royal decree of 5 July 2000 the children were granted the family name van Vollenhoven, without titles. Prince Bernhard and his family live in Amsterdam.


Bernhard Heinrich Karl Martin, Prince of Bülow (German: Bernhard Heinrich Karl Martin Fürst von Bülow German)(3 May 1849 – 28 October 1929) was a German statesman who served as Foreign Minister for three years and then as Chancellor of the German Empire from 1900 to 1909. He was born at Klein-Flottbeck, Holstein (now part of Altona, Hamburg). His father, Bernhard Ernst von Bülow, was a Danish and German statesman and member of the Bülow family. On 9 January 1886 he married Maria Beccadelli di Bologna, Marchesa di Altavilla, Principessa di Camporeale (6 February 1848 – 20 January 1929) (as her 2nd husband).


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« Reply #772 on: August 31, 2021, 10:12:49 AM »

Bernhard (c. 1140 – 2 February 1212), a member of the House of Ascania, was Count of Anhalt and Ballenstedt, and Lord of Bernburg through his paternal inheritance. From 1180 he was also Duke of Saxony (as Bernhard III or Bernhard I). Bernhard was the youngest of the seven sons of Albert the Bear (d. 1170), Duke of Saxony from 1138 to 1142 and first Margrave of Brandenburg from 1157, by his wife Sophie of Winzenburg. Bernhard married firstly, Judith (Jutta) (b. bef. 1154 – d. aft. 12 December 1201), a daughter of Mieszko III the Old of Poland with issue. Secondly, Sophia, daughter of Louis II, the Iron, Landgrave of Thuringia with issue.


Bernhard I, Prince of Anhalt-Bernburg (c. 1218–1287) was a German prince of the House of Ascania and ruler of the principality of Anhalt-Bernburg. He was the second son of Henry I, Count of Anhalt (who was elevated to the rank of prince in 1218), by his wife Irmgard, daughter of Hermann I, Landgrave of Thuringia.In Hamburg on 3 February 1258, Bernhard married Princess Sophie (b. 1240 - d. aft. 1284), daughter of King Abel of Denmark. They had six children.


Bernhard II, Prince of Anhalt-Bernburg (ca. 1260/5 – aft. 26 December 1323), was a German prince of the House of Ascania and ruler of the principality of Anhalt-Bernburg. He was the third son of Bernhard I, Prince of Anhalt-Bernburg, by his wife Princess Sophie, daughter of King Abel of Denmark. On 27 December 1302 Bernhard married Helene (b. 1270 – d. 9 August 1315), daughter of Wizlaw II, Prince of Rügen and widow of John III, Lord of Mecklenburg. They had three sons.


Bernhard III, Prince of Anhalt-Bernburg (died 20 August 1348) was a German prince of the House of Ascania and ruler of the principality of Anhalt-Bernburg. He was the eldest son of Bernhard II, Prince of Anhalt-Bernburg, by his wife Helene, daughter of Wizlaw II, Prince of Rügen.In 1328 Bernhard married Agnes (c. 1310 – 4 January 1338), daughter of Rudolph I, Elector of Saxony and Duke of Saxe-Wittenberg. Bernhard and Agnes had five children.


Bernhard IV, Prince of Anhalt-Bernburg (died 28 June 1354) was a German prince of the House of Ascania and ruler of the principality of Anhalt-Bernburg. He was the eldest son of Bernhard III, Prince of Anhalt-Bernburg, by his first wife Agnes, daughter of Rudolf I, Duke of Saxe-Wittenberg and Elector of Saxony. After the death of his father in 1348, Bernhard inherited the principality of Anhalt-Bernburg as sole ruler, bypassing the rights of his younger brothers Henry and Otto. He also used the title of "Margrave of Landsberg" despite the fact the margraviate had been repurchased by the House of Wettin in 1347. Bernhard was betrothed shortly before his death to Beatrix (born Wartburg, 1 September 1339 – d. Seusslitz, 25 July 1399), daughter of Frederick II, Margrave of Meissen. The marriage apparently never took place or, if it ever did take place, was only juridical and unconsummated. Bernhard died without issue and was succeeded by his brother Henry.


Bernhard V, Prince of Anhalt-Bernburg (died 24 June 1420) was a German prince of the House of Ascania and ruler of the principality of Anhalt-Bernburg. He was the eldest son of Henry IV, Prince of Anhalt-Bernburg, by his wife Sophie, a possible member of the House of Stolberg.On 8 September 1396, Bernhard married Elisabeth (d. 1426), daughter of Ulrich III, Count of Honstein-Kelbra. Both spouses were great-great-grandchildren of Bernhard I, Prince of Anhalt-Bernburg, through his children Sophie and Bernhard II. This marriage only produced one daughter.


Bernhard, Count of Bylandt (3 January 1905 – 4 April 1998) was a German nobleman, artist, sculptor, author and member of the House of Bylandt or more specifically the branch of Bylandt-Rheydt. In 1939 he married the German actress Dorothea Gmelin. After divorce he remarried pianist Ilse Josten.


Bernhard Moritz von Oeynhausen (?) married Magdalena (23 February 1596 – 6 December 1662), a daughter of Johann VII, Count of Nassau-Siegen.


Bernard of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Plön (31 January 1639 – 13 January 1676) was a Danish General.  He was the fourth son of Joachim Ernest, the reigning Duke of Holstein-Plön, and his wife Dorothea Augusta of Gottorp. He died of a sudden fever in 1676 in Plön. He was never married.


Bernhard von Spanheim (or Sponheim; 1176 or 1181 – 4 January 1256), a member of the noble House of Sponheim, was Duke of Carinthia for 54 years from 1202 until his death. A patron of chivalry and minnesang, Bernhard's reign marked the emergence of the Carinthian duchy as an effective territorial principality.In 1122 Bernhard's ancestor Count Henry of Sponheim, descending from Rhenish Franconia, had inherited the Imperial estate of Carinthia. Upon his death in the following year, he was succeeded by his younger brother Engelbert, Bernhard's great-grandfather. His father was Duke Herman of Carinthia, who had reigned from 1161 until 1181Duke Bernhard's exalted rank corresponds to his wedding with Judith, daughter of the Přemyslid King Ottokar I of Bohemia and the Árpád princess Constance of Hungary, in 1213. Four known children result from the marriage


Bernhard of Carinthia (d. before 1249) son of Bernhard von Spanheim and Judith of Bohemia.


Bernhard II, Duke of Saxe-Jena (14 October 1638 – 3 May 1678), was duke of Saxe-Jena. He was the seventh child but fourth surviving son of Wilhelm, Duke of Saxe-Weimar and Eleonore Dorothea of Anhalt-Dessau. He married Marie Charlotte de la Trémoille, daughter of Henri de La Trémoille and Marie de La Tour d'Auvergne. They had 5 children. The marriage of Bernhard and Marie Charlotte was totally unhappy, and, as they were seemingly irreconcilable, the duke had decided to marry one of the ladies of his court, Marie Elisabeth of Kospoth. He solemnly promised that he would divorce his wife and marry her, and she ceded to his advances. They had one daughter


Bernhard (9 November 1667 – 26 April 1668), son of Bernhard II, Duke of Saxe-Jena and Marie Charlotte de la Trémoille
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« Reply #773 on: August 31, 2021, 10:15:10 AM »

Bernadine is a latinate diminutive of the given name "Bernard". Bernadette is a French name, a female form of the name Bernard, which means "brave bear".


Bernardine of Lippe (1563-1628) was a Countess of Lippe by birth and by marriage Countess of Leiningen-Leiningen. She was a daughter of Count Bernhard VIII of Lippe (1527–1563) from his marriage with Catherine (1524–1583), the daughter of Count Philip III of Waldeck-Eisenberg. In 1587, she married Count Louis of Leiningen-Westerburg (1557–1622). She had nine children.

Princess Bernadette de Broglie-Revel

Princess Bernadette Esterházy de Galántha
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« Reply #774 on: August 31, 2021, 10:57:04 AM »

Maurits is the Dutch equivalent of the masculine given name Maurice.

Maurice is a traditionally masculine given name, also used as a surname. It originates as a French name derived from the Latin Mauritius or Mauricius and was subsequently used in other languages. Its popularity is due to Mauritius, a saint of the Theban Legion (died 287). Mauritius is otherwise attested as a given name of the Roman Empire period, in origin meaning "one from Mauritania", i.e. "the Moor".Forms in other languages include: Latvian Māris, Spanish Mauricio, Portuguese Maurício, Italian Maurizio, Dutch Maurits, Greek Μαυρίκιος (Mavrikios), Russian Маврикий (Mavrikiy), German Moritz, Czech Mořic, English Morris.


Maurits of Orange (Dutch: Maurits van Oranje; German: Moritz von Oranien)(14 November 1567 – 23 April 1625) was stadtholder of all the provinces of the Dutch Republic except for Friesland from 1585 at the earliest until his death in 1625. Before he became Prince of Orange upon the death of his eldest half-brother Philip William in 1618, he was known as Maurits of Nassau. Maurits was the son of William the Silent and Anna of Saxony and was born at the castle of Dillenburg. He was named after his maternal grandfather, the Elector Maurice of Saxony, who was also a noted general. He never married but was the father of illegitimate children.


John Maurice of Nassau (Dutch: Johan Maurits van Nassau-Siegen; German: Johann Moritz von Nassau-Siegen; Portuguese: Joăo Maurício de Nassau-Siegen)(117 June 1604 – 20 December 1679) was called "the Brazilian" for his fruitful period as governor of Dutch Brazil. He was Count and (from 1664) Prince of Nassau-Siegen, and Grand Master of the Order of Saint John (Bailiwick of Brandenburg). He was born in Dillenburg. His father was John VII of Nassau; his grandfather John VI of Nassau, the younger brother of Dutch stadtholder Willem the Silent of Orange, making him a grandnephew to Willem the Silent.


Prince Maurits of the Netherlands, Prince of Orange-Nassau (Willem Frederik Maurits Alexander Hendrik Karel)(15 September 1843 – 4 June 1850), was the second son of King Willem III of the Netherlands and his first spouse, Sophie of Württemberg. When Prince Maurits suffered from meningitis, Queen Sophie wanted to consult another physician for a second opinion, but King Willem III refused and the child died. Their already strained relationship fell apart almost completely, as Sophie blamed William for Maurits death.


Prince Maurits Willem Pieter Hendrik of Orange-Nassau, van Vollenhoven (17 April 1968) is a member of the Dutch royal family as the eldest son of Princess Margriet of the Netherlands and Pieter van Vollenhoven. In 1989, van Vollenhoven met Marilčne (Marie-Helčne) van den Broek (4 February 1970), the youngest daughter of Hans van den Broek and Josee van Schendel. They married in 1998. Together, the couple has three children. By Royal Decree of 26 May 1998, the children of van Vollenhoven bear the surname "van Lippe-Biesterfeld van Vollenhoven", without titles. Upon the abdication of Queen Beatrix, which took place on 30 April 2013, it was confirmed that the children of Princess Margriet and Pieter van Vollenhoven would no longer be eligible to succeed to the throne, and that they would also cease to be members of the Royal House according to The Membership of the Royal House Act.


Maurice (21 March 1521 – 9 July 1553) was Duke (1541–47) and later Elector (1547–53) of Saxony. His clever manipulation of alliances and disputes gained the Albertine branch of the Wettin dynasty extensive lands and the electoral dignity. Maurice was the fourth child but first son of the future Henry IV, Duke of Saxony, then a Catholic, and his Protestant wife Catherine of Mecklenburg-Schwerin. Henry was the younger brother of George, Duke of Saxony. After Maurice came of age, in 1539, his parents began to look for a wife for him. The favorite was Philip's eldest daughter, Agnes. The marriage plans threatened to fail, however, because of the illegal double marriage of the Landgrave. Without the knowledge of his parents, Maurice remained committed to his engagement with Agnes. The wedding, particularly disapproved of by his mother, took place in Marburg on 9 January 1541. Letters from that time illustrate the strong mutual devotion of the couple. Together they had two children.


Maurice of Saxe-Lauenburg (1551 – 2 November 1612) was the fourth son of Francis I of Saxe-Lauenburg and Sybille of Saxe-Freiberg (2 May 1515 – 18 July 1592), daughter of Duke Henry IV the Pious of Saxony. Maurice ruled Saxe-Lauenburg as duke between 1581 and 1612, together with his elder brothers Magnus II (until 1588) and Francis II, who survived him. In 1581 Maurice married Katharina von Spörck; however, they got a divorce already in the next year. They had no children. With his mistress Gisela of Saxony (married with Adam von Tschammer) Duke Maurice had two illegitimate sons



Maurice of Hesse-Kassel (German: Moritz) (25 May 1572 – 15 March 1632), also called Maurice the Learned or Moritz, was the Landgrave of Hesse-Kassel (or Hesse-Cassel) in the Holy Roman Empire from 1592 to 1627.Maurice was born in Kassel as the son of William IV, Landgrave of Hesse-Kassel, and of his wife Sabine of Württemberg. On 23 September 1593, Maurice married Agnes of Solms-Laubach (7 January 1578 – 23 November 1602). They had six children.On 22 May 1603, Maurice married Countess Juliane of Nassau-Dillenburg (3 September 1587 – 15 February 1643). They had fourteen children.


Maurice (14 July 1600 – 11 August 1612) son of Maurice of Hesse-Kassel and his 1st wife Agnes of Solms-Laubach


Maurice (13 June 1614 – 16 February 1633) son of Maurice of Hesse-Kassel and his 2nd wife Countess Juliane of Nassau-Dillenburg.


Maurice (24 September 1621-24 September 1621) son of Wilhelm V, Landgrave of Hesse-Kassel (13 February 1602 – 21 September 1637) and Countess Amalie Elisabeth of Hanau-Münzenberg


Maurice of Savoy (10 January 1593 – 4 October 1657) was a Prince of Savoy and a 17th-century cardinal. He was the son of Charles Emmanuel I, Duke of Savoy and Infanta Catherine Michelle of Spain.


Maurice of Saxe-Zeitz (28 March 1619 – 4 December 1681) was a duke of Saxe-Zeitz and member of the House of Wettin. Born in Dresden, he was the youngest surviving son of John George I, Elector of Saxony, and his second wife Magdalene Sibylle of Prussia. In Dresden on 19 November 1650, Maurice married Sophie Hedwig of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg, a daughter of Philip, Duke of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg and at the same time his brother Christian also married her sister Christiana of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg. Maurice and Sophie had two sons. In Weimar on 3 July 1656, Maurice married for a second time to Dorothea Maria of Saxe-Weimar, daughter of the Duke Wilhelm. They had ten children.


Maurice (26 September 1652 – 10 May 1653), son of Maurice of Saxe-Zeitz and his 1st wife Sophie Hedwig of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg.


Moritz Wilhelm (English: Maurice William)(12 March 1664 – 15 November 1718), a member of the Saxon House of Wettin, was the second and last Duke of Saxe-Zeitz from 1681 until his death. He was born at Moritzburg Castle in the Wettin residence of Zeitz, the eldest son of Duke Maurice of Saxe-Zeitz (1619–1681) and his second wife, Dorothea Maria (1641–1675) In Potsdam on 25 June 1689, Moritz Wilhelm married Marie Amalie of Brandenburg (1670–1739). They had five children.


Maurice, Prince Palatine of the Rhine KG (16 January 1621  – September 1652), was the fourth son of Frederick V, Elector Palatine and Princess Elizabeth, only daughter of King James VI and I and Anne of Denmark. In 1652, while sailing for the West Indies, specifically near the Virgin Islands, he was caught in a hurricane and went down with his flagship, HMS Defiance.


William Maurice, Prince of Nassau-Siegen (18 January 1649 – 23 January 1691) was a Count of Nassau-Siegen. In 1664, he was elevated to Prince of Nassau-Siegen. He was the son of Count Henry II of Nassau-Siegen (1611–1652) and his first wife Maria Magdalene of Limburg-Styrum (1632–1707). In 1664, William Maurice was elevated to the rank of Imperial Prince. In 1678, his childless uncle John Maurice adopted William Maurice as his son, and also made him co-ruler of Nassau-Siegen. When John Maurice died in 1679, William Maurice inherited Nassau-Siegen. On 6 February 1678 in Schaumburg, he married Ernestine Charlotte (1662–1732), the daughter of Adolph, Prince of Nassau-Schaumburg. Her maternal grandfather was the famous Field Marshal Peter Melander, Count of Holzappel. The marriage produced two sons.


Prince Maurice Victor Donald of Battenberg KCVO, (3 October 1891 – 27 October 1914) was a member of the Hessian princely Battenberg family and the extended British Royal Family, and the youngest grandchild of Queen Victoria. He was known as Prince Maurice throughout his life, since he died before the British Royal Family relinquished their German titles during World War I and the Battenbergs changed their name to Mountbatten. Prince Maurice was born on 3 October 1891. He was given the name Maurice after his father Prince Henry of Battenberg and the great-grandfather, Count Mauritz von Hauke, Victor after his grandmother the Queen, and Donald in honour of Scotland, as he was born at Balmoral Castle. His father was Prince Henry of Battenberg, the son of Prince Alexander of Hesse and by Rhine and Julie Therese née Countess of Hauke. His mother was Princess Henry of Battenberg (née The Princess Beatrice of the United Kingdom), the fifth daughter and the youngest child of Queen Victoria and Albert, Prince Consort. He died in WW I


Prince Maurice Francis George of Teck (29 March 1910 – 14 September 1910); died at five months old. Son of Alexander Cambridge, 1st Earl of Athlone (Alexander Augustus Frederick William Alfred George; born Prince Alexander of Teck)(14 April 1874 – 16 January 1957) and Princess Alice of Great Britain (Windsor) (25 February 1883 – 3 January 1981).
 

Maurice of Anhalt-Dessau (31 October 1712 - 11 April 1760), was a German prince of the House of Ascania from the Anhalt-Dessau branch. He was also a Prussian soldier and Generalfeldmarschall. Maurice was the fifth son of Leopold I, Prince of Anhalt-Dessau, by his morganatic wife, Anna Louise Föhse.


Moritz, Landgrave of Hesse (Moritz Friedrich Karl Emanuel Humbert)(6 August 1926 – 23 May 2013) was the son of Prince Philip, Landgrave of Hesse, and the head of the House of Brabant and the German House of Hesse. Landgrave Moritz was born at Racconigi Castle, in Italy. During the Second World War, Moritz's mother, Princess Mafalda of Savoy, was arrested by the Nazis for alleged subversive activities and died in the Buchenwald concentration camp in 1944 as a result of a U.S. bombing raid on the camp. Prince Louis of Hesse and by Rhine, the last head of the Hesse-Darmstadt line, died in 1968, at which time Moritz's father succeeded him as head of the entire house. Moritz had been the head of the House of Hesse since the death of his father Philip on 25 October 1980. Moritz married Princess Tatiana of Sayn-Wittgenstein-Berleburg. Their marriage took place in the summer of 1964 in Giessen and ended in divorce in 1974. They had four children.


Hereditary Prince Moritz (26 March 2007), son of Donatus, Prince and Landgrave of Hesse (Heinrich Donatus Philipp Umberto)(17 October 1966) and Countess Floria Franziska Marie-Luisa Erika von Faber-Castell (14 October 1974). He is the twin of Princess Paulina.


Prince Maurizio of Savoy, Duke of Montferra (Maurizio Giuseppe Maria)(13 December 1762 – 1 September 1799) was a member of the Royal House of Savoy Prince Maurizio was born at the Royal Palace of Turin in 1762. He was the ninth child but the fourth son of King Victor Amadeus of Savoy (then styled the "Duke of Savoy") and Queen Maria Antonia Ferdinanda of Spain. He was styled the Duke of Montferrat from birth.


Prince Mauricio Gabriel Robert of Saxe-Gessaphe (14 Sep 1989), son of Princess Gisela of Bavaria and Alexander, Prince of Saxe-Gessaphe (German: Alexander Prinz von Sachsen-Gessaphe; born Alexander Afif)(12 February 1954)


Maurice Henry, Prince of Nassau-Hadamar (23 April 1626 – 24 January 1679) was — after his father — the second ruler of the younger Nassau-Hadamar line of the Ottonian branch of the House of Nassau. Maurice Henry was born on 23 April 1626 in Hadamar as the son of Prince John Louis of Nassau-Hadamar and his wife Countess Ursula of Lippe, the daughter of Count Simon "the Elder" of Lippe. John Louis died in 1653, and Maurice Henry succeeded him. Maurice Henry married three times and was the father of 13 children. His first marriage was on 30 January 1650 in Siegen with his cousin Ernestine Charlotte (23 October 1623 – 15 August 1668 in Hadamar), the daughter of Count John VIII of Nassau-Siegen. They had 6 children. His second marriage was on 12 August 1669 in Siegen with Maria Leopoldine (1652 – 27 June 1675). She was a daughter of Count John Francis Desideratus of Nassau-Siegen and a niece of his first wife. They had 3 children. His third marriage was on 24 October 1675 in Hachenburg with Anna Louise (11 April 1654 in Hachenburg – 23 April 1692 in Hadamar), the eldest daughter of Count Salentin Ernest of Manderscheid-Blankenheim. They had 4 children.



Prince Moritz of the Princely Family of Liechtenstein



Prince Moritz of Saxe-Altenburg (24 October 1829  – 13 May 1907), was a member of the ducal house of Saxe-Altenburg. He was the father of Ernst II, Duke of Saxe-Altenburg. He was the third but second surviving son of Georg, Duke of Saxe-Altenburg and Duchess Marie Louise of Mecklenburg-Schwerin (daughter of Frederick Louis, Hereditary Grand Duke of Mecklenburg-Schwerin and his first wife Grand Duchess Elena Pavlovna of Russia). In Meiningen on 15 October 1862 Moritz married Princess Augusta of Saxe-Meiningen, daughter of Bernhard II, Duke of Saxe-Meiningen. They had five children.


George Moritz, Hereditary Prince of Saxe-Altenburg (William George Moritz Ernest Albert Frederick Charles Constantine Edward Maximilian)(13 May 1900 – 13 February 1991), was the last head of the ducal house of Saxe-Altenburg and nominal Duke of Saxe-Altenburg. He devoted much of his life to promote anthroposophy. Born in Potsdam, Prussia, he was the eldest son of Prince Ernest of Saxe-Altenburg and Princess Adelaide of Schaumburg-Lippe, his first wife. On 13 February 1991 George Moritz died as a result of pneumonia in Rendsburg hospital. With his death the house of Saxe-Altenburg became extinct, although the family name continued due to the adoption in 1942 of Franz, Count Praschma (1934-2012) by Princess Marie (6 June 1888 - 12 November 1947), second daughter of Prince Albert of Saxe-Altenburg.






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« Reply #775 on: August 31, 2021, 03:04:40 PM »

Alice is most often used as a feminine given name, used primarily in English and French; however, it has proven popular in some other languages.


Alice of Jerusalem (also Haalis, Halis, or Adelicia)(c. 1110 – after 1136) was a Princess consort of Antioch by marriage to Bohemond II of Antioch. She engaged in a longlasting power struggle during the reign of her daughter Constance of Antioch.


Alice of Champagne (French: Alix; c. 1193 – 1246) was the queen consort of Cyprus from 1210 to 1218, regent of Cyprus from 1218 to 1223, and of Jerusalem from 1243 to 1246. She was the eldest daughter of Queen Isabella I of Jerusalem and Count Henry II of Champagne. In 1210, Alice married her step-brother King Hugh I of Cyprus, receiving the County of Jaffa as dowry.


Alice Heine (10 February 1858 – 22 December 1925) was the American-born Princess consort of Monaco by marriage to Prince Albert I of Monaco. She was born Marie Alice Heine at 900 Rue Royale, in the French Quarter of New Orleans, Louisiana. Her French father, Michel Heine, was a scion of a prominent German-rooted Berlin and Paris banking Jewish family. Her mother was Amélie Marie Céleste Miltenberger, daughter of Joseph Alphonse Miltenberger, an architect and cast-iron importer by trade of French Alsatian descent, and his Creole wife, Marie Céleste Dorfeuille. She married her first husband, Marie Odet Armand Aimable Chapelle de Jumilhac, Marquis of Jumilhac then 7th Duke of Richelieu and Duke of Aiguillon, in Paris on February 27, 1875. They had one son and one daughter. Alice first met Albert I of Monaco in Madeira in 1879. At the time, the Hereditary Prince was still in an unhappy marriage with Lady Mary Victoria Douglas-Hamilton. The prince's first marriage was eventually annulled by the Church on January 3, 1880, and Alice and the prince began a relationship soon thereafter. The marriage to Prince Albert I of Monaco, Sovereign Prince of Monaco, occurred on October 30, 1889. According to Thomas Fouilleron, director of the Monaco Palace Archives, “Prince Albert I was deeply in love with her. It is one of the very first love marriages of the Principality” Alice and Prince Albert I separated judicially on May 30, 1902 (Monaco) and June 3, 1902 (France), but remained married. Upon the prince's death 20 years later, Alice became the Dowager Princess of Monaco. She did not remarry.


Princess Alice of the United Kingdom VA CI (Alice Maud Mary)(25 April 1843 – 14 December 1878) was the Grand Duchess of Hesse and by Rhine from 1877 to 1878. She was the third child and second daughter of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert. Alice was engaged to Prince Louis of Hesse on 30 April 1861, following the Queen's consent. Between the engagement and the wedding, Alice's father Prince Albert died on 14 December 1861. Despite the Queen's grief, she ordered that the wedding should continue as planned. On 1 July 1862, Alice and Louis were married privately. The couple had 7 children. In November 1878, the Grand Ducal household fell ill with diphtheria. Alice's eldest daughter Victoria was the first to fall ill, complaining of a stiff neck in the evening of 5 November. Diphtheria was diagnosed the following morning, and soon the disease spread to Alice's children Alix, Marie, Irene, and Ernest. Her husband Louis became infected shortly thereafter. Elisabeth was the only child to not fall ill, having been sent away by Alice to the palace of the Princess Charles, her mother-in-law.Marie became seriously ill on 15 November, and Alice was called to her bedside, but by the time she arrived, Marie had choked to death. A distraught Alice wrote to Queen Victoria that the "pain is beyond words". Alice kept the news of Marie's death secret from her children for several weeks, but she finally told Ernest in early December. His reaction was even worse than she had anticipated; at first he refused to believe it. As he sat up crying, Alice broke her rule about physical contact with the ill and gave him a kiss. However, by Saturday, 14 December, the anniversary of her father's death, she became seriously ill with the diphtheria caught from her son. Alice's death was felt in both Britain and Hesse.


Princess Alice of Battenberg (Victoria Alice Elizabeth Julia Marie)(25 February 1885 – 5 December 1969) was the mother of Prince Philip and mother-in-law of Queen Elizabeth II. She was the eldest child of Prince Louis of Battenberg and his wife, Princess Victoria of Hesse and by Rhine. Her mother was the eldest daughter of Louis IV, Grand Duke of Hesse, and Princess Alice of the United Kingdom, the Queen's second daughter. Her father was the eldest son of Prince Alexander of Hesse and by Rhine through his morganatic marriage to Countess Julia Hauke, who was created Princess of Battenberg in 1858 by Louis III, Grand Duke of Hesse. Princess Alice met Prince Andrew of Greece and Denmark (known as Andrea within the family), the fourth son of King George I of Greece and Olga Constantinovna of Russia, while in London for King Edward VII's coronation in 1902. They married in a in 1903. The couple had 4 daughters and 1 son.


Princess Alice, Countess of Athlone VA GCVO GBE (Alice Mary Victoria Augusta Pauline)(25 February 1883 – 3 January 1981) was a member of the British royal family. She is the longest-lived British princess of the blood royal, and was the last surviving grandchild of Queen Victoria. Princess Alice was born on 25 February 1883 at Windsor Castle to the Duke and Duchess of Albany. Her father was the youngest son of Queen Victoria and Albert, Prince Consort. On 10 February 1904, at St George's Chapel, Windsor, Princess Alice of Albany married her second cousin once-removed, Prince Alexander of Teck, the brother of Princess Mary, the Princess of Wales (later Queen Mary, consort of George V). Prince and Princess Alexander of Teck had three children. Her husband was granted the Earldom of Athlone in 1917 following the royal family's relinquishing of German titles.


Alice Christabel Montagu Douglas Scott (25 December 1901 – 29 October 2004) the third daughter and fifth child of John Montagu Douglas Scott, Earl of Dalkeith (later Duke of Buccleuch and Queensberry), and his wife, the former Lady Margaret Alice "Molly" Bridgeman, daughter of the 4th Earl of Bradford. In August 1935, Lady Alice became engaged to Prince Henry, Duke of Gloucester. They were married in a private ceremony, in the Private Chapel, Buckingham Palace in 1935. The couple received a grace and favour residence at York House, St James's Palace,[Crazy London and, in 1938, they purchased Barnwell Manor in Northamptonshire. The Duchess suffered two miscarriages, before giving birth to two sons.


Princess Alice of Bourbon-Parma (Italian: Alicia Maria Carolina Ferdinanda Rachael Giovanna Filomena)(27 December 1849 – 16 January 1935 ) was the youngest daughter of Charles III, Duke of Parma and Princess Louise Marie Thérčse of France, the eldest daughter of Charles Ferdinand, Duke of Berry and Princess Caroline Ferdinande Louise of the Two Sicilies. On 11 January 1868 Alice married Ferdinand IV, Grand Duke of Tuscany (1835–1908). They had 10 children.


Princess Alicia of Bourbon-Parma (Alicia Maria Teresa Francesca Luisa Pia Anna Valeria)(13 November 1917 – 28 March 2017) was a Spanish infanta. A member of the House of Bourbon-Parma  She was the seventh child and fourth daughter of Prince Elias of Bourbon-Parma and Archduchess Maria Anna of Austria. On 16 April 1936, she married Prince Alfonso of Bourbon-Two Sicilies, Infante of Spain, nephew of ex-King Alfonso XIII of Spain. They had three children.



Alice Holland, Countess of Kent (c. 1350 – 17 March 1416), LG, formerly Lady Alice FitzAlan, was an English noblewoman, a daughter of the 10th Earl of Arundel, and the wife of the 2nd Earl of Kent, the half-brother of King Richard II. In 1354, at the age of four, Lady Alice was betrothed to her father's ward Edmund Mortimer who would in 1360 become the 3rd Earl of March. The marriage however did not take place. Alice married instead on 10 April 1364, 2nd Earl of Kent, one of the half-brothers of the future King Richard II by his mother Joan of Kent's first marriage to Thomas Lord Holland. Together Thomas and Alice had ten children.


Alice Spencer, Countess of Derby (4 May 1559 – 23 January 1637) was an English noblewoman from the Spencer family and noted patron of the arts. Poet Edmund Spenser represented her as "Amaryllis" in his eclogue Colin Clouts Come Home Againe (1595) and dedicated his poem The Teares of the Muses (1591) to her. Alice was born in Althorp, Northamptonshire, England on 4 May 1559, the youngest daughter of Sir John Spencer, Member of Parliament and High Sheriff of Northamptonshire, and Katherine Kytson. In about 1579 Alice married her first husband, Ferdinando Stanley, heir to the Earldom of Derby, and a claimant to the English throne. His mother, Lady Margaret Clifford, was heir presumptive to Queen Elizabeth I from 1578 until her death in 1596. On 25 September 1593, he succeeded as Earl of Derby and Lord of Mann; from that date onwards, Alice was styled as the Countess of Derby. ogether Ferdinando and Alice had three daughters.



Lady Alice Hastings (1606–1667), daughter of Elizabeth Stanley, Countess of Huntingdon (6 January 1588 – 20 January 1633) and Henry Hastings, 5th Earl of Huntingdon (24 April 1586 – 14 November 1643). She married Sir Gervase Clifton, 1st Baronet, as his seventh wife; died childless.


Alice Montagu (1407 – before 9 December 1462) was an English noblewoman and the suo jure 5th Countess of Salisbury, 6th Baroness Monthermer, and 7th and 4th Baroness Montagu, having succeeded to the titles in 1428. Her husband, Richard Neville became 5th Earl of Salisbury by right of his marriage to Alice. Alice was born in 1407, the daughter and only legitimate child, of Thomas Montagu, 4th Earl of Salisbury, and Eleanor Holland, who was the daughter of Thomas Holland, 2nd Earl of Kent, and Lady Alice FitzAlan. The latter was a daughter of Richard FitzAlan, 3rd Earl of Arundel, and Eleanor of Lancaster. In 1420, she married Richard Neville. Alice and Richard had ten children who survived infancy.



Alice Neville, Baroness FitzHugh (c. 1430 – after 22 November 1503) was the wife of Henry FitzHugh, 5th Baron FitzHugh. She is best known for being the great-grandmother of Queen consort Catherine Parr and her siblings, Anne and William, as well as one of the sisters of Warwick the 'Kingmaker'.  Lady Alice was the third daughter of Richard Neville, 5th Earl of Salisbury jure uxoris and Lady Alice Montacute, 5th Countess of Salisbury suo jure. Lady Alice married Henry, Lord FitzHugh of Ravensworth Castle, near Richmond (1429–72), head of a powerful local family between Tees and Swale. Lord and Lady FitzHugh had 11 children; five sons and six daughters


Alice FitzHugh (c. 1448 – 10 July 1516) was the eldest daughter and co-heiress of Henry FitzHugh, 5th Baron FitzHugh, and Lady Alice Neville. Alice was born at the ancestral castle of Ravensworth. She married Sir John Fiennes, the son of Sir Richard Fiennes and Joan Dacre, 7th Baroness Dacre. Alice was a first cousin of Queen consort Anne Neville and great-aunt of Queen consort Catherine Parr. Alice had five sons and one daughter.


Alice Vaux (d. 1543), daughter of Elizabeth FitzHugh and her 2nd husband Nicholas Vaux, 1st Baron Vaux of Harrowden (c. 1460 – 14 May 1523) She married Sir Richard Sapcote c. 1501. They had at least one child, Anne.


Alice de Lacy, suo jure Countess of Lincoln, suo jure 5th Countess of Salisbury (25 December 1281 – 2 October 1348) was an English peeress. Born on Christmas Day 1281 at Denbigh Castle, Alice was the only daughter and heir of Henry de Lacy, Earl of Lincoln and Margaret Longespée, Countess of Salisbury suo jure (in her own right). Her mother Margaret was the great-granddaughter and ultimate heir of one of the illegitimate sons of Henry II of England, William Longespée (Longsword), whose nickname became his surname.


Alice of Saluzzo, Countess of Arundel (died 25 September 1292), also known as Alesia di Saluzzo, was an Savoyard noblewoman and an English countess. She was daughter of Thomas I of Saluzzo, and the wife of Richard Fitzalan, 8th Earl of Arundel. She assumed the title of Countess of Arundel in 1289.Sometime before 1285, Alice married Richard FitzAlan, feudal Lord of Clun and Oswestry in the Welsh Marches, the son of John FitzAlan, 7th Earl of Arundel and Isabella Mortimer. Richard would succeed to the title of Earl of Arundel in 1289, thus making Alice the 8th Countess of Arundel. The marriage produced 4 children.


Alice FitzAlan (died 7 September 1340), daughter of Alice of Saluzzo and Richard FitzAlan. She married Stephen de Segrave, 3rd Lord Segrave, by whom she had issue.


Alice de Warenne, Countess of Arundel (15 June 1287 – 23 May 1338) was an English noblewoman and heir apparent to the Earldom of Surrey. In 1305, she married Edmund FitzAlan, 9th Earl of Arundel. Alice, the only daughter of William de Warenne (1256-1286) and Joan de Vere, daughter of Robert de Vere, 5th Earl of Oxford, was born on 15 June 1287 in Warren, Sussex, six months after her father was accidentally killed in a tournament on 15 December 1286. On the death of her paternal grandfather, John de Warenne, 6th Earl of Surrey in 1304, her only sibling John de Warenne, 7th Earl of Surrey succeeded to the earldom. He became estranged from his childless wife and they never reconciled, leaving Alice as the heir presumptive to the Surrey estates and title. In 1305, Alice married Edmund Fitzalan, 9th Earl of Arundel, the son of Richard Fitzalan, 8th Earl of Arundel and Alice of Saluzzo. They had 9 children.


Alice FitzAlan (born 1310), daughter of Alice de Warenne and Edmund FitzAlan. She married John de Bohun, 5th Earl of Hereford.


Elizabeth (or Alice) de Arundel, daughter of Sir Edmund de Arundel, Knt., of Chedzoy, Martock, Sutton Montagu, and Thurlbear, Somerset; Chudleigh, Devon; Melbury Bubb, Dorset; Bignor, Trayford and Compton, Sussex (c. 1329–1381/2) and Lady Sybil de Montacute (or Montagu), who married Sir Leonard Carew (1343–1369) of Mohuns Ottery in Devon, feudal lord of Carew Castle in Pembrokeshire and lord of the manor of Moulsford in Berkshire. From Alice are descended all the members of the prominent and widespread Carew family, except Carew of Beddington in Surrey, descended from one of Sir Leonard's great-uncles. (See Baron Carew, Earl of Totnes, Carew baronets.)



Alice Sergeaux, later Countess of Oxford (c. 1386 – 18 May 1452), who married firstly Guy de St Aubyn of St. Erme, Cornwall, and secondly about 1406–7 (as his 2nd wife) the 11th Earl of Oxford and widower of Alice de Holand (dsp. 1406, niece of Henry IV), and was the mother of two sons by him She was a daughter of Philippa de Arundel (died 13 September 1399) and Sir Richard Sergeaux.



Alice Comyn, Countess of Buchan, Lady Beaumont (1289 – 3 July 1349) was a Scottish noblewoman, a member of the powerful Comyn family which supported the Balliols, claimants to the disputed Scottish throne against their rivals, the Bruces. She was the niece of John Comyn, Earl of Buchan, to whom she was also heiress, and after his death the Earldom of Buchan was successfully claimed by her husband Henry de Beaumont, Earl of Buchan, by right of his wife. His long struggle to claim her Earldom of Buchan was one of the causes of the Second War of Scottish Independence. Alice was born in Aberdeenshire, Scotland, in 1289, the eldest daughter of Alexander Comyn, Sheriff of Aberdeen and his wife Joan le Latimer and the granddaughter of Alexander Comyn, Earl of Buchan. Shortly before 14 July 1310, Alice married Henry de Beaumont, Lord Beaumont, the son of Louis de Brienne, Viscount de Beaumont and Agnes, Viscountess de Beaumont. Upon her marriage she was styled as Lady Beaumont. The marriage produced ten children.



Alice de Beaumont (?) daughter of Alice Comyn and Henry de Beaumont.


Alice Maud Olivia Stanley, Countess of Derby (née Montagu)(15 August 1862 – 23 July 1957) was born the daughter of the 7th Duke of Manchester and his wife, Countess Louise von Alten. On 5 January 1889, she married Lord Stanley of Bickerstaffe. Lord Stanley succeeded to his father's title of Earl of Derby in 1908, whereupon she became Countess of Derby. They had two sons and one daughter, all of whom she outlived. From 1901 till 1910 Alice was a Lady of the Bedchamber to Queen Alexandra.


Countess Alice Victoria Trolle-Wachtmeister (9 May 1926 – 26 June 2017) was a courtier at the Royal Court of Sweden from the 1970s to 2015, serving as chief court mistress from 1994 to 2015. Alice Tornérhielm was born on 9 May 1926 in Helsingborg, the daughter of Erik Tornérhielm, a squire from Gedsholm, and the Danish-born Ellen Valentiner-Branth  In 1949, Alice Tornérhielm married Count Hans Gabriel Trolle-Wachtmeister (9 January 1923)


Countess Alice "Ai" Széchényi (1911–1974), daughter of Hungarian Count László Széchenyi (1879–1938) and American heiress Gladys Moore Vanderbilt (August 27, 1886 – January 29, 1965) She married Hungarian Count Béla Hadik (1905–1971)
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« Reply #776 on: August 31, 2021, 03:05:15 PM »

Alys of France, (or Alice) Countess of Vexin (4 October 1160 – c. 1220) was a French princess, the daughter of Louis VII, King of France and his second wife, Constance of Castile Alys married William IV Talvas, Count of Ponthieu, on 20 August 1195. They had two daughters: Marie, Countess of Ponthieu, and Isabelle; and a stillborn son named Jean.


Alice of France (French: Alix)(July–August 1150 – 1197/1198) was countess consort of Blois by marriage to Theobald V, Count of Blois. She was regent of Blois during the absence of her spouse in 1190-1191, and regent during the minority of Louis I, Count of Blois from 1191 until 1197. Alix was the second daughter born to King Louis VII of France and Duchess Eleanor of Aquitaine In 1164, Alix married Theobald V, Count of Blois, who had previously attempted to abduct Alix's mother to force her into a marriage with him. Alix and Theobald had seven children



Alice de Lusignan, Countess of Surrey (1224 – 9 February 1256) was a uterine half-sister of King Henry III of England and the wife of John de Warenne, 6th Earl of Surrey. Shortly after her arrival in England from France in 1247, her half-brother arranged her marriage to the Earl, which incurred some resentment from the English nobility. Alice was the second-eldest daughter of Hugh X of Lusignan ("le Brun"), Seigneur de Lusignan and Count of La Marche, and Isabella of Angoulęme, queen dowager of England In 1247, a year after her mother's death, Alice accompanied the new papal legate William of Modena, the Cardinal-bishop of Sabina, to England, which she had decided to make her home, and live at the expense of the Crown In August of that year, her half-brother, King Henry married her to John de Warenne, 6th Earl of Surrey (August 1231 – 29 September 1304) John was the son of William de Warenne, 5th Earl of Surrey and Maud Marshal. Together they had three children.



Alice de Toeni, Countess of Warwick (c. 1284 – bef. 8 January 1325) was a wealthy English heiress and the second wife of Guy de Beauchamp, 10th Earl of Warwick, an English nobleman in the reign of kings Edward I and Edward II. He was one of the principal opponents of Piers Gaveston, a favourite of Edward II. Alice married three times; Guy was her second husband. Alice de Toeni (or de Tosny) was born c. 1284 in Flamsted, Hertfordshire, the only daughter of Ralph VII de Toeni, Lord Toeni of Flamsted (1255–1295) and his Scottish-born wife, Mary. In 1300, when Alice was sixteen, she married her first husband, Sir Thomas Leybourne (died May 1307), son of Sir William Leybourne, by whom she had one daughter. On 28 February 1309, less than two years after the death of her first husband, Alice married secondly Guy de Beauchamp, 10th Earl of Warwick, the only son of William de Beauchamp, 9th Earl of Warwick and Maud FitzJohn He had been previously married to Isabel de Clare, the daughter of Gilbert de Clare, 6th Earl of Gloucester and Alice de Lusignan of Angoulęme, but the marriage, which had produced no children, was annulled. Alice and Guy had two sons and two daughters. Following the sudden death of Guy de Beauchamp at Warwick Castle on 12 August 1315, which was rumoured to have been caused by poisoning, Alice married thirdly on 26 October 1316, William la Zouche, 1st Lord Zouche de Mortimer (see Baron Zouche), by whom she had a son and a daughter.


Alice de Janzé (née Silverthorne)(28 September 1899 – 30 September 1941), also known as the Countess de Janzé during her first marriage and as Alice de Trafford during her second marriage. Alice Silverthorne was born in Buffalo, Erie County, New York, the only child of textile industrialist William Edward Silverthorne and his wife Julia Belle Chapin (14 August 1871 – 2 June 1907) In 1921 she married Frédéric de Janzé, Comte de Janzé (February 28, 1896 − December 24, 1933), a French sportsman and writer. His father was Vicomte Léon Frédéric de Janzé and his mother was Moya Hennessy, daughter of the landscape painter William John Hennessy. They were divorced in June 1927. They had two daughters, Nolwén Louise Alice de Janzé (20 June 1922 – 7 March 1989) and Paola Marie Jeanne de Janzé (1 June 1924 – 24 December 2006). Alice was a neglectful mother and Frédéric was a neglectful father; the children were primarily brought up in their family's chateau de Parfondeval in Normandy by governesses and Frédéric's sister. In 1925, the couple first met and became good friends with Josslyn, 22nd Earl of Erroll, and his wife, Idina, Countess of Erroll, in Montparnasse. Some time later, the young Lord and Lady Erroll invited the de Janzés to spend some time in their home in the so-called 'Happy Valley' in the British Colony of Kenya, a community of British colonials living in the Wanjohi Valley, near the Aberdare Mountains. This enclave had become notorious among socialites in the UK for being a community for those seeking a hedonistic lifestyle, including drugs, alcohol and sexual promiscuity. Noticing that Alice had become restless, Frédéric decided to distract her and agreed to the trip. Even among the scandalous residents of Happy Valley, Alice was soon known as "the wicked Madonna" Soon she began an affair with Lord Erroll, openly sharing him with his wife Idina. The de Janzés later returned to Happy Valley in 1926. While Frédéric distracted himself with lion hunting, Alice began a love affair with British aristocrat Raymond Vincent de Trafford (28 January 1900 – 14 May 1971), son of Sir Humphrey de Trafford, 3rd Baronet. Alice's infatuation with de Trafford was so great that the couple attempted to elope, although they promptly returned. Frédéric was aware of his wife's open infidelity but did not become preoccupied by it, although years later he would refer to the love triangle with de Trafford as "the infernal triangle". That autumn, in an attempt to save his marriage, Frédéric returned to Paris with Alice; he was unsuccessful. Alice visited Frédéric's mother; revealing that she was in love with de Trafford, she asked her help in obtaining a divorce. Her mother-in-law advised her to think of her two daughters and do nothing she might later regret. Alice soon returned to Kenya and her lover. Hoping to keep the extramarital affair from becoming a scandal, her mother-in-law loaned Alice a furnished flat in a quiet street in Paris to use as a "love nest" with de Trafford. Under pressure from his family, Frédéric quickly sued for divorce. Frédéric died on 24 December 1933, in Baltimore, Maryland of septicaemia
 On the morning of 25 March 1927, Alice awoke in an agitated state in her Paris home, according to the later testimony of her maid. That afternoon, when Alice and Raymond de Trafford met, he informed her that he would not be able to marry her as his strict Catholic family had threatened to disinherit him if he followed through with the plan. The couple later visited a sporting equipment shop together, where Alice bought a gold-mounted, pearl-handled revolver. At the Gare du Nord a few hours later, as de Trafford was bidding farewell to her in his train compartment before he left for London by an express boat train, she pulled the revolver from her purse and shot him in the stomach, puncturing his lung.She then shot herself in the stomach. De Trafford spent several days in a hospital in critical condition. Alice is reported to have screamed "But he must live! I want him to live!" when she heard the news that de Trafford was too seriously wounded to survive. Her own wound was initially overlooked by doctors during the confusion. Despite initial reports that spoke of her also being gravely injured, her wounds were quite superficial. The incident made headlines all over the world.On 5 April, Alice was officially charged with attempted murder with premeditation. Thanks to the intervention of her aunt Mrs Francis May, Alice vanished from the public eye, hidden in a nursing home close to Paris in preparation for the impending trial. Her lawyers attempted, without success, to have the charges against her dismissed.Alice received a suspended sentence of six months in prison and a fine of 100 francs (approximately four U.S. dollars) by the Paris Correctional Court, who rebuked de Trafford for his failure to deliver his promise to marry her, out of fear of losing the family allowance.Although it was criticized by some newspapers, this lenient decision may have been influenced by the revelation concerning Alice's frequent suicide attempts, de Trafford's taking responsibility for her state of mind, and the public's sympathetic view of her as the tragic victim of a true crime of passion. Even the prosecuting attorney insisted upon leniency and declared that "I should not like to bear de Trafford's responsibility for a broken heart and a disrupted home". Under the First Offenders Act, Alice was immediately released, and on 13 April 1929 she received a full presidential pardon from Gaston Doumergue, the president of the French Republic, so that even the fine she had been forced to pay was returned to her by the court. The request for the pardon was partially made to avoid any commercial repercussions the conviction might cause. In the wake of the shooting scandal, a divorce was granted to Frédéric de Janzé, on the grounds of desertion, by the Paris Tribunal on 15 June 1927. While no mention was made of the Gare du Nord episode, Alice was to receive no alimony and Frédéric was granted custody of their two children. That December, Alice shocked both the Count and the newspapers when she declared that she would remarry her husband for "the sake of the children"; she later retracted her statement. The civil divorce was followed by an annulment of the marriage by the Vatican on 26 July 1928; Frédéric's attorneys then warned every newspaper in England never to refer to Alice as Countess de Janzé again.Alice resumed her love affair with de Trafford, the man she had almost killed. A rumour that the couple would soon have a quiet wedding in Paris was first circulated in May 1927,  then in September of that same year and later in January 1928. Alice's lawyer denied any such plans, and no wedding took place. The rumour surfaced again in April 1930. Ultimately, the couple married on 22 February 1932 in Neuilly-sur-Seine and spoke of buying a house in London. Alice commented on her affair with de Trafford: "We were deeply in love. It was arranged that we should marry", although it has been suggested that Alice literally pursued de Trafford for three years before she finally got him to marry her. During this time Alice, who now had severe financial reversals, took over the management of a gown shop in Paris under the name of "Gloria Bocher", but soon lost both interest and money in the venture.Her marriage also rapidly collapsed, ending only three months after the wedding when the couple got into a heated argument in the compartment of an English railroad train over their honeymoon destination.Alice officially sought a divorce in November 1932, charging Raymond, who had fled to Australia, with cruelty and desertion. It took her two years to obtain his signature, and the divorce procedure was reported to begin in September 1934, but did not go forward. Alice may have changed her mind, but she again officially filed for divorce in May 1937, winning an uncontested suit and a grant of decree nisi on the grounds of adultery with an unnamed correspondent at a London hotel.Following the divorce, Alice considered permanently returning to Chicago; however friends advised her against it, pointing out how the shooting scandal had made her a "marked woman" in her native land. Accepting her notoriety, Alice returned to the world of 'Happy Valley', where she permanently settled in the large farmhouse she had previously bought in Gilgil, located on the banks of the River Wanjohi. She spent the following years reading and taking care of her animals, which included lions, panthers and antelopes. She became addicted to drugs, particularly morphine. She was avoided by certain members of the community due to her mood swings and the shooting incident; her friend, aviator Beryl Markham, later disclosed: "Loneliness fixed Alice. Everyone was frightened of her." Alice now rarely visited her children in France.On 24 January 1941, Lord Erroll was found shot to death in his car, at an intersection outside Nairobi. Errol's serial philandering contributed to the persistent rumour that the perpetrator was a woman Police duly interrogated all of Erroll's closest acquaintances, including Alice de Janzé. Although she had an alibi because she had spent an intimate night with Dickie Pembroke, another Happy Valley resident, due to her drug habits, her romantic attachment to Errol, and her previous attempt to kill a paramour, she was immediately regarded as the prime suspect among the white community of Happy Valley. It was also rumoured that she had attempted suicide on hearing the news of Erroll's death. In March 1941, British aristocrat Sir Henry John "Jock" Delves Broughton was officially charged with Lord Erroll's murder. Delves Broughton had been aware of a passionate love affair between his young wife, Diana, and Erroll, in the months before his murder. Alice paid regular visits to Delves Broughton in prison, and, with her friend Idina, the late Errol's first wife, attended every day of the trial. In July 1941, Delves Broughton was acquitted due to lack of evidence.Paul Spicer theorizes that Alice de Janzé was the actual murderer of Lord Erroll, based on several letters that Alice's personal doctor and former lover, William Boyle, discovered in her house on the day of her death, and later handed over to the police. In August 1941, after being diagnosed with uterine cancer, Alice de Janzé underwent a hysterectomy. On 23 September, she attempted suicide by taking an overdose of pentobarbital. When her friend, Patricia Bowles, discovered her, she had already marked every piece of furniture with the name of the friend who would inherit it. Bowles rescued Alice by calling a doctor to pump her stomach A week later, on 30 September, two days after turning 42, Alice succeeded in ending her life. A servant found her dead on her bed from a self-inflicted gunshot wound, from the same weapon she had once used on Raymond and herself. Alice left three suicide notes, one addressed to the police, one to her daughters and one to Dickie Pembroke. The content of the letters was never publicly disclosed, fuelling rumours that they containing revelations into the Errol murder.


Alice of Bigorre (1217/1220-1255), also known as Alice or Alix de Monfort was suo jure ruling Countess of Bigorre between 1251 and 1255. She was the eldest daughter of Petronilla, Countess of Bigorre and her third husband Guy de Monfort. Alice was married twice during her lifetime and from her first marriage, she gained the title of Lady of Chabanais.Alice was cared for by her uncle, Amaury de Montfort, while he had her mother remarried. By the time of Petronilla's fifth marriage and the birth of her daughter Martha, she needed a stronger union so had Alice married off to Jordan, Lord of Chabanais, a relative of Boson of Mastas.An agreement was reached, upon Petronilla's death, Alice and Jordan would inherit Bigorre, whilst Martha would inherit her father's lands of Mastas. By 1247, Jordan had died and so Alice was left with their three children. She married for a second time to Raoul de Courtenay during 1247.The couple had a daughter named Matilda who later married Philip of Chieti.
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« Reply #777 on: August 31, 2021, 03:05:35 PM »

Alice de Lusignan (or Alice of Angoulęme) (born after October 1236 – May 1290) was the first wife of Marcher baron Gilbert de Clare, 7th Earl of Gloucester, and half-niece of King Henry III of England. Alice de Lusigan was born sometime after October 1236 in Angoulęme, Charente, France, the daughter of Hugh XI of Lusignan, Seigneur de Lusignan, Couhe, et de Peyrat, Count of La Marche and Angoulęme, and Yolande of Brittany. In 1253, Alice married Gilbert de Clare, 7th Earl of Gloucester (2 September 1243 – 7 December 1295). He was the son of Richard de Clare, 6th Earl of Hertford and Maud de Lacy. He was ten years old at the time of his marriage. In later years, "Red" Gilbert would become one of the most powerful and important noblemen in the kingdom. The marriage produced two daughters.


Alice Emily Coke, Countess of Leicester, DBE, JP (née White)( 29 September 1855 – 24 April 1936), styled The Honourable Alice White from 1873 to 1879 and Viscountess Coke from 1879 to 1909, was an Anglo-Irish aristocrat active in the British Red Cross during the First World War. She was the daughter of Sir Luke White, who succeeded as 2nd Baron Annaly in 1873. She married Viscount Coke on 26 August 1879. He succeeded his father as 3rd Earl of Leicester in 1909. The couple had five children, including Thomas Coke, 4th Earl of Leicester. She was a prominent figure in Norfolk, becoming a Justice of the Peace in 1922. She was president of the Norfolk Branch of the British Red Cross Society during the War, and was in consequence appointed Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire (DBE) in the 1920 civilian war honours.


Alice Vaughan, Countess of Carbery (1619-1689), known before her marriage as Alice Egerton, was the daughter of John Egerton, 1st Earl of Bridgewater. She was a musician and performer who acted in two notable masques: Aurelian Townshend's Tempe Restored (1632), and John Milton's Maske Performed at Ludlow Castle (1634) Alice Egerton was the youngest of eleven daughters. Alice Egerton married Richard Vaughan, 2nd Earl of Carbery in 1652, when she was aged about 33 and he was approximately twenty years older; they had no children.


Alice Edith Isaacs, Marchioness of Reading, CI, GBE (née Cohen)(c. 1866 – 30 January 1930) was the first wife of Rufus Isaacs, 1st Marquess of Reading, and a prominent philanthropist in colonial India. Isaacs was born in London, the third daughter of Albert Cohen, a merchant in the City of London, and his wife, Elizabeth. She married Rufus Isaacs, then a newly qualified barrister, on 8 December 1887. He had considered being a stockbroker but his wife encouraged him to pursue a career in law. He was ultimately Solicitor-General, Attorney-General and Lord Chief Justice. Her title successively changed from Mrs Isaacs to Lady Isaacs on her husband's knighthood in 1910, Baroness Reading on his ennoblement in 1914, Viscountess Reading in 1916, the Countess of Reading in 1917, and finally the Marchioness of Reading in 1926. In 1921, Lord Reading was appointed Viceroy of India. He was reluctant to accept, as his wife's health was delicate, but she persuaded him. She accompanied him to India and, despite continuing poor health, served prominently as Viceregal Consort. She also threw herself into charitable work, particularly with Indian women and children. She established the Women of India Fund in 1921 and National Baby Week in 1923, as well as supporting many existing charities. In 1926 she campaigned to construct a standard hospital in Peshawar, in place of Agerton Hospital. The new hospital was subsequently named as Lady Reading Hospital. Later, upon the retirement of her husband in 1926, they returned to England. She died of cancer in 1930, aged 64.


Alice or Adeliza, Adelaide or Aelis (c. 1002 – 1038) was a countess consort of Burgundy, the daughter of Richard II, Duke of Normandy (972–1026) and Judith of Brittany She married Reginald I, Count of Burgundy and had 5 children.


Alice of Hainault, Countess Marshal (died 26 October 1317), was the daughter of John de Avenes, Count of Hainault, and Philippine, daughter of the Count of Luxembourg. She was the second wife of Roger Bigod, 5th Earl of Norfolk, Earl Marshal of England. Alice of Hainault was the daughter of John de Avenes, Count of Hainault, Holland and Zeeland, Lord of Friesland, by Philippine, daughter of Henri II, Count of Luxembourg and Roche, Marquis of Arlon (d.1274), and Margaret of Bar, daughter of Henry II, Count of Bar.  Her father succeeded as Count of Holland when his cousin, John I, Count of Holland, died without issue in 1299 at the age of fifteen. Alice married, as his second wife, Roger Bigod, 5th Earl of Norfolk, Earl Marshal of England, the last of the line of Bigod Earls of Norfolk. Norfolk's first wife was Aline Basset, widow of Hugh le Despencer, 1st Baron le Despencer (d.1265), and daughter and heiress of Sir Philip Basset of Soham, Cambridgeshire, by his first wife Hawise de Lovaine (d. before 11 April 1281), daughter of Sir Matthew de Lovaine, by whom he had no issue Norfolk died before 6 December 1306. He had no issue by either of his marriages, and at his death, in accordance with an agreement he had made with Edward I on 12 April 1302, the earldom of Norfolk and the office of Earl Marshal reverted to the Crown However his widow continued to be known as the Countess Marshal.
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« Reply #778 on: August 31, 2021, 03:28:01 PM »

Alice Chaucer, Duchess of Suffolk, LG (c. 1404 – 1475) was a granddaughter of the English poet Geoffrey Chaucer. Married three times, she eventually became a Lady of the Most Noble Order of the Garter. She was born as Alice Chaucer, a daughter of Thomas Chaucer by his wife Matilda Burghersh. Her grandfather was the poet Geoffrey Chaucer, author of The Canterbury Tales. She married three times: Firstly, when aged 11, she married Sir John Phelip (c. 1380 – 2 October 1415). The couple lived briefly at Donnington Castle, but Sir John died within a year. Sir John, also titled Lord Donnington, had married Maud, the widow of Walter Cookesey of Caldwall Castle, Kidderminster in the County of Worcestershire. Sir John lived at Caldwall Castle during his marriage to Maud and upon her death married Alice Chaucer. Sir John, a close personal friend of Henry V, died of dysentery after the successful 22 September 1415 capture of the fortress of Harfleur in Normandy. Sir John is buried at St Mary's Church in Kidderminster, Worcestershire. Secondly, after 1421, Alice married Thomas Montagu, 4th Earl of Salisbury (1388–1428), one of the most important English commanders during the Hundred Years' War, who died at the Siege of Orléans. Thirdly, in 1430, she married William de la Pole (1396–1450), whose father Michael de la Pole, 2nd Earl of Suffolk had also died at Harfleur along with Sir John Phelip. William was Steward of the Household to King Henry VI, and from 1447 to 1450 was the dominant force in the Council and Chief Minister to the king; as such he was particularly associated with the unpopular royal policies whose failures culminated in the anti-court protest and political violence of Cade's Revolt in 1450. He was Constable of Wallingford Castle in 1434. By William de la Pole she had a son: John de la Pole (1442–1492) who married Elizabeth of York, making him the brother-in-law of two kings, Edward IV and Richard III. John became 2nd Duke of Suffolk in 1463.


Alice Dudley, Duchess of Dudley (née Leigh)(1579 – 22 January 1669), also known as Duchess Dudley, was the second wife of the explorer Sir Robert Dudley. In 1605, after giving birth to seven daughters, she was abandoned by her husband, who went into exile in Tuscany, remarried, and eventually sold his English estates. In 1644, by way of reparation for her losses, King Charles I created Alice Dudley a duchess in her own right "for her natural life", the dukedom thus created not being heritable.Alice Leigh was a daughter of Sir Thomas Leigh, 1st Baronet (died 1625), of Stoneleigh Abbey, Warwickshire, who was created a baronet in 1611, by his marriage to Catherine, a daughter of Sir John Spencer of Wormleighton. Her father was the third son of Sir Thomas Leigh, Lord Mayor of London for 1558, and in 1643 her nephew Thomas (1595–1672) was created the first Baron Leigh. On 11 September 1596, at Ashow, Warwickshire, Alice Leigh married Sir Robert Dudley, the natural son of Robert Dudley, 1st Earl of Leicester, Queen Elizabeth I's favourite, by Lady Sheffield. A daughter of this marriage, who was to be the first of seven, was baptised on 25 September 1597. Five of their daughters reached adulthood: Alice (who married Sir Ferdinando Sutton), Douglas (who married William Dansey), Katherine (who married Sir Richard Leveson), Frances (who married Sir Gilbert Kniveton), and Anne (who married Sir Robert Holborne). In 1605, Robert Dudley left England and fled to Florence, accompanied by his first cousin once removed, Elizabeth Southwell. That winter, he and Southwell announced their conversion to Roman Catholicism and intention to marry. To repudiate his existing marriage, Robert claimed that in 1591 he had entered into a marriage contract with Frances Vavasour, one of Queen Elizabeth's maids of honour. His third marriage was never recognised in England. Robert Dudley owned estates which included Kenilworth Castle which were valued at Ł50,000. In 1612, these were sold for Ł14,500 to Henry Frederick, Prince of Wales, although he paid only a fraction of even that price, and after his death the property devolved upon the new Prince of Wales, the future King Charles. In 1622 Charles obtained a special Act of Parliament to enable Alice Dudley "to alien her estate from her children as a feme sole", so that she could then sell her interest in the properties for Ł4,000, plus further payments to be made in later years. By letters patent of 23 May 1644, King Charles I created Dudley a duchess for her own life. Dudley was finally widowed in 1649, her husband dying at his villa near Florence after more than forty years in exile.


Alice Dudley (?) daughter of Alice Dudley (née Leigh) and Robert Dudley. She married Sir Ferdinando Sutton



Alice Frederica Keppel (née Edmonstone)(29 April 1868 – 11 September 1947) was a British society hostess and a long-time mistress and confidante of King Edward VII. Alice Frederica Edmonstone (known as "Freddie" to her family) was born on 29 April 1868 in Woolwich Dockyard, Kent, to Mary Elizabeth, née Parsons (1823–1902), and Sir William Edmonstone, 4th Baronet (1810–1888), who was serving as Superintendent at the Dockyard at the time. Besides his position as a baronet, her father was a retired admiral in the Royal Navy, and her maternal grandfather had been a governor of the Ionian Islands. On 1 June 1891, at the age of 23, she married the Honourable Lt Col George Keppel, son of the 7th Earl of Albemarle. He was four years older than Alice and was serving as a soldier in the British Army at the time of their marriage.The Keppel family had a history of service to the British monarchy as descendants of Arnold Joost van Keppel, who had accompanied King William III to Britain in 1688 and been granted the title Earl of Albemarle in 1696. George and Alice Keppel had two daughters: Violet Trefusis (6 June 1894 – 29 February 1972) and Sonia Rosemary Cubitt (24 May 1900 – 16 August 1986) Her husband's lack of money led Alice to engage in affairs with richer men in order to keep the family up with the lifestyle of London society of those times. She began her first affair with Ernest Beckett, 2nd Baron Grimthorpe, and members of the Keppel family believed that Beckett was the biological father of Keppel's daughter Violet. Alice also had an affair with Humphrey Sturt, 2nd Baron Alington. Keppel's husband once said of her: "I do not mind what she does as long as she comes back to me in the end."  Her affairs were conducted with his knowledge, and despite a deep affection for his wife, he also had affairs.Despite affairs on both sides, one of her daughters described her parents' marriage as a "marriage of companionship of love and laughter" Keppel became one of the best-known society hostesses of the Edwardian era. In 1898, the 29-year-old Keppel met Edward, Prince of Wales, the 56-year-old heir apparent to the British throne. Despite a 26-year age difference, she soon became Edward's mistress. Keppel lived at 30 Portman Square, where Edward regularly visited her; her husband conveniently left during the visits Her relationship with Edward lasted through his ascension to the throne as King Edward VII in 1901 and until his death in 1910. Keppel was one of the few people in Edward VII's circle who was able to smooth his mood swings.Edward's wife, Alexandra of Denmark, was fond of Keppel and tolerant of the liaison. She preferred Keppel to Edward's previous mistress, Daisy Greville, Countess of Warwick, whom she disliked for being indiscreet when she showed off her position. After Edward, Prince of Wales, became king in 1901, Keppel's discretion made her a perfect communicator between the king and his ministers. She knew how to present a topic to him so that he would listen, even if sometimes he disagreed. The Viceroy of India once said that "there were one or two occasions when the King was in disagreement with the Foreign Office, and I was able, through her, to advise the King with a view to the foreign policy of the government being accepted." Keppel's influence was founded on her discretion, social finesse, and conversational skill. Her best known contribution to politics was her role as a Liberal hostess. In this role, she acted as a representative for Edward and noted Liberals and was able to help Edward's causes. What influence she had in politics is unknown, but it is stated the king listened to her and depended on her advice.King Edward's death made Keppel so grief stricken that at his deathbed she had to be escorted out of his room by members of the Royal Household. Embarrassed by her behaviour, she later tried to minimise her dramatic outburst, but eventually admitted that she had been unable to control herself.In November 1910, the Keppels left Britain. Keppel stated it was because of her children's education, but it may also have been because of the king's death which had made her life change. In 1925, Keppel and her husband moved to Italy, buying the palazzo of Villa dell' Ombrellino in Bellosguardo in Florence. In 1946, the Keppels returned to their palazzo in Italy, and a year later, on 11 September 1947, Alice died of cirrhosis of the liver. Her husband George died two and a half months later, in his permanent suite kept at the Ritz Hotel. It was said that he could not live without her, having been married for 56 years. Through her younger daughter, Sonia Cubitt, Alice Keppel is the great-grandmother of Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall, the former mistress and second wife of Edward's great-great-grandson Charles, Prince of Wales.



Archduchess Alice of Austria, Princess of Tuscany (29 April 1941), daughter of Archduke Gottfried of Austria (German: Gottfried Maria Joseph Peter Ferdinand Hubert Anton Rupert Leopold Heinrich Ignaz Alfons, Erzherzog von Österreich, Prinz von Toskana) (14 March 1902– 21 January 1984) and Princess Dorothea of Bavaria. She married on 7 May 1970 in Salzburg, Baron Vittorio Manno (31 July 1938 ), son of Baron Antonio Manno and Bonile Maria Asinari di Rossillon. They have two children


Alice Habsburg (Polish: Alicja Elżbieta Ankarcrona) (18 December 1889 – 26 November 1985) was a Swedish-born aristocrat and member of the Polish Home Army during World War II. Born Alice Elisabeth Ankarcrona in Hölö, Sweden, she was the daughter of Oscar Carl Gustav Ankarcrona. She grew up in Sweden. In 1911, she married Count Ludwig Badeni, a diplomat working at the Austro-Hungarian legation in Stockholm. During their engagement, she converted to Catholicism. The couple had a single son, Kasimir Badeni, born 1912. Shortly after his birth, Ludwig Badeni started to suffer from mental illness and was taken to a mental hospital. He died in 1916. In the background of the disintegrating Austro-Hungarian state, she witnessed first-handed the Polish–Ukrainian War, seen the Battle of Lwów, where she was impressed by the Polish Lwów Eaglets At the end of the conflict, Alice became engaged to Archduke Karl Albrecht of Austria. As her Busk estate was devastated and still unsafe, she and her son spent some time at Karl Albrecht's family estate, the New Palace at Żywiec, in southern Poland. When the Polish-Soviet War broke out in April 1919, Karl Albrecht joined the Polish army and Alice and Kasimir again returned to Busk. Once more, fighting took place around the estate while they lived there. On 18 November 1920, Alice married Karl Albrecht in the palace chapel at Żywiec, and soon afterwards the couple settled at the estate, where they lived together with the parents of Karl Albrecht, Archduke Charles Stephen of Austria and Archduchess Maria Theresa of Austria, as well as his brother Archduke Leo Karl of Austria and his wife Marie-Clothilde de Thuilličres. Alice's husband worked with the administration of the estate. During these years, Alice Habsurg also spent part of her time and money trying to improve the estate at Busk. The couple had two daughters, Maria Christina and Renata, and two sons, Karl Stefan (Karol) and Albrecht. The couple gave their children an essentially Polish upbringing, with Polish as their first language. Both parents also fully supported independent Poland. Her husband supported Polish organisations and donated money and machine-guns to the Polish Army. Alice Habsburg would later, to the Gestapo, state her nationality as "Polish". She has also stated that to give her children a Polish upbringing "was a simple act of loyalty to the country that had opened its borders to us and given us back our property and standing" When Nazi Germany invaded Poland in 1939, Alice's husband joined the Polish army. Alice remained at the estate at Żywiec. Already on 3 September, German soldiers reached the estate and began to use it as a barracks. Officers from SS and Gestapo followed suit and interrogated Alice Habsburg for the first time. Alice Habsburg believed her husband and children were safe at the estate in Busk, but when the Soviet Union also invaded Poland, she left Żywiec to try to find them Eventually, her three sons managed to flee the country and later joined the Polish Armed Forces in the West. Her husband was arrested by the Nazi German authorities and send to prison. Both he and his wife were pressed to give up their loyalties to Poland and instead join or support the Nazi regime, but both refused. Because of this, Karl Albrecht was kept imprisoned in Cieszyn until December 1941, when he was released due to health reasons and as a consequence of certain international pressure. Alice Habsburg had petitioned the Swedish Government and Sven Hedin to work for the release of her husband, and several royal or ex-royal families in Europe had done the same. Some time after the German invasion, Alice Habsburg joined the Polish resistance organization, the Union of Armed Struggle (later transformed into the Home Army). In autumn 1940, she was forced to leave her estate and to go live in Wisła, where she stood under surveillance. Even so, she enjoyed a relative degree of freedom and managed to travel to both Berlin and Cologne, despite this being forbidden. She also kept acting as a courier for the resistance.[2] In October 1942 Alice Habsburg, together with her husband and their daughter Renata, were transferred to a labour camp in Strausberg, in Germany. Alice refused to do her assigned duties, stating that "Although no work is shameful, I refuse to work for the Hitlerite regime"; an act of disobedience that went nonetheless unpunished. She was explicitly forbidden from interacting with the Polish forced laborers at the camp. Her husband, now released from prison, was however allowed to leave and, being in poor health after his treatment in prison, went to a hospital in Vienna upon his wife's insistence. He returned to Strausberg to be with his family in summer 1943. Alice Habsburg stayed in Straussberg until the end of the war. She and her husband were liberated, together with many other camp inmates, on 10 April 1945 by American troops. In 1946, she was awarded the Polish Cross of Valour by the Polish government. On 15 December 1949, she was accorded the hereditary title of Princess of Altenburg by the head of the House of Habsburg-Lorraine.The same, now communist regime in Poland, however, did not restore any of the property to the family, and Alice Habsburg and her husband and daughters, significantly impoverished, eventually settled in Sweden, helped by Alice's Swedish relatives.



Maria Alice, Archduchess of Austria-Teschen (1893–1962), daughter of Archduke Friedrich, Duke of Teschen (Friedrich Maria Albrecht Wilhelm Karl)( 4 June 1856 – 30 December 1936) and Princess Isabella Hedwig Franziska Natalie of Cro˙ (27 February 1856 – 5 September 1931)  She married Baron Friedrich von Waldbott-Bassenheim (their daughter Countess Maria Immaculata Waldbott von Bassenheim was the second wife of Count Hans Heribert of Toerring-Jettenbach, son of Duchess Sophie Adelheid in Bavaria)


Maria Alice Villela de Carvalho (1942 - 2020), a descendant of the explorer Vasco Da Gama and of Pedro Álvares Cabral, the founder of Brazil. In 1982 she married Edward John Carlos Plunkett, 20th or 19th Baron of Dunsany (10 September 1939 – 24 May 2011) Plunkett and his wife, Lady Dunsany, an architect qualified in the US, Ireland and the UK, lived at Dunsany Castle, Dunsany, County Meath, Ireland. They had two sons, Randal Plunkett, 21st Baron of Dunsany, and the Honourable Oliver Plunkett. In addition, Lord Dunsany had two step children Daniel and Joana de Marsillac, who were very close to him and considered as his own. Their father was his first cousin and great friend.The 20th Lord Dunsany died in May 2011, after some years of chronic illness, including having developed cerebral palsy. A private funeral with his widow, sons and step-children, sister, close family friends and staff, was conducted within the ancestral castle. He was buried in the grounds, by the Church of St. Nicholas, the reconsecration of which he had helped arrange. The pallbearers were his sons and step-son, two members of the Castle staff, and a family friend. A memorial service was held in Dunsany Parish Church a week after the funeral



Princess Alice of Bourbon-Parma (2000), great-granddaughter of Prince René of Bourbon-Parma and Princess Margaret of Denmark. She is also the grandniece of Anne of Bourbon-Parma, who was the last queen of Romania.


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« Reply #779 on: September 02, 2021, 01:57:00 PM »

Adelswelt mentioned today that Ernst August of Hanover and his wife Ekaterina had their third child in July, a girl named Eleonore.
So far there has been no official announcement of the birth.


Eleanor  is a feminine given name, originally from an Old French adaptation of the Old Provençal name Aliénor.  Common hypocorisms include Elle, Ella, Ellie, Elly, Leonor, Leonora, Leonore, Nella, Nellie, Nelly, and Nora.

Britanny: Azenor
English: Eleanor, Elinor
Estonia: Eleonoora, Ellinor
French: Eléonore, Léonore, Elléonore
German: Eleonore
Greek: Ελεονώρα
Hungarian, Slovakian: Eleonóra
Irish: Eileanóra
Italian, Dutch, Polish: Eleonora
Occitan: Alienor, Alienňr
Portuguese: Leonora, Leonor
Provençal: Lenoa, Leno
Spanish: Leonor
Swedish: Eleanora, Ellinor


Eleanor of Normandy (b. 1011/1013, d. after 1071), daughter of Richard II of Normandy.

Eleanor of Aquitaine (ca. 1122–1204), wife of Louis VII of France and Henry II of England, mother of Richard I and King John

Eleanor of England, Queen of Castile (1161–1214), daughter of Henry II of England and Eleanor of Aquitaine; wife of Alfonso VIII of Castile

Eleanor, Fair Maid of Brittany (1184–1241), daughter of Geoffrey, Duke of Brittany

Eleanor of Castile (1202-1244) (1202–1244), wife of James I of Aragon

Eleanor of England, Countess of Leicester (1215–1275), daughter of King John of England, wife of Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester

Eleanor of Provence (1222–1291), wife of Henry III of England, mother of Edward I

Eleanor of Castile (1241–1290), wife of Edward I of England, mother of Edward II

Eleanor of England, Countess of Bar (1269–1298), daughter of Edward I, betrothed to Alfonso III of Aragon, and wife of Henry III of Bar

Eleanor of Anjou (1289-1341), daughter of Charles II of Naples and Mary of Hungary, and wife of Frederick III of Sicily

Eleanor de Clare (1292-1337), granddaughter of Edward I of England and wife of Hugh Despenser the Younger

Eleanor of Castile (1307-1359) (1307–1359), wife of Alfonso IV of Aragon

Eleanor of Woodstock (1318–1355), daughter of Edward II, wife of Reynold II, Count of Gelderland

Eleanor of Sicily (1349-1375), wife of Peter IV of Aragon

Leonor Telles de Menezes (1350–1386), wife of Ferdinand I of Portugal

Eleanor of Castile (d. 1416) (136x–1416), wife of Charles III of Navarre

Eleanor of Aragon, Queen of Portugal (1402–1445) wife of Edward I of Portugal

Eleanor of Viseu (1458–1525), wife of John II of Portugal

Eleanor of Austria (1498–1558), Queen consort of Portugal (1516–1521) and of France (1530–1547)

Eleanor of Toledo (1522–1562), Spanish noblewoman and Duchess and Regent of Florence (1539)

Eleanor of Austria (15 November 1498 – 25 February 1558), also called Eleanor of Castile, was born an Archduchess of Austria and Infanta of Castile from the House of Habsburg, and subsequently became Queen consort of Portugal (1518–1521) and of France (1530–1547). She also held the Duchy of Touraine (1547–1558) in dower. She is called "Leonor" in Spanish and Portuguese and "Eléonore" or "Aliénor" in French.

Countess Eleonore Batthyány-Strattmann (29 May 1673 – 24 November 1741) was a Viennese Court lady. The daughter of Imperial Court Chancellor Count Theodor Heinrich von Strattmann, she was married to Hungarian nobleman and Ban of Croatia Ádám II Batthyány until his early death in 1703.

Eleanor Gwynn (known colloquially as "Nell") (1650-1687), Restoration actress and mistress of Charles II of England

Ulrika Eleonora of Sweden, its reigning queen 1719-1720

Maria Eleonora of Brandenburg (11 November 1599 – 28 March 1655) was a German princess and Queen of Sweden as the consort of King Gustav II Adolph (Gustavus Adolphus).

Hedwig Eleonora of Holstein-Gottorp (23 October 1636 – 24 November 1715) was Queen of Sweden from 1654 until 1660 as the wife of King Charles X Gustav.

Ulrika Eleonora of Denmark and Norway (11 September 1656 – 26 July 1693) was Queen of Sweden as the wife of King Charles XI.


Eleonore von Habsburg-Lothringen (Eleonore Maria del Pilar Iona Christina Jelena)(28 February 1994) is an Austrian jewellery designer, fashion model, and member of the House of Habsburg-Lorraine. Eleonore Habsburg-Lorraine was born in 1994 in Salzburg to Karl, a politician and head of the House of Habsburg-Lorraine, and Francesca Thyssen-Bornemisza de Kászon et Impérfalva, an art collector and by birth member of the Thyssen-Bornemisza family. On 20 July 2020, Eleonore von Habsburg-Lorraine married Belgian race car driver Jérôme d'Ambrosio in a small civil ceremony at the Civil Registry of Monaco.


Leonor, Princess of Asturias (Leonor de Todos los Santos de Borbón y Ortiz)(31 October 2005) is the heir presumptive to the throne of Spain as the elder daughter of King Felipe VI and Queen Letizia.


Countess Leonore of Orange-Nassau, Jonkvrouwe van Amsberg (Leonore Marie Irene Enrica)( born 3 June 2006), is the third child and second daughter of Prince Constantijn and Princess Laurentien of the Netherlands. She is a member of the Dutch royal family and currently seventh in the line of succession to the Dutch throne.

Princess Eléonore of Belgium (Eléonore Fabiola Victoria Anne Marie)(16 April 2008) is the younger daughter and the youngest of four children of King Philippe and Queen Mathilde of Belgium. She is currently fourth in line to the throne of Belgium after her older siblings Princess Elisabeth, Duchess of Brabant, Prince Gabriel, and Prince Emmanuel.


Princess Leonore Lilian Maria, Duchess of Gotland (20 February 2014) the 1st and eldest daughter of Christopher O'Neill (27 June 1974) and Princess Madeleine of Sweden, Duchess of Hälsingland and Gästrikland (Madeleine Thérčse Amelie Josephine)(10 June 1982) is the second daughter and youngest child of King Carl XVI Gustaf and Queen Silvia. Upon her birth


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