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« Reply #825 on: September 24, 2021, 03:06:03 PM »

Emma is a feminine given name. It is derived from the Germanic word ermen meaning "whole" or "universal". Emma is also used as a diminutive of Emmeline, Amelia or any other name beginning with "em".

Dame Emma Hamilton (born Amy Lyon; 26 April 1765 – 15 January 1815), generally known as Lady Hamilton, was an English maid, model, dancer and actress. She began her career in London's demi-monde, becoming the mistress of a series of wealthy men, culminating in the naval hero Lord Nelson, and was the favourite model of the portrait artist George Romney. In 1791, at the age of 26, she married Sir William Hamilton, British ambassador to the Kingdom of Naples, where she was a success at court, befriending the queen, the sister of Marie Antoinette, and meeting Nelson. She had 2 daughters: Emma Carew (father: Honourable Charles Francis Greville (1749–1809); whose mistress she was) and Horatia Nelson (with Nelson).


Emma Louisa (Radford), Lady Radford, FSA, FRHistS, JP (26 April 1937) was an English antiquarian and public servant. A noted local historian and a contributor to the Dictionary of National Biography, she was the first woman to be elected President of the Devonshire Association for the Advancement of Science, Literature and the Arts, and was also among the first women to be appointed a magistrate for the Exeter Bench. Emma Louisa Radford was the daughter of Daniel Radford (1828–1900) In 1882, she married her first cousin, George Heynes Radford (1851–1917), the son of George David Radford, of Plymouth. The younger George was a solicitor who later served as a London County Councillor (1895–1907) and Liberal Member of Parliament for East Islington (1906–17), for which service he was knighted in 1916. Together, they had a son and three daughters


Emma Kalanikaumakaʻamano Kaleleonālani Naʻea Rooke (January 2, 1836 – April 25, 1885) was queen of Hawaii as the wife of King Kamehameha IV from 1856 to his death in 1863. She was later a candidate for the throne but King Kalākaua was elected instead. Emma was born on January 2, 1836, in Honolulu and was often called Emalani ("royal Emma"). Her father was High Chief George Naʻea and her mother was High Chiefess Fanny Kekelaokalani Young. She was adopted under the Hawaiian tradition of hānai by her childless maternal aunt, chiefess Grace Kamaʻikuʻi Young Rooke, and her husband, Dr. Thomas C. B. Rooke. Emma became engaged to the king of Hawaii, Alexander Liholiho. At the engagement party, a Hawaiian charged that Emma's Caucasian blood made her unfit to be the Hawaiian queen and her lineage was not suitable enough to be Alexander Liholiho's bride; she broke into tears and the king was infuriated. On June 19, 1856, she married Alexander Liholiho, who a year earlier had assumed the throne as Kamehameha IV. He was also fluent in both Hawaiian and English.Two years later on May 20, 1858 Emma gave birth to a son, Prince Albert Edward Kamehameha.


Princess Emma of Anhalt-Bernburg-Schaumburg-Hoym (20 May 1802–1 August 1858) was a German princess. She was the Grandmother of the Dutch Queen Emma of Waldeck and Pyrmont, who was born the day after she died and was named after her. Emma was one of the four daughters of the prince Victor II, Prince of Anhalt-Bernburg-Schaumburg-Hoym (1767–1812) from his marriage to Amelia of Nassau-Weilburg (1776–1841) She married on 26 June 1823 at Schaumburg Castle, George II, Prince of Waldeck and Pyrmont (1789–1845). The couple had five children

Emma of Waldeck and Pyrmont (Adelheid Emma Wilhelmina Theresia)(2 August 1858 – 20 March 1934) was Queen consort of the Netherlands and Grand Duchess consort of Luxembourg by marriage to King-Grand Duke Willem III. Emma was born a princess of Waldeck and Pyrmont on 2 August 1858 in Arolsen Castle in Arolsen, the capital of the small German principality of Waldeck and Pyrmont. She was the fourth daughter of Georg Viktor, Prince of Waldeck and Pyrmont, and Princess Helena of Nassau-Weilburg. Princess Emma married the elderly King William III in Arolsen on 7 January 1879, two years after the death of his first wife, Sophie of Württemberg The king had three sons from his first marriage, William, Maurice, and Alexander, all of whom died without any legitimate offspring. With William, Emma had her only child, the future Queen Wilhelmina, on 31 August 1880. When her last surviving stepson Alexander, Prince of Orange died in 1884, her daughter became heir to the throne. This changed Emma's own position, since it was likely that her daughter would succeed her spouse as a minor, in which case Emma herself would be regent during her minority.


Emma Francisca Catharina van Vollenhoven,(28 November 2006) daughter of Prince Pieter-Christiaan of Orange-Nassau, van Vollenhoven and his wife Anita van Eijk. Via her father she descends of Emma of Waldeck and Pyrmont


Princess Emma of Schaumburg-Lippe (1850–1855), daughter of Princess Hermine of Waldeck and Pyrmont and Adolf I, Prince of Schaumburg-Lippe


Princess Emma of Schaumburg-Lippe (1865–1868), daughter of Princess Hermine of Waldeck and Pyrmont and Adolf I, Prince of Schaumburg-Lippe


Princess Emma of Bentheim and Steinfurt (19 February 1889 – 25 April 1905) daughter of Princess Pauline of Waldeck and Pyrmont and  Alexis, Hereditary Prince of Bentheim and Steinfurt (a niece of Queen Emma).


Princess Emma Marie Charlotte Sofia of Hohenzollern / of Prussia (2 April 2015), 3rd child and only daughter of Georg Friedrich Ferdinand, Prince of Prussia (10 June 1976) and  Princess Sophie of Isenburg (7 March 1978)


Emma of Mělník (b. before 950, d. 1005/1006), wife of Boleslav II of Bohemia and Bohemian duchess

Emma of Normandy (c. 985–1052), twice Queen consort of the Kingdom of England

Emma Tallulah Behn (2008) third and youngest daughter of Ari Behn and  Princess Märtha Louise of Norway


Rachel Emma Manners, Duchess of Rutland (née Watkins)(1963) is a British noblewoman and podcaster.  Born Emma Watkins, the daughter of a farmer from Knighton, Powys (then within Radnorshire). Watkins married David Manners, 11th Duke of Rutland, in 1992. They separated in 2012 but continue to co-habitate. The couple had 5 children.


Emma of Paris (943 – 19 March 968), was a duchess consort of Normandy, married to Richard I, Duke of Normandy. She was the daughter of Count Hugh the Great of Paris and Hedwiga de Sachsen and sister of Hugh Capet, king of France. Emma was betrothed to Richard I in her childhood as a part of an alliance between Normandy and Paris against the French royal house. The marriage took place in 960. The union gave a permanent and useful status to Normandy, especially since the brother of Emma became king in 987. Emma has been pointed out as the mother of Emma of Normandy, but this is not chronologically possible. Emma died childless.


Emma of Blois (c. 950–27 December 1003) was Duchess consort of Aquitaine by marriage to William IV, Duke of Aquitaine. She ruled Aquitaine as regent for her son, William V, Duke of Aquitaine, from 996 until 1004.


Lady Emma Louise Vickers (née Herbert) (12 March 1969) is a British circus trapeze artist, stuntwoman, and teacher of circus arts. The daughter of Henry Herbert, 17th Earl of Pembroke and Claire Murray Threipland. Herbert's parents did not fight her eccentric lifestyle. She married Robin Vickers in 2005 They had 2 children.


Emma Colebrooke or Emma, Lady Tankerville (1752 – 20 November 1836) was a British heiress, art patron and botanist. Lady Tankerville's collection of botanical illustrations are held at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. Phaius tankerville was named in her honour by Sir Joseph Banks because it was the first tropical orchid to flower in England and it flowered in her greenhouse. She was one of two daughters of Mary (born Skyner) and James Colebrooke.  She married Charles Bennet, 4th Earl of Tankerville on 7 October 1771 They had 11 children.

Emma Clare Roebuck Ingilby, Lady Ingilby (née; Thompson) is a British aristocrat and businesswoman. Upon her marriage to Sir Thomas Colvin William Ingilby, 6th Baronet in 1984, she became the châtelaine of Ripley Castle, the seat of the Ingilby baronets. She co-owns and co-runs the estate alongside her husband, and opened the castle up to the public in the late 1980s. Lady Ingilby is the daughter of Major Richard A. Thompson, a military officer, and Pamela Margaret Baker, a school teacher. She met Sir Thomas Colvin William Ingilby, 6th Baronet of Ripley Castle, at a dinner party when she was eighteen years old. They married on 25 December 1984. Upon her marriage to Sir Thomas, she gained the title Lady Ingilby. She and her husband have five children.


Lady Emma Caroline de Vere Beauclerk (22 July 1963), daughter of Murray Beauclerk, 14th Duke of St Albans and his 1st wife Rosemary Frances Scoones. She married 1991 David Craig Shaw Smellie


Emma of Normandy (referred to as Ælfgifu in royal documents;[2] c. 984 – 6 March 1052) was Queen of England, Denmark and Norway through her marriages to Æthelred the Unready (1002–1016) and Cnut the Great (1017–1035). She was the daughter of the Norman ruler Richard the Fearless and Gunnor.

Emma Harriet Nicholson, Baroness Nicholson of Winterbourne (16 October 1941) is a British politician, who has been a life peer since 1997. Born in Oxford and a descendant of the family which founded London gin distillers J&W Nicholson & Co, Lady Nicholson is the third of four daughters of Sir Godfrey Nicholson, Bt and his wife, Lady Katharine (the fifth daughter of the 27th Earl of Crawford). She was diagnosed as deaf at the age of 16On 9 May 1987, Nicholson married Sir Michael Harris Caine, with whom she had a foster son Amar Kanim, who was rescued from Iraq after surviving a napalm attack in March 1991 She was widowed in 1999.

 Lady Emma Montagu (September 1965 – 29 April 2014), daughter of Angus Montagu, 12th Duke of Manchester and his 1st wife Mary Eveleen McClure (1937/1938).


Lady Emma Cavendish (26 March 1943); Daughter of Andrew Robert Buxton Cavendish, 11th Duke of Devonshire and Hon. Deborah Mitford. She married Hon. Tobias Tennant, son of Christopher Grey Tennant, 2nd Baron Glenconner on 3 September 1963. They have three children (including Stella Tennant) and ten grandchildren



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« Reply #826 on: September 24, 2021, 03:14:36 PM »

Countess Emma Kinsky of Wchinitz and Tettau (13 March 1888 – 2 December 1957), daughter of Countess Marie of Wilczek (1858–1938) and Rudolf, 9th Prince Kinsky of Wchinitz and Tettau.

Emma de Guader (died after 1096) was a Norman noblewoman, the wife of Ralph de Guader and the daughter of William FitzOsbern, Lord of Breteuil and later first Earl of Hereford of a new creation, who was a cousin and close adviser of William the Conqueror.[1] William's opposition to their marriage led to the unsuccessful Revolt of the Earls.


Baroness Emma Orczy (full name: Emma Magdolna Rozália Mária Jozefa Borbála Orczy de Orci) (23 September 1865 – 12 November 1947), usually known as Baroness Orczy (the name under which she was published) or to her family and friends as Emmuska Orczy, was a Hungarian-born British novelist and playwright. She is best known for her series of novels featuring the Scarlet Pimpernel, the alter ego of Sir Percy Blakeney, a wealthy English fop who turns into a quick-thinking escape artist in order to save French aristocrats from "Madame Guillotine" during the French Revolution, establishing the "hero with a secret identity" in popular culture  Orczy was born in Tarnaörs, Heves County, Hungary. She was the daughter of the composer Baron Félix Orczy de Orci (1835–1892) and Countess Emma Wass de Szentegyed et Cege (1839–1892)


Emma Caroline Smith-Stanley (1805 – 26 April 1876) was the Countess of Derby as the wife of Edward Smith-Stanley, 14th Earl of Derby, who served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom three times in the mid-19th century.She was the second daughter of Edward Bootle-Wilbraham, 1st Baron Skelmersdale.She married Edward Smith-Stanley in May 1825. They had three children.


Lady Emma Charlotte Stanley, (died 23 August 1928),  only daughter of Emma Caroline Smith-Stanley and Edward Smith-Stanley She married Wellington Patrick Manvers Chetwynd Talbot, son of Charles Chetwynd-Talbot, 2nd Earl Talbot.


Emma Cust, Countess Brownlow, (28 July 1791 – 28 January 1872), formerly Lady Emma Sophia Edgcumbe, was the third wife of John Cust, 1st Earl Brownlow. The couple had no children, although the earl had children from his two previous marriages. Emma was born in Portugal Street (now Piccadilly), Hyde Park, London, the daughter of Richard Edgcumbe, 2nd Earl of Mount Edgcumbe, and his wife, the former Lady Sophia Hobart She married the earl on 17 July 1828 at St George's, Hanover Square, London. In 1830 she was appointed a Lady of the Bedchamber to Adelaide of Saxe-Meiningen, queen consort of King William IV of the United Kingdom, a position she retained until Adelaide's death in 1849.

Lady Emma Cathleen Douglas (b. 1956) daughter of David Harrington Angus Douglas, 12th Marquess of Queensberry  and his 1st wife Ann Jones (the actress Ann Queensberry) She married 1986 Damon Lewis Vincent Heath, and has issue


Countess Emma de Bendern, the first wife of gossip columnist Nigel Dempster.
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« Reply #827 on: September 27, 2021, 03:00:54 PM »

Peter is a common masculine given name. It is derived from Greek Πέτρος, Petros (an invented, masculine form of Greek petra, the word for "rock" or "stone"), which itself was a translation of Aramaic Kefa ("stone, rock"), the nickname Jesus gave to apostle Simon Bar-Jona. In the various languages there are various variations and such on Peter


Russia:

Peter the Great (Russian: Пётр Вели́кий, tr. Pyotr Velíkiy Peter I (Russian: Пётр Первый, tr. Pyotr Pyervyy or Pyotr Alekséyevich (Russian: Пётр Алексе́евич) (9 June [O.S. 30 May] 1672 – 8 February [O.S. 28 January] 1725) ruled the Tsardom of Russia and later the Russian Empire from 7 May [O.S. 27 April] 1682 until his death in 1725, jointly ruling before 1696 with his elder half-brother, Ivan V. Named after the apostle, and described as a newborn as "with good health, his mother's black, vaguely Tatar eyes, and a tuft of auburn hair". Son of Aleksey Mikhaylovich (Russian: Алексе́й Миха́йлович) (19 March [O.S. 9 March] 1629 – 8 February [O.S. 29 January] 1676) and his second wife  Nataliya Kyrillovna Naryshkina (1 September 1651 – 4 February 1694). Peter the Great had two wives, with whom he had fourteen children, three of whom survived to adulthood. Peter's mother selected his first wife, Eudoxia Lopukhina, with the advice of other nobles in 1689. This was consistent with previous Romanov tradition by choosing a daughter of a minor noble. This was done to prevent fighting between the stronger noble houses and to bring fresh blood into the family. He also had a mistress from Holland, Anna Mons. Upon his return from his European tour in 1698, Peter sought to end his unhappy marriage. He divorced the Tsaritsa and forced her to join a convent. The Tsaritsa had borne Peter three children, although only one, Alexei Petrovich, Tsarevich of Russia, had survived past his childhood.He took Marta Helena Skowrońska, a Polish-Lithuanian peasant, as a mistress some time between 1702 and 1704.[42] Marta converted to the Russian Orthodox Church and took the name Catherine. Though no record exists, Catherine and Peter are described as having married secretly between 23 Oct and 1 December 1707 in St. Petersburg.Peter valued Catherine and married her again (this time officially) at Saint Isaac's Cathedral in Saint Petersburg on 19 February 1712. His eldest child and heir, Alexei, was suspected of being involved in a plot to overthrow the Emperor. Alexei was tried and confessed under torture during questioning conducted by a secular court. He was convicted and sentenced to be executed. The sentence could be carried out only with Peter's signed authorization, and Alexei died in prison, as Peter hesitated before making the decision. Alexei's death most likely resulted from injuries suffered during his torture.[45] Alexei's mother Eudoxia had also been punished; she was dragged from her home, tried on false charges of adultery, publicly flogged, and finally confined in monasteries while forbidden to be talked to.
In 1724, Peter had his second wife, Catherine, crowned as Empress, although he remained Russia's actual ruler. All of Peter's male children had died.


Peter Petrovich (1704 - ?), son of Peter I and his 2nd wife

Peter Petrovich (15 November 1715-19 April 1719), son of Peter I and his 2nd wife


Peter II Alexeyevich (Russian: Пётр II, Пётр Алексеевич, Pyotr Vtoroy, Pyotr Alekseyevich)(23 October [O.S. 12 October] 1715 – 30 January [O.S. 19 January] 1730) reigned as Emperor of Russia from 1727 until his untimely death. He was the only son of Tsarevich Alexei Petrovich (son of Peter the Great by his first wife, Eudoxia Lopukhina) and of Charlotte Christine of Brunswick-Lüneburg. He was the last agnatic member of the House of Romanov.Peter was born in Saint Petersburg on 23 (O.S. 12) October 1715. His mother died when he was only ten days old. His father, the tsarevich Alexei, accused of treason by his own father, Peter the Great, died in prison in 1718. So three-year-old Peter and his four-year-old sister, Natalya, became orphans. Their grandfather showed no interest in their upbringing or education: the Tsar had disliked their father and even their grandmother, his own first wife, and young Peter in particular reminded him of his only son Alexei, whom the Tsar suspected of treachery. Therefore, from his childhood, the young orphaned Peter was kept in the strictest seclusion.Peter the Great died in 1725 and was succeeded by his second wife, Catherine I, a woman of low birth. During the reign (1725-1727) of Catherine I, young Peter was ignored; but by the time she died in 1727, it had become clear to those in power that the only male-line grandson of Peter the Great could not be kept from his inheritance much longer. The majority of Russians and three-quarters of the nobility (especially the old-established nobility) were on his side, while the Holy Roman Emperor Charles VI (Peter's uncle - the husband of his mother's elder sister, Elisabeth Christine of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel) persistently urged Peter's claims through the imperial ambassador at Saint Petersburg. Through the efforts of Menshikov, the court named Peter as Catherine's heir apparent, even though Catherine had two daughters of her own. The relevant documentation also specified the betrothal of Peter to Menshikov's daughter Maria. After Catherine's death in May 1727 and the proclamation of the 11-year-old Peter II as emperor, Menshikov took the young autocrat into his own house on Vasilievsky Island and had full control over all of his actions. Peter II was quick-witted, but apparently a stubborn and wayward boy, much like his grandfather. Despite these similarities, the emperor had no desire to learn to rule, unlike Peter the Great. His young age meant that he could not adequately manage public affairs, and he almost never appeared at the Supreme Privy Council. This led to frustration among his subjects and in the imperial administration – officials did not dare to assume responsibility for important decisions. The Russian fleet became neglected, but Peter II showed no interest in the matter. Peter tightened serfdom by banning serfs from volunteering for military service and thus escaping their status. Emperor Peter II died as dawn broke on 30 January 1730 – the day scheduled for his marriage to Ekaterina Dolgorukova. He is buried in the Cathedral of the Archangel located at the Moscow Kremlin and was the only post-Petrine Russian monarch given that honor; along with Ivan VI (who was murdered and buried in the fortress of Shlisselburg), he is the only post-Petrine monarch not buried in the Peter and Paul Cathedral in Saint Petersburg. With Peter's death, the direct male line of the Romanov dynasty ended. He was succeeded on the Russian throne by Anna Ivanovna, daughter of Peter the Great's half-brother and co-ruler, Ivan V.



Peter III (Russian: Пётр III Фёдорович, romanized: Pyotr III Fyodorovich)( 21 February [O.S. 10 February] 1728 – 17 July [O.S. 6 July] 1762) was Emperor of Russia for six months in 1762. He was born in Kiel as Charles Peter Ulrich of Schleswig-Holstein-Gottorp (German: Karl Peter Ulrich von Schleswig-Holstein-Gottorp), the only child of Charles Frederick, Duke of Holstein-Gottorp (the son of Hedvig Sophia of Sweden, sister of Charles XII), and Anna Petrovna (the elder surviving daughter of Peter the Great).The German-born Peter could hardly speak Russian and pursued a strongly pro-Prussian policy, which made him an unpopular leader. He was deposed by troops loyal to his wife, Catherine, the former Princess Sophie of Anhalt-Zerbst who, despite her own German origins, was a Russian nationalist. She succeeded him as Empress Catherine II. Peter died in captivity soon after his overthrow, perhaps with Catherine's approval as part of the coup conspiracy. However, another theory is that his death was unplanned, resulting from a drunken brawl with one of his guards.



Grand Duke Peter Nikolaevich of Russia (Russian: Пётр Никола́евич Рома́нов)(22 January [O.S. 10 January] 1864 – 17 June 1931) was a Russian Grand Duke and a member of the Russian Imperial Family. Grand Duke Peter Nikolaevich was the second son of Grand Duke Nicholas Nicolaievich the Elder (1831–1891) and Duchess Alexandra of Oldenburg (1838–1900). On 26 July 1889, he married Princess Milica of Montenegro (1866–1951), daughter of King Nicholas I of Montenegro (1841–1921). The Grand Duke and Duchess had four children.


Oldenburg

Peter I or Peter Frederick Louis of Holstein-Gottorp (German: Peter Friedrich Ludwig von Holstein-Gottorp) (17 January 1755 – 21 May 1829) was the Regent of the Duchy of Oldenburg for his incapacitated cousin William I from 1785 to 1823, and then served himself as Duke from 1823 to 1829.Peter Frederick Louis was born on 17 January 1755 at Riesenburg, Prussia. He was the only surviving son of Prince Georg Ludwig of Holstein-Gottorp and Sophie Charlotte of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Beck. On 6 June 1781, he married Duchess Frederica of Württemberg, the second daughter of Frederick II Eugene, Duke of Württemberg and his wife, Friederike Dorothea of Brandenburg-Schwedt. Frederica's sister, Sophie, was the wife of Crown Prince Paul of Russia (the future Tsar Paul I. Peter and Frederica became the parents of two sons: August (born in 1783) and George (born in 1784).Fredericka died due to complications from a miscarriage on 24 November 1785 at Vienna, Austria, predeceasing her husband by forty years.


Peter II (German: Nikolaus Friedrich Peter) (8 July 1827 – 13 June 1900) was the reigning Grand Duke of Oldenburg from 1853 to 1900.Duke Nikolaus Friedrich Peter was the only son of Augustus, Grand Duke of Oldenburg by his second wife Princess Ida of Anhalt-Bernburg-Schaumburg-Hoym. He was born on 8 July 1827 in Oldenburg. On 10 February 1852, Peter married Princess Elisabeth of Saxe-Altenburg She was the fourth daughter of Joseph, Duke of Saxe-Altenburg and Amelia of Württemberg, and was a sister of Queen Marie of Hanover and Grand Duchess Alexandra Iosifovna of Russia. They had two sons, Frederick Augustus (born in 1852) and George (born in 1855). Peter II may have had an illegitimate son, Peter Altmann (Rastede 1857-Brighton 1934), married and had issue.


Duke Peter of Oldenburg (German: Konstantin Friedrich Peter; Russian: Пётр Гео́ргиевич Ольденбу́ргский, romanized: Pëtr Geórgievič Ol'denbúrgskij)( 26 August [O.S. 14 August] 1812 – 14 May [O.S. 2 May] 1881) was a Duke of the House of Oldenburg. Duke Peter was born on 26 August 1812 in Yaroslavl, Russia. His father, Duke George, who was only the second son of the reigning Duke of Oldenburg, had no prospects of inherited his father's state or fortune of his own and was living in Russia since his marriage in 1809 to Grand Duchess Catherine Pavlovna of Russia. Duke George, who had been appointed governor on the Volga, died six month after Peter, his second, was born. Peter's mother Grand Duchess Catherine Pavlovna of Russia was the favorite sister of Tsar Alexander I of Russia who took his two nephews, Peter and his older brother Alexander, under his protection. The brothers lived in Russia until his mother married King Wilhelm I of Württemberg in 1816. They moved to Württemberg and were educated in Stuttgart. At the death of his mother, less than three years later, Peter and his brother were sent to their grandfather in Oldenburg. Being in direct line of succession to the throne of Oldenburg, as their uncle the hereditary Grand Duke Augustus was unmarried at the time, both boys were given the same extensive education by their grandfather Duke Peter as he had given his own sons and were regularly sent on instructive trips around Germany to broaden their education. On 23 April 1837 Duke Peter married Therese Wilhelmine Friederikke, Princess of Nassau-Weilburg in Biebrich. This was a happy marriage that lasted for more than thirty years. They had eight children, three of them died early.



Duke Peter Alexandrovich of Oldenburg (21 November 1868 – 11 March 1924) was the first husband of Grand Duchess Olga Alexandrovna of Russia, the youngest sister of Tsar Nicholas II. He was born in Saint Petersburg in the Oldenburg Palace (present-day site of Saint-Petersburg State University of Culture and Arts), the only child of Duke Alexander Petrovich of Oldenburg (1844–1932) and Princess Eugenia Maximilianovna of Leuchtenberg (1845–1925). His mother was a granddaughter of Tsar Nicholas I of Russia through Nicholas's daughter, Grand Duchess Maria Nikolayevna, and his father was a great-grandson of Tsar Paul I of Russia through his paternal grandmother Grand Duchess Catherine Pavlovna. He was known by the name of "Petya" In 1900, he began to escort the 18-year-old Grand Duchess Olga Alexandrovna (1882–1960), the youngest daughter of the late Tsar Alexander III and younger sister to the reigning Tsar Nicholas II, to the theatre and opera.His proposal of marriage the following year came as a surprise to Olga, who later explained, "I was so taken aback that all I could say was 'thank you'" She assumed that Oldenburg was pushed into proposing by his ambitious mother. Perhaps Olga accepted his proposal to gain independence from her mother, or avoid marriage into a foreign court. The marriage was announced in May 1901, and was unexpected by many, as Oldenburg had shown no prior interest in women. The Dowager Empress Maria Feodorovna wrote to her son, Tsar Nicholas II, "I am sure you won't believe what has happened. Olga is engaged to Petya and both are very happy. I had to consent, but it was all done so quickly and unexpectedly that I still cannot believe it."Tsar Nicholas replied to his mother, "...I cannot believe Olga is actually engaged to Petya. They were probably both drunk yesterday. ... We both laughed so much reading your note that we have not recovered yet." A prenuptial agreement drawn up by a committee of the Tsar, the Oldenburg family, and government ministers, promised Olga an annuity of 100,000 rubles from the Tsar, and one million rubles to be deposited in a fund from which she could draw interest.On 9 August 1901, they were married at Saint Petersburg. Their marriage remained unconsummated, and Oldenburg was believed by family and friends to be homosexual. Two years after their marriage, Olga met a cavalry officer her own age, Nikolai Kulikovsky, member of Russian-Moldavian Kulikovsky noble family, to whom she was attracted. She confronted Oldenburg and asked for a divorce, which he refused with the qualification that he might reconsider after seven years. However, Oldenburg appointed Kulikovsky as an aide-de-camp, and allowed him to live in the same residence as Oldenburg and the Grand Duchess on Sergievskaya street.In the middle of World War I, after living separately for two years, Oldenburg's marriage to Olga was annulled on 16 October 1916. Olga married Kulikovsky the following month. After the Russian Revolution, Oldenburg and his mother managed to escape Russia, and settled in France.He died aged 55 in 1924 in exile in Antibes, France
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« Reply #828 on: September 27, 2021, 03:09:24 PM »

Netherlands

Pieter van Vollenhoven Jr. (April 30, 1939) is the husband of Princess Margriet of the Netherlands and a member, by marriage, of the Dutch Royal House.Van Vollenhoven was born in Schiedam, he is the second son of Pieter van Vollenhoven Sr. (1897–1977) and his wife Jacoba Gijsbertha Stuylingh de Lange (1906–1983). The van Vollenhoven family and the Stuylingh de Lange family belong to the Dutch patriciate. Van Vollenhoven married Princess Margriet of the Netherlands at The Hague on January 10, 1967 This made him the first member of the Dutch Royal House being a commoner and not of royal or noble origin. He was not given any royal titles as a result of the marriage and is therefore formally addressed as "Mister Van Vollenhoven" or by his professional title as "Professor Van Vollenhoven". They have 4 sons.


Prince Pieter-Christiaan Michiel of Orange-Nassau, van Vollenhoven (22 March 1972), is the third son of Princess Margriet of the Netherlands and Prof. Pieter van Vollenhoven. Before the succession of his cousin Prince Willem-Alexander as King, he was a member of the Dutch Royal House and twelfth in line to the throne. With Willem-Alexander's succession however, he is no longer a member of the Dutch Royal House, and is no longer in line to direct succession to the Dutch throne, but still retains his membership as a member of the Dutch Royal Family He married Anita van Eijk in a civil ceremony on 25 August 2005 at the Het Loo Palace, Apeldoorn, which was followed by a religious ceremony on 27 August 2005 at the Grote of St. Jeroenskerk, currently known as Oude Jeroenskerk, in Noordwijk.Since he did not seek parliamentary approval for his marriage, due to the remote chance of his succession to the throne, Pieter-Christiaan lost his place in the succession to the Dutch throne when he married Anita.On 9 June 2006, Prince Pieter-Christiaan and Princess Anita announced that they were expecting their first child. Anita gave birth to a daughter, Emma Francisca Catharina van Vollenhoven, on 28 November 2006. The baby was born at 6:00 pm at the Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis in Amsterdam. Like her cousins, the baby was christened in the chapel of Het Loo palace in Apeldoorn, on her parents' wedding anniversary, 25 August 2007. Emma's godparents are her uncle, Prince Bernhard; her aunt, Caroline van der Toorn; Evert-Jan Wamsteker and Countess Alexandra de Witt.On 15 May 2008, the couple announced that they were expecting their second child by the end of November 2008. Anita gave birth to a son on 19 November 2008. His full name is Pieter Anton Maurits Erik van Vollenhoven. He was born at 1:32 am at the Haaglanden Medical Center in The Hague. As with his sister and their cousins, he was christened in the chapel of Het Loo palace in Apeldoorn on September 20, 2009.


Pieter van Vollenhoven (19 November 2008), son and 2nd child of Prince Pieter-Christiaan and Anita van Eijck.


Greece

Prince Peter of Greece and Denmark (Greek: Πέτρος)(3 December 1908 – 15 October 1980) was a Greek prince, soldier and anthropologist specialising in Tibetan culture and polyandry. Born in Paris and high in the line of succession to the Greek throne, Prince Peter was deemed to have forfeited his succession rights by marrying a twice-divorced Russian commoner, Irina Aleksandrovna Ovtchinnikova. A member of the House of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg, Prince Peter was the elder child and only son of Prince George of Greece and Denmark and the wealthy author and psychoanalyst Princess George (née Marie Bonaparte). His father was the second son of King George I of Greece and his mother the only daughter of the French botanist Prince Roland Bonaparte and Marie-Félix Blanc. In 1935, Prince Peter met and started a relationship with Irina Aleksandrovna Ovtchinnikova, a four years older married Russian woman with an ex-husband. The next year, she obtained her second divorce, and her influence over Peter steadily increased. His family strongly disapproved of his relationship with "the Russian", as they dubbed Ovtchinnikova. Peter himself did not want to gain a reputation as bad as that of King Edward VIII of the United Kingdom, who abdicated the same year to marry his own twice divorced foreign lover, the American Wallis Simpson. While in Madras, Peter decided to officialise his relationship with Ovtchinnikova. The pair were married in a Danish consulate in September 1939. Aware of his family's disapproval of the relationship, but also possibly wishing to take advantage of the turmoil created by the recently declared Second World War, the Prince did not bother to inform either the Greek royal court or his parents about the marriage. The royal family learned of the mesalliance through the press a few weeks later. Prince George, affronted by his son's decision not to ask him or the King for permission to marry, disowned Peter and henceforward refused contact with him. Despite her own disappointment, however, Princess George remained in touch with her son and continued to regularly send him money.



Montenegro


Prince Peter Petrovich-Njegosh of Montenegro, Grand Duke of Zahumlie (10 October 1889 – 7 May 1932) was a soldier in the Balkan and First World War and a member of the Royal Family of Montenegro. Prince Peter was born in Cetinje, the youngest son of Prince Nicholas I of Montenegro and his consort Milena of Montenegro. In the Autumn of 1918 while still in exile in France, Prince Peter met a married woman named Violette Brunet, (otherwise Violet Brunetta d'Usseaux) whose husband (Italian nobleman Sergio Brunetta d'Usseaux) was in the service of his father, King Nicholas I of Montenegro. Having fallen in love and wishing to marry her, Prince Peter wrote to his father instructing him to arrange the marriage. When his father objected, Prince Peter tried to blackmail his father, threatening to reveal damaging secrets about the surrender of Lovćen. In any case, Prince Peter's father died in 1921. With the end of the First World War, Prince Peter and the Montenegrin Royal Family were exiled and denied the chance to return to their kingdom when the Podgorica Assembly chose to unite Montenegro with the other Slavic lands as part of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia. It was reputedly at the bedside of a dying friend, that Prince Peter met the London-born[13] music hall performer Violet Emily Wegner, daughter of William Wegner, a police detective, and his wife, Arabella Eliza Darby. Violet had married Count Sergio Brunetta d'Usseaux in London in 1912. D'Ussueaux was the son of Comte Eugenio Brunetta d'Usseaux who had been the Secretary General of the Olympic Committee responsible for reviving the games and administering the 1908 London Olympic Games. Eugenio died in mysterious circumstances in 1919 and his body was never received at the place of its intended burial. Eugenio had been seeking news of a son missing in Russia after the October Revolution which may have been his son Sergio. There is no confirmed information about Sergio's death. Prince Peter's proposal of marriage to Violet was accepted which suggests Violet's previous marriage was ended, probably by the death of Sergio. Violet's mother, it is said, persuaded the couple to delay marriage as Prince Peter had a claim of compensation against the Yugoslav government, (estimated at around £6million for the confiscation of the Royal Family's property in Montenegro). Violet's mother feared that if Prince Peter married her daughter, a commoner, it could jeopardise his claim. It is asserted she advised him to collect the money before he wed her daughter. After a number of years of failed attempts to secure the money, Prince Peter attempted to strike a deal with the Yugoslav government whereby he would drop his claim to £6million for a lower £2million. After going to Belgrade and signing paperwork he was told by the government that having agreed to accept £2million, the sum would still not be remitted to him until a later date. Prince Peter nevertheless married Violet in Paris on 29 April 1924 before having received any pay out . After the marriage Prince Peter's wife became HRH Princess Violet Ljubica of Montenegro.In 1932, Prince Peter died in Merano aged 42. His wife Princess Violet Ljubica of Montenegro died in Monte Carlo on 17 October 1960. They had no children.
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« Reply #829 on: September 27, 2021, 04:12:58 PM »

Portugal / Brazil

Peter I (Portuguese: Pedro I)(8 April 1320 – 18 January 1367), called the Just (o Justo) or the Cruel (o Cruel), was King of Portugal from 1357 until his death. He was the third but only surviving son of Afonso IV of Portugal and his wife, Beatrice of Castile.In 1328, Peter's father, Afonso IV arranged for the marriage of his eldest daughter, Maria, to Alfonso XI of Castile. In 1334, she bore him a son, who ultimately became Peter of Castile. However, Maria returned home to her father in Portugal in 1335 because her royal husband soon after their marriage had begun a long affair with the beautiful and newly widowed Leonor de Guzman, which the Castilian king refused to end. Alfonso's cousin, Juan Manuel, Prince of Villena, had been rebuffed by the Castilian king in 1327 when the two-year child marriage between his daughter Constanza (granddaughter of James II of Aragon) and Alfonso had been annulled to clear the way for the marriage to Maria. For two years Juan Manuel had waged war against the Castilians, who had kept Constanza hostage, until Bishop John del Campo of Oviedo mediated a peace in 1329. Enraged by Alfonso's infidelity and mistreatment of his lawful wife, her father made a new alliance with the powerful Castilian aristocrat. Afonso married his son and heir, Peter, to Constanza, thereby allying himself with Juan Manuel. When Constanza arrived in Portugal in 1340, Inês de Castro, the beautiful and aristocratic daughter of a prominent Galician family (with links albeit through illegitimacy, to the Portuguese and Castilian royal families), accompanied her as her lady-in-waiting. Peter soon fell in love with Inês, and the two conducted a long love affair that lasted until Inês's murder in 1355. Constanza died in 1345, weeks after giving birth to Fernando, who eventually became the first of Peter's sons to succeed him as king of Portugal. The scandal of Peter's affair with Inês, and its political ramifications, caused Afonso to banish Inês from court after Constanza died.Peter refused to marry any of the princesses his father suggested as a second wife; and the king refused to allow his son to marry Inês as Peter wanted. The two aristocratic lovers began living together in secret.


Infante D. Pedro, Duke of Coimbra  (9 December 1392 – 20 May 1449) was a Portuguese infante (prince) of the House of Aviz, son of King John I of Portugal and his wife Philippa of Lancaster, daughter of John of Gaunt. In Portugal, he is better known as Infante D. Pedro das Sete Partidas [do Mundo], "of the Seven Parts [of the World]" because of his travels. Possibly the best-travelled prince of his time, he was regent between 1439 and 1448. In 1429 Peter married Isabella of Urgell, daughter of James II, Count of Urgell, and candidate to the throne of the Crown of Aragon at the Compromise of Caspe. The couple had 7 children.


Peter of Coimbra (also known as Peter the Constable) (Portuguese: Pedro)( c. 1429 – Granollers, 30 June 1466) was the son of Infante Peter, Duke of Coimbra, who became the fifth Constable of Portugal and third Grand Master of the Order of Saint Benedict of Aviz. The Consell de Cent later granted Peter the crown of Aragon, which he claimed from 1463 to 1466 in opposition to John II. Sometimes called Peter V, his status as king of Aragon, however, along with that of John II's other challengers, is disputed.His parents were Infante Peter, Duke of Coimbra, and Isabella of Urgell.



Dom Pedro II (Peter II)(26 April 1648 – 9 December 1706), nicknamed "the Pacific", was the King of Portugal from 1683 until his death, previously serving as regent for his brother Afonso VI from 1668 until his own accession. He was the fifth and last child of John IV and Luisa de Guzmán. He married two times:  Marie Françoise of Savoy-Nemours (1646–1683; married 2 April 1668); 1 daughter and  Maria Sophia of Neuburg (6 August 1666 – 4 August 1699; married in 1687), 7 children.


Pedro of Braganza (¿? – 1741), son of Mariana Silveira, a nun and Infante Francisco, Duke of Beja (25 May 1691 –21 July 1742)


Pedro, Prince of Brazil (19 October 1712 – 29 October 1714) was the second child of John V of Portugal and Maria Ana of Austria. He was made Prince of Brazil and Duke of Braganza upon his birth. He died at the age of two, making his brother Joseph (future Joseph I of Portugal) the new Prince of Brazil.


Peter III (Portuguese: Pedro III)(5 July 1717 – 25 May 1786), nicknamed the Builder, became King of Portugal jure uxoris by the accession of his wife and niece Queen Maria I in 1777, and co-reigned alongside her until his death. His parents were King João V and his wife Maria Ana of Austria. Pedro was a younger brother of José I of Portugal. Pedro married his niece Maria, Princess of Brazil, in 1760, at which time she was the heiress presumptive to the throne then held by his brother José I. According to custom, Pedro thus became king of Portugal in right of his wife. They had six children, of whom the eldest surviving son succeeded Maria as João VI on her death in 1816. The couple married on 6 June 1760. At the time of their marriage, Maria was 25 and Pedro was 42. Despite the age gap, the couple had a happy marriage. Peter automatically became co-monarch (as Pedro III of Portugal) when Maria ascended the throne, as a child had already been born from their marriage. The couple had six children and a stillborn baby.


Dom Pedro I (English: Peter I)(12 October 1798 – 24 September 1834), nicknamed "the Liberator", was the founder and first ruler of the Empire of Brazil. As King Dom Pedro IV, he reigned briefly over Portugal, where he also became known as "the Liberator" as well as "the Soldier King". Born in Lisbon, Pedro I was the fourth child of King Dom João VI of Portugal and Queen Carlota Joaquina, and thus a member of the House of Braganza. When the country was invaded by French troops in 1807, he and his family fled to Portugal's largest and wealthiest colony, Brazil. On 13 May 1817, Pedro was married by proxy to Maria Leopoldina of Austria.  Seven children resulted from this marriage. After long negotiations, Portugal signed a treaty with Brazil on 29 August 1825 in which it recognized Brazilian independence. Except for the recognition of independence, the treaty provisions were at Brazil's expense, including a demand for reparations to be paid to Portugal, with no other requirements of Portugal. Compensation was to be paid to all Portuguese citizens residing in Brazil for the losses they had experienced, such as properties which had been confiscated. João VI was also given the right to style himself emperor of Brazil.A few months later, the Emperor received word that his father had died on 10 March 1826, and that he had succeeded his father on the Portuguese throne as King Dom Pedro IV. Aware that a reunion of Brazil and Portugal would be unacceptable to the people of both nations, he hastily abdicated the crown of Portugal on 2 May in favor of his eldest daughter, who became Queen Dona Maria II. His abdication was conditional: Portugal was required to accept the Constitution which he had drafted and Maria II was to marry his brother Miguel. Regardless of the abdication, Pedro I continued to act as an absentee king of Portugal and interceded in its diplomatic matters, as well as in internal affairs, such as making appointments.He found it difficult, at the very least, to keep his position as Brazilian emperor separate from his obligations to protect his daughter's interests in Portugal. Miguel feigned compliance with Pedro I's plans. As soon as he was declared regent in early 1828, and backed by Carlota Joaquina, he abrogated the Constitution and, supported by those Portuguese in favor of absolutism, was acclaimed King Dom Miguel I. As painful as was his beloved brother's betrayal, Pedro I also endured the defection of his surviving sisters, Maria Teresa, Maria Francisca, Isabel Maria and Maria da Assunção, to Miguel I's faction. Only his youngest sister, Ana de Jesus, remained faithful to him, and she later traveled to Rio de Janeiro to be close to him. The imperial entourage included Domitila de Castro (then-Viscountess and later Marchioness of Santos), who had been Pedro I's mistress since their first meeting in 1822. Although he had never been faithful to Maria Leopoldina, he had previously been careful to conceal his sexual escapades with other women. However, his infatuation for his new lover "had become both blatant and limitless", while his wife endured slights and became the object of gossip. Pedro I was increasingly rude and mean toward Maria Leopoldina, left her short of funds, prohibited her from leaving the palace and forced her to endure Domitila's presence as her lady-in-waiting. In the meantime, his lover took advantage by advancing her interests, as well as those of her family and friends. Those seeking favors or to promote projects increasingly sought her help, bypassing the normal, legal channels. They had 1 daughter at least. After his wife's death, Pedro I realized how miserably he had treated her, and his relationship with Domitila began to crumble. Maria Leopoldina, unlike his mistress, was popular, honest and loved him without expecting anything in return. The Emperor greatly missed her, and even his obsession with Domitila failed to overcome his sense of loss and regret. At the insistence of Pedro I, Domitila departed from Rio de Janeiro on 27 June 1828. He had resolved to marry again and to become a better person. He even tried to persuade his father-in-law of his sincerity, by claiming in a letter "that all my wickedness is over, that I shall not again fall into those errors into which I have fallen, which I regret and have asked God for forgiveness".Franz I was less than convinced. The Austrian emperor, deeply offended by the conduct his daughter endured, withdrew his support for Brazilian concerns and frustrated Pedro I's Portuguese interests. Because of Pedro I's bad reputation in Europe, owing to his past behavior, princesses from several nations declined his proposals of marriage one after another. However, once he learned that a betrothal had finally been arranged, the Emperor ended his relationship to Domitila. On 2 August 1829, the Emperor had been married by proxy to Amélie of Leuchtenberg. The couple had 1 daughter.


Peter V (Portuguese: Pedro V )(16 September 1837 – 11 November 1861), nicknamed "the Hopeful" (Portuguese: o Esperançoso), was King of Portugal from 1853 to 1861. As the eldest son of Queen Maria II and King Ferdinand II, Peter was a member of the House of Braganza. Peter married Princess Stephanie of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen, eldest daughter of Karl Anton, Prince of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen, and Princess Josephine of Baden, by proxy in Berlin on 29 April 1858 and then in person in Lisbon on 18 May 1858. It was a happy marriage until Queen Stephanie died a year later from diphtheria. As Peter and Stephanie's marriage was childless, the Portuguese throne passed to his brother Luís.


Dom Pedro II (2 December 1825 – 5 December 1891), nicknamed "the Magnanimous", was the second and last monarch of the Empire of Brazil, reigning for over 58 years. He was born in Rio de Janeiro, the seventh child of Emperor Dom Pedro I of Brazil and Empress Dona Maria Leopoldina and thus a member of the Brazilian branch of the House of Braganza. Pedro II inherited an empire on the verge of disintegration, but he turned Brazil into an emerging power in the international arena. He married Princess Teresa Cristina of the Two Sicilies (14 March 1822 – 28 December 1889). The couple had 4 children, 2 sons and 2 daughters. Only their daughters survived. Pedro II of Brazil was the second and last emperor of Brazil. Despite his popularity among Brazilians, Pedro II was removed from his throne in 1889 after a 58-year reign. He was promptly exiled with his family. Despite his deposition, he did not make an attempt to regain power. He died in late 1891 while in Paris, France, after two years in exile.


Dom Pedro Afonso (19 July 1848 – 10 January 1850) was the Prince Imperial and heir apparent to the throne of the Empire of Brazil. Born at the Palace of São Cristóvão in Rio de Janeiro, he was the second son and youngest child of Emperor Dom Pedro II and Dona Teresa Cristina of the Two Sicilies, and thus a member of the Brazilian branch of the House of Braganza. Pedro Afonso was seen as vital to the future viability of the monarchy, which had been put in jeopardy by the death of his older brother Dom Afonso almost three years earlier. In 1847 and the two following years, Pedro II and his family spent the summer at Petrópolis. The traditional summer residence of the imperial family was at Santa Cruz Estate, a rural property that had belonged to the Braganzas for generations. The shift to Petrópolis seemed an unwelcome novelty among members of the court, "who disliked any change that threatened the established ways and interests". Bowing to tradition, the Emperor decided to again summer at Santa Cruz in 1850. During the imperial family's stay at the rural estate, Pedro Afonso and his sister Isabel were struck by fever. The princess eventually recovered, but the Prince Imperial died of convulsions at 04:20 on 10 January. Contemporaries argued that either encephalitis or a congenital disorder may have caused his death.


Dom Pedro de Alcântara of Orléans-Braganza, Prince of Grão Pará (15 October 1875 – 29 January 1940) was the first-born son of Dona Isabel, Princess Imperial of Brazil and Prince Gaston of Orléans, Count of Eu, and as such, was born second-in-line to the imperial throne of Brazil, during the reign of his grandfather, Emperor Dom Pedro II, until the empire's abolition. He went into exile in Europe with his mother when his grandfather was deposed in 1889, and grew up largely in France In 1908 Dom Pedro wanted to marry Countess Elisabeth Dobržensky de Dobrženicz (1875–1951) who, although a noblewoman of the Kingdom of Bohemia, did not belong to a royal or reigning dynasty. Although the constitution of the Brazilian Empire did not require a dynast to marry equally. his mother ruled that the marriage would not be valid dynastically for the Brazilian succession, and as a result he renounced his rights to the defunct throne of Brazil on 30 October 1908. Pedro and Elisabeth married on 14 November 1908 in Versailles, France, and had 5 children


Prince Pedro Gastão of Orléans-Braganza (born Pierre-d'Alcantara Gaston Jean Marie Philippe Laurent Hubert d'Orléans et Bragance ; in Portuguese, Pedro de Alcântara Gastão João Maria Filipe Lourenço Humberto Miguel Gabriel Rafael Gonzaga de Orléans e Bragança e Dobrzensky de Dobrzenicz) (19 February 1913 – 27 December 2007) was one of two claimants to the Brazilian throne and head of the Petrópolis branch of the Brazilian Imperial House. He was the son of Pedro de Alcântara, Prince of Grão-Pará and his wife Countess Elisabeth Dobrzensky of Dobrzenicz. He married Princess Maria de la Esperanza of Bourbon-Two Sicilies (1914–2005), a daughter of Prince Carlos of the Two Sicilies and Princess Louise of Orléans, on 18 December 1944 in Seville, Spain, and had six children
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« Reply #830 on: September 27, 2021, 04:13:07 PM »

Prince Pedro Carlos of Orléans-Braganza (31 October 1945) is a forest engineer and one of two claimants to the defunct Brazilian throne, and head of the Petrópolis branch of the Imperial House of Brazil. The Petrópolis branch claims the throne in opposition to the Vassouras branch of the Orléans-Braganzas, headed by Prince Luiz of Orléans-Braganza. Though both Pedro Carlos and Luiz are great-great-grandchildren of Emperor Pedro II of Brazil, of the House of Braganza, they dispute leadership over the Brazilian Imperial Family due to a dynastic dispute concerning their fathers, who were cousins. Pedro Carlos was born in Petrópolis, the eldest son of six children of Prince Pedro Gastão of Orléans-Braganza and his wife, Princess Maria de la Esperanza of Bourbon-Two Sicilies. Pedro Carlos has been married and widowed twice. Each marriage has resulted in one son. He married Rony Kuhn de Souza (20 March 1938 – 14 January 1979) on 2 September 1975. Pedro Carlos's first wife died two days after the birth of their son.On 16 July 1981, at Fazenda São Geraldo, Pedro Carlos married Patricia Alexandra Branscombe (22 November 1964 – 21 November 2009).


Prince Pedro Thiago of Orléans-Braganza (12 January 1979 ) son of Rony Kuhn de Souza and prince Pedro Carlos of Orléans-Braganza. On 26 May 1992, Pedro Thiago was kidnapped while on his way to school and held for a ransom reported at $5 million.[11] He was freed on 2 June after police raided a house in a Rio de Janeiro suburb. In January 2002, he was indicted on charges relating to the theft and then sale of a set of porcelain dishes from the Palace of the Grão-Pará belonging to his aunt Princess Cristina.


Prince Pedro Henrique of Orléans-Braganza (Portuguese: Pedro Henrique Afonso Felipe Maria Miguel Gabriel Rafael Gonzaga de Orléans e Bragança)(13 September 1909 – 5 July 1981), was a great-grandson of the last emperor of Brazil, Pedro II, and one of two claimants to the abolished throne. He was born in 1909 in France at Boulogne-sur-Seine during the exile of the Brazilian imperial family, which had been deposed in 1889. His father, Prince Luiz of Orléans-Braganza, was the second son of the heir to the defunct Brazilian throne, the Princess Imperial Isabel, and Prince Gaston, Count of Eu.  His mother was Princess Maria Pia of Bourbon-Two Sicilies. The year before Pedro Henrique's birth, she recognized his father, Luiz, as the heir to the succession when Luiz's elder brother, Pedro de Alcântara, Prince of Grão-Pará, renounced his claim to the throne on behalf of himself and his descendants. Pedro Henrique was only able to return to Brazil in 1945, when the Second World War ended. He settled first in Petrópolis, Rio de Janeiro, in the palace of the Grão-Pará, and then in the neighborhood of Retiro, also in Petrópolis. His cousin, Prince Pedro Gastão of Orléans-Braganza, the eldest son of Pedro de Alcântara, Prince of Grão-Pará, challenged Pedro Henrique's claim to the succession in 1946, on the basis that his father's renunciation had no legal force.Pedro Henrique married Princess Maria Elisabeth of Bavaria at Nymphenburg Palace, Bavaria, on 19 August 1937. They had 12 children.


Pedro de Alcántara Henrique Maria Miguel Gabriel Rafael Gonzaga of Orléans-Braganza (1 December 1945), son of Pedro Henrique and Maria Elisabeth. He renounced Imperial succession rights for himself and his descendants on 28 December 1972 and married on 4 July 1974 in Rio de Janeiro, Maria de Fátima Baptista de Oliveira Rocha (born 14 July 1952 in Rio de Janeiro), with whom he had children


Prince Pedro Luiz of Orléans-Bragança (12 January 1983 – 1 June 2009) was the son of Prince António of Orléans-Bragança, and was third in the line of succession to the former Brazilian throne, abolished in 1889. His childless uncle, Prince Luiz of Orléans-Bragança is pretender to the former imperial crown of Brazil and one of two claimants to be head of the former dynasty. Prince Luiz' heir is another childless uncle, Prince Bertrand (born 1941), and his own father, Prince António, is second in line. Some monarchists expected Prince Pedro Luiz to eventually become the pretender on the deaths of his father and uncles. Pedro Luiz' younger brother, Prince Rafael, took his place in the line of succession upon legal declaration of Pedro Luiz' death in the crash of Air France Flight 447.


Prince Peter August of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (Portuguese: Pedro Augusto Luís Maria Miguel Gabriel Rafael Gonzaga)(19 March 1866 – 6 July 1934), known in Brazil as Dom Pedro Augusto, was a prince of the Empire of Brazil and of the House of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha-Koháry. The favorite grandson of Emperor Pedro II, he was known as "the Preferred" (Portuguese: O Preferido). The eldest son of Prince Ludwig August of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, and of Dona Princess Leopoldina of Brazil, Princess of Brazil, Dom Pedro Augusto was also the first grandson of Emperor Dom Pedro II of Brazil and Empress Teresa Cristina.Due to the lack of heirs by the Princess Imperial and the miscarriage suffered by Dona Leopoldina in her first pregnancy, there were high expectations surrounding the birth of Dom Pedro Augusto. The apparent infertility of Princess Dona Isabel meant that Pedro Augusto was considered the heir apparent since the day of his birth. However, at nine years of age, the prince found himself sliding down in the line of succession, due to the birth of his cousin Dom Pedro de Alcântara, who held the title of Prince of Grão-Pará. Dom Pedro Augusto learned of the military coup that resulted in the Proclamation of the Republic hours after the incident, when returning from a horseback ride. Forced by the provisional government to go into exile, on November 17, at dawn, all members of the Imperial family - with the exception of Dom Augusto, who was in circumnavigation with the Imperial Navy in the East - boarded the steamer Alagoas and were escorted by the battleship Riachuelo up to the limits of the Brazilian territorial waters. It was aboard the Alagoas that Prince had his first psychotic break-down: he tried to strangle the captain, accusing him of having taken a bribe in order to kill everyone on board.Restrained and locked in his cabin, he was stricken with persecutory delusions, and ended up wrapping his body in a lifeguard buoy, fearing that the ship was being bombed. With alternating phases of excitement and lethargy, Pedro Augusto threw bottles overboard with requests for help. There are records of at least one of these messages, found in a bottle on Maragogi beach.Having arrived in his European exile, Pedro Augusto was taken for psychiatric treatment in Graz (Austria). A few weeks later he was discharged and met with his grandparents when they received the news of the death of Dona Teresa Cristina, the only family ally in his pretensions to the throne. With the move of the family to Cannes, he contacted old supporters and tried to plan the monarchical restoration in Brazil. However, his psychological situation deteriorated further, and the few monarchists still active soon withdrew their support from the prince. Having been abandoned by the "pedristas", Pedro Augusto's psychiatric symptoms progressively worsened. His nights were sleepless, he did not eat, and he began babbling incomprehensible words or ranting against imaginary enemies. Often the servants of the Coburg Palace found him huddled in a corner with a glazed look and foaming at the mouth. The few remaining friends tried in vain to help him. At the request of the physician Jean Charcot, the young man was examined by the famous Sigmund Freud. Although his health showed signs of recovery, monarchists ended up investing their hopes and support in his brother as pretender to the throne. With the death of Dom Pedro II, on December 5, 1891, melancholy and mania returned. Pedro Augusto accused his aunt and uncle, Princess Isabel and the Count d'Eu, of spreading rumours about his sanity; and he accused journalists of casting doubts on his masculinity. In October 1893, articles published in French and Argentine newspapers recognized the status of his cousin Dom Pedro de Alcântara as the rightful claimant to the imperial throne. This led Pedro Augusto to the brink of collapse, and his old delusions returned. After being restrained and sent to the Coburg Palace again, he attempted suicide by throwing himself through one of the windows of his room.  Admitted by his father to a sanatorium in Tulln an der Donau, "The Preferred" spent the rest of his life believing that he would one day become Emperor of Brazil. On April 25, 1900, all of his personal belongings were auctioned off in Vienna. The prince died on July 7, 1934, at the age of 68 and after over four decades of hospitalization. His body was buried in the crypt of the Sankt-Augustin-Kirche in Coburg.


Spain


Don Pedro Carlos (Pedro Carlos Antonio Rafael José Javier Francisco Juan Nepomuceno Tomás de Villanueva Marcos Marcelino Vicente Ferrer Raimundo)(18 June 1786 – 4 July 1812) was an Infante of Spain and Portugal. Infante Pedro Carlos was a son of Infante Gabriel of Spain and Infanta Mariana Victoria of Portugal. His paternal grandfather was King Charles III of Spain and his maternal grandfather was King Peter III of Portugal. Pedro Carlos was the only surviving child of the couple and an orphan at the age of two. In Brazil Pedro Carlos was engaged to his cousin Maria Teresa, Princess of Beira, daughter of Carlota Joaquina of Spain and John VI of Portugal, and they married on 13 May 1810 in Rio de Janeiro. The couple was very happy during their two years of marriage, after which Pedro Carlos became ill and died in Alto da Boa Vista on 4 July 1812. The couple had one child.



Bourbon-Two Sicilies

Prince Pedro of Bourbon-Two Sicilies, Duke of Calabria (Spanish: Pedro Juan María Alejo Saturnino y de Todos los Santos)(16 October 1968), is the only son of Infante Carlos, Duke of Calabria (1938–2015) and his wife, Princess Anne of Orléans. He is a claimant to the headship of the House of Bourbon-Two Sicilies, which ruled the Kingdom of Two Sicilies before the unification of Italy. Pedro married Sofía Landaluce y Melgarejo (born 23 November 1973 in Madrid), daughter of José Manuel Landaluce y Domínguez and his wife María de las Nieves Blanca Melgarejo y González (granddaughter of the Dukes of San Fernando de Quiroga), on 30 March 2001 at Real Club de la Puerta de Hierro in Madrid.Pedro and Sofía have seven children. Their eldest son was born out of wedlock as at the time Pedro's parents were against his marriage to Sofia.


Prince Pedro of Bourbon-Two Sicilies (born 3 January 2007) son of Prince Pedro and Sofia.


Pedro López-Quesada y Fernández-Urrutia (26 July 1964) husband of Princess Cristina of Bourbon-Two Sicilies (15 March 1966) (elder sister of Prince Pedro).


Pedro López-Quesada y de Bórbon-Dos Sicilias (born 1 December 2003 ) son of Princess Christina and Pedro López-Quesada y Fernández-Urrutia
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« Reply #831 on: September 27, 2021, 04:21:38 PM »

Yugoslavia

Peter I (Serbian Cyrillic: Петар I Карађорђевић, romanized: Petar I Кarađorđević)(11 July [O.S. 29 June] 1844 – 16 August 1921) reigned as the last king of Serbia (1903–1918) and as the first king of the Serbs, Croats and Slovenes (1918–1921). Since he was the king of Serbia during a period of great Serbian military success, he was remembered by the Serbian people as King Peter the Liberator, and also as Old King. Peter was Karađorđe's grandson and third son of Persida Nenadović and Prince Alexander Karađorđević, who was forced to abdicate. Peter lived with his family in exile. Peter was born in Belgrade on 11 July [O.S. 29 June] 1844, the fifth of Prince Alexander Karađorđević and his consort Persida Nenadović's ten children. On 11 August 1883 he married Princess Zorka of Montenegro  (Serbian Cyrillic: Кнегиња црногорска Зорка)( 23 December [O.S. 11 December] 1864 – 16 March [O.S. 4 March] 1890). They had five children.


Peter II (Serbian Cyrillic: Петар II Карађорђевић, romanized: Petar II Karađorđević)(6 September 1923 – 3 November 1970) was the last king of Yugoslavia, reigning from October 1934 until his deposition in November 1945. He was the last reigning member of the Karađorđević dynasty. The eldest child of King Alexander I and Maria of Romania. The Chicago Tribune reported on 1 August 1943 about the royal romance in London between King Peter and Princess Alexandra of Greece and Denmark that: "The princess, a pretty, dark-haired girl, used to serve waffles and coffee to American officers and nurses over a snack bar at the London Red Cross club. There she met King Peter, a slender young man in naval uniform who often dropped in to listen to the music of a United States infantry band". In April 1942, Peter proposed marriage to Princess Alexandra after a few weeks of courtship and she accepted.While the Western media portrayed a "fairy tale romance" across the backdrop of wartime London between the young Yugoslav king and a Greek princess, the announcement of Peter's engagement to Alexandra in July 1943 caused immense controversy in his homeland According to Serbian tradition, a leader must not marry during a national emergency, and the news that Peter had become engaged while his homeland was torn by war caused a backlash against him. However much Peter was in love with Alexandra, his engagement and "fairy tale" wedding in the relative comfort of London while his subjects were suffering so much was seen as a callous break with Serbian traditions. Peter married Alexandra in London on 20 March 1944. Attending the wedding which was held at the Yugoslav legation in London was King George VI who served as Peter's best man together with King Haakon VII of Norway, King George II of Greece, and Queen Wilhelmina of the Netherlands all attending. The couple had 1 son, Crown Prince Alexander, who was born on 17 July 1945. Peter was deposed by Yugoslavia's Communist Constituent Assembly on 29 November 1945 with Yugoslavia proclaimed a republic.Right up until his death, Peter continued to nurture hopes that one day he would be restored to the Yugoslav throne, in the words of the American journalist Peter Hockenos being a "forlorn figure" while "rival emigre groups drew the hapless king into their incessant schemings and quarrels. The royalist community resembled a bad caricature of a powerless, squabbling diaspora". A romantic, impractical man, Peter held to a completely unrealistic hope that there were still bands of Chetniks active in the rural areas of central Serbia who would rise up at the right moment when Peter led an army of emigres in an invasion of Yugoslavia, and together they would overthrow Marshal Tito.


Peter, Hereditary Prince of Yugoslavia (February 5, 1980), also known as Peter III Karađorđević (Serbian Cyrillic: Петар III Карађорђевић / Petar III Karađorđević), is the eldest son of Alexander, Crown Prince of Yugoslavia, and his 1st wife Princess Maria da Gloria of Orléans-Braganza. Prince Peter is the grandson of King Peter II. Peter, Hereditary Prince of Yugoslavia' is second in line after his father HRH Crown Prince Alexander to the defunct throne.






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« Reply #832 on: September 27, 2021, 04:36:03 PM »

Bourbon

Peter I of Bourbon (Pierre Ier, Duc de Bourbon)(1311 – 19 September 1356) was the second Duke of Bourbon, from 1342 to his death. Peter was son of Louis I of Bourbon, whom he also succeeded as Grand Chamberlain of France, and Mary of Avesnes. Peter is reported to have been somewhat mentally unstable, a trait of nervous breakdowns (presumably hereditary) that showed clearly for example in his daughter Joan of Bourbon, the queen, and in her son, king Charles VI of France, as well as in Peter's only surviving son, Duke Louis II.


Peter II, Duke of Bourbon (1 December 1438 – 10 October 1503), was the son of Charles I, Duke of Bourbon, and Agnes of Burgundy, and a member of the House of Bourbon. He and his wife Anne of France ruled as regents during the minority of Charles VIII of France.A loyal and capable subject of the crown, Peter earned the grudging respect of Louis XI through his demonstration of the Bourbon family's "meekness and humility". Initially he was betrothed to Marie d'Orleans, sister of Louis, Duke of Orleans (the future Louis XII); Louis XI, who wanted to prevent such an alliance between two of the greatest feudal houses in France, broke the engagement, and took measures to bind both families closer to the crown. A marriage between Peter and the King's elder daughter, Anne, was arranged (as was another marriage between Louis of Orleans and Anne's younger sister, Joan); as a mark of his favour, the King forced Peter's older brother John II, Duke of Bourbon to grant the Bourbon fief of Beaujeu (Beaujolais) to Peter, who was also given a seat on the royal council. Peter and Anne were married on 3 November 1473.


Monaco

Prince Pierre of Monaco, Duke of Valentinois (born Count Pierre Marie Xavier Raphaël Antoine Melchior de Polignac)(24 October 1895 – 10 November 1964) was the father of Rainier III of Monaco. He was a promoter of art, music, and literature in Monaco and served as the head of the country's delegation to the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) and to the International Olympic Committee. He was the fourth son and youngest child of Count Maxence Melchior Edouard Marie Louis de Polignac (1857–1936) and his Mexican-born wife, Susana Mariana Estefanía Francisca de Paula del Corazón de Jesús de la Torre y Mier (1858–1913). He married civilly on 19 March and religiously on 20 March 1920, in Monaco, Princess Charlotte of Monaco, the illegitimate but adopted daughter of Louis II of Monaco by Marie Juliette Louvet.  Pierre de Polignac, member of a cadet branch of one of France's most renowned ducal families,[4] noble since at least the 12th century, duke in 1780, peer in 1817, and a descendant of Marie Antoinette's favourite, Yolande de Polastron, duchesse de Polignac, changed his name and coat of arms to those borne by the House of Grimaldi by Monegasque ordinance issued on 18 March 1920, the day before his wedding. He had become a subject of the Sovereign Prince of Monaco, also by Monegasque Sovereign Ordinance, on 29 February 1920. From the date of the religious wedding the court of Monaco referred to him, jure uxoris, as Duke of Valentinois. That title had been conferred upon his wife as heiress presumptive on 20 May 1919. His surname and arms were altered by ordinance shortly after he became a Monegasque citizen, to ensure that his dynastic issue would bear the surname of Grimaldi in compliance with Article I of Monaco's house law. Pierre remained in succession to the French title Duke of Polignac, as do his legitimate male-line descendants.According to James Lees-Milne, a British writer and friend of Pierre's, his unhappy arranged marriage was complicated by his homosexuality and Princess Charlotte's affairs. In the mid-1920s, the couple unofficially separated, with Pierre living in his Paris apartment and on an estate near the city, when not in Monaco. Prince Pierre and Princess Charlotte were judicially separated on 20 March 1930 at Paris, and in a case titled "Princesse héréditaire Grimaldi de Monaco c. Prince Pierre Grimaldi de Polignac" were divorced by ordinance of Prince Louis II on 18 February 1933. The divorce was confirmed by a Paris tribunal in December of that year. One magazine story reported that "The union ended ... under circumstances which prompted the temperamental father-in-law to vow he would call out the Monégasque army if the prince ever set foot in the principality again." The banishment from Monaco was lifted in April 1933, and Prince Pierre thereafter received an annuity of 500,000 francs a year. He and his wife had two children


Pierre Rainier Stefano Casiraghi ( 5 September 1987) is the younger son and youngest of three children of Caroline, Princess of Hanover, and her second husband, Stefano Casiraghi. He is the maternal-line grandson of Rainier III, Prince of Monaco, and American actress Grace Kelly. Casiraghi is eighth in the line of succession to the Monegasque throne, following his twin cousins Hereditary Prince Jacques and Princess Gabriella, his mother, his brother Andrea, nephews Alexandre and Maximilian Casiraghi and niece India Casiraghi. Casiraghi has been in a relationship with the journalist Beatrice Borromeo since May 2008. They were married in a civil ceremony on 25 July 2015 in the gardens of the Prince's Palace of Monaco. The religious ceremony took place on Isola Bella on 1 August 2015. Pierre and Beatrice's first child, Stefano Ercole Carlo, was born on 28 February 2017. Their second child, Francesco Carlo Albert, was born on 21 May 2018.



France

Pierre Philippe Jean Marie d'Orléans (4 November 1845 – 17 July 1919) was Duke of Penthièvre and a grandson of French king Louis Philippe I and of Brazilian Emperor Pedro I. Declining a proposal to marry into the Brazilian royal family, he chose a naval career and fathered two children without marrying. Prince Pierre d'Orléans was the son of François d'Orléans, Prince of Joinville and his wife, Princess Francisca of Brazil. On his father's side, he was the grandson of the French king Louis Philippe I. On his mother's side he was the grandson of Pedro I & IV, Emperor of Brazil and King of Portugal and the Algarves, for whom he was named. Although he never married, Prince Pierre d'Orléans had two children with Angélique Marie Augustine Lebesgue (d. 1881), a married woman.


Pierre Fernand Eugène Lebesgue (12 July 1881 – 23 September 1962), son of Pierre d'Orleans and Angelique, who in 1941 would marry Yvonne Patrigean


Prince Pierre d'Orléans (born 6 August 2003), son of Prince Eudes, Duke of Angoulême, (born 18 March 1968) and Marie-Liesse de Rohan-Chabot (born on 29 June 1969)


Prince Pierre-Napoléon Bonaparte (11 October 1815 – 7 April 1881) was a French nobleman, revolutionary and politician, the son of Lucien Bonaparte and his second wife Alexandrine de Bleschamp. He was a nephew of Napoleon I, Joseph Bonaparte, Elisa Bonaparte, Louis Bonaparte, Pauline Bonaparte, Caroline Bonaparte and Jérôme Bonaparte. On 22 March 1853, Pierre married the daughter of a Paris plumber working as a doorman, Éléonore-Justine Ruflin. Altogether the couple had at least two children.
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« Reply #833 on: September 27, 2021, 04:57:01 PM »

Other

Peter (Spanish: Pedro)(30 August 1334 – 23 March 1369), called the Cruel (el Cruel) or the Just (el Justo), was the king of Castile and León from 1350 to 1369. Peter was the last ruler of the main branch of the House of Ivrea.His parents were Alfonso XI of Castile and Maria of Portugal. He was to be married to his contemporary Joan, the second daughter and favourite of King Edward III of England; however on their way to Castile she and her retinue travelled through cities infested with the Black Death, ignoring townspeople who had warned them not to enter their settlements. Since the plague had not yet entered England, it is likely that they underestimated the danger. Joan soon contracted the disease and died in 1348, aged 14. About two years later Peter began his reign when almost sixteen years old and subject to the control of his mother and her favourites. Though at first controlled by his mother, Peter emancipated himself with the encouragement of the minister Alburquerque. Becoming attached to María de Padilla, he married her in secret in 1353. María turned him against Alburquerque, who fled to Portugal. In the summer of 1353, the young king was practically coerced by his mother and the nobles into marrying Blanche of Bourbon; he deserted her at once. This marriage necessitated Peter's denying that he had married María, but his relationship with her continued and she bore him four children. He also apparently went through the form of marriage with Juana de Castro, widow of Don Diego de Haro, convincing her that his previous marriage to Queen Blanche was a nullity. Peter and Juana were married in Cuellar, and Juana was proclaimed Queen of Castile. After two nights, he then deserted her. She bore him a son who died young, after Peter's death. A period of turmoil followed in which the king was for a time overpowered and, in effect, imprisoned. The dissension within the party striving to coerce him enabled him to escape from Toro, where he was under observation, to Segovia. In 1361, Queen Blanche died at Medina Sidonia. French historians claim that Peter ordered two Jews to murder her; another version of the story says she was poisoned; a third one that she was shot with a crossbow, although it may have been the plague. Also that year, Maria de Padilla died in Seville.


Pedro (died 1461) bishop of Osma and Palencia. Son of John (1355–1405) and doña Elvira de Eril. John was a son of Peter of Castile and  Juana de Castro.


Pyotr Bagration (10 July 1765 – 24 September 1812) was a Russian general and prince of Georgian origin, prominent during the Napoleonic Wars.Pyotr was born in 1765 to a prince of the Mukhrani branch of the Bagrationi dynasty,  Colonel Prince Ivane Bagrationi, who was the eldest son of Prince Alexander, an illegitimate son of King Jesse of Kartli, which is now central Georgia.He was the alleged lover of Emperor Paul's daughter Catherine. In 1800 Paul recognized the title of "Prince (Knyaz) Bagration" for Pyotr in Russia, and unexpectedly married him off to Countess Catherine Pavlovna Skavronskaya, the favourite niece of Grigory Potemkin and one of the Empress Maria's ladies-in-waiting. Bagration and Catherine had been casually involved, but the marriage was a failure. The young and lovely Catherine soon preferred travelling and, in 1805, fled to Vienna, where her salon and running affair with Prince Clemens von Metternich—who called her "the Naked Angel"—permitted her to serve as an important agent of Russian intelligence and diplomacy. Bagration was obliged by the emperor to claim their daughter, Marie-Clementine, as his own and to subsidize thousands of rubles of Catherine's debts. He had a reputation as a heavy gambler, as well, and was forced to sell estates to cover losses that rose as high as 80,000 roubles.


Prince Pyotr Romanovich Bagration (Russian: Пётр Рома́нович Багратио́н, Georgian: პეტრე რომანის (რევაზის) ძე ბაგრატიონი)(24 September 1818 – 17 January 1876), the son of general Prince  Roman Bagration, was a Russian-Georgian statesman, general and scientist who invented the first dry galvanic cell. A descendant of the Georgian royal Bagrationi dynasty, with Georgia already annexed by the Russian Empire at the death of King George XII Bagration of Georgia in 1801, successor of King Erekle II Bagration, (Georgian: ერეკლე II) (7 November 1720 or 7 October 1721 – 11 January 1798) reigning as the king of Kakheti from 1744 to 1762, and of Kartli and Kakheti from 1762 until 1798. Both his father, Roman (Revaz) Bagrationi (1778 — Tiflis, 1834), and uncle, Pyotr Bagration (Kizlar, Dagestan, 1765 — Battle of Borodino, 1812), were famous Russian Army generals.Prince Bagration was married to Anna Alekseyevna Martynova (1824–1885) and had twin daughters.


Pyotr Alexeyevich Kropotkin (Russian: Пётр Алексе́евич Кропо́ткин )(9 December 1842– 8 February 1921) was a Russian anarchist, socialist, revolutionary, economist, sociologist, historian, zoologist, political scientist, human geographer and philosopher who advocated anarcho-communism. He was also an activist, essayist, researcher and writer. Born into an aristocratic land-owning family. Pyotr Kropotkin was born in Moscow, into an ancient Russian princely family. His father, Major General Prince Alexei Petrovich Kropotkin, was a descendant of the Smolensk branch, of the Rurik dynasty which had ruled Russia before the rise of the Romanovs. Kropotkin's father owned large tracts of land and nearly 1,200 male serfs in three provinces. His mother was the daughter of a Cossack general.Kropotkin dropped his princely title at age 12 "under the influence of republican teachings" and "even rebuked his friends, when they so referred to him."


Peter Urusov (Russian: Пётр Арсла́нович Урусов, Turkish: Urak Arslan-oglu) was a Tatar prince who killed False Dmitry II on 11 December 1610.


Pyotr Vasilyevich Ouroussoff, co-founder of the Bolshoi Ballet in 1776


Peter I (French: Pierre; c. 1187 – 26 May 1250), also known as Peter Mauclerc, was Duke of Brittany jure uxoris from 1213 to 1221, and regent of the duchy for his minor son John I from 1221 to 1237. As duke he was also 1st Earl of Richmond from 1218 to 1235. Peter was the second son of Robert II, Count of Dreux and Yolande de Coucy. The latter was in turn the son of Robert I, Count of Dreux, a younger brother of Louis VII of France. Peter was thus a Capetian, a second cousin of Louis VIII of France. Peter was married three times. His first wife was Alix of Thouars, Duchess of Brittany (1201-1221), they had 3 children. His second wife was Nicole (died February 1232). Nicole and Peter had a son. His third wife was Marguerite de Montaigu, Lady of Montaigu, Commequiers, La Garnache then Machecoul, and widow of Hugh I de Thouars (died 1230), a brother to Guy of Thouars; this made Marguerite a paternal line aunt of Alix. They married by 1236, and had no issue.


Peter (1241–1268), Lord of Dinan, Hade, Léon, Hennebont and La Roche-Derrien Son of John I Duke of Brittany and  Infanta Blanche of Navarre.


Peter, Viscount of Leon (1269–1312), son of John II Duke of Brittany and Beatrice of England.


Peter of Brittany, Seigneur of Dol-Combourg and Sant-Maloù (1289 – 1312), son of Arthur II Duke of Brittany and Marie, Viscountess of Limoges.


Peter II (in Breton Pêr II, in French Pierre II) (1418–1457), was Duke of Brittany, Count of Montfort and titular earl of Richmond, from 1450 to his death. He was son of Duke John VI and Joan of France, and a younger brother of Francis I.While he was Count of Guingamp, he fought against the English in Normandy in 1449 and in 1450 with his brother, Francis I, Duke of Brittany, and his uncle the Constable de Richemont. They took several cities, including Coutances, Saint-Lô and Ferns. Upon the death of his brother in 1450, Peter became Duke. Since Francis did not have a son, according to the provisions of the first Treaty of Guerande (1365) that did not allow the succession of girls, he appointed Peter in preference to his own daughters, Margaret and Marie, to succeed him. Peter II then pursued the murderers of his other brother, Gilles. In June 1442 he married Françoise d'Amboise (1427–1485), daughter of Louis d'Amboise, Viscount of Thouars and Prince of Talmond, Françoise was later beatified by the Catholic Church. The marriage never produced any children. By 1455, Peter II and his wife, Frances d'Amboise, had failed to produce offspring. Given the health problems of Peter II, this raised the question of succession. To prevent the throne of Brittany from falling into foreign hands, the Duke decided to marry his niece, Margaret, the eldest daughter of his deceased brother Francis, to his cousin, Francis, Count of Étampes. To seal the marriage, the Duke summoned the Estates of Brittany, a sovereign court, at Vannes to meet on November 13, 1455, in the upper room of la Cohue. The court, composed of the main Breton lords bishops, abbots and representatives of cities approved the marriage.The wedding started on November 16 with a grand mass in Saint Peter's cathedral in Vannes. Peter II died in 1457 with no known issue. He was succeeded by his uncle Arthur.




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« Reply #834 on: September 27, 2021, 05:37:16 PM »

Paul  is a common masculine given name in countries and ethnicities with a Christian heritage (Eastern Orthodoxy, Catholicism, Protestantism) and, beyond Europe, in Christian religious communities throughout the world. Paul – or its variations – can be a given name or surname.


Paul-Philippe al României (13 August 1948), also known as Prince Paul of Romania, Paul-Philippe Hohenzollern and Paul Lambrino, is the son of Carol Lambrino and Hélène Henriette Nagavitzine. His father was the elder son of King Carol II of Romania and Zizi Lambrino. Paul-Philippe claims that he, and not Margareta of Romania, is the rightful head of the royal house of Romania. In 1918, the crown prince of Romania (the future King Carol II) married Zizi Lambrino. The wedding was annulled the following year because it contravened the royal house's statute—Lambrino was both a Romanian and a commoner, and the marriage took place without the consent of the king. The couple had one son, Carol Lambrino, the father of Paul Hohenzollern. In 1921, Crown Prince Carol married Princess Helen of Greece and Denmark, and they had a son who became King Michael I of Romania. Hohenzollern claims to be the rightful head of Romania's royal house on the grounds that Prince Carol's marriage to Zizi Lambrino, carried out in a religious ceremony in Odessa, was never annulled in an Orthodox Church, thus rendering his subsequent marriages bigamous. Nevertheless, he states that he accepts Romania's republican form of government and does not wish to see the monarchy restored. He also points to a 1955 decision by a court in Lisbon recognising Carol Lambrino as King Carol II's first son and granting him full succession rights, a decision upheld in 1957 and 1963 in France and the following year in the United Kingdom. The latter ruling entitled Carol Lambrino to a British passport under the name "Prince of Hohenzollern, Prince of Romania" He filed suit in Romania in 1991 against King Michael I. The case reached its conclusion in February 2012, when the High Court of Cassation and Justice extended to Romania the Lisbon court's decision recognising Carol Lambrino as the son of King Carol II. The ruling has unclear implications with regard to both throne and property succession. In the 2000 Romanian presidential election, Hohenzollern was an unsuccessful independent candidate. After the 2012 final verdict of the Romanian Supreme Court of Justice recognising Paul as one of King Carol II's heirs, his uncle, King Michael I, reportedly invited Paul to reconciliation talks. In 1996 he married    Lia Georgia Triff, they have 1 son: Carol Ferdinand.


Paul Maximilian Lamoral, Prince of Thurn and Taxis (full German name: Paul Maximilian Lamoral Fürst von Thurn und Taxis) (27 May 1843 – 10 March 1879), was the third child of Maximilian Karl, 6th Prince of Thurn and Taxis and his second wife Princess Mathilde Sophie of Oettingen-Oettingen and Oettingen-Spielberg. At the request of his father to King Maximilian II of Bavaria, he was appointed on 15 November 1861 as junior lieutenant in the 2nd Bavarian artillery regiment (military registry no. KA OP 69 547) and was assigned as orderly officer of then Crown Prince Ludwig on 1 May 1863. Ludwig and Paul became close friends. After Ludwig's accession to the throne in 1864, Paul was promoted to personal aide-de-camp of the king on 18 January 1865. In the following two years, Paul von Thurn und Taxis, who matched the king in his good looks,[5] became the closest friend and confidant of the monarch. Although this infatuation, like that with Richard Wagner, was probably not sexually expressed, there were rumours in Munich that Ludwig was sexually intimate with his aide-de-camp. But soon the relationship between Paul and Ludwig soured. Jealous tongues attempted to discredit Paul, and evil and untrue rumours reached Ludwig's ears that Paul lived a frivolous life. Having little malice in his own nature, Ludwig could never get used to it in others and at first he probably took the rumours about Paul at face value. Although Ludwig's feelings for his friend grew deeper and developed into great love, the friendship was so precariously balanced that the slightest tremor of reality threatened to send it plummeting to oblivion. Paul again “faltered” making a wrong choice, saying the wrong word, displaying too much familiarity on one occasion and not enough affection on another. Trivial in themselves, such incidents preyed upon Ludwig's mind until they became unbearable. Once and for all, he cut Paul out of his life. Apparently the final indiscretion was so trivial that even Paul himself was unaware of it. When he learned of his fall from grace, he sent some agonized letters to the King, but there was to be no response from Ludwig. On 7 November 1866, Paul is released from his duties as aide-de-camp and transferred to an artillery regiment "under gracious recognition of his services". From midst November 1866, he started to drink without limits and in a state of turmoil and distress ended up with the Jewish soubrette Elise Kreuzer of the Actien-Volkstheater. After their final break up Paul would never see Ludwig again. In January 1867, Paul retired from the Bavarian army under peculiar circumstances, which were later termed as "desertion" by Minister of War Siegmund von Pranckh in 1872 Using the alias "Rudolphi", Paul moved to Wankdorf near Bern, Switzerland, together with Elise where their son Heinrich, named after Elise's father Heinrich Kreuzer, a known opera singer, was born on 30 January 1867.  After Paul received notice that his parents had tasked the Bavarian police to trace their son in order to convince him to abandon Elise, they moved to Mannheim or Ludwigshafen in August 1867. In October 1867, Paul took up an engagement at the municipal theatre of Aachen under the name “Herr von Thurn” together with Elise.In 1868, Prince Paul von Thurn und Taxis was forced by his family to marry Elise morganatically, and thereafter was disowned by them, stripped of all his titles, rank and birthrights against an annual pension of 6000 florin. Paul kept writing to Ludwig but without any reply. In the end he begged the King to give him a title. On 19 June 1868 Ludwig inscribed him upon the list of the nobility of Bavaria as Herr Paul von Fels. However, his later petition for conferment of hereditary nobility was declined on 10 December 1869 at the request of the Bavarian Ministry.


Prince Paul of Württemberg (Paul Heinrich Karl Friedrich August)(19 January 1785 – 16 April 1852) was the fourth child and second son of King Frederick I and his wife, Duchess Augusta of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel. Paul was born in St. Petersburg during a period when his father, not yet the ruler of Württemberg, was made governor of Old Finland by Catherine the Great in Russia. The couple had traveled to Russia to visit Frederick's sister Sophie, who was married to the heir to the Russian throne, the Tsesarevich Paul. Prince Paul's parents separated shortly after his birth. The marriage was unhappy, and there were allegations of abusive treatment of his mother. His mother was granted asylum by Catherine the Great and never returned to Württemberg. In 1797, Frederick married Charlotte, Princess Royal, eldest daughter of King George III of the United Kingdom, who supervised the education of Paul and his two surviving siblings, Wilhelm and Catharina. On 28 September 1805 in Ludwigsburg, Paul married Princess Charlotte of Saxe-Hildburghausen, second daughter of Frederick, Duke of Saxe-Hildburghausen, who became Duke of Saxe-Altenburg in 1826. They had five children.


Paul Friedrich (7 March 1809 – 28 May 1810), son of Prince Paul of Württemberg and Princess Charlotte of Saxe Hildburghausen.


Prince Paul of Yugoslavia, also known as Paul Karađorđević (Serbo-Croatian: Pavle Karađorđević, Павле Карађорђевић, English transliteration: Paul Karageorgevich)(27 April 1893 – 14 September 1976), was prince regent of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia during the minority of King Peter II. Paul was a first cousin of Peter's father Alexander I. Prince Paul of Yugoslavia was the only son of Prince Arsen of Serbia, younger brother of King Peter I, and of Princess and Countess Aurora Pavlovna Demidova, a granddaughter on one side of the Finnish philanthropist Aurora Karamzin and her Russian husband Prince and Count Pavel Nikolaievich Demidov and on the other of the Russian Prince Peter Troubetzkoy and his wife Elisabeth Esperovna, by birth a Princess Belosselsky-Belozersky. In 1923 he married Princess Olga of Greece and Denmark, a sister of Princess Marina, Duchess of Kent. They had 3 children.


Paul I (Russian: Па́вел I Петро́вич; Pavel I Petrovich) (1 October [O.S. 20 September] 1754 – 23 March [O.S. 11 March] 1801) was Emperor of Russia from 1796 until his assassination. Officially, he was the only son of Peter III and Catherine the Great, although Catherine hinted that he was fathered by her lover Sergei Saltykov. In 1773 he married Wilhelmina Louisa of Hesse-Darmstadt, who took the name Natalia Alexeievna, Tsarevna of Russia (25 June 1755 – 26 April 1776) Grand Duchess Natalia Alexeievna finally died after giving birth to a stillborn son. In 1776 he married Duchess Sophie Dorothea of Württemberg, who took the name Maria Feodorovna (25 October 1759 – 5 November 1828 [OS 24 October]). Throughout her marriage with Paul I of Russia, Maria Feodorovna had ten children.



Grand Duke Paul Alexandrovich of Russia (Russian: Павел Александрович)(3 October 1860 – 28 January 1919) was the sixth son and youngest child of Emperor Alexander II of Russia by his first wife, Empress Maria Alexandrovna. He was a brother of Emperor Alexander III and uncle of Nicholas II, Russia's last monarch.During his visits to Greece, in the family atmosphere of his first cousin Queen Olga of Greece, Grand Duke Paul grew closer with Olga's eldest daughter, Princess Alexandra of Greece and Denmark. Alexandra's father, King George I of Greece, was a brother of Tsarina Maria Feodorovna, Paul's sister-in-law. During the silver wedding anniversary of King George and Queen Olga, Paul asked for Alexandra's hand and he was accepted. Their engagement was announced on 10 November 1888. The wedding took place on 17 June [O.S. 5 June] 1889 in St. Petersburg, at the chapel of the Winter Palace. Grand Duke Paul was twenty-nine years old and his wife ten years younger. Grand Duke Paul's marriage was happy, but brief. Alexandra, after a difficult first pregnancy, gave birth to a daughter on 18 April  [O.S. 6 April] 1890, Grand Duchess Maria Pavlovna of Russia (1890–1958). Alexandra was of a frail constitution and she was also homesick for her native Greece. In autumn of that same year, Grand Duke Paul took his wife for a holiday in Greece. At their return to Russia, he was appointed commander of the imperial house guards at Krasnoye Selo and, therefore, he was usually away fulfilling his military duties. Paul and his wife were given rooms at the Catherine Palace in Tsarskoye Selo, but they saw each other only on weekends. Although Grand Duke Sergei and his wife Elizabeth moved to Moscow in May 1891, the two couples remained very close. In the summer of 1891, Paul and Alexandra decided to spend some time with them at Ilinskoie, Sergei's country estate outside Moscow. While there, Alexandra, seven months pregnant with her second child, carelessly stepped into a waiting boat, causing premature labor and the following day gave birth prematurely to a son, Grand Duke Dmitri Pavlovich of Russia (1891–1942). Alexandra did not recover consciousness and died six days later on 24 September  [O.S. 12 September] 1891.Grand Duke Paul was deeply affected by Alexandra's death. During this period, his brother Sergei and Sergei's wife took care of Paul's motherless children in a pattern of behavior that would be repeated in the years to follow. In his widowhood, the grieving grand duke moved to Tsarskoye Selo, leaving his palace in St Peterburg that had been his home with Alexandra to never return. For a long time, the palace stood vacant. After that, the building changed many hands over time. In 1895, Paul began an affair with a commoner, Olga Valerianovna Karnovich. Olga was married with three young children, a son and two daughters. Her husband, Eric von Pistohlkors, was an aide de camp of Paul's brother, Grand Duke Vladimir, and a captain in Paul's regiment. The affair initially remained secret, but it became public knowledge at court when Olga attended a court ball wearing a diamond necklace that had belonged to Paul's mother, Empress Maria Alexandrovna.  The Dowager Empress Maria Feodorovna recognized the jewels and had Olga removed from the ball.  In the subsequent scandal, Paul was moved to a different regimental command and Eric von Pistohlkors was sent away, but it was already too late. Olga was pregnant with Paul's child. She gave birth to a son, Vladimir, in January 1897, and Eric von Pistohlkors asked for a divorce. Paul wanted to recognize Vladimir as his son and marry Olga, but his family opposed his union. Despite his family's opposition, Paul remained infatuated with Olga. He lost interest in Maria and Dmitri and spent long periods abroad with his mistress. On 10 October 1902, Grand Duke Paul married Olga in a Greek Orthodox church in Livorno, Italy. Because he married morganatically and without Emperor Nicholas II's permission, Grand Duke Paul was banished from Russia; he was dismissed from his military commissions; all his properties were seized, and his brother Grand Duke Sergei was appointed as guardian of Maria and Dmitri. Although an outcast to the Romanovs, Grand Duke Paul had a happy life in Paris with Olga and their three children. In August 1915, the Tsar granted Paul's wife, Olga, the title of Princess Paley with the style of Serene Highness, and their children also became Prince Vladimir Pavlovich Paley and Princesses Irina Pavlovna and Natalia Pavlovna Paley During the Russian revolution Grandduke Paul was murdered by the  Bolsheviks.


Paul Dmitrievich Romanovsky-Ilyinsky (27 January 1928 – 10 February 2004) was a three-time mayor of Palm Beach, Florida, and the only child of Grand Duke Dmitri Pavlovich of Russia and his morganatic wife, Cincinnati heiress Audrey Emery. He was a great-grandson and, from 1992 to 2004, heir-male of Tsar Alexander II of Russia (a position now held by his son) and a first cousin once removed of Nicholas II. His father, Grand Duke Dmitri, as a direct result of his involvement in the murder of Grigori Rasputin in 1916, had been sent to the Persian front, which ultimately saved his life; many of his relatives, including his father and half-brother, were executed by the Bolsheviks. Ilynskiy's parents were divorced in 1937, and Ilyinsky was raised by his mother, who mostly lived in France. That same year, she married her second husband, Prince Dimitri Djordjadze, a member of a princely house of Georgia; they also later divorced. Ilyinsky was a U.S. citizen. Ilyinsky was married twice; he married his first wife, Mary Evelyn Prince in 1949 (annulment in 1951), and married his second wife, Angelica Philippa Kauffmann in 1952. Ilyinsky had four children.


Count Pál János Ede Teleki de Szék (1 November 1879 – 3 April 1941) was a Hungarian politician who served as prime minister of the Kingdom of Hungary from 1920 to 1921 and from 1939 to 1941 Teleki was born to Géza Teleki (1844–1913), a Hungarian politician and Minister of the Interior, and his wife Irén Muráty (Muratisz) (1852–1941), the daughter of a wealthy Greek merchant  He married Countess Johanna von Bissingen-Nippenburg and had 2 children.


Count Pavel Nikolayevich Ignatiev (Russian: Павел Николаевич Игнатьев, sometimes rendered in English as Paul Ignatieff)(June 30/July 12, 1870 – August 12, 1945) was an Imperial Russian politician who served as Education Minister for Tsar Nicholas II. He was the son of Count Nikolay Pavlovich Ignatyev, who was the Minister of the Interior under Tsar Alexander III. After the October Revolution brought the Bolsheviks into power, Ignatieff fled Russia with his family, ultimately ending up in Canada.Ignatieff married Princess Natalia Nikolayevna Meshcherskaya (1877-1944) in Nice, France, on April 16, 1903. They would have seven children, all boys, two of whom died as infants.


Paul (Greek: Παύλος, Pávlos)( 14 December 1901 – 6 March 1964) was King of Greece from 1 April 1947 until his death in 1964. He was succeeded by his son, Constantine II. To his family, he was known as Palo Paul was born on 14 December 1901 at Tatoi Palace in Athens, the third son of King Constantine I of Greece and his wife, Princess Sophia of Prussia. From 1917 to 1920, Paul lived in exile with his father, Constantine I. From 1923 to 1935, he lived in exile again in England, this time with his brother, George II. On 9 January 1938, Paul married Princess Frederica of Hanover, his first cousin once removed through Frederick III, German Emperor, and Victoria, Princess Royal, and second cousin through Christian IX of Denmark, in Athens. They had three children. Paul returned to Greece in 1946. He succeeded to the throne in 1947, on the death of his childless elder brother, King George II.


Pavlos, Crown Prince of Greece, RE (Greek: Παύλος)(born 20 May 1967) is the eldest son and second child of Constantine II, the last King of Greece from 1964 to 1973 and his wife, Anne-Marie of Denmark. He was heir apparent to the throne of Greece and was its crown prince from birth, remaining so during his father's reign until the monarchy's abolition. As a male-line descendant of Christian IX of Denmark, he is also a titular Danish prince although not in succession to the Danish throne, his mother having renounced her rights to the Danish throne, upon her marriage to his father. Pavlos married British-born heiress Marie-Chantal Miller, who he had met at a party three years earlier in New Orleans, on 1 July 1995. The couple have five children.


Prince Pavel Dmitrievich Dolgorukov (Russian: Князь Павел Дмитриевич Долгоруков, tr. Pavel Dmitrievič Dolgorukov)(1866 – June 9, 1927) was a Russian landowner and aristocrat who was executed by the Bolsheviks in 1927. Prince Pavel Dolgorukov was born in 1866. He was a member of the Dolgorukov family, one of the oldest branches of the Russian aristocracy during the Tsarist era. He inherited great wealth and was involved in the work of the zemstvo (regional councils), particularly in the Moscow region, where he owned an estate. After the Bolsheviks swept to power in 1917, Dolgorukov was arrested in Petrograd and was imprisoned for a while in the fortress of Peter and Paul. Like the rest of his social class, he had lost all his wealth in the revolution. He made his way to the south and joined the White movement, first under the leadership of Kornilov and then under Denikin. On June 9, 1927, he was executed along with 19 other former officers and members of the Tsarist aristocracy. The Cheka had charged them with the assassination of Ambassador Voikov in Warsaw. They were shot without trial.


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« Reply #835 on: September 27, 2021, 06:14:06 PM »

Paula is a common female given name (from Latin Pauline, petite). It is used in German, English, Estonian, Finnish, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, Romanian, Hungarian, Polish, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Latvian, and Croatian languages. Pauline is a female given name. It was originally the French form of Paulina, a female version of Paulinus, a variant of Paulus meaning the little, hence the younger.


Princess Paula Maria Pavlovna Romanovsky-Ilyinsky (18 May 1956), daughter of Paul Dmitrievich Romanovsky-Ilyinsky and Angelica Philippa Kauffmann She married Mark Comisar on 31 May 1980.

Princess Pauline of Orange-Nassau (Wilhelmina Frederika Louise Pauline Charlotte)(1 March 1800 – 22 December 1806) was a Princess of the House of Orange-Nassau. Pauline was born in Berlin while her parents were living in exile during the time the Low Countries were occupied by France. She was the third child and first-born daughter of the later King Willem I of the Netherlands and his wife, Wilhelmine of Prussia. In October 1806, Pauline with her mother and brothers left Berlin for Königsberg to escape the French troops. From birth, she had poor health, probably due to the difficult circumstances during her mother's pregnancy. According to doctors, she suffered from some kind of nervous fever. Due to bad weather while fleeing Berlin, Pauline's health quickly declined. On 15 December 1806 her condition became alarming; she died a week later, on 22 December. Her mother could hardly be separated from her deathbed and there were fears for her sanity. According to some sources Pauline died at the home of a mayor who had housed the family temporarily; according to others, she died on the Freienwalde, one of the royal Prussian possessions west of Berlin near the Oder.


Luise Pauline Maria Biron, Princess of Courland, Duchess of Sagan (19 February 1782 – 8 January 1845) was a Princess of Courland by birth and through her marriage to Friedrich Hermann Otto, Prince of Hohenzollern-Hechingen, Pauline was Princess consort of Hohenzollern-Hechingen. Pauline was the second-eldest child and daughter of Peter von Biron, the last Duke of Courland and Semigallia, and his third wife Dorothea von Medem. Pauline married Friedrich Hermann Otto, Hereditary Prince of Hohenzollern-Hechingen, son of Hermann, Prince of Hohenzollern-Hechingen and his second wife Princess Maximiliane of Gavre, on 26 February 1800 in Prague. Pauline and Friedrich had one son.


Princess Pauline Emma Auguste Hermine of Waldeck and Pyrmont (German: Pauline Emma Auguste Hermine Prinzessin zu Waldeck und Pyrmont)(19 October 1855 – 3 July 1925) was a member of the House of Waldeck and Pyrmont and a Princess of Waldeck and Pyrmont. Through her marriage to Alexis, Prince of Bentheim and Steinfurt, Pauline was also a member of the Princely House of Bentheim and Steinfurt and Princess consort of Bentheim and Steinfurt from 28 September 1890 to 21 January 1919.Pauline was born in Arolsen, Principality of Waldeck and Pyrmont on 19 October 1855 and was the second-eldest child and daughter of George Victor, Prince of Waldeck and Pyrmont and his first wife Princess Helena of Nassau. Pauline married Alexis, Hereditary Prince of Bentheim and Steinfurt, fourth child and eldest son of Ludwig Wilhelm, Prince of Bentheim and Steinfurt and his wife Landgravine Bertha of Hesse-Philippsthal-Barchfeld, on 7 May 1881 in Arolsen, Principality of Waldeck and Pyrmont. Pauline and Alexis had eight children.


Pauline Langenfeld (1884–1970) wife of Prince Eberwyn of Bentheim and Steinfurt (10 April 1882 – 31 July 1949)  from 1906–1914


Princess Pauline Friederike Marie of Württemberg,(full German name: Pauline Friederike Marie, Prinzessin von Württemberg) (25 February 1810, – 7 July 1856) was a member of the House of Württemberg and a Princess of Württemberg by birth. Through her marriage to Wilhelm, Duke of Nassau, Pauline was also a Duchess consort of Nassau. Pauline is an ancestress of the present Belgian, Danish, Dutch, Luxembourgish, Norwegian, and Swedish Royal families. Pauline was the fourth child of Prince Paul of Württemberg and his wife Princess Charlotte of Saxe-Hildburghausen. Pauline married William, Duke of Nassau, eldest son of Frederick William, Prince of Nassau-Weilburg and his wife, Burgravine Louise Isabelle of Kirchberg, and widower of her aunt Louise on 23 April 1829 in Stuttgart. William is third cousin of Pauline's father, Prince Paul of Württemberg (both are great-great-grandsons of King George II of Great Britain), which makes them third cousins, once removed. Pauline and William had four children


Princess Pauline of Württemberg (German: Prinzessin Pauline Olga Helene Emma von Württemberg)(19 December 1877 – 7 May 1965) was the elder daughter of Wilhelm II of Württemberg and wife of Wilhelm Frederick, Prince of Wied. She was for many years the regional director of the German Red Cross, in western Germany. Pauline was born at Stuttgart in the Kingdom of Württemberg, the elder daughter of Wilhelm II of Württemberg (1848–1921) by his first wife Princess Marie of Waldeck and Pyrmont (1857–1882). She became their only surviving child after the deaths of her brother Prince Ulrich and unnamed stillborn sister. She was indicted for concealing, since October 1945, a pair of important Nazis by a military court of the United States. She confessed to knowingly sheltering Frau Gertrud Scholtz-Klink and her spouse, former SS Maj. General August Heissmayer. The Princess was aware that Frau Scholtz-Klink was the head of the Nazi women's organizations, but she denied that she had been aware of Heissmayer's SS position. Princess Pauline was bailed out of custody but scheduled for trial in March 1948.  She stated that she came to know Frau Scholtz-Klinik during the years when both women headed significant institutions under the Nazis, the Princess asserting that she had then been the director of the German Red Cross for Hesse, Nassau, the Rhineland and Westphalia. Princess Pauline married on 29 October 1898 in Stuttgart to William Frederick, Prince of Wied (1872–1945), son of William, Prince of Wied and the spectacularly wealthy Princess Marie of the Netherlands.  Her husband's elder brother was William, Prince of Albania, and she was a first cousin of the Dutch queen, Wilhelmina of the Netherlands. They had 2 children


Pauline Clémentine Marie Walburga, Princess of Metternich-Winneburg zu Beilstein (née Countess Pauline Sándor de Szlavnicza)(25 February 1836 – 28 September 1921) was a famous Austrian socialite, mainly active in Vienna and Paris. Known for her great charm and elegance as well as for her social commitment, she was an important promoter of the work of the German composer Richard Wagner and the Czech composer Bedřich Smetana. She was also instrumental to the creation of the haute couture industry. Pauline was born in Vienna into the Hungarian noble family of Sándor de Szlavnicza.  Her father, Count Móric Sándor (1805–1878), described as "a furious rider", was known throughout the Habsburg empire as a passionate horseman. Her mother, Princess Leontine von Metternich-Winneburg (1811–1861), was a daughter of the Austrian state chancellor Prince Klemens Wenzel von Metternich (known as the architect of the Concert of Europe). It was at his home in Vienna that Pauline spent almost her whole childhood.In 1856, she married her uncle, Prince Richard von Metternich (1829–1895), whereby her grandfather Prince Klemens Wenzel von Metternich also became her father-in-law. The couple lived a happy conjugal life, despite Richard's frequent love-affairs with actresses and opera prima donnas. Their first child was Sophie (born 1857); her second daughter, Pascaline (b. 1862), married Count Georg von Waldstein-Wartenberg, an insane and alcoholic Czech aristocrat who was said to have murdered her in delirium in Duchcov (today in the Czech Republic) in 1890. Her youngest daughter, Clementine (b. 1870), was badly injured by her dog as a child and decided never to marry due to her scarred face. Pauline accompanied her husband, an Austrian diplomat, on his missions to the royal Saxon court in Dresden and in 1859 to the imperial French court in Paris, where they lived for more than eleven years until the Franco-Prussian war of 1870/71. She played an important role in the social and cultural life of both Dresden and Paris, and, after 1871, Vienna. Pauline's regular travels between, and extended stays in, Paris and Vienna, permitted her to act as a cross-cultural transmitter of the many trends that interested her in music, political ideas, and sport. She was a close friend and confidante of French Empress Eugénie, and, with her husband, was a prominent personality at the court of Emperor Napoleon III. In 1860 she introduced fashion designer Charles Frederick Worth to the Empress and thus started his rise to fame. She was a leading fashion icon; it was said that she was often the very first one to wear a new fashion, which was secondly adopted by the empress, and then accepted and copied by the rest of high society.


Pauline Bonaparte (20 October 1780 – 9 June 1825) was the first sovereign Duchess of Guastalla in Italy, an imperial French princess and the princess consort of Sulmona and Rossano. She was the sixth child of Letizia Ramolino and Carlo Buonaparte, Corsica's representative to the court of King Louis XVI of France. Her elder brother, Napoleon, was the first emperor of the French. She married Charles Leclerc, a French general, a union ended by his death in 1802. Later, she married Camillo Borghese, 6th Prince of Sulmona. Her only child, Dermide Leclerc, born from her first marriage, died in childhood. She was the only Bonaparte sibling to visit Napoleon in exile on his principality, Elba.


Princess Pauline of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach (Pauline Ida Marie Olga Henriette Katherine)( 25 July 1852 – 17 May 1904) was the wife of Charles Augustus, Hereditary Grand Duke of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach. She was a daughter of Prince Hermann of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach and Princess Augusta of Württemberg. On 26 August 1873 at Friedrichshafen, Baden-Württemberg, Pauline married Charles Augustus, Hereditary Grand Duke of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach. They were second cousins, as she was the paternal granddaughter of Prince Bernhard, younger brother of the Charles Frederick, Grand Duke of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach, the grandfather of Karl August. They had 2 sons.


Pauline of Württemberg (4 September 1800 – 10 March 1873) was a daughter of Duke Louis of Württemberg and Princess Henriette of Nassau-Weilburg. Pauline Therese was born in Riga, one of the five children of Duke Louis of Württemberg and his wife, Princess Henriette of Nassau-Weilburg. On 15 April 1820 in Stuttgart, Pauline Therese married her first cousin King William I of Württemberg. Pauline thus became Queen consort of Württemberg. As his third wife, their marriage was unhappy, particularly because of the deep attachment William showed to his mistress, the actress Amalia Stubenrauch. Nevertheless, they had three children including the future King Charles I.William I died at Schloss Rosenstein in Stuttgart on 25 June 1864. Upon his death, their alienation became known to the public; Pauline was completely excluded from her inheritance in his will. Pauline had been very popular, not only for the kindness she showed to her subjects but also for the devotion she showed to the poor.


Paola Louise Marica Doimi de Lupis (7 August 1969) Her father is Louis Doimi de Lupis, who claimed to be a member of the Frankopan family. Her mother is Ingrid Detter, a barrister and professor of law at Stockholm University. The announcement of Lady Nicholas's marriage refers to her parents as 'Don' and 'Donna' She met her husband, Lord Nicholas Windsor, at a millennium party in New York in 1999, and their engagement was announced on 26 September 2006. They married on 4 November 2006 in the Church of Santo Stefano degli Abissini in the Vatican City, following a civil ceremony on 19 October 2006 in a London register office and she became Lady Nicholas Windsor. This was the first time a member of the British Royal Family married at the Vatican. They have 3 sons.


Donna Paola Ruffo di Calabria (11 September 1937) the seventh and youngest child of Fulco, Prince Ruffo di Calabria, 6th Duke of Guardia Lombarda (1884–1946).  Her mother was Donna Luisa Gazelli dei Conti di Rossana e di Sebastiano (1896–1989), a matrilineal descendant of the Marquis de Lafayette, a hero of the American Revolution. In 1958, the Prince of Liège went to the Vatican to witness the coronation of Pope John XXIII. At a reception at the Belgian embassy, the Prince met Italian Donna Paola Ruffo di Calabria. "We were both shy, so we only talked a little," Paola said later about their first meeting. Shy but smitten, Prince Albert later proposed marriage to Paola, and she accepted. Their engagement was announced at the Chateau of Laeken in 1959. The Prince of Liège married Donna Paola Ruffo di Calabria at St. Goedele Cathedral in Brussels on 2 July 1959. The couple has 3 children together. She was Queen of the Belgians from 1993 to 2013, as the wife of the King Albert II.


Pauline Christine Wilhelmine of Anhalt-Bernburg (also: Princess Pauline of Lippe)(23 February 1769 – 29 December 1820) was a princess consort of Lippe, married in 1796 to Leopold I, Prince of Lippe. She served as the regent of Lippe during the minority of her son from 1802 to 1820. She is regarded as one of the most important rulers of Lippe. Pauline was born in Ballenstedt, the daughter of Prince Frederick Albert, Prince of Anhalt-Bernburg of Anhalt-Bernburg and his wife Louise Albertine of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Plön. On 2 January 1796 Princess Pauline of Anhalt-Bernburg married Prince Leopold I of Lippe. eopold of Lippe had been asking for her hand for years, but Pauline had repeatedly rejected his suits. The marriage took place only after Leopold's health improved. Previously, he had been put under guardianship for a short time because of mental confusion. In the following years, Pauline spoke positively about their marriage and her "loving" husband. Pauline gave birth to two sons, Leopold (born November 6, 1796) and Frederick (born December 8, 1797). A third child, a girl named Louise, died shortly after birth on 17 July 1800. Leopold I died on 4 April 1802 and on 18 May Pauline took up the regency for her minor son, the later prince Leopold. In the marriage contract between Leopold and Pauline from 1795, it had been agreed that Pauline, as the future mother, should take both the guardianship and the regency of a minor prince.


Princess Pauline of Lippe (1834–1906), daughter of Leopold II of Lippe and Princess Emilie of Schwarzburg-Sondershausen.


Dona Paula (17 February 1823 – 16 January 1833) was a princess of the Empire of Brazil and thus, a member of the Brazilian branch of the Portuguese House of Braganza. Her parents were Emperor Dom Pedro I, the first ruler of an independent Brazil, and Archduchess Leopoldina of Austria. Born in Rio de Janeiro, Paula was the couple's third child; she lost her mother at the age of three and her father at the age of eight, when he abdicated and left Brazil for Portugal, where he wanted to restore the throne of Paula's eldest sister, Maria da Glória, who should have become queen regnant of Portugal.After her mother's death, Paula and her siblings were mainly raised by a slave, a wet-nurse and a statesman whom Pedro I had appointed to take care of his five children. Paula and her siblings were present when her father married his second wife, Amélie de Beauharnais, who eventually became like a mother to the children. After her father abdicated and left, the children were left alone in Brazil, as his father took with him Amélie; the two had a daughter abroad. Paula became severely ill in late 1832 and died in early 1833, at the age of nine. She was buried, at her father's request, in Rio de Janeiro.


Countess Paula von Königsegg-Aulendorf, wife of Joachim Egon, Prince of Fürstenberg and mother of Heinrich, Prince of Fürstenberg (Heinrich Fürst zu Fürstenberg in German)( 17 July 1950) who is the Head of the House of Fürstenberg since 2011.


Countess Paula von Khevenhüller-Metsch (2003), member of an Austrian noble family. Khevenhüller is the name of a Carinthian noble family, documented there since 1356, with its ancestral seat at Landskron Castle. In the 16th century, the family split into the two branches of Khevenhüller-Frankenburg, Imperial Counts (i.e. immediate counts of the Holy Roman Empire) from 1593, and Khevenhüller-Hochosterwitz, raised to Imperial Counts in 1725 and, as Khevenhüller-Metsch, to princely rank (Fürsten) in 1763. The family belongs to high nobility.


Prince Franz de Paula of Liechtenstein (Franz de Paula Joachim Joseph) (25 February 1802 – 31 March 1887) was a son of Johann I Joseph, Prince of Liechtenstein (1760–1836) and wife Landgravine Josepha of Fürstenberg-Weitra, nephew of Aloys I, brother of Aloys II and uncle of Johann II and Franz I. On 3 June 1841, in Vienna, he married Ewa Jozefina Julia Eudoxia Hrabia Potocka (Paris, 10 August 1818 – Vienna, 21 May 1895), sister of Count Alfred Józef Potocki (1817–1889), Sejm Marshal, Minister-President of Austria, and had four children.


Franz de Paula Ulrich, 3rd Prince Kinsky of Wchinitz und Tettau, was a Bohemian noble and general in service of the House of Habsburg. He was born in Zlonice, Bohemia, 23 June 1726, and died in Prague, Bohemia (present day Czech Republic) 19 December 1792. His father, Count Philip Kinsky of Wchinitz and Tettau (1700–1749), was a Habsburg state administrator, jurist, and ambassador to the Court of St. James's. He married Maria Carolina, Countess of Martinitz in 1722: from this marriage, he had four sons and four daughters.


Infante Francisco de Paula of Spain (10 March 1794 – 13 August 1865) was an Infante of Spain and the youngest son of Charles IV of Spain and Maria Luisa of Parma. He was a brother of Ferdinand VII, as well as the uncle and father-in-law of Isabella II.Born on 10 March 1794 at the Royal Palace of Aranjuez, Infante Francisco de Paula was the fourteenth child of King Carlos IV of Spain (1748–1819) and his wife Maria Luisa of Parma (1751–1819), a granddaughter of King Louis XV of France.His parents had married twenty-nine years earlier and Francisco de Paula was the couple's last child. As the youngest in a large family, he was his mother's favorite  His father, King Carlos IV, had a passion for hunting and collecting clocks, but little interest in political affairs. He took a passive role in the direction of his own kingdom, leaving the government to his wife and to his prime minister, Manuel Godoy. Queen Maria Luisa thoroughly dominated the king. On 12 June 1819 he married Luisa Carlotta of Naples and Sicily (Luisa Carlotta Maria Isabella; 24 October 1804 – 29 January 1844). They had 11 children. Infante Francisco de Paula contracted a morganatic marriage on 19 December 1852 with Teresa de Arredondo y Ramirez de Arellano. They had one son.




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« Reply #836 on: September 27, 2021, 07:01:06 PM »

Josephine is a female given name. It is the English version of the French name Joséphine. In Greece, the female name Josephine is Io̱si̱fína and used mainly on the island of Crete. The feminine form of the name Joseph, which is taken from the Hebrew name Yosef, meaning "(YHWH) shall grow."


Princess Joséphine-Charlotte of Belgium (11 October 1927 – 10 January 2005) She was the oldest child and only daughter of the King Leopold III of Belgium and his first wife, Princess Astrid of Sweden. While expecting her daughter, Astrid had read a biography of her ancestress, the French empress Joséphine de Beauharnais. Josephine was also the name of one of the child's great-aunts, Princess Joséphine-Caroline of Belgium, the dearest sister of King Albert I. Astrid was a devoted mother to her "little Jo". Joséphine-Charlotte meet Jean, Grand Duke of Luxembourg for the first time during one of her short stays with her godmother and future mother-in-law, Grand Duchess Charlotte, in Fischbach in 1948. On 26 December 1952, the couple announced their engagement to the public even though they already engaged the previous month. Joséphine-Charlotte and Jean were joined in marriage on 9 April 1953 in Luxembourg. During their 52-year marriage, the royal couple had five children.


Joséphine of Leuchtenberg or Joséphine de Beauharnais (Joséphine Maximilienne Eugénie Napoléone de Beauharnais) (14 March 1807 – 7 June 1876) was Queen of Sweden and Norway as the wife of King Oscar I. Joséphine was born on 14 March 1807 in Milan, Italy. She was the first of six children of Eugène de Beauharnais, Duke of Leuchtenberg (1781 - 1824), and his wife, Princess Augusta of Bavaria (1788 - 1851). At birth, she was given the title 'Princess of Bologna' by Napoleon, and later she was also made Duchess of Galliera. She spent her first seven years in Italy. Charles XIV John of Sweden feared the legitimist policy of the Congress of Vienna, and wished to give the House of Bernadotte connections through blood with old royal dynasties of Europe. The marriage of his son and heir to the throne, Crown Prince Oscar, was the solution to this problem, and in 1822, he finally forced his son to agree to marry and to make a trip to Europe to inspect a list of potential candidates for the position of Crown Princess and Queen. In this list, a Princess of Denmark was the first alternative; a Princess of Leuchtenberg was the second; a Princess of Hesse was the third and a Princess of Weimar was the fourth Charles XIV John had chosen Josephine of Leuchtenberg as candidate number two, because she had connections both to the old dynasties of Europe through her mother, and to the House of Bonaparte through her father, and thus, she "joined the new interests with the old", as he expressed the matter. Crown Prince Oscar declined marriage to a Danish Princess, but expressed his interest in the Princess of Leuchtenberg after his first meeting with Joséphine on 23 August 1822 in Eichstätt. The couple reportedly developed a mutual attraction and fell in love when they saw each other, and therefore, the marriage was accepted by both families and duly arranged. Joséphine took lessons in the Swedish language and corresponded with Oscar until the wedding. Her father was reportedly not against her conversion to Lutheranism, but the Swedish representatives had apparently thought it necessary to offer her the option to keep her religion Princess Joséphine married the Crown Prince by proxy at the Palais Leuchtenberg in Munich on 22 May 1823. They also conducted a wedding ceremony in person on 19 June 1823 in Stockholm, Sweden. The first wedding ceremony was Catholic, and the second wedding ceremony was Lutheran. Josephine was a social success in Sweden from the moment of her arrival, both as a private person in the circles of high society as well as a public person, and was to become more popular as Queen than her predecessor and successor. The relationship between Josephine and Oscar was initially described as a mutually happy one, and the couple shared their interests in culture, painting, writing and singing. They had 5 children. However, Oscar was known for his extramarital affairs, a fact that deeply tormented Josephine, who suffered from jealousy.


Joséphine Bonaparte (born Marie Josèphe Rose Tascher de La Pagerie)(23 June 1763 – 29 May 1814) was the Empress of the French as the first wife of Emperor Napoleon I. She is widely known as Joséphine de Beauharnais. Marie Josèphe Rose Tascher de La Pagerie was born in Les Trois-Îlets, Martinique, to a wealthy French family that owned a sugarcane plantation, which is now a museum. She was the eldest daughter of Joseph-Gaspard Tascher (1735–1790), knight, Seigneur de (lord of) la Pagerie, lieutenant of Troupes de Marine, and his wife, the former Rose-Claire des Vergers de Sannois (1736–1807). In October 1779, Joséphine went to France with her father. She married Alexandre de Beauharnais
on 13 December 1779, in Noisy-le-Grand. They had two children: a son, Eugène de Beauharnais (1781–1824), and a daughter, Hortense de Beauharnais (1783–1837). Joséphine and Alexandre's marriage was not a happy one. Alexandre abandoned his family for over a year in a brief tryst and often frequented whorehouses, leading to a court-ordered separation during which Josephine and the children lived at Alexandre's expense in the Pentemont Abbey, run by a group of Bernardian nuns. On 2 March 1794, during the Reign of Terror, the Committee of Public Safety ordered the arrest of her husband. He was jailed in the Carmes prison in Paris. Considering Joséphine as too close to the counter-revolutionary financial circles, the Committee ordered her arrest on 18 April 1794. A warrant of arrest was issued against her on 2 Floréal, year II (21 April 1794), and she was imprisoned in the Carmes prison until 10 Thermidor, year II (28 July 1794). During this time, Joséphine was only allowed to communicate with her children by their scrawls on the laundry list, which the jailers soon prohibited Her husband was accused of having poorly defended Mainz in July 1793, and being considered an aristocratic "suspect", was sentenced to death and guillotined, with his cousin Augustin, on 23 July 1794, on the Place de la Révolution (today's Place de la Concorde) in Paris. Joséphine was freed five days later, thanks to the fall and execution of Robespierre, which ended the Reign of Terror. On 27 July 1794 (9 Thermidor), Tallien arranged the liberation of Thérèse Cabarrus, and soon after that of Joséphine Madame de Beauharnais had affairs with several leading political figures, including Paul François Jean Nicolas Barras. In 1795, she met Napoleon Bonaparte, six years her junior, and became his mistress.  In January 1796, Napoleon Bonaparte proposed to her and they were married on 9 March. Until meeting Bonaparte, she was known as Rose, but Bonaparte preferred to call her Joséphine, the name she adopted from then on. The marriage was not well received by Napoleon's family, who were shocked that he had married an older widow with two children. After their marriage, Napoleon was said to have kept a picture of her in his pocket which he would plant many kisses on every passing hour. Josephine, however, never even looked at the picture of her new husband that Napoleon gave her. Joséphine, left behind in Paris, in 1796 began an affair with a handsome Hussar lieutenant, Hippolyte Charles. Rumors of the affair reached Napoleon; he was infuriated, and his love for her changed entirely. In 1798, Napoleon led a French army to Egypt. During this campaign, Napoleon started an affair of his own with Pauline Fourès, the wife of a junior officer, who became known as "Napoleon's Cleopatra." The relationship between Joséphine and Napoleon was never the same after this. His letters became less loving. No subsequent lovers of Joséphine are recorded, but Napoleon had sexual affairs with several other women. In 1804, he said, "Power is my mistress." In December 1800, Joséphine was nearly killed in the Plot of the rue Saint-Nicaise, an attempt on Napoleon's life with a bomb planted in a parked cart.Napoleon was elected Emperor of the French in 1804, making Joséphine empress. Shortly before their coronation, there was an incident at the Château de Saint-Cloud that nearly sundered the marriage between the two. Joséphine caught Napoleon in the bedroom of her lady-in-waiting, Élisabeth de Vaudey, and Napoleon threatened to divorce her as she had not produced an heir. Eventually, however, through the efforts of her daughter Hortense, the two were reconciled. When after a few years it became clear she could not have a child, Napoleon, while still loving Joséphine, began to think about the possibility of an annulment. The final die was cast when Joséphine's grandson Napoléon Charles Bonaparte, who had been declared Napoleon's heir, died of croup in 1807. Napoleon began to create lists of eligible princesses. At dinner on 30 November 1809, he let Joséphine know that — in the interest of France — he must find a wife who could produce an heir. Joséphine agreed to the divorce so the Emperor could remarry in the hope of having an heir. The divorce ceremony took place on 10 January 1810 and was a grand but solemn social occasion, and each read a statement of devotion to the other. On 11 March, Napoleon married Marie-Louise of Austria by proxy. After the divorce, Joséphine lived at the Château de Malmaison, near Paris. She remained on good terms with Napoleon, who once said that the only thing to come between them was her debts. Joséphine died in Rueil-Malmaison on 29 May 1814, soon after walking with Emperor Alexander I of Russia in the gardens of Malmaison, where she allegedly begged to join Napoleon in exile. Napoleon learned of her death via a French journal while in exile on Elba, and stayed locked in his room for two days, refusing to see anyone. He claimed to a friend, while in exile on Saint Helena, that "I truly loved my Joséphine, but I did not respect her." Despite his numerous affairs, eventual marriage annulment, and remarriage, the Emperor's last words on his death bed at St. Helena were: "France, the Army, the Head of the Army, Joséphine."("France, l'armée, tête d'armée, Joséphine").


Joséphine de Lorraine (Marie Joséphine Thérèse)( 26 August 1753 – 8 February 1797) was a princess of the House of Lorraine and by marriage the Princess of Carignan. She was the paternal grandmother of King Charles Albert of Sardinia, from whom the modern royal house of Italy descends. Marie Joséphine Thérèse de Lorraine was the second of four children born to Louis de Lorraine, prince de Brionne, a cadet of the House of Guise, among the most influential families of France's ancien regime. The senior, sovereign branch of the House of Lorraine would merge with the Imperial House of Habsburg during her lifetime through marriage of the last reigning duke, Francis, to Maria Theresa of Austria. Her mother was princess Louise Julie Constance de Rohan (1735-1815), who also belonged to a powerful family of princes étrangers, the House of Rohan. On 18 October 1768 Joséphine married Prince Victor Amadeus of Savoy, the son and heir of Louis Victor, Prince of Carignan and his German wife, the Landgravine Christine Henriette of Hesse-Rotenburg. Prince Charles Emmanuel of Savoy was born to Joséphine in Turin on 24 October 1770. She died aged 43 in Turin at the Palazzo Carignano and was buried at Turin Cathedral until 1816, when she was moved to the Basilica of Superga during the reign of Victor Emmanuel I of Sardinia.


Countess Josephine of Rosenborg (1972), daughter of Count Christian of Rosenborg (Christian Frederik Franz Knud Harald Carl Oluf Gustav Georg Erik; (22 October 1942 – 21 May 2013) and Anne Dorte Maltoft-Nielsen (3 October 1947  – 2 January 2014).  Countess from birth but lost their titles with her non-dynastic marriage.


Princess Josephine of Baden (21 October 1813 – 19 June 1900) was born at Mannheim, the second daughter of Charles, Grand Duke of Baden and his wife, Stéphanie de Beauharnais. She was the mother of the first king of Romania. Through her younger daughter Marie, she is the ancestress of the Belgian royal family and the Grand Ducal family of Luxembourg. On 21 October 1834 at Karlsruhe, she married Karl Anton Joachim Zephyrinus Friedrich Meinrad, Prince of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen, son of Charles, Prince of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen (1785–1853) and his wife Marie Antoinette Murat (1793–1847).They had six children


Princess Joséphine Marie of Belgium (30 November 1870 — 18 January 1871) she died at one month. Daughter of  Prince Philippe of Belgium, Count of Flanders and Princess Marie of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen. She was the twin of Princess Henriette of Belgium.


Princess Joséphine Caroline of Belgium (18 October 1872 – 6 January 1958) was the youngest daughter of Prince Philippe, Count of Flanders and Princess Marie of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen. On 28 May 1894 in Brussels, she married her maternal first cousin Prince Karl Anton of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen, later simply of Hohenzollern (1 September 1868 - 21 February 1919), third son of Leopold, Prince of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen, later simply of Hohenzollern and Infanta Antónia of Portugal. They had 4 children.


Princess Josephine of Denmark, Countess of Monpezat (Josephine Sophia Ivalo Mathilda)(8 January 2011) is a member of the Danish royal family. She is the fourth and youngest child of Crown Prince Frederik and Crown Princess Mary. She is the twin sister of Prince Vincent. Josephine is fifth in line to the Danish throne, after her father and older siblings, Prince Christian, Princess Isabella, and her elder twin brother.


Princess Joséphine of Belgium (17 October 2003), daughter of Princess Delphine of Belgium (previously known as Jonkvrouw Delphine Boël) and her partner James (Jim) O'Hare


Landgravine Josepha of Fürstenberg-Weitra (German: Landgräfin Josefa zu Fürstenberg-Weitra)( 21 June 1776 – 23 February 1848) was princess consort of Liechtenstein as wife of Johann I Joseph, Prince of Liechtenstein. Josepha was born at Vienna, Austria, the first daughter of Joachim Egon, Landgrave of Fürstenberg-Weitra (1749–1828) and his wife, Countess Sophia Maria of Oettingen-Wallerstein (1751–1835).On 12 April 1792 in Vienna, she married Prince Johann Joseph of Liechtenstein (1776–1848). They had 14 children.


Infanta Maria Josefa of Spain (6 July 1744 – 8 December 1801) was a Princess of Naples and Sicily by birth. At the accession of her father to the Spanish throne as Charles III, she became an Infanta of Spain. Born and raised in Naples, she arrived in Spain with her family in October 1759, at age fifteen. She lived at the court of her father and later with her brother Charles IV of Spain. She remained unmarried.


Josefa de Iturbide y Huarte (December 22, 1814 — December 5, 1891) was the daughter of Agustín de Iturbide and Ana María Huarte who received the title of Mexican Princess during the First Mexican Empire by the Constituent Congress and Princess of Iturbide during the Second Mexican Empire by Maximilian of Habsburg.


Princess Josefa de Godoy di Bassano y Crowe, de Tudó y O'Donovan (October 8, 1834 – August 12, 1882), dei principi Godoy di Bassano, was a Spanish-Italian aristocrat. She was the 2nd Vizcondesa (Viscountess) de Rocafuerte (by rehabilitation of April 24, 1871) and 2??th Noble Dame of the Royal Order of Queen María Luisa. Josefa was born in Paris, the second daughter and third child of Manuel de Godoy di Bassano, 2nd Prince Godoy di Bassano, and Dona María Carolina Crowe y O'Donovan O'Neill. Her father was the son of Manuel de Godoy and Josefa de Tudó, born illegitimately while his father was still married to María Teresa de Borbón. Her maternal grandparents were Sir Lawrence Crowe, Lord of St Stephen's Green House, and Lady Crowe (née Lucinda O'Donovan O'Neill), both from Dublin, Ireland. Josefa married twice. Her first husband was don Juan de Lara y Irigoyen, ... y ... (May 17, 1808 – October 4, 1869), whom she married in Montserrat, Barcelona, on December 18, 1856. He was Lieutenant-General of the Army, Minister of War, Captain-General of Valencia and Castilla la Nueva, Life Senator of the Realm, Grand Crosses of the Order of Charles III and the Order of St. Hermenegild. The marriage was childless She married secondly don Hermogenes García de Samaniego y del Castillo, Díez de Tejada y Centeno, in Madrid on October 29, 1873. Her second husband was Colonel of General Staff, Commander of the Order of Charles III (brother of the 1st Marqués de la Granja de Samaniego with a Coat of Arms of de Samaniego in Spain, previously a title of the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies, don Manuel García de Samaniego y del Castillo, Díez de Tejada y Centeno, Colonel of the Army, Knight of the Order of Santiago). This second marriage too was childless.
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« Reply #837 on: September 27, 2021, 07:01:17 PM »


Infanta Francisca Josefa of Portugal  (30 January 1699 – 15 July 1736) was a Portuguese infanta (princess) and the last of eight children of King Peter II of Portugal and his second wife Marie Sophie of Neuburg. Francisca Josefa was born and died in Lisbon. Charles Emmanuel III of Sardinia was proposed as a possible marriage for the infanta in 1720–21, but nothing came of it. She never married nor had issue and she died when she was 37 years old. She is buried at the Royal Pantheon of the Braganza Dynasty.


Doña María Josefa Alonso-Pimentel y Téllez-Girón iure uxoris Duchess of Osuna, suo jure 12th Duchess of Benavente (26 November 1752 – 5 October 1834), was a Spanish aristocrat, famous for her patronage of artists, writers and scientists.She married Pedro Téllez-Girón, 9th Duke of Osuna in 1771. The couple had many children; her possessions and noble titles were absorbed thereto by the Osuna family The Duchess and her husband were among the most important aristocrats who became patrons of the painter Francisco de Goya.


Josefa Téllez-Girón, daughter of  Doña María Josefa Alonso-Pimentel y Téllez-Girón and  Pedro Téllez-Girón


Josefa de Tudó y Catalán, 1st Countess of Castillo Fiel, (in full, Spanish: Doña Josefa Petra Francisca de Paula de Tudó y Catalán, Alemany y Luesia, primera condesa de Castillo Fiel, primera viscondesa de Rocafuerte), also known as Pepita Tudó (19 May 1779 - 20 September 1869) was the mistress of Spanish Prime Minister Manuel de Godoy. Tudó was born in Cádiz and she was always called "Pepita", a diminutive of Josefa. Her father was a gunner named Antonio de Tudó y Alemany who died when she was young. Since the age of sixteen, Pepita and her mother, Catalina Cathalán y Luecia, and her sisters, Magdalena and Socorro, lived in the house of Manuel de Godoy, one of the most powerful men in Spain. Pepita was his lover by 1800. However, the Queen of Spain, María Luisa, forced Godoy to marry María Teresa de Borbón y Vallabriga, Countess of Chinchón, a marriage which was favorable to Godoy for social reasons. The marriage did not end Godoy's relationship with Pepita; in 1805, she gave birth to a son, Manuel, and in 1807, she gave birth to another son, Luis.In 1807, under Godoy's influence, Carlos IV presented Pepita with the title of Countess of Castillo Fiel and Viscountess of Rocafuerte. When María Teresa died in November 1828, Godoy and Pepita could finally marry, even though they had secretly performed a marriage ceremony years earlier. The following year or still in December 1828, Godoy and Pepita married. The Pope made him 1st Principe di Paserano; however, they moved to Paris in 1832 where they lived in somewhat straitened circumstances. Godoy was later given a pension by Louis Philippe I. Later, Pepita returned to Spain in hopes of reclaiming the family properties. At ninety years old, Pepita told a reporter that Godoy knew only one true love: Queen María Luisa. She died in 1869 in Madrid.


Maria Josepha of Saxony, Dauphine of France (4 November 1731 – 13 March 1767) was Dauphine of France through her marriage to Louis, the son and heir of Louis XV. Marie Josèphe was the mother of three kings of France, including Louis XVI, as well as Madame Élisabeth. Maria Josepha was born on 4 November 1731 in Dresden Castle to Augustus III, Prince-Elector of Saxony and King of Poland, and Maria Josepha of Austria. Maria Josepha was the ninth of sixteen children and the fifth daughter. Dauphin Louis, eldest son of King Louis XV of France, was widowed on 22 July 1746 when his wife, Infanta Maria Teresa, died giving birth to their only child, a daughter named after herself. King Ferdinand VI of Spain, Maria Teresa's half-brother, had offered the Dauphin another sister, Infanta Maria Antonia. Instead, the King of France and his all-powerful mistress Madame de Pompadour wanted to open up diplomatic channels. The marriage between Maria Josepha and the Dauphin had first been suggested by her uncle Maurice de Saxe. Louis XV and his mistress were convinced that the marriage would be advantageous to French foreign affairs. France and Saxony had been on opposing sides in the recent War of the Austrian Succession and thus the marriage between the Saxon princess and the Dauphin would form a new alliance between the two nations. There was one problem with the suggested bride: Maria Josepha's grandfather Augustus II of Poland had deposed Stanislaus I Leszczyński from the Polish throne. Leszczyński was the father of Maria Leszczyńska, Louis XV's wife and mother of the Dauphin. The marriage was said to have humiliated the simple-living Queen, even though she and Maria Josepha would later get on well. Other proposals came from Savoy in the form of Princess Eleonora of Savoy or her sister Maria Luisa of Savoy. Both were refused. Despite the disapproval of the Queen, Maria Josepha married the Dauphin on 9 February 1747. The couple would have 13 children, among them several still born.


Marie Joséphine of Savoy (Italian: Maria Giuseppina Luigia)(2 September 1753 – 13 November 1810) was a Princess of France and Countess of Provence by marriage to the future King Louis XVIII of France. She was, in the opinion of Bourbon Royalist Legitimists, regarded as titular 'Queen of France' when her husband assumed the title of King in 1795 upon the death of his nephew, the titular King Louis XVII of France, until her death. In reality she never had this title, as she died before her husband actually became King in 1814.Marie Joséphine was born at the Royal Palace of Turin on 2 September 1753 as the third child and second daughter of Prince Victor Amadeus of Savoy and Infanta Maria Antonia Ferdinanda of Spain. At the time of her birth, her paternal grandfather Charles Emmanuel III was the King of Sardinia, thus her parents were styled Duke and Duchess of Savoy. Marie Joséphine was engaged to the French prince Louis Stanislas, Count of Provence. Her aunts, Maria Luisa of Savoy and Eleonora of Savoy, were once proposed as brides for Louis Stanislas's father Louis. The marriage was arranged as a part of a series of Franco-Savoyard dynastic marriages taking place in a time span of eight years: after the wedding between her first cousin Princess Marie Louise of Savoy-Carignano and Louis Alexandre de Bourbon, Prince of Lamballe  and the wedding between Marie Joséphine and Louis Stanislas, her younger sister Maria Theresa was married to her younger brother-in-law, the Count of Artois (future King Charles X of France) in 1773, and her eldest brother Prince Charles Emmanuel of Savoy (the future king of Sardinia) was married to her sister-in-law Princess Clotilde of France in 1775. Her eldest brother-in-law, Dauphin Louis Auguste (the future Louis XVI of France), had married Marie Antoinette one year earlier. Marie Joséphine was married on 16 April 1771 by proxy in the Kingdom of Sardinia, then again in person on 14 May 1771 at the Palace of Versailles. Her marriage to a Petit-fils de France (Grandson of France) allowed her to assume the rank of petite-fille de France (Granddaughter of France). At the death of her husband's grandfather Louis XV in 1774, her brother-in-law succeeded as Louis XVI; as the eldest brother of the king, her spouse took on the style Monsieur, and Marie Joséphine was thus under the reign of her brother-in-law known under the style of Madame. The marriage of Marie Joséphine had been deemed necessary by Louis XV because the dauphin had not consummated his marriage, and there may thus prove to be necessary to leave the task to provide the next heir to the throne to the count of Provence, who was second in line in succession after his brother The Franco-Savoyard marriage alliance was greatly disliked by Austria and Empress Maria Theresa, who feared that Marie Joséphine might gain influence upon Louis XV in France in favor of Savoy, (which was the rival of Austria) in Northern Italy, and that she would undermine the position of the childless Marie Antoinette if she gave birth to an heir to the French throne while the marriage of the Dauphin was still unconsummated. Her spouse Louis Stanislas, aware of the gossip surrounding the unconsummated marriage of his elder brother the Dauphin, made a point of boasting of vigorous conjugal relations between him and his spouse, so as to avoid the suspicions that the marriage was not consummated. It was widely doubted that the marriage was consummated.  


Maria Josepha of Austria (Maria Josepha Benedikta Antonia Theresia Xaveria Philippine, Polish: Maria Józefa)(8 December 1699 – 17 November 1757) was the Queen of Poland by marriage to Augustus III. From 1711 to 1717, she was heir presumptive to the Habsburg Empire. Her sister Maria Amalia became Electress of Bavaria. Maria Josepha was born in Vienna, an Archduchess of Austria, the eldest child of Joseph I, Holy Roman Emperor and Princess Wilhelmina Amalia of Brunswick-Lüneburg. She was named for her father. A marriage between Maria Josepha and Frederick Augustus II, Elector of Saxony (1696–1763) had been suggested by Frederick's father, August II the Strong, since 1704. The fact that Maria Josepha was not allowed to marry a non-Catholic, however, prevented the marriage. When Augustus converted to Catholicism in 1712, the negotiations became serious. Emperor Charles VI forbade Maria Josepha and her sister from marrying until they renounced their positions in the line of succession, securing the succession for Charles's future daughter Maria Theresa. Maria Josepha renounced her claim on 10 August 1719. Ten days later, Maria Josepha and Frederick Augustus married. Through this marriage between the Houses of Wettin and Habsburg, Frederick Augustus II's father hoped to place Saxony in a better position should there arise a war of succession to the Austrian territories. In 1733, Frederick Augustus was elected King of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth as August III the Saxon. Maria Josepha was crowned 20 January 1734. Queen Maria Josepha was described as ambitious, intelligent and religious. She founded many churches and convents and gave her strong support to the Polish Jesuits. Maria Josepha and Frederick Augustus had sixteen children, but only fourteen are recognized by historians.


Maria Josepha Amalia of Saxony (Maria Josepha Amalia Beatrix Xaveria Vincentia Aloysia Franziska de Paula Franziska de Chantal Anna Apollonia Johanna Nepomucena Walburga Theresia Ambrosia)(6 December 1803 – 18 May 1829) was Queen consort of Spain as the wife of King Ferdinand VII of Spain. She was the youngest daughter of Prince Maximilian of Saxony (1759–1838) and his first wife, Princess Carolina of Parma (1770–1804), daughter of Duke Ferdinand of Parma. She was a member of the house of Wettin.Born Princess Maria Josepha Amalia of Saxony, she lost her mother when she was a few months old, so her father sent her to a convent near the Elbe river, where she was raised by the nuns. As a result, Maria Josepha Amalia had a strict religious upbringing and was a fervent Roman Catholic all her life. Ferdinand VII of Spain's second wife, Maria Isabel of Portugal, died in 1818 without leaving any issue. Thus the King began to look for a new consort and his choice fell on Maria Josepha Amalia. They married on 20 October 1819 in Madrid. Although the new queen was too young, naive and inexperienced, the king fell in love with her because of her sweet temper. Besides, she was more attractive than his previous wives, Maria Antonia of Naples and Maria Isabella of Portugal. After his two childless marriages, there was great pressure for the Bourbon dynasty in Spain to ensure that King Ferdinand VII had an heir. Saxon princesses were renowned for their fertility since Maria Josepha Amalia and Ferdinand VII's common ancestors Augustus III of Poland and Maria Josepha of Austria had had some fourteen children, including Ferdinand VII's grandmother and Maria Josepha's grandfather. Nevertheless, the marriage remained childless and Maria Josepha Amalia withdrew from public life. It took a personal letter sent by Pope Pius VII in order to convince the queen that sexual relations between spouses were not contrary to the morality of Catholicism. She died as a result of fevers on 18 May 1829 in Aranjuez, leaving her husband heartbroken, and was buried in El Escorial. Her husband remarried for the fourth time to Maria Christina of the Two Sicilies who eventually gave birth to the future Queen Isabella II of Spain.


Princess Maria Josepha of Saxony (31 May 1867 – 28 May 1944) was the mother of Emperor Charles I of Austria and the fifth child of George of Saxony and Infanta Maria Anna of Portugal. Maria Josepha Louise Philippina Elisabeth Pia Angelica Margaretha was the daughter of the future King George of Saxony (1832–1904) and Infanta Maria Anna of Portugal (1843–1884). On 2 October 1886 at age nineteen, she married Archduke Otto Franz of Austria, "der Schöne" (the handsome), younger brother of the Archduke Franz Ferdinand who would later be killed in Sarajevo. A pious woman, only her strength of religion enabled her to bear the burdens of marriage to the notoriously womanizing "gorgeous Archduke". His frequent absences from his family helped her goal of keeping her children away from his bad influence succeed. Eventually, however, she herself entered into a relationship with the actor Otto Tressler, who had been presented to her by the emperor Franz Joseph, who felt sorry for her because of the adultery of her spouse. Maria Josepha often invited Tressler to her home; he sometimes met her husband and his friends in the doorway. When her husband died, her ability to avoid extravagant displays of grief was much admired. As a widow, she ended her relationship with Tressler, probably because of her sense of what was appropriate behaviour for a widow. With Archduke Otto Franz she had  2 sons.
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« Reply #838 on: September 27, 2021, 07:35:46 PM »

Henrietta is a feminine given name, derived from the male name Henry. The name is an English version of the French Henriette, a female form of Henri. A short version of the name is Harriet, which was considered the "spoken form" of Henrietta, much as Harry was considered the "spoken form" of Henry in medieval England. All these names are derived from Henrik, which is ultimately derived from the Germanic name Heimiric, derived from the word elements heim, or "home" and ric, meaning "power, ruler."


Henrietta Maria of France (1609–1669), daughter of Henry IV of France, wife of Charles I of England

Henriette Marie, Princess Palatine (1626–1651), daughter of Elizabeth Stuart

Mary Henrietta, Princess Royal (1631–1660), daughter of Charles I of England and Henrietta Maria

Henrietta Anne, Duchess of Orleans (1644–1670), daughter of Charles I of England and Henrietta Maria

Henriette Adelaide of Savoy (Enrichetta Adelaide Maria)( 6 November 1636 – 13 June 1676), was Electress of Bavaria by marriage to Ferdinand Maria, Elector of Bavaria. She had much political influence in her adopted country and with her husband did much to improve the welfare of the Electorate of Bavaria.Born at the Castello del Valentino in Turin, she was the older of twin girls; her sister Princess Catherine Beatrice of Savoy died in Turin 26 August 1637. On 7 October 1637 she lost her father Victor Amadeus I, Duke of Savoy, when she was just one year old. Her mother, Christine of France, was the daughter of Henry IV of France and Marie de' Medici. On 8 December 1650 Henriette married Ferdinand Maria, heir to the Electorate of Bavaria future. The next year he became Elector upon the death of his father Maximilian. They had 8 children.

Henrietta Butler, Viscountess Galmoye, previously Henrietta Waldegrave, Baroness Waldegrave (née Lady Henrietta FitzJames)(1667 – 3 April 1730), was an illegitimate daughter of James Stuart, Duke of York, subsequently King of England, Scotland and Ireland, by his mistress, Arabella Churchill (a sister of the first Duke of Marlborough). Upon marrying she became Lady Waldegrave, and then with her second marriage Viscountess Galmoye, as well as Countess of Newcastle (in the Jacobite Peerage).She was the older sister of the celebrated James FitzJames, 1st Duke of Berwick. She was brought up a Roman Catholic and married into a family of the same religion. On 29 November 1683, she married Henry Waldegrave, 1st Baron Waldegrave, and by him had two children. She accompanied her father and his wife in their exile and lived some years at Saint-Germain-en-Laye in France. After her husband's death in 1689, she was involved with an Irish soldier, Mark Talbot. She subsequently married Piers Butler, 3rd Viscount Galmoye, on 3 April 1695. He had been created Earl of Newcastle in the Jacobite Peerage in 1692. The marriage was childless. She died in 1730 and was buried in Navestock.


Henriette Louise de Bourbon (Henriette Louise Marie Françoise Gabrielle) (15 January 1703 – 19 September 1772) was a French princess by birth and a member of the House of Bourbon. She was the abbess of Beaumont-lès-Tours Abbey. Henriette Louise was born at the Palace of Versailles, the seventh child and fifth daughter of Louis III de Bourbon, Prince of Condé and his wife, Louise-Françoise de Bourbon. Henriette Louise's father was a grandson of le Grand Condé, and her mother was the eldest surviving legitimised daughter of King Louis XIV of France and his mistress, Madame de Montespan. Henriette Louise grew up at Fontevraud Abbey. She was one of nine children. In 1725, Henriette Louise as well as her sister Élisabeth Alexandrine was on a list of potential brides presented to King Louis XV. Her name had been placed on the list by her brother, the duc de Bourbon, who was Louis XV's chief minister. Along with his mistress, Madame de Prie, the duke wanted to make his sister the queen in the hopes of being able to influence the young king. Henriette Louise, however, did not want to marry at all, saying that she instead wanted to become a nun like her cousin Louise Adélaïde d'Orléans.


Henrietta Alexandrine Friederike Wilhelmine of Nassau-Weilburg, then of Nassau (areas now part of Germany) (30 October 1797 – 29 December 1829) was the wife of Archduke Charles, Duke of Teschen. Her husband was a notable general of the Napoleonic Wars and victor of the Battle of Aspern-Essling against Napoleon I of France. Henrietta was the youngest daughter of Frederick William of Nassau-Weilburg (1768–1816) and his wife Burgravine Louise Isabelle of Kirchberg. Her paternal grandparents were Karl Christian of Nassau-Weilburg and Princess Wilhelmine Carolina of Orange-Nassau. On 15 September/17 September 1815 in Weilburg, Henrietta married Archduke Charles of Austria. The bride was almost eighteen years old and the groom forty-four. Her husband was a son of Leopold II, Holy Roman Emperor and Maria Louisa of Spain. However he had been adopted and raised by his childless aunt Marie Christine of Austria and her husband Albert of Saxe-Teschen. He was the heir to the Duchy of Teschen and would succeed in 1822. This marriage was a very happy one.Henrietta and Charles had seven children. Henrietta died young of scarlet fever, which she had caught while nursing her children through the same illness. She is the only Protestant buried in the Imperial Crypt in the Capuchin Church.


Marie Henriette of Austria (Marie Henriette Anne)(23 August 1836 – 19 September 1902) was Queen of the Belgians as the wife of King Leopold II. The marriage was arranged against the will of both Marie Henriette and Leopold and became unhappy due to their dissimilarity, and after 1872 the couple lived separate lives, though they continued to appear together in public. Marie Henriette was one of five children from the marriage of Archduke Joseph, Palatine of Hungary, and Duchess Maria Dorothea of Württemberg. Marie Henriette was a cousin of Emperor Ferdinand I of Austria, and granddaughter of Leopold II, Holy Roman Emperor, through her father. She was also a first cousin, once removed to the future Queen Mary of the United Kingdom through her mother.  It was said that she was raised by her mother "as a boy". Marie Henriette was a vivid and energetic person with a strong will and a hot temperament, interested in riding. One day before her 17th birthday, she married 18-year-old Prince Leopold of Belgium, the heir to the throne, on 22 August 1853. Leopold was the second-surviving son of Leopold I of Belgium and his French wife, Louise of Orléans; Marie Henriette was the sister-in-law of Charlotte of Belgium, future Empress of Mexico and a cousin by marriage to Victoria of the United Kingdom and Maria II of Portugal. The marriage was arranged to strengthen the status of the Belgian Monarchy. As the former Protestant monarch of a newly established monarchy, the Belgian king wished his son to marry a member from a Roman Catholic and prestigious dynasty, and the name Habsburg was one of her more important qualities. The marriage further more created an historical link between the new Kingdom of Belgium and the Habsburg dynasty of the Austrian Netherlands. The marriage was suggested by her future father-in-law the king of Belgium to her guardian, the Archduke John of Austria, and arranged by the two men over her head. She was introduced to Leopold on an Imperial court ball at Hofburg in May 1853, and she was informed that she was to marry him. Neither she or Leopold made a good impression on each other. She protested against the marriage plans without success, but was convinced to submit to it by her mother. Leopold himself also commented that he had agreed to the marriage because of his father. Marie Henriette resigned from her rights to the Austrian throne and signed the marriage contract in Vienna on 8 August 1853. A wedding by proxy was celebrated at the Schönbrunn Palace on 10 August, after which she travelled to Brussels, where the final ceremony was celebrated with Leopold in person on 22 August. Marie Henriette was described as intelligent, well educated and cultivated, Leopold as well spoken and interested in military issues, but with no common interests whatsoever. The marriage was arranged against the will of both Marie Henriette and Leopold, and was to be unhappy from the start. On 10 December 1865, King Leopold I died and was succeeded by his son Leopold II, making Marie Henriette queen. When the king was enthroned, there were questions as to whether Marie Henriette should participate, but the king refused and the queen was instead reduced to being a spectator at the ceremony. The couple had 4 children; 3 daughters and 1 son. The latter drowned.


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« Reply #839 on: September 27, 2021, 07:35:56 PM »

Henriette of France (1727–1752) was a French princess, the twin of Louise Élisabeth of France, and the second child of King Louis XV of France and queen consort Marie Leszczyńska.


Princess Henriette of Belgium, later Princess Henriette of Orléans, Duchess of Vendôme (30 November 1870 – 28 March 1948), was the daughter of Prince Philippe, Count of Flanders, and Princess Marie of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen. She was the younger twin sister of Princess Joséphine Marie of Belgium, who died at the age of six weeks in 1871. She married in Brussels, Belgium, on 12 February 1896 Prince Emmanuel of Orléans, 8th Duke of Vendôme (18 January 1872 – 1 February 1931). He was a son of Prince Ferdinand, Duke of Alençon, and Duchess Sophie Charlotte in Bavaria, and was a great-grandson of King Louis-Philippe of France. The couple had 4 children.


Princess Henriette of Schönaich-Carolath[needs IPA] (German: Henriette Hermine Wanda Ida Luise Prinzessin von Schönaich-Carolath)( 25 November 1918 – 16 March 1972) was the youngest daughter of Prince Johann George von Schönaich-Carolath and Princess Hermine Reuss of Greiz, who later became the second wife of Wilhelm II, German Emperor. After Princess Henriette's father died in 1920, her mother married secondly in 1922 to the former German Emperor, Wilhelm II. Hermine had five young children, but it was decided that only the youngest, Princess Henriette, would come to live with them at Doorn. Wilhelm generally stayed out of his stepchildren's affairs, with the exception of Henriette. He seemed to have a genuine affection for her, and she came to be known as "the general". According to Giles MacDonough, Henriette "performed the role of resident grandchild, passing the sugar when coffee was served". On 6 August 1940 at his residence at Doorn, former German Emperor Wilhelm II officially announced his stepdaughter Princess Henriette's engagement with his grandson, Prince Karl Franz of Prussia. Karl Franz (1916–1975) was the only son of Prince Joachim of Prussia and his wife, Princess Marie-Auguste of Anhalt. The couple were married on 1 October 1940 and had three children. The couple divorced on 5 September 1946.


Princess Henriette Anna-Bess Helle Mette Reuss (German: Henriette Prinzessin Reuss)(2 June 1977) is a princess of the formerly sovereign German House of Reuss, rulers of the principalities of Reuss for almost a thousand years.Her branch of the family reigned over the Principality of Reuss-Gera until 1918, although she is not directly descended from any of the rulers. She is the daughter of Prince Heinrich Ruzzo Reuss, a native of Switzerland and Sweden, and his wife, Princess Mette Reuss, (née Rinde), a native of Norway. She is a step-daughter of pop singer Frida Lyngstad, who married her father in 1992. Henriette lives in Switzerland, and is married to German businessman Jan Herud. During the first decade of the 21st century Princess Henriette lived in Boston, while her twin sister, Princess Pauline, lived in London


Princess Henriëtte of Nassau-Weilburg, then of Nassau (22 April 1780,– 2 January 1857) was a daughter of Prince Charles Christian and Carolina of Orange-Nassau, daughter of William IV, Prince of Orange.On 28 January 1797, she married Duke Louis of Württemberg, a son of Duke Friedrich II Eugen, Duke of Württemberg, at the Hermitage, near Bayreuth. They had 5 children.


Henriette Friederike Therese Elisabeth (9 October 1823 – 3 April 1915), daughter of  Joseph, Duke of Saxe-Altenburg (1789–1868) and Duchess Amelia of Württemberg (German: Amalie Therese Luise Wilhelmine Philippine von Württemberg; 28 June 1799 – 28 November 1848)


Princess Wilhelmine Pauline Henriette Amalie Louise (May 7, 1833 – August 7, 1834) daughter of Prince William of Baden and Duchess Elisabeth Alexandrine of Württemberg


Princess Henriette of Liechtenstein (German: Henriette Maria Norberta, Prinzessin von und zu Liechtenstein)(6 June 1843 – 24 December 1931) was a Princess of Liechtenstein and member of the Princely House of Liechtenstein.  Henriette was the seventh daughter and eighth child of Alois II, Prince of Liechtenstein and his wife Countess Franziska Kinsky of Wchinitz and Tettau. On 26 April 1865, in Vienna, she married her first cousin Prince Alfred of Liechtenstein (Prague, 11 June 1842 - Frauenthal castle, 8 October 1907), the son of Prince Franz de Paula of Liechtenstein (1802–1887) and Countess Julia Eudoxia Potocka-Piława (1818–1895). The couple had 10 children together.


Princess Maria Henriette Theresia Aloisa Franziska Sophie Josepha Michaela Adelheid Annunziata Elisabeth Ignatia Benedikta et omnes sancti (6 November 1914 – 13 October 2011), daughter of Prince Aloys of Liechtenstein (Alois Gonzaga Maria Adolf)(17 June 1869– 16 March 1955) and Archduchess Elisabeth Amalie of Austria (7 July 1878 – 13 March 1960). She married in 1943 to Peter Graf von Eltz genannt Faust von Stromberg and had issue.


Henriette Marie, Princess Palatine (17 July 1626 – 18 September 1651) was a German noblewoman of the House of Wittelsbach. Henriette Marie was the third daughter and ninth child of Frederick V, Elector Palatine, the exiled "Winter King" of Bohemia and his consort Elizabeth Stuart. Her paternal grandparents were Frederick IV and Louise Juliana of Nassau. Her maternal grandparents were King James VI and I (of Scotland and England) and his consort Anne of Denmark. She was thus a potential heir to the English and Scottish crowns. On 4 April 1651, in Sárospatak, Hungary, she was married to Sigismund Rákóczi, brother of George Rákóczi II, Prince of Transylvania. Henriette Marie died unexpectedly on 18 September 1651. Her husband followed her to the grave a few months later


Louise Henriette de Bourbon (20 June 1726 – 9 February 1759), Mademoiselle de Conti at birth, was a French princess, who, by marriage, became Duchess of Chartres (1743–1752), then Duchess of Orléans (1752–1759) upon the death of her father-in-law. On 4 February 1752, her husband became the head of the House of Orléans, and the First Prince of the Blood (Premier prince du sang), the most important personage after the immediate members of the royal family. Louise Henriette was born in Paris, the only daughter of Louis Armand de Bourbon, Prince of Conti and Louise Élisabeth de Bourbon. Her father was the second son of François Louis de Bourbon, Prince of Conti known as le Grand Conti and his wife Marie Thérèse de Bourbon. Her paternal grandmother and her maternal grandfather being siblings, her parents were first cousins. One of Louise Henriette's cousins, Louis Jean Marie de Bourbon, Duke of Penthièvre, son of Louis-Alexandre de Bourbon, Count of Toulouse, and heir to the Penthièvre fortune, had proposed marriage to her, but her mother's choice fell upon the heir of the more prestigious House of Orléans. As a result, on 17 December 1743, at the age of seventeen, Louise Henriette married her second cousin, the Duke of Chartres, Louis Philippe d'Orléans, in the chapel of the Palace of Versailles. In 1731, a marriage between the two families had already taken place, that of Henriette's elder brother Louis François I de Bourbon, prince de Conti to Louise Diane d'Orléans. The Duke of Chartres' father, Louis d'Orléans, Duke of Orléans, known as the Pious, accepted his wife's choice because of the princess' upbringing in a convent; however, after a much passionate beginning, Louise Henriette's scandalous behaviour caused the couple to break up Among her extramarital affairs, she is said to have had a relationship with the Count of Melfort whom she met at the Château de Saint-Cloud after the birth of her son. The couple had three children.


Henriette de La Marck (31 October 1542 – 24 June 1601), also known as Henriette of Cleves, was a French noblewoman and courtier. She was the 4th Duchess of Nevers, suo jure Countess of Rethel, and Princess of Mantua by her marriage with Louis I of Gonzaga-Nevers. A very talented landowner, she was one of France's chief creditors until her death. Henriette was born in La Chapelle-d'Angillon, in the department of Cher, France, on 31 October, 1542. She was the eldest daughter and second child of Francis I of Cleves, 1st Duke of Nevers, Count of Rethel, and Marguerite of Bourbon-La Marche.[1] Dauphin Henry (future King Henry II of France) acted as her godfather at her baptism. She had many siblings, including her brothers Francis and James, her father's heirs as rulers of Nevers and Rethel, Henri (who died young), Catherine, and Marie.On 4 March 1565, 22-years old Henriette married Louis I Gonzaga, Prince of Mantua in Moulins, Bourbonnais After her eldest brother Francis had died in 1562 and brother James in 1564 without leaving heirs, Henriette became the suo jure 4th Duchess of Nevers and Countess of Rethel. She had been left with enormous debts from her late father and brothers, but managed well her lands and brought the financial situation back in order. Her profits were such that she eventually became one of the chief creditors of France's unstable state during the Wars of Religion.The couple had 5 children.

Maria Henrietta (3 September 1571 - 3 August 1601): daughter of Henriette of Cleves and Louis I Gonzaga. She Married Henry of Lorraine, Duke of Mayenne


Henrietta Maria (French: Henriette Marie)( 25 November 1609 – 10 September 1669) was Queen of England, Scotland, and Ireland as the wife of Charles I. She was mother of his two immediate successors, Charles II and James II and VII. Contemporaneously, by a decree of her husband, she was known in England as Queen Mary, but she did not like this name and signed her letters "Henriette R" (the "R" standing for regina, Latin for "queen".) Henrietta Maria was the youngest daughter of Henry IV of France (Henry III of Navarre) and his second wife, Marie de' Medici, and named after her parents. She was born at the Palais du Louvre on 25 November 1609, but some historians give her a birth-date of 26 November. Henrietta Maria first met her future husband in 1623 at a court entertainment in Paris, on his way to Spain with the Duke of Buckingham to discuss a possible marriage with Maria Anna of Spain The proposal fell through when Philip IV of Spain demanded he convert to Catholicism and live in Spain for a year as conditions for the marriage. As Philip was aware, such terms were unacceptable and when Charles returned to England in October, he and Buckingham demanded James declare war on Spain. Searching elsewhere for a bride, Charles sent his close friend Henry Rich, 1st Earl of Holland to Paris in 1624. A Francophile and godson of Henry IV of France, Holland strongly favoured the marriage, the terms of which were negotiated by James Hay, 1st Earl of Carlisle Henrietta Maria was aged fifteen at the time of her marriage, which was not unusual for royal princesses of the period. A proxy marriage was held at Notre-Dame de Paris on 1 May 1625, where Duke Claude of Chevreuse stood as proxy for Charles. Shortly after Charles succeeded as king, with the couple spending their first night together at St Augustine's Abbey near Canterbury on 13 June 1625 As a Catholic, Henrietta Maria was unable to participate in the Church of England ceremony on 2 February 1625 when Charles was crowned in Westminster Abbey. A suggestion she be crowned by the Catholic bishop of Mende who accompanied her to England was unacceptable, although she was allowed to watch the ceremony at a discreet distance. After an initially difficult period, she and Charles formed a close partnership and were devoted to each other, but Henrietta Maria never fully assimilated into English society. The couple had 9 children.


Henrietta Anne of England (16 June 1644 O.S. [26 June 1644 N.S.] – 30 June 1670) was the youngest daughter of King Charles I of England, Scotland and Ireland and Henrietta Maria of France. Fleeing England with her mother and governess at the age of three, Henrietta moved to the court of her first cousin, King Louis XIV of France, where she was known as Minette She married her other cousin Philippe I, Duke of Orléans and became a fille de France, but their relationship was marked by frequent tensions over common suitors. The couple had 8 children (including miscarriages and stillbirths).
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