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« Reply #525 on: May 12, 2020, 10:03:38 PM »

great job Princi!  Star

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« Reply #526 on: May 13, 2020, 10:36:29 AM »

Henrietta is a feminine given name, derived from the male name Henry. The name is an English version of the French Henriette, a female form of Henri. A short version of the name is Harriet, which was considered the "spoken form" of Henrietta. All these names are derived from Henrik, which is ultimately derived from the Germanic name Heimiric, derived from the word elements heim, or "home" and ric, meaning "power, ruler."

Henrietta Maria of France (French: Henriette Marie)(1609 – 1669) was queen consort of England, Scotland, and Ireland as the wife of Charles I. She was mother of his two immediate successors, Charles II and James II and VII. Contemporaneously, by a decree of her husband, she was known in England as Queen Mary, but did not like this name and signed her letters "Henriette R". Henrietta Maria was the youngest daughter of Henry IV of France (Henry III of Navarre) and his second wife, Marie de' Medici, and named after her parents. In 1625 she married Charles I. The couple would have 9 children.

Mary, Princess Royal (Mary Henrietta)(1631 –  1660) was Countess of Nassau by marriage to Prince Willem II, and co-regent for her son Willem III during his minority as Sovereign Prince of Orange from 1651 to 1660.She was the eldest daughter of King Charles I of England, Scotland, and Ireland and his wife, Henrietta Maria of France. Her only child later reigned as King of England, Ireland and Scotland. Mary was the first daughter of a British sovereign to hold the title Princess Royal. In 1641 she married Prince Willem II. In March 1647, Mary's husband, Willem II, succeeded his father as stadholder. However, in November 1650, just after his attempt to capture Amsterdam from his political opponents, he died of smallpox.The couple's only child, Willem (later Willem III), was born a few days later. Mary, now a Dowager, was obliged to share the guardianship of her infant son with her mother-in-law, Amalia of Solms-Braunfels, and brother-in-law, Frederick William I, Elector of Brandenburg. They had more power over the young Prince's affairs than she, as evidenced by his being christened Willem, and not Charles as she had desired.She was unpopular with the Dutch because of her sympathies with her own family, the Stuarts. In September 1660, she returned to England. She died there of smallpox on 24 December 1660


Henrietta of England (1644 – 1670) was the youngest daughter of King Charles I of England, Scotland and Ireland and his wife, Henrietta Maria of France. While living at the French court, the princess was given the name Anne in honour of her aunt, the French queen Anne of Austria. In February 1649, Henrietta's mother was informed of the execution of her husband Charles I, who had been beheaded on 30 January. The monarchy was later restored under Charles II, Henrietta's brother. In 1661 Henrietta married Philippe, Duke of Orléans (1640 –  1701), the second surviving son of French king Louis XIII and queen Anne. The marriage started well and Philippe seems to have been a doting husband. A year into the marriage, Henrietta gave birth to a daughter later baptised Marie Louise. The paternity of the child was doubted by some of the court, who insinuated Louis XIV or the Count of Guiche was the father. Henrietta and Guiche may have started an affair early in her marriage, despite his having been an alleged former lover of Philippe. The couple would eventually have 3 surviving children (amongs stillborn children and miscarriages).

Henrietta Godolphin, 2nd Duchess of Marlborough (1681 – 1733) was the daughter of John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough, general of the army, and Sarah Jennings, Duchess of Marlborough, close friend and business manager of Queen Anne. She was born Henrietta Churchill, and became The Hon. Henrietta Churchill when her father was made a Scottish Lord of Parliament in 1682 and Lady Henrietta Churchill in 1689, when her father was created Earl of Marlborough. She married The Hon. Francis Godolphin in 1698, becoming Lady Henrietta Godolphin. She became Viscountess Rialton in 1706 when her father-in-law was created Earl of Godolphin, and Countess of Godolphin in 1712 when her husband succeeded as 2nd Earl of Godolphin. She bore five children during her marriage to Lord Godolphin.

Henrietta "Harriet" Pelham-Holles, Duchess of Newcastle-upon-Tyne (1701 – 1776) was the wife of the British statesman and Prime Minister Thomas Pelham-Holles, 1st Duke of Newcastle-upon-Tyne. She was the daughter of Francis Godolphin, 2nd Earl of Godolphin, and Henrietta Churchill, 2nd Duchess of Marlborough. She was also the granddaughter of Sidney Godolphin, 1st Earl of Godolphin, and John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough, and Sarah Churchill, Duchess of Marlborough.


Marie Henriette of Austria (Marie Henriette Anne)(1836 – 1902) was Queen of the Belgians as the wife of King Leopold II. Marie Henriette was one of five children from the marriage of Archduke Joseph, Palatine of Hungary, and Duchess Maria Dorothea of Württemberg. Marie Henriette was a cousin of Emperor Ferdinand I of Austria, and granddaughter of Leopold II, Holy Roman Emperor, through her father.One day before her 17th birthday, she married 18-year-old Prince Leopold of Belgium, the heir to the throne, in 1853. The marriage was arranged to strengthen the status of the Belgian Monarchy. As the former Protestant monarch of a newly established monarchy, the Belgian king wished his son to marry a member from a Roman Catholic and prestigious dynasty, and the name Habsburg was one of her more important qualities. The marriage became unhappy, and the couple lived more or less separate lives. She became queen in 1865. After the death of their son in 1869, the couple separated completely after having made a last attempt to have another son, which, however, resulted in their daughter Clementine. She gave her daughters a very strict upbringing. Her main interest was in her Hungarian horses. She lived most of her life unhappy and discontented. In 1895 she retreated to Spa; her youngest daughter Clementine replaced her as first lady at the Court in Brussels for the remainder of her husband's life.

Archduchess Maria Henrietta,(full German name: Maria Henrietta Caroline Gabriele, Erzherzogin von Österreich)(1883 – 1956) was a member of the Teschen branch of the House of Habsburg-Lorraine and an Archduchess of Austria and Princess of Bohemia, Hungary, and Tuscany by birth. She was the third child and daughter of Archduke Friedrich, Duke of Teschen and his wife Princess Isabella of Cro˙. She married Prince Gottfried of Hohenlohe-Schillingsfürst, son of Konstantin Prince of Hohenlohe-Waldenburg-Schillingsfürst of Ratibor and Corvey and Marie Antoinette Princess of Sayn-Wittgenstein-Berleburg, in 1908. Maria Henrietta had three children.

Anne Henriette of France (1727 – 1752) was a French princess, the twin of Louise Élisabeth of France, and the second child of King Louis XV of France and queen consort Marie Leszczyńska. She died of smallpox at the age of 24.

Henriette of Cleves, also known as Henriette de La Marck, (1542 –  1601) was a French courtier and noblewoman. She was the suo jure 4th Duchess of Nevers, suo jure Countess of Rethel, and Princess of Mantua through her marriage with Louis I of Gonzaga-Nevers. Henrietta was one of France's chief creditors until her death. She was the eldest daughter and second child of Francis I of Cleves, 1st Duke of Nevers, Count of Rethel, and Marguerite of Bourbon-La Marche. In 1565, 22-years old Henriette married Louis I Gonzaga, Prince of Mantua in Moulins, Bourbonnais. Her husband assumed the titles of Duke of Nevers and 1st Duke of Rethel, while Henriette acquired the new titles of Duchess of Rethel and Princess of Mantua. They had four children.

Maria Henrietta Gonzaga (1571 - 1601), daughter of Henriette of Cleves and Louis I Gonzaga She married Henry of Lorraine, Duke of Mayenne (1578-1621). They had no children.

Princess Henriette Anna-Bess Helle Mette Reuss (German: Henriette Prinzessin Reuss) (1977) is a princess of the formerly sovereign German House of Reuss, rulers of the principalities of Reuss for almost a thousand years. Her branch of the family reigned over the Principality of Reuss-Gera until 1918, although she is not directly descended from any of the rulers. She is the daughter of Prince Heinrich Ruzzo Reuss, a native of Switzerland and Sweden, and his wife, Princess Mette Reuss, (née Rinde), a native of Norway. She is a step-daughter of pop singer Frida Lyngstad, who married her father in 1992. Henriette lives in Switzerland, and is married to German businessman Jan Herud.

Henriette Hermine Wanda Ida Louise of Schönaich-Carolath (1918 - 1972)  was the youngest daughter of Prince Johann George von Schönaich-Carolath and Princess Hermine Reuss of Greiz. Her father died when she was two years old. Her mother remarried two years later to ex-Emperor Wilhelm II, after which she spent her childhood in Huis Doorn. Her stepfather was like a grandfather to her and he was very fond of his young wife's youngest daughter. She married in 1940 in Doorn to Prince Charles of Prussia, a grandson of the German emperor and a son of Prince Joachim of Prussia and Marie Auguste of Anhalt. The couple had three sons. Henriette and Karel divorced in 1946.

Henriette "Hetty / Hetti" by Bohlen and Halbach (1933 as Henriette Auersperg - 2019) was the Daughter of Alois Auersperg (born 1897 as Alois, Prince of Auersperg ) and Henriette Auersperg (born 1903 as Henriette, Countess Larisch von Mönnich , from 1919 Henriette Larisch-Moennich).She married "as the beginning of a marriage of convenience" in 1969 the homosexual  German entrepreneur son and the last offspring of the Krupp dynasty, Arndt von Bohlen and Halbach.


Marie (Mary) Henriette Alexandra Larisch von Moennich (1884–1907), daughter of Georg Larisch von Moennich (1855-1928) and Marie Louise Elisabeth Freiin von Wallersee (1858-1940), the  illegitimate born daughter of actress Henriette Mendel, Baroness von Wallersee (1833–1891) and Ludwig Wilhelm, Duke in Bavaria (1831–1920) (eldest brother Emperess Elisabeth of Austria).

Henriette Mendel, Baroness von Wallersee (1833 – 1891) was a German actress, and the mistress and, later, morganatic wife of Ludwig Wilhelm, Duke in Bavaria. By him she was the mother of Countess Marie Larisch von Moennich. Born Auguste Henriette Mendel in Darmstadt, Hessen-Darmstadt, she was the daughter of Adam Mendel and of Anna Sophie Müller. Henriette and Ludwig had an illegitimate daughter, Marie Louise, born in 1858. Marie would later become famous under her married name, Countess Marie Larisch von Moennich. When Henriette became pregnant a second time, a morganatic marriage was arranged. Ludwig renounced succession rights to the Bavarian throne in 1859. The couple's son Karl Emanuel was born on May 9, 1859, Henriette was created Freifrau von Wallersee on May 19, 1859, and the marriage occurred on May 28, 1859 in Augsburg, Bavaria, at which time her children became Freiin and Freiherr von Wallersee. For the marriage she had to convert to Catholicism. Karl Emanuel only survived a few months, dying on August 1, 1859. The couple had no more children.


Countess Henriette Larisch von Moennich (1903-1994) daughter of Friedrich Larisch von Moennich, Count Larisch von Moennich (1875-1963) and  Marie Luise von Beroldingen, Countess von Beroldingen (1881-1976). Married firstly Johannes Andreas von Orsini und Rosenberg, 5th Fürst von Orsini und Rosenberg (1893-1932) and had children.  Married secondly in 1933,  Alois Maria Joseph Alexander von Auersperg, Prinz von Auersperg (1897-1984), with whom she had a daughter.

Countess Henriette Larisch von Moennich (1853-1916), daughter of Leo Larisch von Moennich, count Larisch von Moennich (1824-1872) and Elena Stirbey, Princess Stirbey (1831-1864) Married in 1871, Heinrich Larisch von Moennich, Count Larisch von Moennich, (1850 - 1918). They had issue.

Countess Henriette Larisch von Moennich (1867-1892) daughter of  Eugen Larisch von Moennich, Count Larisch von Moennich (1835-1880) and Maria Deym von Stritez, Countess Deym von Stríte (1847-1878). Married in 1887, Vienna, to August Maria Rudolf Emanuel Franz von Bellegarde, count of Bellegarde, (1858 - 1929), son of  Franz Alexander Ernst Noyel von Bellegarde, Count von Bellegarde (1833-1912) &   Rudolphine Karoline Kinsky von Wchinitz und Tettau, Countess Kinsky von Wchinitz und Tettau (1836-1899). They had issue.

Countess Henriette of Haugwitz (1799-1884) daughter of Heinrich Wilhelm von Haugwitz, Count von Haugwitz Freiherr von Klein-Obisch (1770-1842) and Anna Philippina Johanna Sophia von Fries, Countess von Fries (1769-1835). Married in 1817,  Heinrich Larisch von Moennich, count Larisch von Mönnich (1793 -1859). They had issue.


Henrietta Howard, Countess of Suffolk (c.1669-1715), formerly Lady Henrietta Somerset, was the second wife of Henry Howard, 6th Earl of Suffolk. Lady Henrietta Somerset was the daughter of Henry Somerset, 1st Duke of Beaufort, and his wife the former Mary Capell. In 1686, Lady Henrietta married Henry Horatio O'Brien, son of the Earl of Thomond, who had inherited the courtesy title "Lord Ibrackan" from his elder half-brother in 1678. They had two children.

Henrietta Howard (1689 –  1767) was a mistress of King George II of Great Britain. Henrietta was one of three daughters of Sir Henry Hobart, 4th Baronet, a Norfolk landowner, by his wife Elizabeth (née Maynard). Her father died in a duel when Henrietta was aged eight, and her mother died four years later in 1701, leaving her an orphan at twelve. She then became the ward of Henry Howard, 5th Earl of Suffolk, marrying his youngest son, Charles Howard, later 9th Earl of Suffolk in 1706. They had one son, the future Henry Howard, 10th Earl of Suffolk. The marriage was unhappy; Charles was a wife-beater and compulsive gambler. In 1714, the couple travelled to Hanover, hoping to ingratiate themselves with the future George I of Great Britain. Henrietta met and became mistress to his son, the future George II, and was appointed a Lady of the Bedchamber to his wife, Caroline of Ansbach. In 1723, the now Prince of Wales made a financial settlement with her husband, who was also a member of his household, in exchange for her services as a royal mistress. Queen Caroline liked Henrietta, and was happy that the King kept a mistress she found congenial, although she would occasionally administer snubs to Henrietta in public. Henrietta was noted for wit and intelligence (although she went deaf at an early age) rather than for beauty. Henrietta and her husband officially separated around 1727, although there was no divorce. Later, after Charles Howard's death in 1733, Henrietta remarried, in 1735, the Hon. George Berkeley, son of the Earl of Berkeley.

Henrietta Mary Alison Newman, daughter of John Francis Newman, himself a son of Sir Cecil Newman, 2nd Bt. Married in 1989 as his second wife Nicholas Alexander, 7th Earl of Caledon (1955). They had 2 children, a son and a daughter. They were divorced.  Caledon's  first wife uses the style of Wendy, Countess of Caledon, his 2nd wife the style Henrietta, Countess of Caledon and his 3rd wife Amanda is now The Countess of Caledon.

Henrietta Hyde, Countess of Rochester (née Boyle)(1646 – 1687) was an English noblewoman. She was one of the Windsor Beauties painted by Sir Peter Lely. She was born in Wiltshire, England to Sir Richard Boyle, 2nd Earl of Cork and Elizabeth Boyle, Countess of Cork. In 1665 she married Laurence Hyde, 1st Earl of Rochester, son of Edward Hyde, 1st Earl of Clarendon and Frances Aylesbury. Henrietta had four children.

Lady Henrietta Hyde (c. 1677,-1730), daughter of Laurence Hyde, 1st Earl of Rochester and Henrietta Hyde, Countess of Rochester. She married Sir James Scott, Earl of Dalkeith KT (1674 – 1705) was an English nobleman and politician. He was the son of James Scott, 1st Duke of Monmouth and Anne Scott, 1st Duchess of Buccleuch. They had six children.

Henrietta Russell, Dowager Duchess of Bedford (born Henrietta Joan Tiarks)(1940) is a landowner and horse breeder, and the widow of Robin Russell, 14th Duke of Bedford. Until her husband succeeded to the Dukedom in 2002, she was better known as the Marchioness of Tavistock. She is the daughter of Henry Frederick Tiarks III (1900 – 1995), a merchant banker with Schroders, and Ina Florence Marshman Bell (1903 – 1989), an actress known as Joan Barry. She married the then Marquess of Tavistock, Robin Russell, in 1961 , thereby becoming the Marchioness of Tavistock. He succeeded his father, becoming the 14th Duke of Bedford, in 2002, at which point Henrietta, became Duchess of Bedford. They had three sons.
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« Reply #527 on: May 14, 2020, 04:05:38 PM »

Alice is a feminine given name used primarily in English and French. It is a form of the Old French name Alis (older Alaďs), short form of Adelais, which is derivation from the Old High German Adalhaidis (see Adelaide), from the Proto-Germanic words *aţala-, meaning "noble" and *haidu-, meaning "appearance; kind" (compare German Adel "nobility", edel "noble", nominalizing suffix -heit "-hood"), hence "of noble character or rank, of nobility".

Adelaide is the English form of a Germanic given name, from the Old High German Adalheidis, meaning "noble natured". The modern German form is Adelheid.  The French form is Adélaďde or Adélaide and Czech is Adéla or Adléta. The name Addie is a diminutive of Adelaide and Heidi is a nickname for Adelheid

Alicia is a feminine given name. It is a variant of Alice

Source: Wikipedia

Alice of Jerusalem (also Haalis, Halis, or Adelicia; c. 1110 - after 1136) was a Princess consort of Antioch by marriage to Bohemond II of Antioch. She engaged in a longlasting power struggle during the reign of her daughter Constance of Antioch. Alice was the second daughter of King Baldwin II of Jerusalem and Morphia of Melitene.

Alice of Champagne (c. 1193 – 1246) was the Queen consort of Cyprus from 1210 to 1218, regent of Cyprus from 1218 to 1223, and of Jerusalem from 1243 to 1246. She was the eldest daughter of Queen Isabella I of Jerusalem and Count Henry II of Champagne. In 1210, Alice married her step-brother King Hugh I of Cyprus, receiving the County of Jaffa as dowry. After her husband's death in 1218, she assumed the regency for their infant son, King Henry I. After a dispute with Philip of Ibelin, bailli of Cyprus in 1223, she left the island. She married Bohemond, heir apparent to the Principality of Antioch and the County of Tripoli, but their marriage was annulled because of kinship. She laid claim to the Kingdom of Jerusalem against the infant Conrad (the son of her niece Queen Isabella II of Jerusalem and the Holy Roman Emperor, Frederick II) who was absent from the kingdom in 1229, but the High Court of Jerusalem rejected her claim. When her son reached the age of majority in 1232, Alice abdicated her regency and departed for France to claim Champagne and Brie. She subsequently renounced her claim and returned to the Holy Land. In 1240, she married Raoul of Nesle who was about half of her age at the time. The High Court of Jerusalem proclaimed Alice and her husband regents for Conrad in 1243, but their power was only nominal. Raoul of Nesle left the kingdom, and Alice, before the end of the year. Alice retained the regency until her death in 1246.


Alice Heine (1858 – 1925) was the American-born Princess consort of Monaco by marriage to Prince Albert I of Monaco. She was born Marie Alice Heine  in the French Quarter of New Orleans, Louisiana. Her French father, Michel Heine, was a scion of a prominent German-rooted Berlin and Paris banking Jewish family. Her mother was Amélie Marie Céleste Miltenberger, daughter of Joseph Alphonse Miltenberger, an architect and cast-iron importer by trade of French Alsatian descent, and his Creole wife, Marie Céleste Dorfeuille The American Civil War sent the family back to France, where the teenaged Alice's youth and beauty and her family's wealth, made a great impression in Parisian society. A & M Heine, her father's firm, helped finance Napoleon III's war with Prussia. Michel and Amélie became regulars in the court of Napoleon III, who, along with the Empress Eugénie, became godparents to the New Orleans-born Heine. Jewish by birth, Alice converted to Roman Catholicism when she married her first husband, Marie Odet Armand Aimable Chapelle de Jumilhac, Marquis of Jumilhac then 7th Duke of Richelieu and Duke of Aiguillon, in 1875. They had one son and one daughter. Alice's second marriage, to Prince Albert I of Monaco, Sovereign Prince of Monaco, occurred in 1889. Whose  first wife had been a daughter of a Scottish duke,  Lady Mary Victoria Hamilton (1850–1922). During her husband's long journeys at sea, Alice took a greater interest in the Monegasque opera season. She brought a strong business acumen, showing an understanding far beyond her years. Having helped put her husband's principality on a sound financial footing, she would devote her energies to making Monaco one of Europe's great cultural centers with its opera, theater, and the ballet. Her affair with composer Isidore de Lara resulted in Prince Albert slapping her in view of an audience at the Salle Garnier. The Prince and Princess of Monaco separated in 1902, but remained married. Upon the prince's death 20 years later, Alice became the Dowager Princess of Monaco. She did not remarry.


Princess Alice, Countess of Athlone, VA, GCVO, GBE (Alice Mary Victoria Augusta Pauline)(1883 – 1981) was a member of the British royal family. She is the longest-lived British princess by descent, and was the last surviving grandchild of Queen Victoria. Her father was Prince Leopold, Duke of Albany, the youngest son of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha. Her mother was Princess Helena of Waldeck and Pyrmont. Princess Alice was one of the carriers of the gene for haemophilia which originated with Queen Victoria. Princess Alice inherited the gene from her father, who died from the disease when she was a year old. In 1904, Princess Alice of Albany married her second cousin once-removed, Prince Alexander of Teck, the brother of Princess Mary, the Princess of Wales (later Queen Mary, consort of George V). After their marriage, Princess Alice was styled Princess Alexander of Teck. Prince and Princess Alexander of Teck had three children.


Alice Mary Liddell-Grainger (1965) daughter of Anne Mary Sibylla Abel Smith (1932) and  David Liddell-Grainger (1930 – 2007). In maternal line a great granddaughter of Princess Alice, Countess of Athlone. Married in 1990 to Pietro Panaggio. Two children.


Princess Alice of Battenberg (Victoria Alice Elizabeth Julia Marie)(1885 – 1969) was the mother of Prince Philip and mother-in-law of Queen Elizabeth II. She was the eldest child of Prince Louis of Battenberg and his wife Princess Victoria of Hesse and by Rhine. Her mother was the eldest daughter of Louis IV, Grand Duke of Hesse and Princess Alice of the United Kingdom,Queen Victoria's second daughter. Her father was the eldest son of Prince Alexander of Hesse and by Rhine through his morganatic marriage to Countess Julia Hauke, who was created Princess of Battenberg in 1858 by Louis III, Grand Duke of Hesse. In 1903 she married Prince Andrew of Greece and Denmark (Greek: Ανδρέας; Danish: Andreas)(1882 – 1944). He was the seventh child and fourth son of King George I of Greece and Olga Constantinovna of Russia. In 1930, she was diagnosed with schizophrenia and was committed to a sanatorium in Switzerland; thereafter, she lived separately from her husband. After her recovery, she devoted most of her remaining years to charity work in Greece. She stayed in Athens during the Second World War, sheltering Jewish refugees, for which she is recognised as "Righteous Among the Nations" by Israel's Holocaust memorial institution, Yad Vashem. After the war, she stayed in Greece and founded a Greek Orthodox nursing order of nuns known as the Christian Sisterhood of Martha and Mary. The couple had 4 daughters and 1 son.
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« Reply #528 on: May 14, 2020, 04:06:02 PM »

Princess Alice of the United Kingdom VA CI (Alice Maud Mary)(1843 – 1878) was the Grand Duchess of Hesse and by Rhine from 1877 to 1878. She was the third child and second daughter of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert. Alice was the first of Queen Victoria's nine children to die, and one of three to be outlived by their mother, who died in 1901. In 1862 she married Louis IV (German: Ludwig IV) (1837 – 1892). The couple had 7 children. Her 2nd son, who suffered from hemophilia, died in 1873 after falling out of a window. In November 1878, the Grand Ducal household fell ill with diphtheria. Alice's eldest daughter Victoria was the first to fall ill, complaining of a stiff neck in the evening of 5 November. Diphtheria was diagnosed the following morning, and soon the disease spread to Alice's children Alix, Marie, Irene, and Ernest. Her husband Louis became infected shortly thereafter. Elisabeth was the only child to not fall ill, having been sent away by Alice to the palace of the Princess Charles, her mother-in-law. Her daughter Marie became seriously ill on 15 November, and Alice was called to her bedside, but by the time she arrived, Marie had choked to death. A distraught Alice wrote to Queen Victoria that the "pain is beyond words". Alice kept the news of Marie's death secret from her children for several weeks, but she finally told Ernest in early December. His reaction was even worse than she had anticipated; at first he refused to believe it. As he sat up crying, Alice broke her rule about physical contact with the ill and gave him a kiss. She became seriously ill with the diphtheria caught from her son. She died 14 december.


Adelaide of Italy (German: Adelheid)(931 – 999 AD), also called Adelaide of Burgundy, was Holy Roman Empress by marriage to Emperor Otto the Great; she was crowned with him by Pope John XII in Rome on 2 February 962. She was regent of the Holy Roman Empire as the guardian of her grandson in 991–995. She was the daughter of Rudolf II of Burgundy, a member of the Elder House of Welf, and Bertha of Swabia.


Adbelahide, Adele, or Adelaide of Aquitaine (also known as Adelaide of Poitiers)( c. 945 or 952 – 1004),was queen consort of France by marriage to Hugh Capet. Adelaide and Hugh were the founders of the Capetian dynasty of France, and Adelaide had some extent of influence over her husband's governance of France. Adelaide was the daughter of William III, Duke of Aquitaine and Adele of Normandy, daughter of Rollo of Normandy. Her father used her as security for a truce with Hugh Capet, whom she married in 969. Adelaide and Hugh had at least three children that lived to adulthood. In 947 she married Lothair II, the nominal King of Italy. The marriage produced a daughter, Emma of Italy, born about 948. She became Queen of Western France by marrying King Lothair of France in 951. They had 4 children together.

Adelaide I (German: Adelheid) 973/74[a] – 1044 or 1045), a member of the royal Ottonian dynasty was the second Princess-abbess of Quedlinburg from 999, and Abbess of Gernrode from 1014, and Abbess of Gandersheim from 1039 until her death, as well as a highly influential kingmaker of medieval Germany. Named after her paternal grandmother, Queen Adelaide of Italy, Abbess Adelaide was the eldest daughter of Emperor Otto II and his consort Theophanu.

Adelheid (died c. 1030), Abbess of Nijvel (Nivelles). Daughter of Matilda of Germany or Matilde of Saxony (979 - 1025) , the third daughter of Otto II, Holy Roman Emperor and his wife, Empress Theophanu &  Ezzo, Count Palatine of Lotharingia.

Adelheid (born c. 1030), daughter of Liudolf of Lotharingia, also Ludolf (c. 1000 – 10 April 1031), the eldest son of Ezzo, Count Palatine of Lotharingia, and his wife Matilde of Germany and Matilda of Zutphen. She was the heiress of her brothers to Zutphen, Waldenburg, etc. She married Godeschalk, Count of Zutphen in right of his wife (b. ca. 1030, died 1063/4).

Adelaide, Abbess of Vilich (c.970 – 1015(?), her date of birth and death are controversial), also known as Adelheid, was the abbess of Vilich  and also of St. Maria im Kapitol in Cologne; she was declared a saint post mortem. After her death she was remembered for the miracles that were ascribed to her. Her parents were Megingoz, count of Guelders, and Gerberga.


Adelaide of Turin (also Adelheid, Adelais, or Adeline)( c. 1014/1020 – 1091) was the countess of part of the March of Ivrea and the marchioness of Turin in Northwestern Italy from 1034 to her death. She was the last of the Arduinici and is often incorrectly associated with Susa. She is sometimes compared to her second cousin, and close contemporary, Matilda of Tuscany. Born in Turin to Ulric Manfred II and Bertha around 1014/1020, Adelaide's early life is not well known. In 1036 or 1037 she married Herman IV (c. 1015-July 1038) who was the Duke of Swabia (1030–1038).Herman died of the plague while fighting for Conrad II at Naples in July 1038 Adelaide remarried in order to secure her vast possessions. Probably in 1041, and certainly before 19 January 1042, Adelaide married Henry, Marquess of Montferrat (c.1020-c.1044/5). Henry died c.1045 and left Adelaide a widow for the second time. Immediately, a third marriage was undertaken, this time to Otto of Savoy (1046). With Otto she had three sons, Peter I, Amadeus II, and Otto. The couple also had two daughters, Bertha, who married Henry IV of Germany, and Adelaide, who married Rudolf of Rheinfelden (who later opposed Henry as King of Germany).

Adelaide of Savoy (German: Adelheid von Turin)(c.1050/2 – 1079), a member of the Burgundian House of Savoy, was Duchess of Swabia from about 1062 until 1079 by her marriage with Rudolf of Rheinfelden, who also was elected German anti-king in 1077. Adelaide's parents were Count Otto of Savoy and his wife Adelaide of Susa from the Arduinici noble family.With Rudolf, Adelaide had at least four children.

Adelaide of Rheinfelden (or Adelaide of Swabia) (German: Adelheid) (1060s – 1090), was Queen Consort of Hungary by marriage to King Ladislaus I of Hungary. Adelaide was born circa 1065 to Rudolf of Rheinfelden, duke of Swabia and German anti-king, and his second wife, Adelaide of Savoy. Around 1077/8 Adelaide married Ladislaus I of Hungary, a member of the Árpád dynasty. Adelaide had two children.

Adelaide (d. 1168), married Ulrich, count of Ramsperg and Hegau (d.c.1155). Daughter of Bertha of Rheinfelden (also Bertha of Bregenz) (born c. 1065; d. after 1128), countess of Kellmünz, who was the daughter of Rudolf of Rheinfelden and her husband Ulrich X of Bregenz.

Adelaide del Vasto (Adelasia, Azalaďs) (c. 1075 – 16 April 1118) was countess of Sicily as the third spouse of Roger I of Sicily, and Queen consort of Jerusalem by marriage to Baldwin I of Jerusalem. She served as regent of Sicily during the minority of her son Roger II of Sicily from 1101 until 1112. She was the daughter of Manfred del Vasto (brother of Boniface del Vasto, marquess of Western Liguria, and Anselm del Vasto). In 1089, Adelaide married Roger I while her sister married Roger's illegitimate son Jordan. Roger I died in 1101, and Adelaide ruled as regent of Sicily for her young sons Simon and Roger II. In 1112 a new marriage was sought for the king. Arnulf of Chocques, Latin Patriarch of Jerusalem, suggested that Baldwin marry Adelaide, as Roger II was now old enough to rule Sicily alone. Baldwin sent ambassadors to Sicily, and somewhat hastily agreed to any terms which Adelaide might have; Adelaide demanded that their son, should they have one, inherit Jerusalem, and if they had no children, the kingdom would pass to her own son Roger II. Adelaide brought with her an enormous amount of badly needed money, as well as some Muslim archers and a thousand other Sicilian soldiers. Adelaide was already well into middle age and no new heir was immediately forthcoming. The king was blamed for a bigamous marriage (as Arda was still alive) and the Patriarch Arnulf was deposed. Pope Paschal II agreed to reinstate him in 1116, provided that he annul the marriage between Baldwin and Adelaide. Baldwin agreed, after falling ill and assuming that renouncing his sin of bigamy would cure him. In 1117 the annulment was performed at Acre, and Adelaide sailed back to Sicily.

Adelaide of Maurienne, also called Alix or Adele (1092 – 18 November 1154) was a member of the House of Savoy who became queen of France as the second wife of King Louis VI (1115-1137). Adelaide was the daughter of Count Humbert II of Savoy and Gisela of Burgundy. Adelaide had the same name as her paternal great-grandmother Adelaide of Susa, ruler of the March of Turin, and her second cousin, Adelaide del Vasto, queen of Jerusalem. Adelaide became the second wife of King Louis VI of France, whom she married in 1115. They had nine children, the second of whom became Louis VII of France.

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« Reply #529 on: May 14, 2020, 04:06:48 PM »

Alice or Adelheid (1144–?), daughter of Robert I of Dreux, nicknamed the Great (c. 1123 – 11 October 1188), who was the fifth son of Louis VI of France and Adélaide de Maurienne and his 2nd wife Hawise of Salisbury (1118–1152), who was the widow of Rotrou III and daughter of Walter Fitz Edward of Salisbury, Sheriff of Wiltshire.

Alice of Courtenay, Countess of Angoulęme (1160 – 1218) was a French noblewoman of the House of Courtenay. Her father was Peter I of Courtenay and her brother was Peter II of Courtenay, Latin Emperor of Constantinople. Alice married twice; by her second husband, Aymer Taillefer, Count of Angoulęme, she was the mother of Isabella of Angoulęme, who was Queen consort of England, as the wife of King John. She is also known as Alix de Courtenay.

Princess Alice, Duchess of Gloucester, GCB, CI, GCVO, GBE (born Lady Alice Christabel Montagu Douglas Scott)( 1901 - 2004) was the wife of Prince Henry, Duke of Gloucester, the third son of King George V and Queen Mary. She was the mother of Prince William of Gloucester and Prince Richard, Duke of Gloucester. She was the third daughter and fifth child of John Montagu Douglas Scott, Duke of Buccleuch and Queensberry, and his wife, the former Lady Margaret Alice "Molly" Bridgeman, daughter of the 4th Earl of Bradford. In 1935 she married Prince Henry, Duke of Gloucester, KG, KT, KP, GCB, GCMG, GCVO, PC (Henry William Frederick Albert)( 1900 –1974) He was the third son and fourth child of King George V and Queen Mary. She suffered two miscarriages, before giving birth to two sons. On 21 August 2003, Princess Alice surpassed the Queen Mother's record as the oldest person in the history of the British royal family by reaching the age of 101 years and 238 days.  On 20 September 2003, at the age of 101 years and 269 days, she was certified by Guinness World Records as the world's longest ever lived royal, surpassing Leonilla, Princess of Sayn-Wittgenstein-Sayn. Princess Alice died on 29 October 2004 in her sleep at Kensington Palace at age 102

Adelaide of Poland (Polish: Adelajda Kazimierzówna) (c. late 1170s / early 1180s – 1211), was a Polish princess and member of the Piast dynasty. She was the daughter of Casimir II the Just, Duke of Sandomierz and High Duke of Poland, by his wife Helena of Znojmo, a Přemyslid princess.

Adelaide of Holland (Dutch: Aleide (Aleidis))( c. 1230 – buried 9 April 1284), Countess of Hainaut, was a Dutch regent. She was a daughter of Floris IV, Count of Holland and Matilda of Brabant In 1246, Adelaide married John I of Avesnes, Count of Hainaut. With John she had 7 children.

Alice of Hainault, Countess Marshal (died 26 October 1317), was the daughter of John de Avenes, Count of Hainault, and Philippine, daughter of the Count of Luxembourg. And a granddaughter of Adelaide of Holland. She was the second wife of Roger Bigod, 5th Earl of Norfolk, Earl Marshal of England.

Aleid van Zandenburg (illegitimate), a daughter of John II (1247 – 1304), Count of Hainaut, Holland, and Zeeland. She was married firstly to Wolfert II of Borselen, lord of Veere, and secondly to Otto III of Buren.

Marie Adélaďde de France, (1732 – 1800), was a French princess, the sixth child and the fourth daughter of King Louis XV of France and his consort, Marie Leszczyńska. As the legitimate daughter of the king, she was a fille de France. She was referred to as Madame Quatričme ("Madame the Fourth"), until the death of her older sister Marie Louise in 1733, as Madame Troisičme, ("Madame the Third"); as Madame Adélaďde from 1737 to 1755; as Madame from 1755 to 1759; and then as Madame Adélaďde again from 1759 until her death. She was named after her paternal grandmother, Marie Adelaide, Dauphine of France.


Louise Marie Adélaďde Eugénie d'Orléans (1777 – 1847) was a French princess, one of the twin daughters of Philippe d'Orléans, known as Philippe Égalité during the French Revolution, and Louise Marie Adélaďde de Bourbon. She was titled Mademoiselle de Chartres at birth, Mademoiselle d'Orléans at the death of her older twin sister in 1782, Mademoiselle (1783–1812), Madame Adélaďde (1830). As a member of the reigning House of Bourbon, she was a princesse du sang.


Adelaide of Saxe-Meiningen (Adelaide Louise Theresa Caroline Amelia; German: Adelheid)(1792 – 1849) was Queen consort of the United Kingdom and Queen consort of Hanover as the wife of King William IV. Adelaide was the daughter of George I, Duke of Saxe-Meiningen, and Luise Eleonore of Hohenlohe-Langenburg. The couple had 3 stillborn children (of which the youngest two were twins) and 2 daughters who died young.

Princess Adelaide of Löwenstein-Wertheim-Rosenberg (1831 – 1909) was the wife of King Miguel I of Portugal but only following his deposition. As a widow, she secured advantageous marriages for their six daughters. She was a daughter of Constantine, Hereditary Prince of Löwenstein-Wertheim-Rosenberg (1802–1838), and Princess Agnes of Hohenlohe-Langenburg. In 1851, Adelaide married the former King Miguel I of Portugal. The bride was 20 years old while the groom was almost 49. They had 7 children.

Marie-Adélaďde (Marie Adelheid Thérčse Hilda Wilhelmine)(1894 –1924), reigned as Grand Duchess of Luxembourg from 1912 until her abdication in 1919. She was the first Grand Duchess regnant of Luxembourg (after five grand dukes), its first female monarch since Duchess Maria Theresa (1740–1780, who was also Austrian Archduchess and Holy Roman Empress)  She was the eldest child of Grand Duke William IV and his wife, Marie Anne of Portugal. Since her father had six daughters and no sons, he proclaimed Marie-Adélaďde as the heir presumptive on 10 July 1907, in order to solve any succession crisis due to the use of Salic law in the monarchy. She ruled through the First World War, and her perceived support for the German occupation forces led to great unpopularity in Luxembourg as well as neighbouring France and Belgium. In 1919, on the advice of Parliament and after enormous pressure from the Luxembourgish people, she abdicated on 14 January 1919 in favour of her younger sister Charlotte who managed to save the monarchy and the dynasty in a national referendum (28 September 1919). After abdicating, Marie-Adélaďde retired in a monastery in Italy, before leaving due to ill health. She died of influenza in Germany in 1924, at the age of 29.

Princess Marie-Adélaďde of Luxembourg (Marie-Adélaďde Louise Thérčse Wilhelmine)(1924 – 2007)[1] was a Luxembourgish princess, the third child and the second daughter of Grand Duchess Charlotte (1896–1985) and Prince Felix of Bourbon-Parma (1893–1970). She married Graf Karl Josef Henckel von Donnersmarck (1928-2008) in 1958. They had four children – three sons and a daughter.

Adélaďde Marie Béatrice Drapé-Frisch (1989) ,  the daughter of Philippe Drapé-Frisch and his wife. In 2012 she married Archduke Christoph Henri Alexander Maria Marcus d'Aviano of Austria (1988), the 2nd son of Archduke Carl Christian of Austria (1954) and Princess Marie Astrid of Luxembourg (1954). The couple has 2 daughters.

Dońa Maria Adelaide of Braganza, Infanta of Portugal, (1912 – 2012) was a member of the royal house of Braganza, daughter of Miguel, Duke of Braganza and Princess Maria Theresa of Löwenstein-Wertheim-Rosenberg. She was married in 1945, to Dr. Nicolaas van Uden (1921 – 1991) who was Dutch and who became a naturalized Portuguese citizen in 1975. Nicolaas van Uden was a medical biochemist and a great scientific authority in the field of yeast development. They had 6 children.

Adelaide of Vohburg (German: Adela or Adelheid)( c. 1125 – after 1187) was Duchess of Swabia from 1147 and German queen from 1152 until 1153, as the first wife of the Hohenstaufen king Frederick Barbarossa, the later Holy Roman Emperor. Adelaide was a daughter of the Bavarian margrave Diepold III of Vohburg (c. 1079 – 1146), probably from his first marriage with Adelaide (Adelajda; c. 1091 – 1127), a daughter of the Polish duke Władysław I Herman and Judith of Swabia. Adelaide and Frederick's marriage was not successful, however. According to some later sources, this was because Adelaide committed adultery. Adelaide was Frederick's queen consort, but the couple remained childless. In 1153 Frederick petitioned Pope Eugene III for an annulment. The separation was granted and confirmed by the Bishop of Constance in March 1153; the justification given on grounds of consanguinity. No longer a queen, Adelaide, apparently unhampered by her former husband, soon after entered into a morganatic marriage with Dietho of Ravensburg, a ministerialis in the service of Duke Welf VI. The marriage produced several children. Dietho died about 1187; Adelaide survived him and died shortly afterwards.

Adelheid of Wolfratshausen (d. 11 January/12 January 1126) was a countess of Sulzbach as the second wife of Berengar II, Count of Sulzbach. Adelheid was a daughter of Otto II, Count of Wolfratshausen and his wife Justizia. Adelheid married Berengar II, Count of Sulzbach. She had six known children

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« Reply #530 on: May 14, 2020, 04:07:09 PM »

Adelheid of Sulzbach, Abbess of Niedernburg in Passau. Daughter of Adelheid of Wolfratshausen and Berengar II, Count of Sulzbach.

Princess Adelheid of Hohenlohe-Langenburg (1835 –1900) was Duchess of Schleswig-Holstein, a niece of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom, a cousin of King Edward VII, and the mother-in-law of Emperor Wilhelm II of Germany. She is the direct most recent common matrilineal ancestress (through women only) of Carl XVI Gustaf of Sweden and Felipe VI of Spain. Adelheid was born the second daughter of Ernst I, Prince of Hohenlohe-Langenburg by his wife Princess Feodora of Leiningen, who was the older, maternal half-sister of the British Queen Victoria. In 1856 Adelheid married Frederick VIII, Duke of Schleswig-Holstein. They were parents to seven children.

Princess Victoria Adelaide of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg (German: Viktoria Adelheid Helene Luise Marie Friederike)(1885 – 1970) She was the eldest daughter of Frederick Ferdinand, Duke of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg and his wife Princess Karoline Mathilde of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Augustenburg. In 1905 she married Charles Edward, Duke of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha. She and Charles Edward had five children.

Princess Alice-Sybilla Calma Beatrice of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (1974), daughter of Ernst Leopold, Prince of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (Ernst Leopold Eduard Wilhelm Josias)(1935 –1996) and his 2nd wife Gertraude Monika Pfeiffer (1938) She married Gerold Hans Carl Franz Reiser in 2001. They have two children born before their marriage

Princess Helena Adelaide of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg (German: Helene Adelheid Viktoria Marie)( 1888 - 1962) was the third eldest daughter of Friedrich Ferdinand, Duke of Schleswig-Holstein and his wife Princess Karoline Mathilde of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Augustenburg. In 1909 she married Prince Harald of Denmark, fourth child and third son of Frederick VIII of Denmark and his wife Princess Louise of Sweden and Norway. They had 5 children. Princess Helena became very unpopular during World War II because of her sympathy for the German occupation and the Nazi party after the German occupation of Denmark in 1940

Princess Adelaide Louise of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg (German: Adelheid Luise)( 1889 –1964) was a daughter of Friedrich Ferdinand, Duke of Schleswig-Holstein and his wife Princess Karoline Mathilde of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Augustenburg. Adelaide married Friedrich, Hereditary Prince of Solms-Baruth (later Friedrich, 3rd Prince of Solms-Baruth), second child and eldest son of Friedrich II, Prince of Solms-Baruth and his wife Countess Luise of Hochberg in  1914. Solms-Baruth was one of the many minor states of the Holy Roman Empire, located in Lower Lusatia. It had lost its independence in the German Mediatization of 1806.Adelaide and Friedrich had five children

Princess Feodora Adelheid of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Augustenburg (1874- 1910), was a daughter of Friedrich Ferdinand, Duke of Schleswig-Holstein and his wife Princess Karoline Mathilde of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Augustenburg.

Princess Adelheid Amalie Gallitzin (also known as Amaliia Samuilovna Golitsyna or in Russian as Амалия Самуиловна Голицына)( 1748 –1806) was the daughter of the Prussian Field Marshal Count Samuel von Schmettau. In 1768 she married Prince Dmitri Alexeievich Gallitzin (1728 –1803). They had 2 children.

Princess Adélaďde Jeanne Marie d'Orléans (1971), daughter of Prince Michel of Orléans, fils de France, Count of Évreux (Michel Joseph Benoît Marie)(1941) and his morganatic wife Béatrice Marie Pasquier de Franclieu. The marriage was not regarded as dynastic, and Prince Michel's wife and children were not initially given traditional Orléanist royal titles. In  1976, Béatrice was allowed by her father-in-law to share ad personam her husband's style, viz., "Her Royal Highness Princess Michel of Orléans, comtesse d'Evreux" Subsequent to the accession as head of the House of Orléans and pretender by his brother Prince Henri, Count of Paris, Duke of France in 1999, his wife and children were recognized as fully dynastic members of the royal house with commensurate styles and titles Adélaďde is a goddaughter of King Juan Carlos I of Spain, married in 2002 to Pierre-Louis Étienne Marcel Éric Dailly (1968). They have children.

Princess Mary Adelaide of Cambridge (Mary Adelaide Wilhelmina Elizabeth)(1833 –1897) was a member of the British royal family, a granddaughter of George III, grandmother of Edward VIII and George VI and great-grandmother of Elizabeth II. She held the title of Duchess of Teck through marriage.Mary Adelaide is remembered as the mother of Queen Mary, the wife of George V. She was one of the first royals to patronise a wide range of charities. Her father was Prince Adolphus, Duke of Cambridge, the youngest surviving son of George III and Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz. Her mother was Princess Augusta of Hesse-Kassel, the daughter of Prince Frederick of Hesse-Cassel. By the age of 30, Mary Adelaide was still unmarried. Her large girth (earning her the disparaging epithet of "Fat Mary") and lack of income were contributing factors, as was her advanced age. However, her royal rank prevented her from marrying someone not of royal blood. Her cousin, Queen Victoria, took pity on her and attempted to arrange pairings. Eventually a suitable candidate was found in Württemberg, Prince Francis of Teck (1837-1900). The Prince was of lower rank than Mary Adelaide, was the product of a morganatic marriage and had no succession rights to the throne of Württemberg, but was at least of princely title and of royal blood. With no other options available, Mary Adelaide decided to marry him. The couple were married in 1866. The Tecks had one daughter and three sons.

Adelaide of Burgundy (c. 1233 –1273) was a daughter of Hugh IV, Duke of Burgundy by his first wife Yolande of Dreux. Alternatively, she was known as Alice (French) or Aleidis (Dutch). She was Duchess of Brabant as a result of her marriage to Henry III, Duke of Brabant in 1251 and would later act as regent of the Duchy following the death of her husband a decade later.

Archduchess Adelheid of Austria (1914 –1971) was a member of the Austrian imperial family, the House of Habsburg-Lorraine. Adelheid was the second child but eldest daughter of the then Archduke Charles of Austria and his wife Zita of Bourbon-Parma. She died unmarried.

Duchess Adelheid of Pottenstein (1061-1106)

Countess Adelaide of Lippe-Biesterfeld (1870 –1948) was the eldest child of Ernest II, Count of Lippe-Biesterfeld and Countess Karoline of Wartensleben. After the death of Woldemar, Prince of Lippe in 1895, her parents were involved in a regency and succession dispute to the principality of Lippe. Though Woldemar's younger brother Alexander succeeded, he was incapable of ruling due to a mental illness. Consequently, two branches of the House of Lippe argued over rights to a regency. Prince Adolf of Schaumburg-Lippe, a brother-in-law of Wilhelm II, German Emperor was chosen, but a court-settlement allowed Ernest to become the regent of Lippe-Detmold in 1897. Adelaide married Prince Friedrich Johann of Saxe-Meiningen, a younger son of Georg II, Duke of Saxe-Meiningen in 1889. They had 6 children.

Princess Adelaide "Adi" of Saxe-Meiningen (Adelaide Erna Caroline Marie Elisabeth; later Princess Adalbert of Prussia)( 1891 –1971) was a daughter of Prince Frederick John of Saxe-Meiningen and his wife Countess Adelaide of Lippe-Biesterfeld. In 1914, at the beginning of World War I, Adelaide married Prince Adalbert of Prussia at Wilhelmshaven, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany He was the third son of Kaiser Wilhelm II of Germany. She and Prince Adalbert had three children.

Adelheid von Nürnberg a.d.H. Hohenzollern, daughter of  Burggraf Friedrich III. von Nürnberg und Elisabeth von Andechs-Meranien; 2nd Wife of  Heinrich II. (I.) zu Castell.

Adelheid zu Castell daughter of Rupert VI. zu Castell and Margareta N.N.

Adelheid von Nassau-Hadamar, daughter of Johann von Nassau-Hadamar und Elisabeth von Waldeck. Wife of  Friedrich VII. (III.) zu Castell.

Adelheid zu Castell-Rüdenhausen; ( 1869- 1871)  Daughter of Wolfgang August Christian Friedrich Carl Erwein Fürst zu Castell-Rüdenhausen; ( 1830 -1913)  and Emma zu Ysenburg und Büdingen in Büdingen, daughter of  Ernst Casimir II. Fürst zu Ysenburg-Büdingen-Büdingen and Thekla zu Erbach-Fürstenau (1841- 1926).

Adelheid von Nell (1938) wife of Hesso Friedrich zu Castell-Rüdenhausen (1940)

 Adelheid von Seefeld (1872-1948) wife of Oskar Friedrich Hermann zu Castell-Rüdenhausen (1869-1919)

Adelheid Dorothea zu Castell-Rüdenhausen; (1982); married in 2010/2011 Marcus von Seckendorff, (1969). Daughter of Ruprecht Friedrich Siegfried Wolfgang Paul zu Castell-Rüdenhausen; (1940) and Dorothea von Loewenich, (1943).

Adelheid zu Castell-Castell; (1818-1900); daughter of  Friedrich Ludwig zu Castell-Castell[9]; (1791 - 1875 ) and Emilie zu Hohenlohe-Langenburg, daughter of  Karl Ludwig zu Hohenlohe-Langenburg and Amalia zu Solms-Baruth, ( 1793- 1859 ).  Married in 1839 Julius zur Lippe-Biesterfeld, son of Ernst zu Lippe-Biesterfeld und Modeste von Unruh, (1812-1884). They had 14 children.

Countess Adelheid Wilhelmine of Lippe-Biesterfeld (1884 –1961), daughter of Friedrich Count of Lippe-Biesterfeld (German: Friedrich Karl Oskar Heinrich Graf und Edler Herr zur Lippe-Biesterfeld)( 1852 - 1892) and  Princess Maria zu Löwenstein-Wertheim-Freudenberg (1861–1941), daughter of Prince Wilhelm of Löwenstein-Wertheim-Freudenberg (1817–1887), and his wife, Olga Gräfin von Schönburg-Glauchau She married in 1921 to Heinrich von Schönburg-Waldenburg (1863–1945)

Princess Marie Adelheid of Lippe (1895 –1993) was a socialite and author who was active in Nazi Germany. As the wife of Hanno Konopath, a prominent Nazi official, Marie Adelheid was a well known and ardent supporter of the Nazi regime. She was instrumental in the Nordic Ring, a forum for the discussion of issues concerning race and eugenics. Countess Marie Adelheid was born the youngest child and only daughter of Count Rudolf of Lippe-Biesterfeld (1856-1931), later Prince Rudolf of Lippe and his wife Princess Luise von Ardeck (a morganatic granddaughter of Frederick William, Elector of Hesse) Marie Adelheid was also a first cousin once-removed of Prince Bernhard of Lippe-Biesterfeld (1911-2004) who, in 1937 became the prince consort of Juliana, future Queen of the Netherlands. At the age of 24, Marie Adelheid wed, in the castle in which she was born at Drogelwitz, Prince Heinrich XXXII Reuss, J(unior) L(ine), a man seventeen years her senior, Heinrich XXXII was a son of Prince Heinrich VII Reuss J.L. (1825-1906) and his wife Princess Marie of Saxe-Weimar. Soon after the wedding in 1920 the marriage began to break down: Marie Adelheid would give birth to a son, Prince Heinrich V, in 1921 and, in order to marry the father before she delivered the child, she divorced Heinrich XXXII at Guben on 18 February and on 12 April married his younger brother, Heinrich XXXV Reuss J.L. (1887-1936) who, to be eligible for the elopement to Bremen, had divorced his wife of 10 years, Princess Maria of Saxe-Altenburg (1888-1947), on 4 March When Heinrich V was two years old, on 23 June 1923, his parents obtained a divorce in Berlin. Thereafter, Marie Adelheid used the title Princess Reuss zur Lippe. Marie Adelheid married a third and final time to commoner Hanno Konopath (born surnamed "Konopacki”) a Nazi government official, in 1927.  This marriage also ended in divorce nine years later in 1936.

Adelheid Jördis von Lohhausen (1939) the 1st wife of Friedrich Carl Otto Luitpold zu Castell-Castell (1940). Married in 1967, divorced in 2004.

Adelheid von der Leyen zu Bloemersheim (1945-2010) the 2nd wife (of 3) of Hubertus Alexander Wolfgang Rüdiger Emanuel Wilhelm von Faber-Castell (1934-2007) Married 1970; divorced 1982. Had daughter Floria-Franziska Marie-Luise Erika von Faber-Castell (1974), who married Heinrich Donatus von Hessen (1966).

Adelheid countess von Galen (1942) Daughter of Georg count von Galen (1912-1992) en Hildegard von Chappuis (1908-1998)

Adelheid countess von Galen – Freiin von Weichs (1924-2020), daughter of Joseph von Galen (1879-1953) and Maria, countess de Marchant et d’Ansembourg (1885-1952).

Adelheid von Bickern wife of Sander I von Galen (1315-1368) Had 4 children.

Aleid von Galen (ca. 1335-1394) daughter of Sander I von Galen and Adelheid von Bickern. She married Dietrich von Gahr (ca. 1330-1378).

 Adelheid Marianne Viktoria Freiin von Weizsäcker (1916–2004) Sister of former Bundespresident of Germany Richard von Weizsäcker. Daughter of Ernst von Weizsäcker and Marianne von Weizsäcker. She married Botho-Ernst Dietlof Graf zu Eulenburg-Wicken (1903–1944). They had 2 daughters.

Adelheid Countess von der Schulenburg-Emden (1834-1870) Daughter of Eduard, Count von der Schulenburg and Adelheid von der Recke. She married Günther Gebhard Ernst Karl, Count von der Schulenburg (Haus Beetzendorf/ Wolfsburger Linie).

Adelheid von der Schulenburg (1943) daughter of Fritz-Dietlof Count von der Schulenburg (1902 – 1944) and Charlotte Kotelmann Her father was a German government official and a member of the German Resistance in the 20 July Plot against Adolf Hitler. Adelheid married Grey Ruthven, 2nd Earl of Gowrie (1939) as his 2nd wife.




Alicia Koplowitz y Romero de Juseu, 7th Marchioness of Bellavista, G.d.E (1954) is a Spanish business magnate and noblewoman. When her father died, she and her sister inherited Construcciones y Contratas, S.A. (CYCSA), a company founded by her father. She then sold her part of the company to her sister and created one of the largest family offices in Europe called Omega Capital. She ranks as Spain's richest woman in Forbes 2013 World's Richest People list (#589 in the world). he second and youngest daughter (after Esther, born in 1953) of Ernesto Koplowitz Sternberg, a Jewish businessman from Upper Silesia who settled down in Spain to escape the increasing German Nazi persecution in the early-1930s, and Esther Romero de Juseu y Armenteros, a Spanish aristocrat. (Alicia and Esther inherited their titles from their mother. Alicia is Marquesa de Bellavista and Marquesa del Real Socorro while Esther was Marquesa de Casa Peńalver, a title now inherited by one of her daughters.) Alicia married Alberto Cortina. In 1990, Alicia divorced Alberto Cortina after he was photographed by paparazzi in 1989 with another woman (Marta Chávarri, then wife of Fernando Falcó, marqués de Cubas) Alicia has three sons with Alberto Cortina. Between 2004 - 2006 Alicia was in a relationship with a Spanish aristocrat Carlos Fitz-James Stuart, 19th Duke of Alba.  Since 2012 she has been in a relationship with a Portuguese businessman and aristocrat Miguel Pais do Amaral, Count of Alferrarede.
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« Reply #531 on: May 20, 2020, 05:12:42 PM »

Sonia is a feminine given name in many areas of the world including the West, Russia, Italy, Iran, and South Asia. Sonia and its variant spellings Sonja and Sonya are derived from the Russian hypocoristic Sonya, an abbreviation of Sofiya (Greek Sophia "Wisdom")

Queen Sonja of Norway (born Sonja Haraldsen)(1937) is the Queen consort of Norway since 17 January 1991 as the wife of King Harald V. A daughter of clothing merchant Karl August Haraldsen (1889–1959)[3] and Dagny Ulrichsen (1896–1994). In June 1959, she first met Crown Prince Harald at a party hosted by Johan H. Stenersen. Later in August, the Crown Prince invited her to his graduation ball, where they were photographed together for the first time. They dated for nine years, although their relationship had been kept secret because she was a commoner. The Crown Prince made it clear to his father, King Olav V, that he would remain unmarried for life unless he could marry her. This would in effect have put an end to the rule of his family, and likely to the monarchy in Norway, as Harald was the sole heir to the throne. Faced with having to choose one of his relatives from the Danish Royal Family, the Dukes of Schleswig-Holstein or even the Grand Dukes of Oldenburg as his new heir in place of his son, Olav V consulted the government for advice and, as a result, Sonja became engaged to Crown Prince Harald on 19 March 1968. The couple married on 29 August 1968. The couple has 2 children: Princess Märtha Louise (1971) and Crown Prince Haakon (1973).

Sonja Anita Maria Bernadotte, Countess of Wisborg (Sonja Anita Maria Haunz)(1944 – 2008) was the widow of Count Lennart Bernadotte, grandson of Sweden's King Gustaf V through his father, Prince Wilhelm, the king's second son. In 1969, Sonja met her future husband Count Lennart Bernadotte of Wisborg whilst she was working as his personal assistant. Lennart was thirty-five years older than Sonja, to the very day—their birthdays were only one day apart. Lennart was married and the father of four adult children. He divorced his wife of almost forty years, with whom his relations had been uneven for some years, in order to marry Sonja.The wedding of Count Lennart and Countess Sonja took place in 1972. The couple had five children together.


Baroness Sonja Potier des Echelles
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« Reply #532 on: May 20, 2020, 05:21:14 PM »

Haakon, also spelled Hĺkon (in Norway), Hakon (in Denmark), Hĺkan (in Sweden), or Hákon, is an older spelling of the modern Norwegian form of the Old Norwegian masculine first name Hákon meaning "High Son" from há (high, chosen) and konr (son, descendant, kin). An old English form is Hacon as in Haconby, Hacon's Village. The name appears in Scottish Gaelic as Ŕcainn, as seen in the place-name Kyleakin, meaning 'Haakon's Narrows', being named after King Haakon IV of Norway.

King Haakon I of Norway, Haakon the Good:
Haakon Haraldsson (c. 920–961), also Haakon the Good (Old Norse: Hákon góđi, Norwegian: Hĺkon den gode) and Haakon Adalsteinfostre (Old Norse: Hákon Ađalsteinsfóstri, Norwegian: Hĺkon Adalsteinsfostre), was the king of Norway from 934 to 961. He was noted for his attempts to introduce Christianity into Norway.

King Haakon Magnusson of Norway:
Haakon Magnusson (Old Norse: Hákon Magnússon, Norwegian: Hĺkon Magnusson; 1068 – February 1095), byname Toresfostre (Old Norse: Ţórisfóstra, meaning "fostered by Tore"), was king of Norway from 1093 to 1095. Haakon was only partially recognized within Norway and his reign was thus of limited significance. He has generally not been counted in the numbered series of Norwegian kings

King Haakon II of Norway, Haakon Herdebrei
Haakon II Sigurdsson (1147 – 7 July 1162), also known as Haakon Herdebrei, was King of Norway from 1157 until 1162 during the Civil war era in Norway.

King Haakon III of Norway, Haakon Sverreson
Haakon III Sverresson (Norwegian: Hĺkon Sverresson, Old Norse: Hákon Sverrisson) (1182 – 1 January 1204) was King of Norway from 1202 to 1204.

King Haakon IV of Norway, Haakon the Old
Haakon IV Haakonsson (ca. March/April 1204 – 16 December 1263; Old Norse: Hákon Hákonarson; Norwegian: Hĺkon Hĺkonsson), sometimes called Haakon the Old in contrast to his namesake son, was King of Norway from 1217 to 1263. His reign lasted for 46 years, longer than any Norwegian king since Harald Fairhair

King Haakon V of Norway, Haakon V Magnusson
Haakon V Magnusson (10 April 1270 – 8 May 1319) (Old Norse: Hákon Magnússon; Modern Norwegian: Hĺkon Magnusson) was king of Norway from 1299 until 1319

King Haakon VI of Norway, Haakon VI Magnusson
Haakon VI of Norway (Norwegian: Hĺkon, Swedish: Hĺkan; 1340–1380), also known as Hĺkan Magnusson, was King of Norway from 1343 until his death and King of Sweden between 1362 and 1364. He is sometimes known as Haakon Magnusson the Younger to distinguish him from his great-grandfather, Haakon V (reigned 1299–1319)

King Haakon VII of Norway, Christian Frederik Carl Georg Valdemar Axel
Haakon VII (born Prince Carl of Denmark)(3 August 1872 – 21 September 1957) was the King of Norway from 1905 until his death in 1957. Originally a Danish prince, he was born in Copenhagen as the son of the future Frederick VIII of Denmark and Louise of Sweden. After the 1905 dissolution of the union between Sweden and Norway, Prince Carl was offered the Norwegian crown. Following a November plebiscite, he accepted the offer and was formally elected King of Norway by the Storting. He took the Old Norse name Haakon and ascended to the throne as Haakon VII, becoming the first independent Norwegian monarch since 1387. He became King of Norway when his grandfather, Christian IX was still reigning in Denmark; and before his father and older brother became kings of Denmark. During his reign he saw his father, his elder brother Christian X, and his nephew Frederick IX ascend the throne of Denmark, in 1906, 1912, and 1947 respectively. Haakon died at the age of 85 in September 1957, after having reigned for nearly 52 years. He was succeeded by his only son, who ascended to the throne as Olav V. In 1896,then Prince Carl married his first cousin Princess Maud of Wales, youngest daughter of the future King Edward VII of the United Kingdom and his wife, Princess Alexandra of Denmark, eldest daughter of King Christian IX and Princess Louise. Their son, Prince Alexander, the future Crown Prince Olav (and eventually king Olav V of Norway), was born on in 1903.

Haakon, Crown Prince of Norway, (If he succeeds as expected, he will be known as Haakon VIII)
Haakon, Crown Prince of Norway ( Haakon Magnus)(20 July 1973) is the only son of King Harald V and Queen Sonja, and heir apparent to the throne of Norway. In 2001, Haakon married Mette-Marit Tjessem Hřiby with whom he has two children.


Haakon Lorentzen (23 August 1954), son of Princess Ragnhild, Mrs Lorentzen (Ragnhild Alexandra)(9 June 1930 – 16 September 2012) and  Erling Lorentzen, a member of the Norwegian merchant upper-class  He married Martha Carvalho de Freitas and had 3 children.

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« Reply #533 on: May 23, 2020, 08:29:43 AM »

How often is a Princess named Wiltrud? Princess Wiltrud of Bavaria (1884-1975) was the daughter of King Ludwig III of Bavaria.
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« Reply #534 on: May 25, 2020, 11:04:08 AM »

Rupprect, Crown prince of Bavaria had 2 daughters named Irmingard. One with his 1st wife, and one with his 2nd wife. The eldest Irmingard sadly died of diphtheria when being around 6/7 months of age.

Princess Irmingard Maria Therese José Cäcilia Adelheid Michaela Antonia Adelgunde of Bavaria (21 September 1902 – 21 April 1903); died of diphtheria. Daughter of Rupprecht, Crown Prince of Bavaria (1869-1955) and his 1st wife Duchess Marie Gabriele in Bavaria (1878-1912).

Princess Irmingard Marie Josefa of Bavaria (29 May 1923 – 23 October 2010).  Daughter of Rupprecht, Crown Prince of Bavaria (1869-1955) and his 2nd wife Princess Antonia of Luxembourg (Antoinette Roberte Sophie Wilhelmine)(7 October 1899 – 31 July 1954) Irmingard married her first cousin Prince Ludwig of Bavaria (1913–2008). They had 3 children.
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« Reply #535 on: May 25, 2020, 11:08:03 AM »

How often is a Princess named Wiltrud? Princess Wiltrud of Bavaria (1884-1975) was the daughter of King Ludwig III of Bavaria.

In my opinion Ludwig III, who had 13 children with his wife, had more daughters with striking or different names.

Hildegarde, Princess of Bavaria (1881–1948)
Notburga, Princess of Bavaria (1883, lived only a few days)
Wiltrud, Princess of Bavaria (1884–1975).
Helmtrud, Princess of Bavaria (1886–1977).
Dietlinde, Princess of Bavaria (1888–1889)
Gundelinde, Princess of Bavaria (1891–1983)
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« Reply #536 on: May 25, 2020, 11:17:53 AM »

María José is a Spanish and Portuguese language female given name. Marie José is the French version. Also sometimes Maria Josepha or Marie Josepha is used.

Infanta Maria José of Portugal (Maria José Joana Eulália Leopoldina Adelaide Isabel Carolina Micaela Rafaela Gabriela Francisca de Assis e de Paula Inęs Sofia Joaquina Teresa Benedita Bernardina)(19 March 1857 – 11 March 1943), sometimes known in English as Maria Josepha, was a Portuguese infanta. Maria José was the fourth child and third daughter of King Miguel I of Portugal and his wife Adelaide of Löwenstein-Wertheim-Rosenberg. Among her sisters were Maria Ana, Grand Duchess of Luxemburg and Maria Antónia, Duchess of Parma. Her only brother was Miguel, Duke of Braganza.
On 29 April 1874 she married the widower Karl Theodor, Duke in Bavaria, the younger brother of Empress Elisabeth of Austria. The couple had 5 children (Karl Theodor also had 1 daughter of his 1st marriage).

Marie-José of Belgium (Marie-José Charlotte Sophie Amélie Henriette Gabrielle; 4 August 1906 – 27 January 2001) was the last Queen of Italy. Her 35-day tenure as queen consort earned her the nickname "the May Queen". The youngest child of King Albert I of the Belgians and his consort, Duchess Elisabeth in Bavaria. Apparently named after her maternal grandmother Infanta Maria José of Portugal. In 1930, she married in Rome Crown Prince Umberto of Italy, from the House of Savoy, and so became Princess of Piedmont (Italian: Principessa di Piemonte). The couple had four children.

Maria Josepha of Austria (Maria Josepha Benedikta Antonia Theresia Xaveria Philippine, Polish: Maria Józefa)(8 December 1699 – 17 November 1757) The eldest child of Joseph I, Holy Roman Emperor and Princess Wilhelmina Amalia of Brunswick-Lüneburg. She was named for her father.  In 1719 she married  Frederick Augustus II, Elector of Saxony (1696–1763) Maria Josepha and Frederick Augustus had sixteen children, but only fourteen are recognized by historians.

Maria Josepha of Saxony (Maria Josepha Karolina Eleonore Franziska Xaveria; 4 November 1731 – 13 March 1767) She was born to  Augustus III, Prince-Elector of Saxony and King of Poland, and Maria Josepha of Austria. Maria Josepha was the ninth of sixteen children and the fifth daughter. At the age of 15 she married Louis, Dauphin of France (4 September 1729 – 20 December 1765)  as his 2nd wife. He had become a widower after the death of his (1st) wife Infanta Maria Teresa Rafaela of Spain (11 June 1726 – 22 July 1746). The couple had 13 children, among others several stillborn.

Princess Maria Josepha of Saxony (31 May 1867 – 28 May 1944) the fifth child of George of Saxony and Infanta Maria Anna of Portugal. In  1886 at age nineteen, she married Archduke Otto Franz of Austria, "der Schöne" (the handsome), younger brother of the Archduke Franz Ferdinand who was killed in Sarajevo. The court in Vienna urgently needed such a wedding to repair their relationship with the Saxon royal family, after both Crown Prince Rudolf and Otto's brother Franz Ferdinand had snubbed the Saxons by rejecting Maria's elder sister Mathilde. A pious woman, only her strength of religion enabled her to bear the burdens of marriage to the notoriously womanizing "gorgeous Archduke". His frequent absences from his family helped her goal of keeping her children away from his bad influence succeed. Eventually, however, she herself entered into a relationship with the actor Otto Tressler, who had been presented to her by the emperor Franz Joseph, who felt sorry for her because of the adultery of her spouse. Maria Josepha often invited Tressler to her home; he sometimes met her husband and his friends in the doorway. When her husband died, her ability to avoid extravagant displays of grief was much admired. As a widow, she ended her relationship with Tressler, probably because of her sense of what was appropriate behaviour for a widow. With Archduke Otto Franz she had 2 sons, among others Archduke Karl Franz of Austria, the last Emperor of Austria.

Maria Josepha Amalia of Saxony (Maria Josepha Amalia Beatrix Xaveria Vincentia Aloysia Franziska de Paula Franziska de Chantal Anna Apollonia Johanna Nepomucena Walburga Theresia Ambrosia)(6 December 1803 – 18 May 1829) She was the youngest daughter of Prince Maximilian of Saxony (1759–1838) and his first wife, Princess Carolina of Parma (1770–1804), daughter of Duke Ferdinand of Parma. She was a member of the house of Wettin. Ferdinand VII of Spain's (14 October 1784 – 29 September 1833) second wife, Maria Isabel of Portugal, died in 1818 without leaving any descendants. Thus the King began to look for a new consort and his choice fell on Maria Josepha Amalia. They married in 1819 in Madrid. The marriage remained childless.


Archduchess Maria Josepha of Austria (Maria Josepha Gabriella Johanna Antonia Anna)(19 March 1751 – 15 October 1767). She was the daughter of Francis I, Holy Roman Emperor (1708–1765) and Maria Theresa of Austria, Holy Roman Empress (1717–1780). She died of smallpox at the age of 16

Maria Josepha of Bavaria (Maria Josepha Antonia Walburga Felicitas Regula)(20 March 1739 – 28 May 1767) She was the seventh and youngest child of Charles Albert, Elector of Bavaria, and Holy Roman Emperor. Her mother, Maria Amalia, was an Archduchess of Austria by birth. Maria Josepha was first married in 1765, to her second cousin, the widowed Joseph, King of the Romans, and heir of Empress Maria Theresa of Austria. The marriage, however, was never happy; it had taken place only under pressure from Joseph's mother, Maria Theresa, who wanted her son to provide an heir to the throne. Joseph, however, had never wanted to remarry after the death of his beloved first wife, Isabella of Parma, although he had made some overtures toward Isabella's younger sister, Maria Luisa of Parma. Maria Luisa, however, was already promised to the Crown Prince of Spain and, in any case, was not interested. Joseph did not find Maria Josepha physically attractive either. Despite Joseph's cold behaviour towards her, Maria Josepha had loved her husband with much ardour and was deeply affected by his unkindness towards her. Being of a meek and timid disposition, and conscious of her own inferiority, she trembled and turned pale whenever she came in her husband's presence. Maria Josepha and Joseph's short-lived marriage did not produce any children, but for much of the two years of her marriage, Josepha's state of health led her and others to suppose that she was pregnant. On 28 May 1767, after only two years of marriage, Maria Josepha died of smallpox as had her predecessor Isabella.


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« Reply #537 on: May 25, 2020, 05:24:54 PM »

Sophia, also spelled Sofia, is a feminine given name, from Greek Σοφία, Sophía, "Wisdom". Diminutive forms include Sophie and Sofie. Sophie (meaning "wisdom") is a version of the name Sophia. The given name is recorded beginning in the 4th century. It is a common female name in the Eastern Orthodox countries. It became very popular in the West beginning in the later 1990s and became one of the most popularly given girls' names in the Western world during the 2010s.

Sofia of Bavaria Wittelsbach (1376–1425), Queen of Bohemia. The youngest child and only daughter of John II, Duke of Bavaria, and his spouse Catherine of Gorizia. In 1389 in Prague, Sophia married Wenceslaus, King of the Romans.

Zoe Palaiologina (Byzantine Greek: Ζωή Παλαιολογίνα), who later changed her name to Sophia Palaiologina (Russian: София Фоминична Палеолог)( ca. 1449 – 7 April 1503), was a Byzantine princess, member of the Imperial Palaiologos family, Grand Princess of Moscow as the second wife of Grand Prince Ivan III. Through her eldest son Vasili III, she was also the grandmother of Ivan the Terrible, the first Tsar of All Russia. Zoe's father was Thomas Palaiologos, Despot of Morea and younger brother of the last Byzantine Emperor, Constantine XI Palaiologos. Her mother was Catherine, the only legitimate daughter and heiress of Centurione II Zaccaria, the last independent Prince of Achaea and Baron of Arcadia.

Safiye Sultan (Ottoman Turkish: صفیه سلطان‎ ) ( c. 1550 – 1619 ), originally named Sofia. She was the Albanian concubine of Murad III and Valide Sultan of the Ottoman Empire as the mother of Mehmed III and the grandmother of Sultans: Ahmed I and Mustafa I. Safiye was also one of the eminent figures during the era known as the Sultanate of Women. She lived in the Ottoman Empire as a courtier during the reigns of seven sultans

Sophia of Hanover (1630–1714), heir to the English throne. Born to Frederick V of the Palatinate, a member of the House of Wittelsbach, and Elizabeth Stuart. In 1658, she married Ernest Augustus, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg, at Heidelberg, who in 1692 became the first Elector of Hanover. Sophia had seven children who reached adulthood. Currently, there are more than 5,000 legitimate descendants of Sophia, although not all are in the line of succession. The Sophia Naturalization Act 1705 granted the right of British nationality to Sophia's non-Roman Catholic descendants those who had obtained the right to British citizenship via this Act at any time before its repeal by the British Nationality Act 1948 retain this lawful right today.

Sophia Charlotte of Hanover (30 October 1668 – 1 February 1705) was the first Queen consort in Prussia as wife of King Frederick I. She was the only daughter of Elector Ernest Augustus of Hanover and his wife Sophia of the Palatinate. Sophia Charlotte and Frederik had 2 sons, Frederik August (died in infancy) and Frederik Wilhelm.

Sophia Dorothea of Brunswick-Lüneburg-Celle (15 September 1666 – 13 November 1726) was the repudiated wife of future King George I of Great Britain, and mother of George II. The union with her first cousin was an arranged marriage of state, instigated by the machinations of his mother, Electress Sophia of Hanover. The marriage of George Louis and Sophia Dorothea was an unhappy one. His immediate family, especially his mother Duchess Sophia, hated and despised Sophia Dorothea. She is best remembered for her alleged affair with Philip Christoph von Königsmarck that led to her being imprisoned in the Castle of Ahlden for the last thirty years of her life. Sophia was the only child of George William, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg by his long-term mistress, Eleonore Desmier d'Olbreuse (1639–1722), Countess of Williamsburg, a Huguenot lady, the daughter of Alexander II Desmier, Marquess of Olbreuse. George William eventually married Eleonore officially in 1676 (they had been married morganatically previously). Sophia and George had 2 children: George II, King of Great Britain and Sophia Dorothea, Queen in Prussia.

Sophia Dorothea of Hanover (26 March 1687 – 28 June 1757) the only daughter of George Louis of Hanover, later King George I of Great Britain, and his wife, Sophia Dorothea of Celle. Sophia Dorothea married her cousin, Crown Prince Frederick William of Prussia, heir apparent to the Prussian throne in 1706. And though Sophia Dorothea disliked him, Frederick William had reportedly felt an attraction to her early on. They had 14 children.

Princess Sophia Dorothea of Prussia (German: Sophia Dorothea Marie von Preußen) (25 January 1719 – 13 November 1765) was the ninth child and fifth daughter of Frederick William I of Prussia and Sophia Dorothea of Hanover. By marriage, she was a Margravine of Brandenburg-Schwedt.In 1734 Sophia Dorothea married her Hohenzollern kinsman Frederick William, Margrave of Brandenburg-Schwedt, son of Philip William, Margrave of Brandenburg-Schwedt, and Princess Johanna Charlotte of Anhalt-Dessau, daughter of John George II, Prince of Anhalt-Dessau. They had five children.

Maria Feodorovna (Russian: Мария Фёдоровна; née Duchess Sophie Dorothea of Württemberg)(25 October 1759 – 5 November 1828 [OS 24 October]) was Empress consort of Russia as the second wife of Tsar Paul I. She was a daughter of Frederick II Eugene, Duke of Württemberg and his wife, Princess Friederike of Brandenburg-Schwedt. She married Paul on 26 September 1776. In spite of her husband's difficult character, Maria Feodorovna made a success of her marriage. Their marriage resulted in the birth of ten children.Duchess Sophia Dorothea of Württemberg (1783–1784), died in infancy. Daughter of Frederik I of Württemberg and his 1st wife Augusta of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel.

Sophia Alekseyevna (Russian: Со́фья Алексе́евна, IPA: [ˈsofʲɪjə ɐlʲɪˈksʲejɪvnə]; 27 September [O.S. 17 September] 1657 – 14 July [O.S. 3 July] 1704) ruled as regent of Russia from 1682 to 1689. She allied herself with a singularly capable courtier and politician, Prince Vasily Golitsyn, to install herself during the minority of her brother Ivan V and half-brother Peter I. Sophia was the third surviving daughter of Tsar Alexis by his first wife, Maria Miloslavskaya.

Princess Sophia Dorothea of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg (generally known as Dorothea) (28 September 1636 – 6 August 1689), was Duchess consort of Brunswick-Lüneburg by marriage to Christian Louis, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg, and Electress of Brandenburg by marriage to Frederick William, Elector of Brandenburg, the "Great Elector".Sophia Alekseyevna (1657–1704), Russian regent. Her parents were  Philip, Duke of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg, and Sophia Hedwig of Saxe-Lauenburg. From her 2nd marriage she had 7 children.
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« Reply #538 on: May 25, 2020, 05:25:14 PM »

Sophia Magdalen of Brandenburg-Kulmbach (1700–1770), Queen consort of Denmark-Norway. She was born to Christian Heinrich, Margrave of Brandenburg-Bayreuth-Kulmbach by his wife, Countess Sophie Christiane of Wolfstein. In 1721 she married the later Christian VI of Denmark. They had 3 children.

Sophia Frederica of Mecklenburg-Schwerin (1758–1794), Princess and Duchess of Mecklenburg-Schwerin. She was the only daughter of Duke Louis of Mecklenburg-Schwerin, second son of Christian Louis II, Duke of Mecklenburg-Schwerin, and Princess Charlotte Sophie of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld.  In 1774, she married Hereditary Prince Frederick of Denmark and Norway, the son of King Frederick V of Denmark and his second wife Juliane Marie of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel, During the first ten years of her marriage (1774-1784), she gave birth to three daughters, the eldest two were stillborn and the third lived only five months, it was only in 1786 when she had the first of her living children, the future King Christian VIII.

Princess Augusta Sophia of the United Kingdom (1768–1840), Duchess of Brunswick and Lüneburg. She was the sixth child and second daughter of King George III and Queen Charlotte. Largely denied access to personal relationships with men of their own rank, several of the daughters of George III embarked on such romances with gentleman at court. Augusta Sophia first met Sir Brent Spencer, a senior Anglo-Irish officer in the British Army, around 1800. As she wrote to her brother, the future King George IV, then Prince Regent, in 1812, the two had entered into an understanding around 1803, while Spencer was stationed in England. In 1805 he was appointed as an equerry to the king. The couple conducted their romance with the utmost privacy, and Augusta asked the Prince Regent in 1812 to consent to her marrying Spencer, promising further discretion in their behaviour. While no record of a marriage between the two exists, it was noted at the court of Hesse-Homburg at the time of her sister Elizabeth's marriage in 1818 that Augusta was "privately married." It was Spencer who informed Augusta of her mother's death later that year, and Spencer was said to be holding a locket with Augusta's picture when he died in 1828.

Princess Sophia of the United Kingdom (1777–1848), British princess. She was the twelfth child and fifth daughter of King George III and Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz. Sophia is perhaps best known for the rumours surrounding a supposed illegitimate child to whom she gave birth as a young woman. Though she never wed, rumours spread that Sophia became pregnant by Thomas Garth, an equerry of her father's, and gave birth to an illegitimate son in the summer of 1800. Other gossip declared the child was the product of rape by her elder brother the Duke of Cumberland, who was deeply unpopular. Historians are divided on the validity of these stories, as some believe she gave birth to Garth's child while others call them tales spread by the Royal Family's political enemies.

Princess Sophia of Gloucester (1773–1844), British princess. She was a great-granddaughter of King George II of Great Britain and niece of King George III. Her father was Prince William Henry, Duke of Gloucester and Edinburgh, the third son of The Prince Frederick, Prince of Wales. Her mother was the Duchess of Gloucester, the illegitimate daughter of Sir Edward Walpole. Sophia was considered as a potential bride for the Duke of Clarence (who later ruled as King William IV), but she expressed no enthusiasm for the match. Sophia never married nor had any children.

Sophia Sidney, Baroness De L'Isle and Dudley (1796–1837), was the eldest illegitimate daughter of William IV of the United Kingdom and his longtime mistress Dorothea Jordan. She was married to Philip Sidney, 1st Baron De L'Isle and Dudley, and had four surviving children.

Sophia Philippa Sidney, daughter of Sophia Sidney, Baroness De L'Isle and Dudley and Philip Sidney, 1st Baron De L'Isle and Dudley. She married Alexander, Graf von Kielmannsegg, a great-grandson of Johann Ludwig, Reichsgraf von Wallmoden-Gimborn (illegitimate son of George II of Great Britain)

Sophia of Nassau (Sophia Wilhelmine Marianne Henriette)(9 July 1836 – 30 December 1913), also Sofia, was Queen of Sweden and Norway as the consort of King Oscar II. She was Queen of Sweden for 35 years, longer than anyone before her, and the longest-serving queen until 2011, when she was surpassed by Queen Silvia. She is also the most recent woman to have been officially Dowager Queen of Sweden. Sophia was the youngest daughter of Wilhelm, Duke of Nassau, by his second wife Princess Pauline Friederica Marie of Württemberg. In 1857 she married the then Prince Oscar of Sweden, Duke of Östergötland. The couple had 4 children, all sons.

Baroness Ebba Sofia Fleetwood (1892–1936), daughter of Prince Oscar Carl August Bernadotte, Count of Wisborg (15 November 1859 – 4 October 1953) and noblewoman Ebba Munck af Fulkila,

Sophia of Prussia (1870–1932), Queen consort of Greece during 1913–1917 and 1920–1922. Her father, Crown Prince Frederick of Prussia, and her mother, Victoria, Princess Royal of the United Kingdom (herself the eldest daughter of Queen Victoria and Albert, Prince Consort) were already the parents of a large family and as the penultimate child, Sophie was eleven years younger than her eldest brother, the future Emperor William II of Germany. Sophie was known as "Sossy" during her childhood (the name was thought to have been picked because it rhymed with "Mossy", the nickname of her younger sister Margaret). In 1889 Sophia married the then  Crown Prince Constantine of Greece ("Tino") .They were third cousins in descent from Paul I of Russia, and second cousins once removed through Frederick William III of Prussia. The couple had 6 children.

Sophie Eila Brandram (23 January 1981), daughter of Richard Paul  George Andrew Brandram (1 April 1948 – 9 May 2020) and his 1st wife Jennifer Steele. Sophie is a paternal granddaughter of Katherine Brandram (née princess of Greece and Denmark), the youngest child and daughter of  Sophia of Prussia & Constantine I of Greece. She married Humphrey Walter Voelcker on 11 February 2017. They have two sons.

Queen Sofía of Spain (born 1938), Queen consort of Spain. The eldest child of King Paul of Greece and his wife, Queen Frederica (née princess of Hannover). In 1962 she married the then infant Juan Carlos of Spain, who later would become King of Spain. Sofia converted from Greek Orthodoxy to Roman Catholicism to become more palatable to Catholic Spain, and thus relinquished her rights to the Greek throne. Along with this, the usual Latinisation of her Greek name (Σοφία) was changed from Sophia to the Spanish variant, Sofía. The couple has 3 children.The then-Princess Sofía was in Greece on a private visit to her brother, King Constantine II, when the 1967 Greek military coup took place. Since then, he has been stripped of his title, citizenship and property in Greece. Except for a brief stay for the funeral of her mother in 1981, Queen Sofía did not visit Greece in the form of the Hellenic Republic until 1998.

Infanta Sofía of Spain (Sofía de Todos los Santos de Borbón y Ortiz)(born 29 April 2007),  Spanish princess. She is the second child and daughter of King Felipe VI and Queen Letizia (née Ortiz Rocasolano).  Sofía was named after her paternal grandmother, Queen Sofía.

Princess Sophie of Greece and Denmark (Greek: Σοφία) (26 June 1914 – 24 November 2001) was the fourth child and youngest daughter of Prince Andrew of Greece and Denmark and Princess Alice of Battenberg. Although the youngest of four sisters, Sophie was the first to wed, marrying her second cousin-once-removed Prince Christoph of Hesse (1901–1943) in 1930. They had 5 children. Sophie's second marriage was to Prince George William of Hanover (her second cousin through Christian IX and third cousin through Victoria, having also been a first cousin once removed of Sophie's first husband, Christoph, in descent from Victoria, Princess Royal) in 1946. Together they had 3 children.

Princess Sofia, Duchess of Värmland (born 1984), wife of Prince Carl Philip, Duke of Värmland. Sofia Hellqvist was born in 1984 at Danderyd Hospital in Danderyd, to a Swedish mother, Marie Britt Rotman (born 1957), a marketing manager in the plastics industry, and a Danish–Swedish father, Erik Oscar Hellqvist (born 1949), employment counsellor at the Swedish employment agency.  Before marrying Prince Carl Philip and becoming a princess of Sweden in 2015, Sofia was a glamour model and reality television contestant. They have two children, Prince Alexander and Prince Gabriel, who are fifth and sixth in the line of succession to the Swedish throne, respectively.

Sophie, Countess of Wessex, (born Sophie Helen Rhys-Jones)(20 January 1965), is a member of the British royal family. She is married to Prince Edward, Earl of Wessex, the youngest son of Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh. Her father, Christopher Bournes Rhys-Jones (born 1931), is a retired sales director for an importer of industrial tyres and rubber goods. Her mother was Mary (née O'Sullivan; 1934–2005), a charity worker and secretary. In 1999 she married Prince Edward. They have 2 children, Lady Louise Windsor (2003) and James, Viscount Severn (2007) In 2001 Sophie had an ectopic pregnancy.

Sophie of Thuringia (20 March 1224 – 29 May 1275) was the second wife and only Duchess consort of Henry II, Duke of Brabant and Lothier. She was the heiress of Hesse which she passed on to her son, Henry. She  was the eldest daughter and second child of Louis IV of Thuringia and St. Elisabeth of Hungary, daughter of King Andrew II of Hungary and Gertrude of Merania. In 1241 at the age of 17, Sophie married Henry II, Duke of Brabant and Lothier as his second wife. Together Henry and Sophie had two children. Sophie also had six stepchildren from her husband's first marriage to Marie.
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« Reply #539 on: May 25, 2020, 05:26:32 PM »

Catherine II (born Sophie of Anhalt-Zerbst)(2 May 1729 – 17 November 1796]), most commonly known as Catherine the Great, was Empress of Russia from 1762 until 1796—the country's longest-ruling female leader.

Sophie Amalie of Brunswick-Lüneburg (24 March 1628 – 20 February 1685) was queen of Denmark and Norway as the consort of the King Frederick III of Denmark. She is known for her political influence, as well as for her cultural impact: she acted as the adviser of Frederick III, and introduced ballet and opera to Denmark. Her parents were George, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg and Anne Eleonore of Hesse-Darmstadt. Sophie Amalie married Prince Frederick in Castle Glücksburg in 1643. The couple had 8 children.

Hedvig Sophia Augusta of Sweden (26 June 1681 – 22 December 1708), Duchess of Holstein-Gottorp, was the eldest child of Charles XI of Sweden and Ulrike Eleonore of Denmark. She was heir presumptive to the Swedish throne until her death and the regent of the duchy of Holstein-Gottorp for her minor son from 1702 to 1708. Some sources refer to her as Sofia. In 1698 at Karlberg she married her cousin, Frederick IV, Duke of Holstein-Gottorp. Her marriage was arranged as a part of the traditional Swedish policy of alliance with Holstein-Gottorp against Denmark; her brother had earlier been expected to marry Frederick's sister, but he refused. The marriage, which had been decided upon during her childhood, took place against her consent and was not happy. She did not like the debauched life of Frederick IV, for which he was known even before their marriage. The couple had 1 son.

Princess Anna Sophie of Denmark (1 September 1647 – 1 July 1717) was the eldest daughter of King Frederick III of Denmark and Sophie Amalie of Brunswick-Lüneburg, and Electress of Saxony from 1680 to 1691 as the wife of John George III. She married Johan Georg in 1666, the relationship between Anna Sophie and John Georg is not described as a happy one. The couple had 2 sons.

Sophie Amalie (19 January 1670 – 27 February 1710), daughter of Christian Albert, Duke of Holstein-Gottorp and Princess Frederica Amalia of Denmark and Norway (11 April 1649 – 30 October 1704). She married on 7 July 1695 to Duke Augustus William of Brunswick-Lüneburg. No issue.

Princess Sophia Hedwig of Denmark and Norway (28 August 1677 – 13 March 1735) was a Danish princess, the daughter of King Christian V and his queen-consort, Charlotte Amalie of Hesse-Kassel. Sophia Hedwig became the object of marriage prospects early on and was betrothed three times. As a child, she became engaged to her cousin, John George IV, Elector of Saxony. This was in line with the traditional policy of dynastic marriage between Denmark and Saxony which had at that point become a tradition. In 1689, it was decided that the marriage was to take place two years later. When John George succeeded his father in 1691, he broke the engagement. In 1692, a marriage to the future Joseph I, Holy Roman Emperor, was suggested, and from 1694 to 1697. However, Sophia Hedwig refused to convert to Catholicism despite considerable pressure to do so by her father. Between 1697 and 1699, there was a Danish policy to create an alliance with Sweden through a double wedding between Charles XII of Sweden and Princess Sophia Hedwig of Denmark, and Prince Charles of Denmark and Hedvig Sophia of Sweden (after the marriage of Hedvig Sophia in 1698, she was replaced by Ulrika Eleonora of Sweden). However, though somewhat encouraging to the idea of a Danish match, Charles XII did in fact not wish to marry at all and the Danish-Swedish alliance was further more met with great resistance in Sweden. Sophia Hedwig remained officially unwed, although they were rumors that she entered a secret marriage with her courtier, the noble Carl Adolph von Plessen (1678-1758).

Sophie Dawes (c. 1795 – 1840), Baronne (Baroness) de Feuchčres by marriage, was an English "adventuress" best known as a mistress of Louis Henry II, Prince of Condé. She was born at St Helens, Isle of Wight, the daughter of an alcoholic fisherman named Richard Daw (or Dawes). She grew up in the workhouse at Newport and after a short period of employment with a local farmer worked as a chambermaid in Portsmouth, then went to London where she worked as a servant in a high-class brothel on Piccadilly. There, she eventually met the exiled duc de Bourbon, afterwards Prince of Condé, in 1811 and became his mistress. She was ambitious, and Condé had her educated well not only in modern languages but, as her still extant exercise books show, in Greek and Latin.[1] He took her to Paris and, to prevent scandal and to qualify her to be received at court, had her married in 1818 to Adrien Victor de Feuchčres, a major in the Royal Guard. The prince provided her dowry and made her husband his aide-de-camp and a baron. The baroness, pretty and clever, became a person of consequence at the court of Louis XVIII.  However, De Feuchčres finally discovered the relations between his wife and Condé, whom he had been assured was her father, and left her, obtaining a legal separation in 1827.

Duchess Sophie Charlotte Augustine in Bavaria (23 February 1847 – 4 May 1897) was a granddaughter-in-law of King Louis Philippe of France, the favourite sister of Empress Elisabeth of Austria and fiancée of King Ludwig II of Bavaria.  She was a daughter of Duke Maximilian Joseph in Bavaria (1808–1888) and Princess Ludovika of Bavaria. The ninth of ten children born to her parents, she was known as Sopherl within the family. She was engaged to her cousin King Ludwig II of Bavaria. Their engagement was publicised on 22 January 1867, but after having repeatedly postponed the wedding date, Ludwig finally cancelled it in October, as it seemed Sophie had fallen in love with the court photographer, Edgar Hanfstaengl. In 1868 she married Prince Ferdinand of Orléans (12 July 1844 – 29 June 1910), Duke of Alençon,  the son of Prince Louis, Duke of Nemours and grandson of the late King Louis Philippe. The couple had 2 children. She died in a fire at the Bazar de la Charité in Paris on 4 May 1897, where she had been helping to raise funds for charity. She refused to be rescued, insisting that the girls, visitors and nuns working alongside her at the bazaar be saved first. A Dominican nun who had managed to escape from the inferno explained that she saw the Duchess get down on her knees and start praying

Princess Sophie (1898–1928), daughter of Prince Emmanuel of Orléans, Duke of Vendôme (Philippe Emmanuel Maximilien Marie Eudes) (18 January 1872 – 1 February 1931) and Princess Henriette of Belgium (1870–1948) She died unmarried in Lugrin in 1928. In 1921, she was rumored to have been engaged to the Crown Prince and Regent of Serbia.

Princess Sophie Maria Friederike Auguste Leopoldine Alexandrine Ernestine Albertine Elisabeth of Saxony, Duchess of Saxony (Full German name: Prinzessin Sophie Maria Friederike Auguste Leopoldine Alexandrine Ernestine Albertine Elisabeth von Sachsen, Herzogin zu Sachsen) (15 March 1845 – 9 March 1867) was the eighth and youngest child of John of Saxony and his wife Amalie Auguste of Bavaria and a younger sister of Albert of Saxony and George of Saxony. Sophie married Duke Karl-Theodor in Bavaria, fifth child and third-eldest son of Duke Maximilian Joseph in Bavaria and his wife Princess Ludovika of Bavaria in 1865. They had one child, daughter Amalie (1865-1912). Childbirth caused severe respiratory problems for Sophie, which progressively weakened her, although she managed to recover. However, a year later she contracted a severe case of influenza that she could not overcome.


Duchess Sophie in Bavaria (German: Sophie Adelheid Ludovika Maria Herzogin in Bayern)(22 February 1875 in Possenhofen, Bavaria – 4 September 1957 in Kreuth, Germany). Her parents were Karl Theodor, Duke in Bavaria, head of a cadet branch of the Bavarian royal family, and an ophthalmologist of recognized reputation, and his second wife, the Infanta Maria José of Braganza, third daughter of King Miguel I, exiled monarch of Portugal. In 1898 in Bavaria's capital, Munich, Sophie Adelheid married Count Hans Veit (Augsburg, 7 April 1862 – Munich, 29 October 1929), head of the mediatized House of Toerring-Jettenbach. They had 3 children.

Princess Sophie of Bavaria (Sophie Friederike Dorothea Wilhelmine)( 27 January 1805 – 28 May 1872) was born to King Maximilian I Joseph of Bavaria and his second wife Caroline of Baden. She was the identical twin sister of Princess Maria Anna of Bavaria, Queen of Saxony as wife of Frederick Augustus II of Saxony. In 1824, she married Archduke Franz Karl of Austria. The couple had 6 children. Her ambition to place her oldest son on the Austrian throne was a constant theme in Austrian politics. At the time she was called "the only man at court". During the Revolution of 1848, she persuaded her somewhat feeble-minded husband to give up his rights to the throne in favour of their son Franz Joseph. Historically, Sophie is remembered for her extremely adversial relationship with Franz Joseph's wife Sisi, who was also her niece. Elisabeth hated Sophie for being strict and demanding to her but there is no evidence that Archduchess had the same feelings toward her niece since she usually described Elisabeth quite pleasantly in her diary and letters.  Nonetheless she had a good relationships with her other daughters-in-law and was caring mother-in-law to Maria Annunziata. She was also noted for her close relationship with Napoleon II, who lived at the Austrian Court as the Duke of Reichstadt. There were rumors of a sexual affair between them. There was even suspicion that Maximilian, her second son, who was born two weeks before Reichstadt's death in 1832, was actually his child. These claims were never verified, but it is certain that they were very good friends and that his death affected her very much.

Sophie, Hereditary Princess of Liechtenstein (born Duchess Sophie in Bavaria)(28 October 1967), is the wife of Alois, Hereditary Prince and Regent of Liechtenstein. Born a Duchess in Bavaria, she belongs to the House of Wittelsbach. Princess Sophie is the eldest of the five daughters of Prince Max, Duke in Bavaria, and Princess Elisabeth, Duchess in Bavaria (née Countess Douglas). Sophie married Hereditary Prince Alois of Liechtenstein in 1993. They have four children.

Archduchess Sophie of Austria (German: Sophie, Erzherzogin von Österreich) (5 March 1855 – 29 May 1857) was the first child and first of three daughters born to Franz Joseph I, Emperor of Austria, and Elisabeth of Bavaria. She died aged two.
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