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« Reply #585 on: June 08, 2020, 04:42:38 PM »

Princess Luise-Dorothea of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen (9 February 1924 – 11 November 1988), daughter of Prince Albrecht Ludwig Leopold Tassilo of Hohenzollern (Potsdam, 28 September 1898 – Bühl, 30 July 1977) and Ilse Margot von Friedeburg She married Egbert Count of Plettenberg on 11 June 1947. They have seven children.


Louise Henrietta of Nassau (Dutch: Louise Henriëtte van Nassau, German: Luise Henriette von Nassau)(7 December 1627 – 18 June 1667) was a Countess of Nassau, granddaughter of William I, Prince of Orange, "William the Silent", and an Electress of Brandenburg.The eldest daughter of Frederick Henry, Prince of Orange, and Amalia of Solms-Braunfels. Louise Henriëtte had to abandon her love for Henri Charles de La Trémoille, Prince of Talmant, son of Henry de La Trémoille, as her mother had royal ambitions for her. However, attempts to conclude an engagement with King Charles II of England came to nothing. Finally she was forced to marry Frederick William, Elector of Brandenburg (1620-1688), "the Great Elector," at The Hague on 7 December 1646, her nineteenth birthday.With Frederick William, Elector of Brandenburg, she had six children.

Princess Luise Dorothea of Prussia (Luise Dorothea Sophie)(29 September 1680 – 23 December 1705) was Hereditary Princess of Hesse-Kassel by marriage to Frederick, Hereditary Prince of Hesse-Kassel. She was the daughter of Frederick I, First King in Prussia by his first wife Elisabeth Henriette of Hesse-Kassel. In 1700, she married her first cousin Frederick, Hereditary Prince of Hesse-Kassel. Frederick was King of Sweden 1720-1751 and Landgrave of Hesse-Kassel from 1730-1751.During her five years of marriage, Luise Dorothea suffered from poor health. She died in childbirth. Frederick remarried to Queen Ulrika Eleonora of Sweden, becoming her prince consort and eventual King regnant of Sweden.


Princess Friederike Luise of Prussia (German: Friederike Luise von Preußen) (29 August 1714 – 4 February 1784) was a daughter of Frederick William I of Prussia and Sophia Dorothea of Hanover and Margravine of Brandenburg-Ansbach.On 30 May 1729 in Berlin, Friederike Luise married her Hohenzollern kinsman Karl Wilhelm Friedrich, Margrave of Brandenburg-Ansbach (12 May 1712 – 3 August 1757). They had two children


Louisa Ulrika of Prussia (Swedish: Lovisa Ulrika; German: Luise Ulrike) (24 July 1720 – 16 July 1782) was Queen of Sweden from 1751 to 1771 as the consort of King Adolf Frederick. She was queen mother during the reign of King Gustav III.Louisa Ulrika was born in Berlin as the daughter of Frederick William I of Prussia and his wife Sophia Dorothea of Hanover, and was thus a younger sister of both Wilhelmine of Bayreuth and Frederick the Great. In 1744 she married King Adolf Frederick. They had 5 children.

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« Reply #586 on: June 08, 2020, 05:28:32 PM »

Stephanie is a female name that comes from the Greek name Στέφανος (Stephanos) meaning "crown". The male form is Stephen. Forms of Stephanie in other languages include the German "Stefanie", the Italian, Czech, Polish, and Russian "Stefania", the Portuguese Estefânia (although the use of that version has become rare, and both the English and French versions are the ones commonly used), and the Spanish Estefanía. The form Stéphanie is from the French language, but Stephanie is now widely used both in English- and Spanish-speaking cultures

Princess Stephanie Josephine Karola Philippine Leopoldine Marie of Hohenzollern (8 April 1895 –7 August 1975) daughter of  Prince Karl Anton of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen, later simply of Hohenzollern (1 September 1868 - 21 February 1919) and his 1st cousin and wife Princess Joséphine Caroline of Belgium (18 October 1872 – 6 January 1958)  She married Joseph Ernst, Count of Glött on 18 May 1920 and they were divorced on 25 May 1943.


Baroness Stephanie Eyrl von und zu Waldgries und Liebenaich (17 December 1930), daughter of Princess Marie Antoinette Wilhelmine Auguste Viktoria of Hohenzollern (23 October 1896 – 4 July 1965) and  Baron Egon Eyrl von und zu Waldgries und Liebenaich. She married Josef von Zallinger-Stillendorf on 27 November 1950. They have four children.

Princess Stéphanie of Belgium (21 May 1864 – 23 August 1945), a Belgian princess by birth, became Crown Princess of Austria through her marriage to the heir-apparent of the Habsburg dynasty, Archduke Rudolf. She was famously widowed in 1889 when Rudolf and his mistress, Mary Vetsera, were found dead in an apparent murder-suicide pact at the Imperial hunting lodge at Mayerling in the Vienna Woods. Her mother, Queen Marie Henriette, was an Archduchess of Austria by birth and aunt to the Queen of Spain. Her father, Leopold II of Belgium, finally became King of the Belgians in December 1865. The royal couple were ill-suited for each other and had an unhappy marriage. Leopold had little interest in Stéphanie and her older sister Princess Louise, and the education of his daughters was neglected In 1881, several weeks before her seventeenth birthday, Princess Stéphanie of Belgium married the Crown Prince Rudolf of Austria. The marriage was happy at first, but difficulties reportedly developed. Though intelligent, Rudolf was highly strung, unconventional, impulsive and very liberal, while Stéphanie's very conservative upbringing left her conventional, formal, and reactionary. The couple only had 1 child: Archduchess Elisabeth Marie of Austria on 2 September 1883. She was known within the family as "Erzsi," short for "Erzsébet," the Hungarian form of "Elisabeth." Stephanie received little support from the Imperial family during her marriage. The relationship between Stephanie and Rudolf broke down quickly. In 1886, Rudolf infected Stephanie with gonorrhea which made further pregnancies impossible, and they reportedly discussed divorce. Both began to seek consolation outside their marriage. Stéphanie married again on 22 March 1900 with Prince Lónyay de Nagy-Lónya et Vásárosnamény ( 24 August 1863 -  20 July 1946), a Hungarian nobleman of unequal rank who, in 1917, was elevated by the Emperor of Austria to the rank of Fürst. Her father was so furious at the marriage that he forbade Stéphanie to see her dying mother


Princess Stéphanie of Windisch-Graetz (April 4, 1909  – May 29, 2005) was the daughter of Prince Otto Weriand of Windisch-Graetz (1873–1952) and Archduchess Elisabeth Marie of Austria (1883–1963), only child of Crown Prince Rudolf of Austria and Princess Stéphanie of Belgium. She was the great-grandchild of Emperor Franz-Joseph and Empress Elisabeth ('Sissi') of Austria. She was also the great-grandchild of King Leopold II of Belgium. Her full name was Stéphanie Eleonore Maria Elisabeth Kamilla Philomena Veronika zu Windisch-Grätz in German, and Stéphanie Éléonore Marie Élisabeth Camille Philomène Véronique de Windisch-Grätz in French. She may have been named after her maternal grandmother, Princess Stéphanie of Belgium. Her nickname in the family was Fée. As a child she suffered greatly from her mother's frequent absences, and her parents' inharmonious marriage. The couple was separated in 1924 and divorced in 1948. Her mother came to live in Brussels with the four children and Princess Clementine of Belgium offered a friendly refuge to Stéphanie. In 1921, Archduchess Elisabeth had begun a relationship with the Austrian socialist member of parliament Leopold Petznek, whom she eventually married in 1948. Stéphanie got along well with her stepfather, but her relationship with her mother was not very good, and worsened after her second marriage. Archduchess Elisabeth did not like Karl-Axel Björklund, and forbade him her house. Stéphanie financially supported her father Otto Weriand in later life. In 1933, Stéphanie married Count Pierre d'Alcantara de Querrieu. Count d'Alcantara was the son of Jean d'Alcantara de Querrieu and Baroness Marie-Lucie t'Kint de Roodenbeeke. Count d'Alcantara was member of the household of King Leopold III. In 1942 he was arrested by the Gestapo and died two years later in the Sachsenhausen concentration camp. She had one child by her first husband. In 1945, after the death of her husband, she married Karl-Axel Björklund (1906–1986). She had one child by her second husband.


Stephanie or Estefania (died after 1066) was the Queen consort of Navarre by marriage to García Sánchez III of Navarre. Early chroniclers are in conflict over her parentage.


Stéphanie, Grand Duchess of Baden (Stéphanie Louise Adrienne de Beauharnais; August 28, 1789 – January 29, 1860) was a French princess and the Grand Duchess consort of Baden by marriage to Karl, Grand Duke of Baden. Daugther of Claude de Beauharnais (26 September 1756 – 10 January 1819) and Claudine Françoise Adrienne Gabrielle de Lézay-Marnézia. In 1806 she married Charles (Karl Ludwig Friedrich) of Baden (8 July 1786– 8 December 1818)He and Grand Duchess Stephanie would have five children.


Stephanie of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen (Stephanie Josepha Friederike Wilhelmine Antonia; Portuguese: Estefânia)( 15 July 1837 – 17 July 1859) was the Queen consort of King Peter V of Portugal. Stephanie was the eldest daughter of Karl Anton, Prince of Hohenzollern, head of the House of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen, and his wife Princess Josephine of Baden. Stephanie married King Peter V of Portugal by proxy on 29 April 1858 There were no children from this marriage.


Princess Stephanie Josephine Karola Philippine Leopoldine Marie of Hohenzollern (8 April 1895 – 7 August 1975), daughter of  Princess Joséphine Caroline of Belgium (18 October 1872- 6 January 1958) and Prince Karl Anton of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen (1 September 1868 – 21 February 1919) She married Joseph Ernst Prince Fugger of Glött, on 18 May 1920 and they were divorced in 1943.


Stephanie of Milly, Lady of Oultrejordain (died 1197), an influential figure in the Kingdom of Jerusalem

Stephanie of Milly, Lady of Gibelet, an influential figure in the Kingdom of Jerusalem, first cousin of the former

Princess Stéphanie of Monaco (born 1965), youngest child of Grace Kelly and Prince Rainier of Monaco She is the younger sister of Albert II, Prince of Monaco, and Caroline, Princess of Hanover. Currently 14th in the line of succession to the Monegasque throne, she has been a singer, swimwear designer and fashion model. Stéphanie had dated Paul Belmondo, Anthony Delon, Rob Lowe, Mario Oliver Jutard and Jean-Yves Le Fur before she began a relationship with her bodyguard Daniel Ducruet in 1992 The couple have two children, Louis, and Pauline Ducruet, born in 1992 and 1994 respectively The children were included in the line of succession to the Monegasque throne when Stéphanie married Ducruet on 1 July 1995 at Monaco town hall. The couple divorced on 4 October 1996. Stéphanie gave birth to her third child, Camille Gottlieb, on 15 July 1998 Although she did not identify the father's name on the birth certificate, many suspected, from the start, that Camille's father is Jean Raymond Gottlieb. As her parents never married, Camille is not included in the line of succession to the Monegasque throne.In 2001, Stéphanie began a relationship with married elephant trainer Franco Knie and moved, along with her three children, into Knie's circus caravan. However, that relationship came to an end in 2002, and Stéphanie and her family returned to Monaco On 12 September 2003, Stéphanie married Portuguese acrobat Adans Lopez Peres, a member of Knie's circus ensemble The marriage ended in divorce on 24 November 2004.


Stéphanie, Hereditary Grand Duchess of Luxembourg (born Countess Stéphanie Marie Claudine Christine de Lannoy on 18 February 1984), is the wife of Hereditary Grand Duke Guillaume, heir apparent to the throne of Luxembourg. She is the youngest child and fourth daughter of the eight children of Count Philippe de Lannoy (1922–2019) and Alix della Faille de Leverghem (1941–2012). In 2012 she married Hereditary Grand Duke Guillaume of Luxembourg. Stéphanie and Guillaume have a son, Prince Charles, born on 10 May 2020.


Countess Stephanie von Wurmbrand-Stuppach (December 26, 1849 – February 16, 1919) was a Hungarian pianist and composer. She was also known as Stephanie Brand-Vrabely Her father, Karl von Vrabély, was a director of the Royal Hungarian Mail. Her mother, Seraphine Edle von Szlemenics, was a Doctor of Laws, the daughter of the Privy Councillor Professor Paul von Szlemenics. On July 6, 1869, she married Count Ernst von Wurmbrand-Stuppach.
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« Reply #587 on: June 08, 2020, 06:03:28 PM »

Charlotte is a female given name, a female form of the male name Charlot, a diminutive of Charles. It is of French origin meaning "free man" or "petite". The name dates back to at least the 14th century. Other names for Charlotte are Charlie, Lottie, Lotte, Carlota and Carlotta.

Princess Charlotte of Cambridge (Charlotte Elizabeth Diana)( born 2 May 2015) is a member of the British royal family. She is the second child and only daughter of Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, and Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge. She is fourth in the line of succession to the British throne


Charlotte Stuart, styled Duchess of Albany (29 October 1753 – 17 November 1789) was the illegitimate daughter of the Jacobite pretender Prince Charles Edward Stuart ('Bonnie Prince Charlie' or the 'Young Pretender') and his only child to survive infancy. Her mother was Clementina Walkinshaw, who was mistress to the Prince from 1752 until 1760. After years of abuse, Clementina left him, taking Charlotte with her. Charlotte spent most of her life in French convents, estranged from a father who refused to make any provision for her. Unable to marry, she herself became a mistress with illegitimate children, taking Ferdinand de Rohan, Archbishop of Bordeaux, as her lover. She was finally reconciled with her father in 1784, when he legitimised her and created her Duchess of Albany in the Jacobite Peerage. She left her own children with her mother, and became her father's carer and companion in the last years of his life, before dying less than two years after him. Her three children were raised in anonymity; however, as the only grandchildren of the pretender, they have been the subject of Jacobite interest since their lineage was uncovered in the 20th century.


Charlotte (Charlotte Adelgonde Élise/Elisabeth Marie Wilhelmine)(23 January 1896 – 9 July 1985)she was the second daughter of Grand Duke William IV and his wife, Marie Anne of Portugal. Charlotte reigned as Grand Duchess of Luxembourg from 1919 until her abdication in 1964. She acceded to the throne on 14 January 1919 following the abdication of her sister, Marie-Adélaïde, due to political pressure over Marie-Adélaïde's role during the German occupation of Luxembourg during World War I. She married Prince Felix of Bourbon-Parma on 6 November 1919. They had six children.


Charlotte, Princess Royal (Charlotte Augusta Matilda)(29 September 1766 – 5 October 1828), was Queen of Württemberg as the wife of King Frederick I. She was the first daughter and fourth child of King George III of the United Kingdom and his wife, Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz. In 1797, the Princess Royal was married to Frederick, Hereditary Prince of Württemberg, the eldest son and heir apparent of Frederick II Eugene, Duke of Württemberg and his wife, Margravine Sophia Dorothea of Brandenburg-Schwedt. The marriage between Duke Frederick and the Princess Royal produced one child: a stillborn daughter on 27 April 1798.


Charlotte of Belgium (7 June 1840 – 19 January 1927) was a Belgian princess who became Empress of Mexico when her husband accepted the Imperial Throne of Mexico and reigned as Maximilian I of Mexico. The only daughter of King Leopold I of Belgium and Louise of Orléans In 1857, Charlotte married her second cousin Archduke Maximilian of Austria. They had no issue. In the early 1860s, the ambitious Napoleon III initiated the French intervention in Mexico. France, eager to turn Mexico into a satellite state, searched for a suitable figurehead to serve as the nominal emperor of Mexico. His choice was Maximilian, who held no real power in Italy and was eager for a more challenging role. Against his brother's advice, Maximilian accepted the Mexican crown and the couple sailed for the New World. Only months after the coronation, however, Napoleon III began signaling his abandonment of Maximilian, and the French began to withdraw their troops from Mexico. This strategic pullback was a potentially fatal blow to the infant Mexican monarchy. Charlotte traveled to Europe to find support. With her efforts all falling to ruin Carlota began manifesting symptoms of paranoia and suffered a profound cognitive and emotional collapse. While the Empress was resting, the Emperor of Austria and the King of Belgium sent delegations to Miramare Castle. Emperor Maximilian was captured by Mexican Republican forces and executed on 19 June 1867. Now archduchess again, she was obedient to the Austrian court, and Count Karl of Bombelles tried to keep her in Miramare. Discussions between the imperial court and Brussels became more important, because of the heritage. The emperor placed Charlotte under custody of his brother Archduke Karl Ludwig of Austria. The king sent his wife to Vienna to visit her cousin Emperor Franz-Josef and take care of Charlotte.Charlotte was kept under observation by a team of medical and imperial guardsHistorians think that after the death of the Emperor in Mexico, Charlotte only had the status of a rich dowager. For the Viennese court and imperial family it was in their financial interest to keep her in Miramare. When she was in Belgium the Viennese court would need to pay her dowry to Leopold in Belgium. Charlotte and her sister-in-law were allowed to go back to Belgium where the king gave her court at Bouchout Castle in Meise, Belgium. During the final years of his life the king cared for his sister. During World War I, there was fighting near Bouchout Castle. The occupying German army did not, however, enter the grounds, over which an Austro-Hungarian flag flewAs Carlota's illness progressed, her paranoia faded. She remained deeply in love with her husband. After his death, she cherished all of the surviving possessions they had enjoyed in common. Carlota died of pneumonia brought on by influenza


Charlotte of Bourbon, Queen of Cyprus (1388-1422)

Charlotte of Cyprus (1444-1487), Queen of Jerusalem and Armenia

Charlotte Jemima Henrietta Maria FitzRoy, Countess of Yarmouth (c. 1650 – 28 July 1684) was one of the many acknowledged illegitimate children of Charles II of England Her mother, Elizabeth Killigrew Boyle, wife of Francis Boyle (afterwards Viscount Shannon in Ireland), had been a maid of honour to Charles II's mother, Queen Henrietta Maria. Charlotte married firstly James Howard, with whom she had a daughter, Stuarta. In 1672 she married William Paston, later the second Earl of Yarmouth, a member of the Paston family, and had issue.


Lady Charlotte Paston (1675–1736), daughter of Charlotte Fitzroy and William Paston. She married Thomas Herne of Haveringland Hall, Norfolk, and had a son, Paston Herne, whose illegitimate daughter Anne Herne married Sir Everard Buckworth (later Buckworth-Herne), 5th Baronet, and was the mother of Sir Buckworth Buckworth-Herne-Soame, 6th Baronet. Lady Charlotte was also married to a Major Weldron


Charlotte Lee, Countess of Lichfield (5 September 1664 – 17 February 1718), formerly Lady Charlotte Fitzroy, was the illegitimate daughter of King Charles II of England by one of his best known mistresses, Barbara Villiers, 1st Duchess of Cleveland. Known for her beauty, she was married at age 12 to her husband, Edward Henry Lee, 1st Earl of Lichfield, with whom she had a large family.


Charlotte Lee, Lady Baltimore (13 March 1678 Old Style – 22 January 1721 Old Style), was an English noblewoman, and granddaughter of King Charles II of England and his mistress Barbara Villiers. Daughter of Charlotte Lee and Edward Henry Lee. She married in 1699, Benedict Leonard Calvert, 4th Baron Baltimore, from whom she separated in 1705; she later married Christopher Crowe


Charlotte (c. 1724 – 1794),daughter of George Henry Lee I, 2nd Earl of Lichfield (1690 – 15 February 1743) and Frances Hales (d. 3 February 1769), daughter of Sir John Hales, 4th Baronet of Hackington. She married Henry Dillon, 11th Viscount Dillon.


Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz (Sophia Charlotte)(19 May 1744 – 17 November 1818) was the wife of King George III. She was Queen of Great Britain and Ireland from her wedding in 1761 until the union of the two kingdoms in 1801, after which she was queen consort of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland until her death in 1818. She was also the Electress consort of Hanover in the Holy Roman Empire until the promotion of her husband to King of Hanover on 12 October 1814, after which she was also queen consort of Hanover. She was the youngest daughter of Duke Charles Louis Frederick of Mecklenburg (1708–1752; known as "Prince of Mirow") and of his wife Princess Elisabeth Albertine of Saxe-Hildburghausen (1713–1761) In 1761 she married George III. They had 15 children.


Charlotte, Princess Royal (Charlotte Augusta Matilda)(29 September 1766 – 5 October 1828), was Queen of Württemberg as the wife of King Frederick I. She was the first daughter and fourth child of King George III of the United Kingdom and his wife, Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz.1797, the Princess Royal was married at the Chapel Royal, St James's Palace, London, to Frederick, Hereditary Prince of Württemberg, the eldest son and heir apparent of Frederick II Eugene, Duke of Württemberg and his wife, Margravine Sophia Dorothea of Brandenburg-Schwedt. The marriage between Duke Frederick and the Princess Royal produced one child: a stillborn daughter on 27 April 1798.


Princess Charlotte Augusta of Wales (7 January 1796 – 6 November 1817) was the only child of George, Prince of Wales (later King George IV), and his wife, Caroline of Brunswick. Had she outlived both her grandfather King George III and her father, she would have become Queen of the United Kingdom; but she died at the age of 21, predeceasing them both. In 1816 she married Prince Leopold of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld (the later King Leopold I of Belgium). Charlotte died in childbirth of her 1st child in 1817.


Charlotte of Savoy (1441-1483), wife of Louis XI of France

Charlotte Amalie of Hesse-Kassel (27 April 1650 – 27 March 1714) was queen-consort of Denmark and Norway by marriage to King Christian V. Her parents were Landgrave William VI of Hesse-Kassel and his consort Hedwig Sophia of Brandenburg. She married Christian V and the couple had 8 children.



Princess Charlotte of Monaco, Duchess of Valentinois (Charlotte Louise Juliette Grimaldi) (30 September 1898 – 15 November 1977), was the daughter of Louis II, Prince of Monaco, and the mother of Rainier III, Prince of Monaco. From 1922 until 1944, she was the Hereditary Princess of Monaco, heir presumptive to the throne. Born Charlotte Louise Juliette de Monaco in Constantine, French Algeria, she was the illegitimate daughter of Marie Juliette Louvet, a cabaret singer, and Louis, Hereditary Prince of Monaco and Duke of Valentinois, son and heir of Monaco's reigning monarch, Prince Albert I. Louis had no legitimate children or siblings, so even before he succeeded his father as Prince Louis II, the principality sought to forestall a succession crisis, anticipating that its neighbour, the French Republic, might take it amiss if the throne fell someday to Louis's legal next of kin. That heir was his cousin, Wilhelm, 2nd Duke of Urach, who, although born and raised in Monte Carlo as the son of Princess Florestine of Monaco, was a German subject, property owner and patrilineal relative of the kings of Württemberg. On 15 May 1911 a law was passed recognising Charlotte as Louis's daughter, and declaring her to be a dynastic member of the sovereign family. Though this act was later held to be invalid under the 1882 statutes, an Ordinance of 30 October 1918 was passed to allow her to be adopted into the dynasty instead. Louis adopted Charlotte in Paris on 16 May 1919, thereby entitling her to the surname Grimaldi, while her grandfather bestowed upon her the traditional title of the Principality's heir, Duchess of Valentinois, for life. Charlotte became heir presumptive to the throne as Hereditary Princess when her grandfather died and her father inherited the princely crown in 1922. 1920, Louis arranged Charlotte's marriage to the then Count Pierre de Polignac of Hennebont, Morbihan, Brittany, France, who, by the Prince's ordinance, took the surname Grimaldi and became a Prince of the Monegasque Royal Family. The couple had two children.Their marriage was not, however, a happy one; they separated on 20 March 1930 due to his homosexuality, and Charlotte left him to live with her doctor and Italian lover, Dalmazzo. The couple were divorced on 18 February 1933 by ordinance of Prince Louis II. On 30 May 1944, the day before her son's 21st birthday and in full agreement with her father, Charlotte renounced and ceded her rights to the throne to her son Rainier, subject to the stipulation that he did not predecease her. From this date she was no longer Hereditary Princess of Monaco, though she retained the title Princess Charlotte of Monaco.


Charlotte Marie Pomeline Casiraghi (born on 3 August 1986). Eldest daughter of Princess Caroline of Monaco and her 2nd husband Stefano Casiraghi. Has a son with her former partner, the French actor and comedian Gad Elmaleh, and a second son with her husband, the French producer Dimitri Rassam


Archduchess Charlotte of Austria (German: Erzherzogin Charlotte von Österreich; 1 March 1921 – 23 July 1989) was a daughter of Emperor Charles I of Austria and his wife Princess Zita of Bourbon-Parma. She was also known by the name Charlotte de Bar while a welfare worker in the United States of America from 1943 to 1956. In 1956 she married George, Duke of Mecklenburg (1899 – 6 July 1963), they had no children.


Charlotte Aglaé d'Orléans (1700–1761), wife of Francesco III, Duke of Modena


Princess Charlotte of Clarence (1819), eldest legitimate child of the future King William IV of the United Kingdom, died hours after birth

Princess Joséphine Charlotte of Belgium (Joséphine Charlotte Stéphanie Ingeborg Elisabeth Marie-José Marguerite Astrid)( 11 October 1927 – 10 January 2005) was Grand Duchess consort of Luxembourg as the wife of Grand Duke Jean. She was a first cousin of Harald V of Norway. She was the first child of King Leopold III of Belgium, and sister of the late King Baudouin I and former King Albert II and aunt of King Philippe I. Joséphine Charlotte was joined in marriage on 9 April 1953 in Luxembourg to Prince Jean, who at the time was The Hereditary Grand Duke and heir-apparent to the throne of Luxembourg During their 52-year marriage, the royal couple had five children


Princess Charlotte of Schaumburg-Lippe (10 October 1864 – 16 July 1946) was the daughter of Prince Wilhelm Karl August of Schaumburg-Lippe, and his wife, Princess Bathildis of Anhalt-Dessau. As the second wife of King William II of Württemberg she became Queen consort of Württemberg. She was not only the last queen of Württemberg, but the last surviving queen of any German state. On 8 April 1886 she married the heir to the throne of the Kingdom of Württemberg, Crown Prince Wilhelm, who succeeded in 1891 as King William II of Württemberg (Wilhelm II. von Württemberg). She was his second wife, and like her predecessor Princess Marie of Waldeck and Pyrmont was held to be of no political consequence. If the marriage had taken place for reasons of state - Wilhelm had no male heir - it was a miscalculation, as Charlotte produced no children.

Salote Tupou III, Queen Regnant of Tonga from 1918–1965 (her name in Tongan translates to Charlotte)


Princess Charlotte of Prussia (Viktoria Elisabeth Auguste Charlotte)(24 July 1860 – 1 October 1919) was Duchess Consort of Saxe-Meiningen as the wife of Bernhard III, the duchy's last ruler. Born at the Neues Palais in Potsdam, she was the second child and eldest daughter of Prince Frederick of Prussia, a member of the House of Hohenzollern who became Crown Prince of Prussia in 1861 and German Emperor in 1888. Through her mother Victoria, Princess Royal, Charlotte was the eldest granddaughter of the British monarch Queen Victoria and her consort Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha.  Princess Charlotte was a difficult child and indifferent student, with a nervous disposition. Her relationship with her demanding mother was strained. As she grew older, Charlotte developed a penchant for spreading gossip and causing trouble. Eager to escape from parental control, at age seventeen, she married Prince Bernhard of Saxe-Meiningen in 1878. Her husband's weak-willed personality had little effect on her. Known for spreading gossip and her eccentric personality, Princess Charlotte enjoyed Berlin society while frequently leaving her only child, Princess Feodora, in the care of family members. Charlotte and Feodora, in turn, also had a difficult relationship.The majority of historians hold that Charlotte and Feodora were afflicted with porphyria, a genetic disease that is believed to have affected some members of the British Royal Family, most notably King George III.


Princess Charlotte of Prussia (21 June 1831 – 30 March 1855), was by birth a Princess of Prussia and member of the House of Hohenzollern and by marriage Hereditary Princess of Saxe-Meiningen. She was the eldest child and daughter of Prince Albert of Prussia (younger son of Frederick William III of Prussia and Louise of Mecklenburg-Strelitz) and his first wife Princess Marianne of the Netherlands (daughter of William I of the Netherlands and Wilhelmine of Prussia).Her parents' marriage was unhappy due to Prince Albert's several affairs, and finally was dissolved on 28 March 1849, after which Princess Marianne began to live with her former coachman Johannes van Rossum, with whom she had a son, Johannes William of Reinhartshausen.The custody of Charlotte and her two surviving siblings Albert and Alexandrine was given to their father; however, their childless aunt Queen Elisabeth Ludovika (wife of Frederick William IV of Prussia) took care of them, moreover after Prince Albert's second and morganatic marriage in 1853 with Rosalie von Rauch, who bore him two sons, Counts William and Frederick of Hohenau.In 1850, the nineteen-year-old princess married Georg, Hereditary Prince of Saxe-Meiningen who was twenty-four years old.They had four childrenAlexandra Feodorovna (Russian: Алекса́ндра Фёдоровна, IPA: [ɐlʲɪˈksandrə ˈfjɵdərəvnə]), born

Princess Charlotte of Prussia (13 July 1798 – 1 November 1860), was Empress of Russia as the wife of Emperor Nicholas I (r. 1825–1855).Charlotte was the eldest surviving daughter of King Frederick William III of Prussia (r. 1797–1840) and of Queen Louise of Prussia In 1817 she married Grand Duke Nicholas Pavlovich of Russia, who later became Emperor Nicholas I. Upon her marriage, Charlotte converted to Russian Orthodoxy, and took the Russian name Alexandra Feodorovna. Ideally matched with her husband, she had a happy marriage that produced a large family; seven of her children survived childhood.










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« Reply #588 on: June 09, 2020, 04:29:12 PM »

Anna is a Latin form of the Greek: Ἅννα and the Hebrew name Hannah (Hebrew: חַנָּה Ḥannāh‎), meaning "favor" or "grace" or "beautiful". Anna is in wide use in countries across the world as are its variants Anne, originally a French version of the name, though in use in English speaking countries for hundreds of years, and Ann, which was originally the English spelling. Saint Anne is traditionally the name of the mother of the Virgin Mary, which accounts for its wide use and popularity among Christians. The name has also been used for numerous saints and queens.

Anna of Austria (7 July 1528 – 16 October 1590), a member of the Imperial House of Habsburg, was Duchess of Bavaria from 1550 until 1579, by her marriage with Duke Albert V. Born at the Bohemian court in Prague, Anna was the third of fifteen children of King Ferdinand I (1503–1564) from his marriage with the Jagiellonian princess Anna of Bohemia and Hungary (1503–1547). Young Anna was engaged several times as a child, first to Prince Theodor of Bavaria (1526–1534), the eldest son of Duke William IV, then to Charles d'Orléans (1522–1545). However, both died at a young age. Anna finally married on 4 July 1546 in Regensburg at the age of 17, Prince Albert V, the younger brother of her first fiancé.  This marriage was part of a web of alliances in which her uncle Emperor Charles V hoped to secure Duke William's support before embarking on the Schmalkaldic Wars The marriage of Anna and Albert produced 7 children.


Maria Anna of Bavaria (21 March 1551  – 29 April 1608)was a politically active Archduchess of Austria by marriage to Archduke Charles II of Austria. She played an important role in the counter reformation in Austria. Maria Anna was the daughter of Albert V, Duke of Bavaria and Anna of Austria. On 26 August 1571 in Vienna, Maria Anna married her maternal uncle, Charles II of Austria. The marriage was arranged to give Charles political support from Bavaria, and Bavaria an agent in Vienna.The relation between Maria Anna and Charles are described as good. Maria Anna was described as confident, ambitious and a great lover of pomp and power, but foremost as a devoted Catholic. She participated in the affairs of state, and successfully benefited a powerful counter reformation in the domains of her spouse. The couple had 14 children.


Anne of Austria (16 August 1573 – 10 February 1598) was Queen of Poland and Sweden as the first consort of King Sigismund III Vasa. Anne was a daughter of Charles II of Austria and Maria Anna of Bavaria.Anne became the first wife of Sigismund of Poland on 31 May 1592. This marriage was opposed by many nobles (szlachta) of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, who were opposed to the alliance with the Austrian Habsburgs that Sigismund pursued.Anne died on 10 February 1598 in Warsaw as a result of haemorrhage during the birth of her last child, who also died then. Sigismund III then married her sister Constance Renate of Habsburg. Anna had five children but only 1 son lived to become an adult.


Anna Maria (23 May 1593 – 9 February 1600) Daughter of Anne of Austria and Sigismund III Vasa.


Maria Anna Isabella, daughter of Władysław IV Vasa or Ladislaus IV of Poland (9 June 1595 – 20 May 1648)


Maria Anna of Bavaria (18 December 1574 – 8 March 1616), was German princess member of the House of Wittelsbach by birth and Archduchess consort of Inner Austria by marriage. Born in Munich, she was the fourth child and second (but eldest surviving) daughter of William V, Duke of Bavaria and Renata of Lorraine. On 23 April 1600, Maria Anna married her first-cousin Ferdinand, Archduke of Inner Austria at Graz Cathedral. This marriage reaffirmed the alliance between the Habsburgs and Wittelsbach. Without interfering in politics, Maria Anna lived in her husband's shadow. The couple had 7 children.


Infanta Maria Anna of Spain (18 August 1606 – 13 May 1646) was a Holy Roman Empress and Queen of Hungary and Bohemia by marriage to Ferdinand III, Holy Roman Emperor. She acted as regent on several occasions during the absences of her spouse. Daughter of King Philip III of Spain and Margaret of Austria, prior to her Imperial marriage she was considered a possible wife for Charles, Prince of Wales; the event, later known in history as the "Spanish Match", provoked a domestic and political crisis in the Kingdoms of England and Scotland. During her marriage, Maria Anna gave birth to six children.


Mariana of Austria or Maria Anna (24 December 1634 – 16 May 1696) was Queen of Spain from 1649 until her husband and uncle, Philip IV, died in 1665. She was then appointed regent for their three-year-old son Charles II, and due to his ill health remained an influential figure until her own death in 1696. Maria Anna was born on 24 December 1634 in Wiener Neustadt, second child of Maria Anna of Spain and her husband Ferdinand (1608-1657), who became Holy Roman Emperor in 1637. The Habsburgs often married within the family to retain their lands and properties, and in 1646 Maria Anna was betrothed to her cousin and heir to the Spanish throne, Balthasar Charles, Prince of Asturias. His death three months later left her without a prospective husband and her widowed uncle Philip IV without an heir. On 7 October 1649, Philip married his fourteen-year-old niece in Navalcarnero, outside Madrid; from then on, she was known by her Spanish name 'Mariana. She had 5 children, among others well known (inbred) Charles (Carlos) II of Spain.

Maria Anna Josepha Antonia Apollonia Scholastica (9 February 1672 – 23 February 1672), Archduchess of Austria, daughter of Margaret Theresa of Spain (Spanish: Margarita Teresa, German: Margarete Theresia)(12 July 1651 – 12 March 1673) & Leopold I (full name: Leopold Ignaz Joseph Balthasar Felician; Hungarian: I. Lipót; )(9 June 1640-5 May 1705) was Holy Roman Emperor, King of Hungary, Croatia, and Bohemia.


Archduchess Maria Anna of Austria (German: Maria Anna von Habsburg, Erzherzogin von Österreich, also known as Maria Anna von Bayern or Maria-Anna, Kurfürstin von Bayern)(13 January 1610 – 25 September 1665), was a German regent, Electress of Bavaria by marriage to Maximilian I, Elector of Bavaria, and co-regent of the Electorate of Bavaria during the minority of her son Ferdinand Maria, Elector of Bavaria from 1651 to 1654. Born in Graz, she was the fifth child and second, but oldest surviving, daughter of Archduke Ferdinand of Inner Austria by his first wife Maria Anna, a daughter of William V, Duke of Bavaria. She was probably named after her mother, who died in 1616. On 15 July 1635 at the Augustinian Church, Vienna, Maria Anna married her uncle, Maximilian I, Elector of Bavaria, whose previous wife, Elisabeth of Lorraine, had died a few months earlier. The marriage was very happy and Maximilian I cared for his wife lovingly. They had 2 surviving children.


Anna of Austria (2 November 1549 – 26 October 1580) was Queen of Spain by marriage to her uncle, King Philip II of Spain. Anna was the eldest daughter of Maximilian II, Holy Roman Emperor, and Maria of Spain, who were first cousins. As the eldest daughter of the Holy Roman Emperor, Anna was a desirable candidate for marriage at the European courts. Her parents thought a Spanish marriage would strengthen links between the Austrian and Spanish Habsburg families. Initially she considered her cousin Don Carlos, the only son of her maternal uncle Philip II of Spain. These plans were shattered in 1568 when Don Carlos died. Plans for a Spanish marriage were revived when Philip's third wife, Elisabeth of Valois, died in childbirth, also in 1568. As a result, Philip was left a widower with two young daughters, Isabella Clara Eugenia and Catherine Michelle. Philip planned to remarry because he no longer had a male heir. The marriage was at first opposed by many, including Pope Pius V, but it was arranged all the same. In 1570 the couple wed and they had 5 children.


Anne of Austria (French: Anne d'Autriche; 22 September 1601 – 20 January 1666), a Spanish princess and an Austrian archduchess of the House of Habsburg, was queen of France as the wife of Louis XIII, and regent of France during the minority of her son, Louis XIV, from 1643 to 1651. During her regency, Cardinal Mazarin served as France's chief minister. Accounts of French court life of her era emphasize her difficult marital relations with her husband, her closeness to her son Louis XIV, and her disapproval of her son's marital infidelity to her niece and daughter-in-law Maria Theresa. She was the eldest daughter of King Philip III of Spain and his wife Margaret of Austria. At age eleven, Anne was betrothed to King Louis XIII of France. Her father gave her a dowry of 500,000 crowns and many beautiful jewels.[2] For fear that Louis XIII would die early, the Spanish court stipulated that she would return to Spain with her dowry, jewels, and wardrobe if he did die. Prior to the marriage, Anne renounced all succession rights she had for herself and her descendants by Louis, with a provision that she would resume her rights should she be left a childless widow. On 18 October 1615, Louis and Anne were married by proxy in Burgos while Louis's sister, Elisabeth of France, and Anne's brother, Philip IV of Spain, were married by proxy in Bordeaux. These marriages followed the tradition of cementing military and political alliances between France and Spain that began with the marriage of Philip II of Spain to Elisabeth of Valois in 1559 as part of the Peace of Cateau-Cambrésis.Anne and Louis, both fourteen years old, were pressured to consummate their marriage in order to forestall any possibility of future annulment, but Louis ignored his bride. Louis's mother, Marie de' Medici, continued to conduct herself as queen of France, without showing any deference to her daughter-in-law. Anne, surrounded by her entourage of high-born Spanish ladies-in-waiting headed by Inés de la Torre, continued to live according to Spanish etiquette and failed to improve her French. Anne had 4 stillborn children before having 2 surviving sons.


Anne Élisabeth, Fille de France (18 November 1662- 30 December 1662   ), daughter of Louis XIV (Louis Dieudonné)(5 September 1638 – 1 September 1715), known as Louis the Great (Louis le Grand) or the Sun King (le Roi Soleil) &  Maria Theresa, Infanta of Spain, Archduchess of Austria, Queen of France and of Navarre (20 September 1638 – 30 July 1683)

Marie Anne, Fille de France (16 November 1664-26 December 1664) daughter of Louis XIV (Louis Dieudonné)(5 September 1638 – 1 September 1715), known as Louis the Great (Louis le Grand) or the Sun King (le Roi Soleil) &  Maria Theresa, Infanta of Spain, Archduchess of Austria, Queen of France and of Navarre (20 September 1638 – 30 July 1683)

Anne Henriette of France (14 August 1727 – 10 February 1752) was a French princess, the twin of Louise Élisabeth of France, and the second child of King Louis XV of France and queen consort Marie Leszczyńska.Henriette reportedly fell mutually in love with her cousin, Louis Philippe, duc de Chartres, the heir to the House of Orléans, and reportedly wished to marry him. The King initially liked the idea, but changed his mind, not wanting the house of Orleans too close to the throne, and the plans were finnally discontinued in 1743, when the duke de Chartres married someone else, and Henriette remained unmarried.


Anna de' Medici (21 July 1616 – 11 September 1676) was a daughter of Cosimo II de' Medici, Grand Duke of Tuscany and his wife Maria Maddalena of Austria. A patron of the arts, she married Ferdinand Charles, Archduke of Further Austria in 1646. They were the parents of Claudia Felicitas of Austria, Holy Roman Empress. Following failed plans for Anna to marry Gaston, Duke of Orléans, she was instead engaged to Archduke Ferdinand Charles of Austria. In 1646, Anna left her native Florence for Innsbruck to be married. On 10 June, she was married to her double first cousin Ferdinand Charles, Archduke of Further Austria. He was the eldest son of Leopold V, Archduke of Austria and his wife Claudia de' Medici. Anna was thirty years old, while Ferdinand Charles was only eighteen. They had 3 children.


Anna Pavlovna of Russia (Russian: Анна Павловна; Dutch: Anna Paulowna)(18 January 1795 [OS 7 January] — 1 March 1865) was a queen consort of the Netherlands. She was born in 1795 at Gatchina Palace, the eighth child and sixth daughter of Paul I of Russia and Empress Maria Feodorovna (born Sophie Dorothea of Württemberg) On 21 February 1816 at the Chapel of the Winter Palace in St Petersburg, she married the Prince of Orange, who would later become King William II of the Netherlands. Anna and William II of the Netherlands had five children.

Anna of Savoy (1306–1365), Byzantine Empress consort

Anna of Saxony (1544–1577), German noble, second wife of William the Silent

Anna Thynn, Marchioness of Bath (born 1943), Hungarian actress and British noblewoman by marriage

Anna of Trebizond (died 1342), Empress of Trebizond

Anne, Queen of Great Britain (1665–1714), Queen of England, Scotland, and Ireland (1702–07) and Great Britain (1707–14)

Anne of Austria, Landgravine of Thuringia (1432–1462)

Anne Neville (1456–1485), wife of King Richard III of England

Anne of Brittany (1477–1514), Breton ruler, wife of both Charles VIII of France and Louis XII of France

Anne Boleyn (c. 1501/1507–1536), second wife of King Henry VIII of England

Anne of Cleves (1515–1557), fourth wife of King Henry VIII

Anne of Denmark (1574–1619), wife of King James VI and I of Scotland, England, and Ireland,

Anne of Austria (1601–1666), wife of Louis XIII of France, Regent of France

Anne Catherine of Brandenburg (1575–1612), wife of King Christian IV of Denmark and Norway

Anne Marie d'Orléans (1669–1728), wife of King Victor Amadeus II of Sardinia

Anne of Romania (1923–2016), wife of King Michael I of Romania

Anne-Marie of Greece (born 1948), Danish princess, wife of King Constantine II

Anne of Denmark, Electress of Saxony (1532–1585), Danish princess from the House of Oldenburg

Anne, Princess Royal and Princess of Orange (1709–1759), daughter of King George II, wife of William IV, Prince of Orange

Anne of Orléans (1906–1986), Princess of France

Anne of Bourbon-Two Sicilies (born 1938), wife of Infante Carlos, Duke of Calabria

Anne, Princess Royal (born 1950), daughter of Queen Elizabeth II

Anne Marie Louise d'Orléans, Duchess of Montpensier (1627–1693), French memoirist

Lady Anne Tree (1927-2010), British philanthropist and prison visitor


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« Reply #589 on: June 11, 2020, 04:10:24 PM »

In Kings & Queens of the Medieval World, the author Martin J. Dougherty wrote:     
Matilda was originally named Adelaide, but her name was changed upon her marriage to Henry V, Holy Roman Emperor, in 1114.
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« Reply #590 on: June 19, 2020, 10:43:46 AM »

Thyra is a female given name, variant of Tyra


Thyra, also known as Thorvi or Thyre, was a Danish queen, spouse of King Gorm the Old of Denmark, the first historically recognized King of Denmark, who reigned from c.  936 to his death c.  958. She is believed to have led an army against the Germans. Gorm and Thyra were the parents of King Harald Bluetooth.


Princess Thyra of Denmark (29 September 1853 – 26 February 1933) was the youngest daughter and fifth child of Christian IX of Denmark and Louise of Hesse-Kassel. In 1878, she married Ernest Augustus, the exiled heir to the Kingdom of Hanover. As the Kingdom of Hanover had been annexed by Prussia in 1866, she spent most of her life in exile with her husband in Austria. Thyra was the third daughter and fifth child of  then Prince Christian and Princess Louise of Denmark.  Her family had been relatively obscure but happy until her father, Prince Christian of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg, was chosen with the consent of the great powers to succeed his childless distant cousin, Frederik VII, to the Danish throne. Just two months before Thyra's birth, the new Act of Succession had been passed and Prince Christian given the title of Prince of Denmark. In 1863, when Thyra was 10 years old, King Frederik VII died, and her father succeeded to the throne of Denmark as King Christian IX. Earlier the same year, her brother Vilhelm had been elected King of Greece, and her sister Alexandra had married Albert Edward, Prince of Wales. In 1866, her other sister Dagmar married the Tsarevich of Russia, Alexander. Thyra was an attractive and gentle young woman, with dark hair and dark blue eyes, and Queen Louise wanted her youngest daughter to make a good marriage as her elder daughters had. Thyra's first suitor was King Willem III of the Netherlands, but as he was thirty-six years older than she was, she rejected him. In her youth, Thyra had fallen in love with Vilhelm Frimann Marcher, a lieutenant in the cavalry, which resulted in a pregnancy. Her brother George I of Greece suggested that she have the baby in Athens to avoid scandal; the Danish press was told Thyra had been taken ill with jaundice. She gave birth to a girl, Maria, on 8 November 1871 at Schloss Glücksburg, who was adopted by Rasmus and Anne Marie Jørgensen of Odense shortly after birth and renamed Kate; she married in 1902 Frode Pløyen-Holstein and died in 1964. Marcher killed himself on 4 January 1872 after a confrontation with the King. In 1878, she married Crown Prince Ernest Augustus of Hanover, 3rd Duke of Cumberland and Teviotdale. Ernst Augustus was the eldest child and only son of King George V of Hanover and his wife, Princess Marie of Saxe-Altenburg. Ernest Augustus had been born as a Crown Prince of Hanover, but in 1866 his father had been deprived of his throne, when the Kingdom of Hanover was annexed by Prussia after siding with Austria in the Austro-Prussian War. The Duke and Duchess of Cumberland had six children.


Duchess Thyra of Mecklenburg-Schwerin (18 June 1919 – 27 September 1981). Daughter of Princess Alexandra of Hanover and Cumberland (German: Alexandra Louise Marie Olga Elisabeth Therese Vera Prinzessin von Hannover und Cumberland)(29 September 1882 – 30 August 1963) and Frederick Francis IV of Mecklenburg-Schwerin (Friedrich Franz Michael)(9 April 1882 – 17 November 1945) In maternal line a granddaughter of Princess Thyra of Denmark


Thyra von Solodkoff (12 October 1989) daughter of Duchess Donata of Mecklenburg (11 March 1956) and Alexander von Solodkoff. In maternal line she is descending from Princess Thyra of Denmark.


Thyra, Princess Heinrich of Hanover (née von Westernhagen)(14 August 1973) is a German forester. As the wife of Prince Heinrich of Hanover (29 April 1961), she is a princess of the House of Hanover. She is the daughter of Burghard von Westernhagen, a medical doctor, and Uta Maria von Pape. She is a member of the von Westernhagen family, a Junker family who were part of the landed nobility of Thuringia. She married Prince Heinrich of Hanover, a younger brother of Ernst August of Hanover, on 30 April 1999. The couple has 3 children. In 2011 von Westernhagen filed a legal complaint against German actress Désirée Nick for slander and insult. The Göttingen district court rejected the complaint in 2012. Von Westernhagen is the stepmother of Oskar Nick, her husband's son through his prior relationship with Désirée Nick.

Princess Thyra of Denmark (Thyra Louise Caroline Amalie Augusta Elisabeth)(14 March 1880 – 2 November 1945) was the sixth child and third daughter of Frederik VIII of Denmark and his wife, Princess Louise of Sweden and Norway. She was named for her paternal aunt Princess Thyra of Denmark (29 September 1853 – 26 February 1933). She died unmarried and without issue.

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« Reply #591 on: June 19, 2020, 10:56:50 AM »

Dagmar is a Scandinavian given name, usually female but occasionally also male, that is also used in the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Poland (Dagmara), the Netherlands, Estonia and Germany, derived from the Old Norse name (Dagmær), dagr meaning "day", and mær meaning "daughter," "mother" and "maiden."

Personally I have encountered both female AND male with this given name.

Dagmar of Bohemia (also known as Margaret, Czech: Markéta)(c. 1186 – 24 May 1212) was Queen of Denmark as the first spouse of King Valdemar II. She was the daughter of King Ottokar I of Bohemia and his first wife, Adelaide of Meissen. Before his first marriage, Valdemar had been betrothed to Richeza of Bavaria, daughter of the Duke of Saxony. When that engagement fell through, he married Margaret, now known as Dagmar, in 1205. In 1209, Queen Dagmar gave birth to Valdemar the Young (c. 1209–1231). Queen Dagmar died on 24 May 1212 while giving birth to her second son, who did not survive.


Maria Feodorovna (26 November 1847 – 13 October 1928), known before her marriage as Princess Dagmar of Denmark, was a Danish princess and Empress of Russia as spouse of Emperor Alexander III (reigned 1881–1894). She was the second daughter and fourth child of King Christian IX of Denmark and Louise of Hesse-Kassel. The rise of Slavophile ideology in the Russian Empire led Alexander II of Russia to search for a bride for the heir apparent, Tsarevich Nicholas Alexandrovich, in countries other than the German states that had traditionally provided consorts for the tsars. In 1864, Nicholas, or "Nixa" as he was known in his family, went to Denmark where he was betrothed to Dagmar. On 22 April 1865 he died from meningitis. His last wish was that Dagmar would marry his younger brother, the future Alexander III. Dagmar was distraught after her young fiancé's death. She was so heartbroken when she returned to her homeland that her relatives were seriously worried about her health. She had already become emotionally attached to Russia and often thought of the huge, remote country that was to have been her home. The disaster had brought her very close to "Nixa's" parents, and she received a letter from Alexander II in which the Emperor attempted to console her. He told Dagmar in very affectionate terms that he hoped she would still consider herself a member of their family. In June 1866, while on a visit to Copenhagen, the Tsarevich Alexander asked Dagmar for her hand. She converted to Orthodoxy and became Grand Duchess Maria Feodorovna of Russia. The lavish wedding took place on 9 November [O.S. 28 October] 1866 in Russia.Maria Feodorovna was beautiful and well received by her Russian peers. Early on she made it a priority to learn the Russian language and to try to understand the Russian people. She rarely interfered with politics, preferring to devote her time and energies to her family, charities, and the more social side of her position. Her one exception to official politics was her militant anti-German sentiment due to the annexation of Danish territories by Prussia in 1864. Maria Feodorovna suffered a miscarriage in 1866 in Denmark while horseback riding. On 18 May 1868, Maria Feodorovna gave birth to her eldest son, Nicholas. Her next son, Alexander Alexandrovich, born in 1869, died from meningitis in infancy. She would bear Alexander four more children who reached adulthood: George (b. 1871), Xenia (b. 1875), Michael (b. 1878), and Olga (b. 1882). As a mother, she doted on and was quite possessive of her sons. She had a more distant relationship with her daughters. On the morning of 13 March 1881, her father-in-law Alexander II of Russia, aged 62, was killed by a bomb on the way back to the Winter Palace from a military parade.  He died a few hours later. Maria's husband succeeded his father as Alexander III.


Princess Dagmar of Denmark (Dagmar Louise Elisabeth)(23 May 1890 – 11 October 1961) was the youngest child and fourth daughter of Frederik VIII of Denmark and his wife, Princess Louise of Sweden and Norway. She was named after her paternal aunt, Empress Maria Feodorovna of Russia, who was born Princess Dagmar of Denmark. In 1922 she married Jørgen Castenskjold (30 November 1893 –  21 November 1978), son of Anton Castenskiold (1860–1940), Royal Danish Court Chamberlain, and wife Sophie Steensen-Leth (1870–1947), from Danish Nobility. They had five children.


Dagmar Louise Thyra Sophia Castenskjold (11 September 1930 – 12 July 2013), daughter of Princess Dagmar of Denmark and Jørgen Castenskjold. She married Poul Bitsch (5 October 1930 - 21 October 1967) in 1950, and had three children




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« Reply #592 on: June 19, 2020, 12:52:17 PM »

Waldemar, Valdemar or Woldemar is an Old High German given name. It consists of the elements wald- "power", "brightness" and -mar "fame". The name is considered the equivalent of the Russian name Vladimir, or Ukrainian name Volodymyr.


Valdemar I of Denmark (14 January 1131 – 12 May 1182), also known as Valdemar the Great (Danish: Valdemar den Store), was King of Denmark from 1146 until his death in 1182. Valdemar was the son of Canute Lavard, Duke of Schleswig, the chivalrous and popular eldest son of King Eric I of Denmark. Valdemar's father was murdered by King Magnus I of Sweden days before the birth of Valdemar; his mother, Ingeborg of Kiev, daughter of Grand Prince Mstislav I of Kiev and Christina Ingesdotter of Sweden, named him after her grandfather, Grand Prince Vladimir Monomakh of Kiev.Valdemar married Sophia of Minsk (c. 1141–1198), the daughter of Richeza of Poland, dowager queen of Sweden, from her marriage to Prince Volodar of Minsk. She was the half-sister of King Canute V of Denmark. Valdemar and Sophia had 9 (known) children.


Valdemar II (9 May 1170 – 28 March 1241), called Valdemar the Victorious or Valdemar the Conqueror (Valdemar Sejr), was the King of Denmark from 1202 until his death in 1241. The nickname Sejr is a later invention and was not used during the King's own lifetime. Sejr means victory in Danish. He was the second son of King Valdemar I of Denmark and Sophia of Minsk, the daughter of Richeza of Poland, Queen Dowager of Sweden and Volodar Giebovich, Prince of Minsk. When his father died, young Valdemar was only twelve years old. He was named Duke of Southern Jutland (Latin: dux slesvicensis, literally Duchy of Schleswig duke) With his first wife, Dagmar of Bohemia, whom he wed in 1205, Valdamar had 2 children, of which 1 was stillborn. With his second wife, Berengaria of Portugal, whom he wed in 1214 he had 5 children.


Valdemar the Young (Danish: Valdemar den Unge) (c. 1209 – 28 November 1231) was King of Denmark from 1218 until his death. Valdemar was the eldest son and co-ruler of King Valdemar II of Denmark by his first wife, Dagmar of Bohemia. He did not outlive his father so was never a sole monarch. He is sometimes referred to as Valdemar III Although Valdemar III is more commonly used to denote a later king, Valdemar of Schleswig. In 1229, the young king married Eleanor of Portugal, daughter of Afonso II of Portugal, at Ribe.They had been married for two years when Queen Eleanor died in childbirth on 28 August 1231. The child was short-lived.On 28 November 1231, Valdemar the Young was accidentally shot while hunting at Refsnæs, near Kalundborg. He died the same day.


Valdemar (English: Waldemar; Swedish: Valdemar Birgersson)(1239 – 26 December 1302) was King of Sweden from 1250 to 1275. Valdemar was the son of the Swedish princess Ingeborg Eriksdotter and Birger Jarl, from the House of Bjelbo. When her brother King Eric XI died in 1250, though a child Valdemar was elected king and crowned the following year. During the first sixteen years of his reign, it was Birger Jarl who was the real ruler. Birger Jarl had been the de facto ruler of Sweden from 1248, before the reign of Valdemar, even under Eric XI. Valdemar's mother and King Eric were children of King Eric X and Richeza of Denmark. In 1260, Valdemar married Sophia, the eldest daughter of King Eric IV of Denmark and Jutta of Saxony. Valdemar also had a relationship with his sister-in-law Jutta. In 1272, Jutta visited Sweden and became Valdemar's mistress. The affair resulted in a child born in 1273. The following year, Jutta was placed in a convent and Valdemar was forced to make a pilgrimage to Rome to ask for the absolution of the Pope. Valdemar was deposed by his brother, Magnus after the Battle of Hova in Tiveden June 14, 1275. In 1277, Sophia separated from her spouse and returned to Denmark. They had six children.


Valdemar (c. 1279 - 29 July 1306), Count of Holstein-Schauenburg, son of Gerhard II, Count of Holstein-Plön and Ingeborg Valdemarsdotter of Sweden, (1263–1292) He died after the Second Battle of Uetersen


Valdemar III Abelsøn (died 1257) was Duke of Schleswig from 1253 until his death in 1257. He was the eldest son of King Abel of Denmark, Duke of Schleswig and Matilda of Holstein. At the time of his father's death in 1252, Valdemar was being held prisoner in the Archbishopric of Cologne, the hostage of the Prince-Archbishop. Thus unable to claim the throne of Denmark, his father's younger brother Christopher I was elected king. However, his mother's relatives, the counts of Holstein were able to obtain his release and supported his claim to the Duchy of Schleswig. In 1253 Christopher I had to relinquish his opposition and created him Duke. The following years Valdemar spent fighting his uncle, King Christopher. Valdemar died in 1257. He was succeeded as duke by his younger brother, Eric I.

Valdemar IV Eriksøn (born c. 1262, died 1312) was Duke of Schleswig from 1283 until his death in 1312. He was the eldest son of Duke Eric I of Schleswig and Margaret of Rugia.  In 1287 Duke Valdemar married Elisabeth of Saxe-Lauenburg, a daughter of John I, Duke of Saxony. This marriage produced the only legitimate son of Duke Valdemar.

Valdemar III (1314–1364) was king of Denmark from 1326 to 1329, while he was underage; he was also Duke of Schleswig as Valdemar V in 1325–26 and from 1330 to 1364. He was a rival king set up against the unsuccessful Christopher II and was widely opposed by his subjects. His term was ended when he abdicated. Sometimes the earlier King Valdemar the Young (c. 1209–1231) is also referred as Valdemar III. Valdemar's father was Duke Eric II of Schleswig and his mother was Adelaide, daughter of Henry I of Rendsborg. In 1340, he gave his only sister Helvig of Schleswig to marriage with Valdemar IV, the new king of Denmark Valdemar died in 1364. He was married to Richardis of Schwerin (died 1384), daughter of Count Günzelin VI of Schwerin-Wittenburg. They had two sons, Valdemar (1338–1360) and Henry (1342–1375). Henry succeeded as Duke of Schleswig when his father died


Valdemar (1338–1360) son of Valdemar III (1314–1364) and Richardis of Schwerin (died 1384)


Valdemar IV Atterdag (the epithet meaning "Return of the Day"), or Waldemar (1320 – 24 October 1375) was king of Denmark from 1340 to 1375. He was the youngest son of King Christopher II of Denmark and Euphemia of Pomerania. In the 1330s, Valdemar V, Duke of Schleswig (previous king of Denmark as Valdemar III) made an alliance with Valdemar IV against his uncle, Gerhard III, Count of Holstein-Rendsburg, and arranged a marriage between Valdemar IV and his sister, Helvig of Schleswig. She was to bring the pawned province of Nørrejylland, one quarter of the territory of Jutland, as a dowry. The wedding took place at Sønderborg Castle in 1340. Helvig was the daughter of Eric II, Duke of Schleswig and Adelaide of Holstein-Rendsburg. The couple had 6 children.

Valdemar of Denmark (1350 – 11 June 1363), died young. Son of Valdemar IV and Helvig of Schleswig.


Prince Valdemar of Denmark (27 October 1858 – 14 January 1939) was the third son and youngest child of Christian IX and Louise of Hesse-Kassel.He married Princess Marie d'Orleans in October 1885. At the time of their marriage, it was decided that any sons would be brought up in Valdemar's Lutheran faith, while any daughters would be raised as Catholics, the faith of their mother. The couple had 4 sons and 1 daughter. Valdemar and his ward prince George of Greece (son of Valdemar's elder brother Vilhelm (= George I of Greece)) had a profound attachment to each other. So deep that at the end of each of George's several yearly visits to Bernstorff, he would weep, Valdemar would feel ill, and the women (red. Marie and George's wife Marie Bonaparte) learned to be patient and not intrude upon their husbands' private moments

Valdemar Alexander Georg Luigi Maria, Count of Rosenborg ( 3 January 1915 – 1 April 1995) son of Prince Aage, Count of Rosenborg, (Aage Christian Alexander Robert)( 10 June 1887 – 19 February 1940) and Matilda Calvi dei conti di Bergolo (17 September 1885 –16 October 1949) he married Baroness Floria d'Huart Saint-Mauris on 20 April 1949.


Waldemar I, Prince of Anhalt-Zerbst (died 7 January 1368) was a German prince of the House of Ascania and ruler of the principality of Anhalt-Zerbst. He was the youngest son of Albert I, Prince of Anhalt-Zerbst, by his second wife Agnes, daughter of Conrad, Margrave of Brandenburg-Stendal. After the death of his father in 1316, the young Waldemar and his older brother Albert II were put under the custody of their maternal uncle Waldemar, Margrave of Brandenburg-Stendal. When both brothers reached adulthood, they ruled the principality of Anhalt-Zerbst jointly. In 1344 Waldemar married Elisabeth (d. aft. 30 May 1351), daughter of Rudolf I, Elector of Saxony, and Duke of Saxe-Wittemberg. They had six children.

Waldemar II, Prince of Anhalt-Zerbst (died bef. 24 August 1371) was a German prince of the House of Ascania and ruler of the Principality of Anhalt-Zerbst. He was the eldest child and only son of Waldemar I, Prince of Anhalt-Zerbst by his first wife Elisabeth, daughter of Rudolf I, Elector of Saxony and Duke of Saxe-Wittemberg. After the death of his father in 1368, Waldemar became the new co-ruler of the principality of Anhalt-Zerbst with his cousin John II. His reign only lasted four years. After his death unmarried and childless, he was succeeded by John II, who became the sole ruler over Anhalt-Zerbst.


Waldemar III, Prince of Anhalt-Zerbst (died 1391) was a German prince of the House of Ascania and ruler of the principality of Anhalt-Zerbst. He was the youngest son of John II, Prince of Anhalt-Zerbst, by his wife Elisabeth, daughter of John I, Count of Henneberg-Schleusingen. He never married and on his death was succeeded by his brothers. Five years later (1396), Sigismund and Albert divided the principality of Anhalt-Zerbst and created two new principalities: Anhalt-Dessau and Anhalt-Köthen.


Waldemar IV, Prince of Anhalt-Dessau (died aft. 22 July 1417) was a German prince of the House of Ascania and ruler of the principality of Anhalt-Dessau.
He was the eldest son of Sigismund I, Prince of Anhalt-Dessau, by his wife Judith, daughter of Gebhard XI, Count of Querfurt. After the death of his father in 1405, Waldemar inherited his principality of Anhalt-Dessau, but had to ruled jointly with his younger brothers George I, Sigismund II, and Albert V by virtue of the family law of the House of Ascania, which stipulated no division of the territories of the principality. Unmarried and childless at his death, Waldemar was succeeded by his brothers and co-rulers.

Waldemar VI, Prince of Anhalt-Köthen (1450 – 1 November 1508), was a German prince of the House of Ascania and ruler of the principality of Anhalt-Köthen. He was the eldest son of George I, Prince of Anhalt-Dessau, by his second wife Sophie, possibly a member of the House of Hohnstein. In 1485 Waldemar married Margarete (b. Rudolstadt, 16 June 1464 - d. Köthen, 1 August 1539), daughter of Günther XXXVI, Count of Schwarzburg and Lord of Arnstedt. They had four children.

Waldemar (b. 1490 - d. young), son of Waldemar VI Prince of Anhalt- Köthen and Margarete of Schwarzburg.

Waldemar V, Prince of Anhalt-Köthen (died 1436) was a German prince of the House of Ascania and ruler of the principality of Anhalt-Köthen.He was the second son of Albert IV, Prince of Anhalt-Köthen, by his first wife Elisabeth, daughter of Gebhard III, Count of Mansfeld.  In 1420 Waldemar married Sophie, daughter of Conrad of Hadmersleben, Lord of Egeln, by his wife Elisabeth of Querfurt, who had the previous year become the second wife of Waldemar's father Albert IV; in consequence, the spouses were step-siblings. They had two children. Waldemar's widow Sophie went on to marry Albert V, Prince of Anhalt-Dessau, a relative of her first husband.

Waldemar the Great (German: Waldemar der Große)( c. 1280 – 14 August 1319), a member of the House of Ascania, was Margrave of Brandenburg-Stendal from 1308 until his death. He became sole ruler of the Margraviate of Brandenburg upon the death of his cousin John V of Brandenburg-Salzwedel in 1317. Waldemar is known as the last in the line of Ascanian margraves starting with Albert the Bear in 1157; he was only succeeded by his minor cousin Henry II, who died one year later. He was a son of Margrave Conrad of Brandenburg-Stendal and his wife Constance, eldest daughter of the Piast duke Przemysł I of Greater Poland. Waldemar was co-regent from 1302, and succeeded as margrave upon the death of his uncle Otto IV in 1308. In 1309 he married his cousin Agnes (c. 1296–1334), a daughter of Margrave Hermann of Brandenburg-Salzwedel. The marriage remained childless.In 1348, an impostor appeared in the Archbishopric of Magdeburg and successfully claimed that he was Waldemar, returning from pilgrimage to the Holy Land after somebody else had been buried in his place. Quickly gaining support due to the rivalries between the Wittelsbach and Luxembourg dynasties, King Charles IV reinvested him for about two years before "the last Ascanian" was unmasked and fled to the Anhalt court in Dessau, where he spent the rest of his life.


Valdemar Magnusson (c.after 1282 – 1318) was a Swedish prince, heir to the throne of Sweden, and Duke of Finland. Valdemar was the third son of Magnus III and Helvig of Holstein. He became Duke of Finland in 1302 at the coronation of his older brother, Birger. Valdemar married Kristina Torgilsdotter, daughter of Torgils Knutsson, who was the constable and virtual ruler of Sweden during King Birger's early reign.

Valdemar Knudsen (also Waldemar, born in 1158; died 18 July 1236 in Cîteaux) was a Danish clergyman and statesman. Valdemar was Bishop of Schleswig from 1188 to 1208, officiated as Steward of the Duchy of Schleswig between 1184 and 1187, and served as Prince-Archbishop of Bremen from 1192 to 1194 and again between 1206 and 1217. He held the latter office on the grounds of the archdiocesan capitular election as archbishop elect and of the royal investiture with the princely regalia, but lacked the papal confirmation. His mother, likely the wife of another man, gave birth to him as the posthumous illegitimate son of King Canute V of Denmark in early 1158.[1] His father Canute V had been slain on 9 August 1157 by the co-regent Sweyn III. So Valdemar, like his half-brother, Saint Niels of Århus, claimed succession to the Danish throne.

Prince Waldemar William Louis Frederick Victor of Prussia (German: Waldemar Wilhelm Ludwig Friedrich Viktor Heinrich)(20 March 1889 – 2 May 1945) was the eldest son of Prince Heinrich of Prussia and his wife, Princess Irene of Hesse and by Rhine. Waldemar married Princess Calixta of Lippe-Biesterfeld (14 October 1895 – 15 December 1982) in 1919. They had no children Waldemar, like his maternal first cousin, Tsarevich Alexei Nikolaevich of Russia; maternal uncle Prince Friedrich of Hesse and by Rhine; and youngest brother Heinrich, suffered from haemophilia. He died in a clinic in Tutzing, Bavaria because of the lack of blood transfusion facilities.


Prince Waldemar Stephen of Schaumburg-Lippe (Waldemar Stephan Ferdinand Wolrad Friedrich Karl)(19 December 1940) is a son of Prince Christian of Schaumburg-Lippe and Princess Feodora of Denmark, and the great-grandson of King Frederik VIII of Denmark. His first marriage was to Anne-Lise Johansen, on 10 September 1977, Queen Margrethe's court photographer, whom he divorced. They had one child. His second marriage was with Karin Grundmann in 2001, whom he divorced in 2002. And in 2002 he married Ruth Schneidewind, whom he divorced in 2003. Prince Waldemar's fourth marriage was with Gertraud-Antonia Wagner-Schöppl on 20 September 2008. He adopted the adult son of his wife: Mag. iur. Dr. iur, Mario-Max Oliver Prinz zu Schaumburg-Lippe, MAS, LL. M. . Né Mario-Helmut Wagner (b. 23 December 1977 to the former husband, Dr. Helmut Wagner, MD).


Woldemar of Lippe (Günther Friedrich Woldemar)(18 April 1824 – 20 March 1895) was the sovereign of the Principality of Lippe, reigning from 1875 until his death. Prince Woldemar of Lippe was born in Detmold the third child of Leopold II, Lippe's reigning prince, and his consort, Princess Emilie of Schwarzburg-Sondershausen (1800–1867). Woldemar was married to Princess Sophie of Baden (1834–1904), a daughter of Prince William of Baden, on 9 November 1858. Following the death of his brother Leopold III on 8 December 1875, Woldemar succeeded him as Prince of Lippe. Following his death in Detmold, Woldemar was succeeded as Prince of Lippe by his brother Alexander. His brother, however, was suffering from a mental illness and, as he had been placed under legal restrictions in 1870, and 1893 it was necessary for a regency to established in Lippe. Prince Woldemar foreseeing this had made a provision in his will that the regency should go to Prince Adolf of Schaumburg-Lippe, the brother-in-law of the German Emperor. Prince Woldemar's decision to appoint Prince Adolf was the beginning of a decade long dispute between two lines of the House of Lippe, the Lippe-Biesterfeld's led by Count Ernst who claimed the regency, and the princes of Schaumburg-Lippe. There were various compromises and the matter was finally resolved in 1905.
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« Reply #593 on: June 19, 2020, 12:52:25 PM »

Vladimir the Great, (958–1015) prince of Novgorod, grand Prince of Kiev, and ruler of Kievan Rus'

Grand Duke Vladimir Alexandrovich of Russia (Russian: Влади́мир Александрович)( 22 April 1847 – 17 February 1909) was a son of Emperor Alexander II of Russia, a brother of Emperor Alexander III of Russia and the senior Grand Duke of the House of Romanov during the reign of his nephew, Emperor Nicholas II. He was fourth among the eight children of Alexander II of Russia and his wife Maria Alexandrovna, born Princess Marie of Hesse-Darmstadt.  While traveling through Germany with his family in June 1871, Grand Duke Vladimir met Duchess Marie of Mecklenburg-Schwerin (14 May 1854 – 6 September 1920), daughter of Friedrich Franz II, Grand Duke of Mecklenburg-Schwerin and Augusta of Reuss-Köstritz.[9] She was seventeen years old and was already engaged to a distant relative, Prince George of Schwarzburg. Grand Duke Vladimir was then twenty four.[9] They were smitten with each other. Vladimir was a second cousin of Maria's father Friedrich Franz II, Grand Duke of Mecklenburg-Schwerin, a grandson of Grand Duchess Elena Pavlovna of Russia. They were also second cousins in descent from Frederick William III of Prussia. In order to marry Vladimir, Maria broke off her previous engagement, but she refused to yield to the necessary conversion to the Orthodox religion. This delayed the couple's engagement for almost two years. Finally, Tsar Alexander II consented to Marie's continued adherence to her Lutheran faith, allowing Vladimir to marry her without loss of his rights to the Russian throne. The engagement was announced in April 1874. They were married on 28 August 1874.Vladimir's wife adopted the patronymic Pavlovna upon her marriage and was known as Grand Duchess Maria Pavlovna of Russia. Only decades later, after Vladimir's death, she converted to the Russian Orthodox confession, then, Emperor Nicholas II bestowed her the title "the Orthodox Grand Duchess". Grand Duke Vladimir and his wife were both witty and ambitious. They enjoy entertaining and their residence in St. Petersburg became the heart of the Imperial capital social life. Well suited to each other, they had a long and happy marriage. Grand Duke Vladimir Alexandrovich and his wife Grand Duchess Maria Pavlovna had five children.


 
Vladimir Kirillovich, Grand Duke of Russia (Cyrillic: Влади́мир Кири́ллович Рома́нов)(30 August [O.S. 17 August] 1917 – 21 April 1992) was the Head of the Imperial Family of Russia, a position which he claimed from 1938 to his death. Vladimir was born Prince Vladimir Kirillovich of Russia at Porvoo in the Grand Duchy of Finland, the only son of Grand Duke Cyril Vladimirovich and Grand Duchess Viktoria Feodorovna (née Princess Victoria Melita of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha). Vladimir's paternal grandparents were Grand Duke Vladimir Alexandrovich of Russia and Grand Duchess Maria Pavlovna (née Duchess Marie of Mecklenburg-Schwerin). His maternal grandparents were Alfred, Duke of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha and Grand Duchess Marie Alexandrovna of Russia. Vladimir's family had fled to Finland after the Russian Revolution of 1917. His family left Finland in 1920,[1] moving to Coburg, Germany. On 8 August 1922 Vladimir's father declared himself Curator of the Russian throne. Two years later on 31 August 1924 his father went a step further and assumed the title Emperor and Autocrat of all the Russias. With his father's assumption of the Imperial title Vladimir was granted the title of Tsesarevich (heir apparent) and Grand Duke with the style of Imperial Highness. In 1930 his family left Germany for Saint-Briac, France where his father set up his court. On the death of his father on 12 October 1938, Vladimir assumed the Headship of the Imperial Family of Russia Vladimir married Princess Leonida Georgievna Bagration-Moukhransky on 13 August 1948. Pre-revolutionary Romanov house law dictated that only those born of an "equal marriage" between a Romanov dynast and a member of a "royal or sovereign house", were included in the Imperial line of succession to the Russian throne; children of morganatic marriages were ineligible to inherit the throne or dynastic status. The family to which Princess Leonida belonged, the Bagrationi dynasty, had been kings in Georgia from the medieval era until the early 19th century, but no male line ancestor of hers had reigned as a king in Georgia since 1505 and her branch of the Bagrations, the House of Mukhrani, had been naturalised among the non-ruling nobility of Russia after Georgia was annexed to the Russian empire in 1801. Yet the royal status of the House of Bagration had been recognized by Russia in the 1783 Treaty of Georgievsk and was confirmed by Vladimir Kirillovich on 5 December 1946 as claimed head of the Russian imperial house. However the last ruling emperor of Imperial Russia Nicholas II had deemed marriage in this family of Princess Tatiana Constantinova in 1911, as morganatic. Some controversy therefore arises as to whether Vladimir's marriage to Leonida was equal or morganatic, and whether his claim to the Imperial throne validly passed to his daughter Maria, to some other dynast, or to no one upon his death. The couple had one daughter Maria. After his death, his daughter Maria Vladimirovna, assumed the headship of the Imperial Family of Russia according to his branch's interpretation of the Russian house laws. This was disputed by Nicholas Romanov, Prince of Russia who had been chosen president of the self-styled "Romanov Family Association" prior to the death of Grand Duke Vladimir. Nicholas asserted that he was the most senior male dynast after the death of Vladimir, as he believed the children of Romanov grand dukes (sons and grandsons of Russia's tsars) who had not married equally were not Russian dynasts, whereas Princes of Russia (being male-line great-grandchildren, or more remote descendants, of Russia's tsars) were not unequivocally subject to the equal marriage restriction, and deemed their children to be dynasts


Vladimir Sergeievich (June 18, 1902 - 1974), nickname Vova,  son of Mathilde Kschessinska, prima Ballerina and mistress of both Grand Duke Sergei Mikhailovich of Russia (Russian: Серге́й Миха́йлович)( 7 October 1869 – 18 July 1918) and his cousin Grand Duke Andrei Vladimirovich of Russia (Russian: Андрей Владимирович) (14 May 1879 – 30 October 1956). The relationship between the three complicated further as Mathilde became pregnant. Both grand dukes were at first convinced they were the child’s father. After the Revolution, Kschessinska and Grand Duke Andrei maintained that Andrei was the father. The child, who became known within the family by his nickname, Vova, received the name and patronymic Vladimir Sergeievich No surname was made public until 1911. The birth certificate showed Sergei as the father. Grand Duke Sergei was devoted to the child, looking after mother and son until his exile and subsequent execution following the fall of the Russian monarchy. The question of Vladimir’s paternity remains unresolved. However, most sources attribute the paternity to Grand Duke Andrei Vladimirovich, whom the child resembled. Grand Duke Andrei could neither openly live together with Mathilda nor did there exist the possibility of contracting a morganatic marriage with her.  After the revolution Kchessinska and Grand Duke Andrei were married in France in 1921. Grand Duke Andrei supported his brother's claim. Grand Duke Kirill granted to Mathilde and her son the titles of Princess and Prince Romanovsky-Krasinsky, with the treatment of Serene Highness. Prince Vladimir Romanovsky-Krasinsky died unmarried and childless in France in 1974, three years after his mother


Jovan Vladimir, (990–1016) King of Duklja

Vladimir of Bulgaria, (r.889–893) King of Bulgaria

Vladimir II Monomakh, (1053–1125) Veliky Knyaz of Kievan Rus, prince of Kiev; also ruled in Rostov and Suzdal

Vladimir the Bold (1353-1410), prince of Serpukhov, one of the principal commanders of Lithuanian–Muscovite War (1368–1372) and Battle of Kulikovo
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« Reply #594 on: June 19, 2020, 01:16:04 PM »

The male name Kiril (or Кирил or Кирилл) is a common first name in the Orthodox Slavic world, in particular in Bulgaria, North Macedonia, and Russia. It is also well known in Greece but in different forms like Kyriakos. (Note that in modern Russian the spelling Кирил is considered to be a mistake, the right spelling is Кирилл.)

Kiril has several variant forms: Cyril, Cyrill, Kirill, Kirillos, Kiryl (Belarusian), Kyril, Cyryl (Polish), Kyrill, Kyrylo (Ukrainian) and a diminutive Kiro (common in the Balkan Sprachbund).


Kyril, Prince of Preslav, Duke in Saxony (born 11 July 1964), also known as Kyril of Saxe-Coburg, is the second son of Tsar Simeon II of Bulgaria  and Doña Margarita Gómez-Acebo y Cejuela. Kyril married Doña ('Lady', in English heraldry) María del Rosario Nadal y Fuster de Puigdorfila on 15 September 1989. Doña/Lady Rosario Nadal was the grand daughter of the Counts of Olocau; her grandfather being the 9th Count, and her late maternal uncle, Excelentísimo Señor Don (lord) Felipe Fuster de Puigdorfila y Villalonga (1935-2010) being the 10th Count. The couple have three children: Mafalda-Cecilia (born 27 July 1994), Olimpia (born 14 December 1995), and Tassilo (born 20 January 2002).In October 2009, it was announced by the Spanish news agency EFE that, according to a report from an anonymous source close to Simeon of Bulgaria, the couple were going to live separately. The source claimed, however, that they don't presently have any plans or intention to divorce. The couple appeared together at the wedding of Victoria, Crown Princess of Sweden in June 2010. Kyril and his wife separated in 2009. Since 2017 he has been in a relationship with British businesswoman Katharine Butler (1967)


Cyril Leo Heraclius, Prince Toumanoff (born Toumanishvili) (1913–1997), Russian-born historian and genealogist who was a Professor Emeritus at Georgetown University Cyril Toumanoff was born in Saint Petersburg into a family of the military officer of the Russian army. His father's ancestors came of the princely family of Tumanishvili (Tumanov) from Georgia, whose ancestors had emigrated from their original homeland in Cilician Armenia in the 15th century. This family is on the list of the Georgian princes that was attached to the Treaty of Georgievsk concluded between the Georgian king Erekle II and the Russian empress Catherine II in 1783. On December 6, 1850, the Tumanishvili were officially enrolled on the Russian Empire's list of Georgian princely families as knyaz Tumanov. Toumanoff's mother, Elizabeth Zhdanova, was a descendant of a number of Russian noble families, with genealogical ties with the Western European nobility.A recognized authority on nobiliary and dynastic questions, Prince Toumanoff was also a Professed Knight of the Sovereign Military Order of Malta, High Historical Consultant, Grand Magistry, and the Grand Prior of Bohemia. Having taken religious orders he became known as Fra Cyril.Cyril Toumanoff died in 1997 in Rome at the age of 83. He is buried at the chapel of the Knights of Malta at Campo Verano, Rome


Grand Duke Kirill Vladimirovich of Russia, RE (Russian: Кири́лл Влади́мирович Рома́нов; Kirill Vladimirovich Romanov)(12 October [O.S. 30 September] 1876 – 12 October 1938) was a son of Grand Duke Vladimir Alexandrovich of Russia, a grandson of Emperor Alexander II and a first cousin of Nicholas II, Russia’s last Tsar.  In 1905, he married his paternal first cousin, Princess Victoria Melita of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha. They wed in defiance of Tsar Nicholas II prohibition. In retaliation, the Tsar stripped Kirill of his offices and honors, also initially banishing the couple from Russia. The marriage caused a scandal in the courts of European royalty as Princess Victoria was divorced from her first husband, Grand Duke Ernst Ludwig of Hesse, also her first cousin. The Grand Duke of Hesse's sister was Tsarina Alexandra Fyodorovna, the wife of Nicholas II. The Tsarina already disliked her former sister-in-law and first cousin, being instrumental in leading the opposition to the marriage in the Russian court. She was not alone in her opposition. Dowager Empress Maria Feodorovna was also appalled at the effrontery of Kirill's marriage. Kirill's marriage was in open defiance of the Russian Orthodox Church ruling that first cousins were not permitted to marry. Kirill knew that the Tsar's brother Grand Duke Michael Alexandrovich had been forbidden to marry his first cousin, Princess Beatrice of Edinburgh and Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. In 1908, after the death of Grand Duke Alexei Alexandrovich had put Kirill third in the line of succession to the Imperial Throne, Nicholas II restored Kirill to his rank of Captain in the Imperial Russian Navy and his position as aide de camp to the emperor. He was given the title Grand Duke of Russia and from then on his wife was styled as Her Imperial Highness Grand Duchess Viktoria Feodorovna.Grand Duke Kirill and Princess Victoria Melita had three children.

Duke Kirill of Oldenburg (Kirill Friedrich-August Jaime Cristobal Hermann Antonius Vincenz Josef Maria)( born 13 June 2002) Son of Duke Paul-Wladimir of Oldenburg (Paul-Wladimir Nikolaus Louis-Ferdinand Peter Max Karl-Emich)(16 August 1969) and Maria del Pilar Méndez de Vigo y Löwenstein-Wertheim-Rosenberg (20 October 1970). He is a great grandson of Grand Duchess Kira Kirillovna of Russia, the 2nd daughter of Grand Duke Kirill Vladimirovich of Russia.



Kira is a mostly feminine name of multiple origins and meanings.
It might be a feminine form of the name Kiran Kiran is of Hindi and Sanskrit origin, meaning "beam of light". In Ancient Hebrew "Keren" means both "a horn" and "a beam of light". Besides Sanskrit and Hebrew there might be other etymologies from Egyptian, where the word Ki-Ra means "like Ra", or Persian. Due to the Greek interpretation of the Persian king's name Kourosh (کوروش, Kūrosh) as Κύρος (Kýros) – which was obviously modeled after the Greek word κύριος (kýrios "lord"), the feminine form being κυρία (kyría) – Kyra (or Kira) can also be understood as a variant. Therefore, it is also in use as a feminine form of the Greek diminutive form Cyril.  In Russian Kira (Ки́ра) is the feminine form of the masculine name Kir, meaning "mistress, ruler", but can translate to "leader of the people", "one the people look to" or "beloved". Kira could also have arrived into Russian from the Persian-Greek name Kyra. Kira can also be the diminutive of the old and rare masculine given name Avvakir. Kira is one of several Anglicized forms of the Irish name Ciara, which in Irish means "dark haired". There is also a Japanese name, romanized as Kira, which is common in Japan, as both given name and family name. Kira kira also means "glittery, shiny" in Japanese.Variant forms include Kaira, Keera, Keira, Kiera, Kyra, Kyrah, Kyreena, Kyrha, Kyria, Kyrie, Kyrene, Kyrra, and Kirra


Grand Duchess Kira Kirillovna of Russia (9 May 1909 – 8 September 1967) was the second child and daughter of Grand Duke Kirill Vladimirovich of Russia and Princess Victoria Melita of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha. Grand Duchess Kira had some difficulty finding a suitable husband. She was interested in the hemophiliac Alfonso of Spain, Prince of Asturias, son of Alfonso XIII of Spain, but was disappointed when the prince showed more interest in one of the daughters of Prince Nicholas of Greece. Later, she was fond of Prince Constantine "Teddy" Soutzo, a Romanian aristocrat. Her cousin Carol II of Romania refused to permit the match for political reasons. Finally, Kira married Louis Ferdinand of Prussia (9 November 1907 – 26 September 1994), the head of the German Imperial House, in 1938.  They had 4 sons and 3 daughters.

Princess Kira of Prussia (Kira Auguste Viktoria Friederike)(27 June 1943 – 10 January 2004) was the fourth child and second daughter of Louis Ferdinand, Prince of Prussia and Grand Duchess Kira Kirillovna of Russia. She married Thomas Frank Liepsner in 1973. They were divorced in 1984. They had one daughter, Kira-Marina Liepsner (22 January 1977), who married Andreas Felix Paul von Bismarck (31 January 1979) in 2005


Kira-Marina Liepsner (22 January 1977), daughter of Princess Kira of Prussia and Thomas Liepsner. She married Andreas Felix Paul von Bismarck (born 31 January 1979) on 7 May 2005 in Berlin.
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« Reply #595 on: June 19, 2020, 02:01:22 PM »

Based on the 4 daughters of Nicholas II of Russia & Alix of Hesse by Rhine. Part I

Olga is a Slavic female given name, derived from Old Norse name Helga. It is used in Russia (Ольга), Ukraine (Ольга, transliterated Olha), Belarus (Вольга, transliterated Vol'ha), Bulgaria (Олга transliterated Ólga), the Czech Republic, Greece and Cyprus (Όλγα, Ólgha), Georgia (ოლგა (Olga) or more archaic ოლღა (Olgha)) Latvia, Lithuania, Albania, Poland, Hungary, Romania, Serbia (Олга or Оља), Slovenia, Croatia, Spain, Latin America, North Macedonia.

Grand Duchess Olga Nikolaevna of Russia (Olga Nikolaevna Romanova) (Russian: Великая Княжна Ольга Николаевна,)(Velikaya Knyazhna Ol'ga Nikolaevna)(15 November [O.S. 3 November] 1895 – 17 July 1918) was the eldest child of the last Tsar of the Russian Empire, Emperor Nicholas II, and of Empress Alexandra of Russia.During her lifetime, Olga's future marriage was the subject of great speculation within Russia. Matches were rumored with Grand Duke Dmitri Pavlovich of Russia, Crown Prince Carol of Romania, Edward, Prince of Wales, eldest son of Britain's George V, and with Crown Prince Alexander of Serbia. Olga herself wanted to marry a Russian and remain in her home country.Olga's murder following the Russian Revolution of 1917 resulted in her canonization as a passion bearer by the Russian Orthodox Church. In the 1990s, her remains were identified through DNA testing and were buried in a funeral ceremony at Peter and Paul Cathedral in St. Petersburg along with those of her parents and two of her sisters.

Olga Nikolaevna of Russia (1822 – 1892), second daughter of Nicholas I of Russia, wife to Charles I, King of Württemberg. She was the second daughter of Nicholas I of Russia and Charlotte of Prussia. She was thus a sister of Alexander II of Russia. She married Charles I of Württemberg, with whom she had no children.

Grand Duchess Olga Feodorovna of Russia (1839 – 1891), wife of Grand Duke Michael Nikolaevich of Russia  Born Princess Cäcilie Auguste of Baden, was the youngest daughter of Grand Duke Leopold of Baden and Sophie Wilhelmine of Sweden. On 28 August 1857, she married Grand Duke Mikhail Nikolaevich of Russia, the youngest son of Tsar Nicholas I of Russia. Upon her marriage, she converted to the Russian Orthodox faith and took the name Olga Feodorovna with the title of Grand Duchess of Russia. Unusually among the Romanovs of her generation, her marriage was a long and happy union. The couple remained devoted to each other. She raised their seven children with an iron hand. The couple had 7 children.
 
Grand Duchess Olga Constantinovna of Russia (1851 – 1926), Queen consort to George I, King of Greece; reigned as Queen regent of Greece in 1920. She was the daughter of Grand Duke Constantine Nikolaievich and his wife, Princess Alexandra of Saxe-Altenburg. Through her father, Olga was a granddaughter of Tsar Nicholas I, a niece of Tsar Alexander II and first cousin of Tsar Alexander III. As a child, Olga was described as a simple and chubby little girl with a broad face and big blue eyes. Unlike her younger sister, Vera, she had a calm temperament, but she was also extremely shy. George visited Russia again in 1867 to meet with his sister Dagmar, who had married Tsarevitch Alexander (later Alexander III) the year before. He was determined to find a wife and the idea of an alliance with a Russian grand duchess, born into the Eastern Orthodox Church, appealed to him. Olga fell in love with George, but she was nevertheless anxious and distraught at the thought of leaving Russia. Her father was initially reluctant to agree to their marriage, thinking that at the age of fifteen she was too young and, being close to his daughter, concerned by the distance between Greece and Russia. For her part, Grand Duchess Alexandra was much more enthusiastic than her husband and, when some members of the imperial family noted the extreme youth of her daughter, she replied that Olga would not always be as young.Eventually, it was decided that Olga and George would marry when she had reached her sixteenth birthday. Meanwhile, she would continue her schoolwork until her wedding day. Olga and George married at the chapel of the Winter Palace in Saint Petersburg on 27 October [O.S. 15 October] 1867. Over the following twenty years, they had eight children.

Princess Olga of Greece (7 April 1880 – 2 November 1880) daughter of Grand Duchess Olga Constantinovna of Russia and King George I of Greece.

Grand Duchess Olga Alexandrovna of Russia (Russian: О́льга Алекса́ндровна)(13 June [O.S. 1 June] 1882 – 24 November 1960) the youngest daughter of Emperor Alexander III and his consort, Empress Marie, formerly Princess Dagmar of Denmark. A  younger sister of Emperor Nicholas II. Olga's relationship with her mother, Empress Marie, the daughter of King Christian IX of Denmark, was strained and distant from childhood. In contrast, she and her father were close. He died when she was 12, and her brother Nicholas became emperor. In 1901, at 19, she married Duke Peter Alexandrovich of Oldenburg, who was privately believed by family and friends to be homosexual. Their marriage of 15 years remained unconsummated, and Peter at first refused Olga's request for a divorce. The couple led separate lives and their marriage was eventually annulled by the Emperor in October 1916. The following month Olga married cavalry officer Nikolai Kulikovsky, with whom she had fallen in love several years before.  The couple had 2 sons.

Princess Olga of Greece and Denmark (Greek: Πριγκίπισσα Όλγα της Ελλάδας και Δανίας, Serbian Cyrillic: Кнегиња Олга Карађорђевић)(11 June 1903 – 16 October 1997) was a granddaughter of King George I of Greece and wife of Prince Paul, Regent of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia. Her father was Prince Nicholas of Greece and Denmark, the third son of George I of Greece and Grand Duchess Olga Constantinovna of Russia. Her mother was Grand Duchess Elena Vladimirovna of Russia, a granddaughter of Tsar Alexander II of Russia. Brought up without wealth, Princess Olga was engaged to Prince Frederick of Denmark in 1922.However, the marriage did not take place and she married Prince Paul of Yugoslavia in Belgrade on 22 October 1923.Prince Paul and Princess Olga had issue

Princess Olga of Greece (17 November 1971), the 2nd child and daughter of Prince Michael of Greece and Denmark, RE (Greek: Μιχαήλ)(7 January 1939) and Marina Karella (Greek: Μαρίνα Καρέλλα)(17 July 1940) After a 3 year engagement she  married in 2008 to her second cousin Prince Aimone of Savoy, Duke of Apulia, a member of the former royal family of Italy. Aimone and Olga are the parents of two sons, Prince Umberto (b. 7 March 2009) and Prince Amedeo (b. 2011), and of a daughter, Princess Isabella (b. 2012).

Princess Olga Andreevna Romanoff (8 April 1950) is a Russian princess and descendant of the House of Romanov. She is the president of the Romanov Family Association. Princess Olga is the youngest child of Prince Andrei Alexandrovich of Russia and the only one born of his second marriage in 1942, to Nadine Sylvia Ada McDougall (1908–2000), daughter of Lt. Col. Herbert McDougall Her father was the son of Grand Duke Alexander Mikhailovich of Russia, who belonged to a cadet branch of the Romanovs, and his wife Grand Duchess Xenia Alexandrovna, Tsar Nicholas II's sister. Olga Andreevna uses the English version of her family name, preferring 'Romanoff' to 'Romanova', the feminine form of her name in Russian. She is known by the title "Princess Olga Andreevna Romanoff" On 3 December 2017, nearly a year after the death of Prince Dimitri Romanovich Romanov on the last day of 2016, she was elected president of the RFA. In 2005, she was on Australian Princess (a reality show) giving advice to competitors.Once considered a possible bride for her third cousin Charles, Prince of Wales,she married Thomas Mathew (born 8 July 1945) in  1975. They separated in 1989, having had issue (3 sons and 1 daughter).

Saint Olga (Church Slavonic: Ольга, in the baptism — Elena)(born c. 890–925, in Pskov[1] – died 969 AD in Kiev) was a regent of Kievan Rus' for her son Svyatoslav from 945 until 960. Due to the imperfect transliteration between Old East Slavic and the English language, the name Olga is synonymous with Olha. The baptism of Olga took the name Elenа.While Olga's birthdate is unknown, it could be as early as 890 AD and as late as 925 AD. Little is known about her life before her marriage to Prince Igor I of Kiev and the birth of their son, Svyatoslav. Igor was the son and heir of Rurik, founder of Rurik dynasty. After his father's death Igor was under guardianship of Oleg, who had consolidated power in the region, conquering neighboring tribes and establishing a capital in Kiev. After Igor's death in 945, Olga ruled Kievan Rus as regent on behalf of their son Svyatoslav.At the time of her death, it seemed that Olga's attempt to make Kievan Rus’ a Christian territory had been a failure. Nonetheless, Olga's Christianizing mission would be brought to fruition by her grandson, Vladimir, who officially adopted Christianity in 988. In 1547, nearly 600 years after her 969 death, the Russian Orthodox Church named Olga a saint


Princess Olga of Hanover and Cumberland (German: Olga Adelaide Louise Marie Alexandrina Agnes Prinzessin von Hannover und Cumberland)(11 July 1884 – 21 September 1958) was the youngest daughter of Ernest Augustus, Crown Prince of Hanover (1845–1923) and Princess Thyra of Denmark (1853–1933) She was probably named after her maternal aunt Queen Olga of Greece, the wife of Thyra's brother King George I of Greece (née Prince Vilhelm of Denmark) Princess Olga resided with her family at Gmunden and remained unmarried throughout her life. In 1958, shortly before Olga's death, her nephew Ernest Augustus, Prince of Hanover, and his wife Princess Ortrud of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg named their daughter, born in 1958, Olga in her honour.


Princess Olga Sophie Charlotte Anna of Hanover (born 1958), daughter of Ernest Augustus, Prince of Hanover, and his wife Princess Ortrud of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg


Princess Olga Margarita Valerie Elisabeth Stephanie Alexandra of Leiningen (23 October 1984). Daughter of Princess Alexandra of Hanover (German: Alexandra Irene Margaretha Elisabeth Bathildis, Prinzessin von Hannover) and Andreas, Prince of Leiningen (Andreas Fürst zu Leiningen)(27 November 1955)


Olga of Württemberg (German: Herzogin Olga Alexandrine Marie von Württemberg)(1 March 1876 – 21 October 1932) the younger twin daughter of Duke Eugen of Württemberg (1846–1877), (son of Duke Eugen of Württemberg, and Princess Mathilde of Schaumburg-Lippe) and his wife, Grand Duchess Vera Constantinovna of Russia (1854–1912), (daughter of Grand Duke Konstantin Nikolayevich of Russia and Princess Alexandra of Saxe-Altenburg). Her older twin was Duchess Elsa of Württemberg (1876–1936). They did not look alike and Olga, much taller than her sister, seemed to be the elder of the two. There were plans to marry Princess Olga to Prince Maximilian of Baden, but he ultimately married Princess Marie Louise of Hanover. In March 1898 there were reports of her engagement to Prince Eugen of Sweden, the youngest son of King Oscar II of Sweden. The marriage never occurred. Prince Eugen, a notable artist, remained a bachelor. Olga married Prince Maximilian of Schaumburg-Lippe (13 March 1871 – 1 April 1904) on 3 November 1898. He was a son of Wilhelm, Prince of Schaumburg-Lippe, and Bathildis, Princess of Anhalt-Dessau.Their marriage lasted less than six years. Her husband died young. They had three children.


Princess Olga Valerianovna Paley (2 December 1865 – 2 November 1929) was the morganatic second wife of Grand Duke Paul Alexandrovich of Russia. She was born as Olga Karnovich in Saint Petersburg, the daughter of Valerian Karnovich and his wife, Olga Vasilyevna Meszaros. She married Erich Gerhard von Pistohlkors (1853–1935 Riga) in 1884, by whom she had four children. She later began an affair with Grand Duke Paul Alexandrovich, causing a great society scandal, and had a child with him, Vladimir. Her marriage to Pistohlkors was terminated by divorce, and Paul asked permission from Tsar Nicholas II to marry Olga, but he refused. In 1902, Paul married her morganatically, but the marriage was not approved, and she was given no titles. In 1904, Luitpold, Prince Regent of Bavaria granted Olga the title of Countess von Hohenfelsen. Nicholas II later acquiesced to the marriage and granted her the title of Princess Paley in 1915. The couple had 3 children.


Olga Erikovna von Pistohlkors (1886–1887), daughter of Olga Karnovich and Erich Gerhard von Pistohlkors


Olga Erikovna von Pistohlkors (1888–1963), daughter of Olga Karnovich and Erich Gerhard von Pistohlkors  She married firstly in 1906 to Count Alexander Belzig von Kreutz and secondly in 1922 to Fürst Sergius Kudaschew.


Olga Ramel (1912–2011) daughter of Alexander Erikovich Pistohlkors (June 6, 1885– 1944) (son of Olga Karnovich and Erich Gerhard von Pistohlkors ) and  Alexandra Taneyeva, a Rasputin follower and the sister of the Tsarina's lady in waiting, Anna Vyrubova.


Lady Helen Olga Hay (née Maitland)(23 May 1944), usually known as Lady Olga Maitland, is a British Conservative politician and journalist The daughter of Patrick Maitland, 17th Earl of Lauderdale, and his wife Stanka (née Losanitch) On 19 April 1969, she married Robin William Patrick Hamilton Hay, M.A., LL.B., a barrister who later became a Crown Court Recorder. They have two sons, Alastair and Fergus, and a daughter, Camilla.
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« Reply #596 on: June 22, 2020, 11:30:41 AM »

Based on the 4 daughters of Nicholas II of Russia & Alix of Hesse by Rhine. Part II

Tatiana (or Tatianna, also romanized as Tatyana, Tatjana, Tatijana, etc.) is a female name of Roman origin. The short form of the name in some Slavic languages is Tanya (Russian: Таня).

Grand Duchess Tatiana Nikolaevna of Russia (Tatiana Nikolaevna Romanova; Russian: Великая Княжна Татьяна Николаевна)(10 June [O.S. 29 May] 1897– 17 July 1918) was the second daughter of Tsar Nicholas II, the last monarch of Russia, and of Tsarina Alexandra (née Alix of Hesse).Tatiana was the younger sister of Grand Duchess Olga and the elder sister of Grand Duchess Maria, Grand Duchess Anastasia and Tsarevich Alexei. She was known amongst her siblings as "the governess" for her domineering but also maternal ways. Tatiana was the closest out of all the children to her mother (Tsarina Alexandra), often spending many hours reading to her. She was often thought to be the most beautiful of all her sisters, and was the most aristocratic in appearance. Her murder by communist revolutionaries on 17 July 1918 resulted in her being named as a passion bearer by the Russian Orthodox Church. Tatiana and all of her siblings were falsely rumored to have survived the assassination and dozens of impostors claimed to be surviving Romanovs. Author Michael Occleshaw speculated that a woman named Larissa Tudor might have been Tatiana; however, all of the Romanovs, including Tatiana, were killed by the Bolsheviks.

Princess Tatiana Konstantinovna of Russia (Russian: Княжна Татьяна Константиовна)(23 January 1890 – 28 August 1979) was the third child and oldest daughter of Grand Duke Konstantin Konstantinovich of Russia and wife, Princess Elisabeth of Saxe-Altenburg. On 14 July 1886, Emperor Alexander III of Russia modified the Romanov house laws by restricting the title of Grand Duke/Duchess to children and grandchildren in the male line of a Russian emperor. More distant agnatic descendants would henceforth bear the title of "Prince(ess) of the Blood Imperial". Thus, Tatiana, being a great-granddaughter of Nicholas I of the so-called "Konstantinovich" branch of the Romanovs was only a princess from birth, entitled to the style of Highness, as opposed to Imperial Highness. Her name, Tatiana, was the idea of her grandfather, and was taken from the character Tatiana Larina from Alexander Pushkin's novel Eugene Onegin. She was close friends with Tsar Nicholas II's two eldest daughters, Olga and Tatiana Nikolaevna, and was mentioned frequently in both their diaries. In early 1911, Tatiana was rumored to be marrying Prince Alexander of Serbia (later Alexander I of Yugoslavia),but nothing came of this; Alexander later married Princess Maria of Romania.In the spring of 1911, Tatiana Konstantinovna became engaged to Prince Constantine Bagration of Mukhrani (2 March 1889, Tbilisi, - 19 May 1915, Jarosław), a Georgian by birth who was serving in a Russian Imperial Guards regiment, and died in World War I. She was to be the first daughter of the Romanovs to openly marry a Russian subject or non-dynastic prince since the dynasty ascended the throne in 1613. Legally Tatiana Konstantinovna's marriage was morganatic. Her father did not approve of the match, and initially sent Tatiana away to the Crimea to visit her relative Dowager Empress Maria Feodorovna. It was there that KR found his daughter with Konstantin, and gave his blessing. Finally, Tatiana Konstantinovna and her Georgian prince were married, at her father's estate at Pavlovsk, on 3 September 1911. Tatiana and Prince Constantine Bagration of Mukhrani had two children. Tatiana Konstantinovna is reported to have become especially close to her uncle, Grand Duke Dmitri Konstantinovich during her widowhood. After the February Revolution, she stayed with him in his palace, where she fell in love with his aide-de-camp, Alexander Korochenzov (17 August 1877 – 6 February 1922). Urged by her uncle, after they were ordered back to Petersburg from previous exile, she left Russia with Korochenzov and her young children. They were fortunate enough to escape, as Dmitri Konstantinovich was executed in St. Petersburg in January 1919. In November 1921, she married Korochenzov in Geneva. Not quite three months later, however, Tatiana became a widow for the second time when Alexander died in Lausanne. Tatiana raised her children alone, giving them the best education she possibly could, and, after both were grown and married, she took the veil, in Switzerland in 1946, just after the end of the second World War, which was her father's dream. At first she served at St. Mary Magdalene Convent in Jerusalem, coincidentally where relics of her aunt, Elisabeth Feodorovna were moved. She later served as Abbess at the Mount of Olives Convent in Jerusalem, and died as Mother Tamara (named so after the medieval Georgian queen Tamar, a remote ancestor of Tatiana's first husband), on 28 August 1979.

Princess Tatiana Radziwiłł (born 1939), only daughter of Princess Eugénie of Greece and Denmark and her 1st husband Prince Dominik Rainer Radziwiłł. She married Jean Henri Fruchaud and has issue. Tatiana was a bridesmaid at the 1962 wedding of Prince Juan Carlos of Spain and Princess Sophia of Greece and Denmark.

Princess Tatiana of Greece and Denmark (born Tatiana Ellinka Blatnik)(28 August 1980) is the wife of Prince Nikolaos, 2nd son of Constantine II, who reigned as King of Greece until the monarchy was abolished in 1973. Tatiana and her brother, Boris Blatnik (21 February 1978), are the natural children of Ladislav Vladimir Blatnik, born in Slovenia, and Marie Blanche Bierlein (10 December 1954) Her biological father died when she was six, and she was raised by her mother. Her stepfather, Attilio Brillembourg, is the owner of a New York area financial services company. On 25 August 2010 she married prince Nikolaos of Greece.


Princess Tatiana Desirée von Fürstenberg (Tatiana Desirée Prinzessin zu Fürstenberg)(February 16, 1971) is an American art curator, singer-songwriter, actress, philanthropist, and filmmaker Von Fürstenberg was born on February 16, 1971, in New York City to fashion designers Prince Egon von Fürstenberg and Princess Diane von Fürstenberg. Her parents divorced in 1972, and she was raised mostly by her maternal and paternal grandmothers, Holocaust survivor Liliane Nahmias and Agnelli. In 2000 von Fürstenberg, who was dating actor and writer Russell Steinberg, gave birth to their daughter Antonia. They married two years later and divorced in 2014.


Princess Tatjana Nora Maria of Liechtenstein (10 April 1973) is the fourth child and only daughter of Prince Hans-Adam II and Princess Marie. She married Baron Philipp von Lattorff (25 March 1968) at St. Florin's Cathedral in Vaduz on 5 June 1999. They have seven children (2 sons and 5 daughters). Previous to her marriage, she was considered a candidate to marry King Felipe VI of Spain, then Prince of Asturias.


Princess Tatiana of Sayn-Wittgenstein-Berleburg (Tatiana Louise Ursula Therese Elsa)(31 July 1940) is the fourth child and second daughter of Gustav Albrecht, 5th Prince of Sayn-Wittgenstein-Berleburg, and his wife, Margareta Fouché d'Otrante. Tatjana is the former wife of the late Moritz, Landgrave of Hesse, from 1980 head of the House of Hesse. Their marriage took place in the summer of 1964 in Gießen. They divorced in 1974. Moritz and Tatiana had four children.


Tatiana Marie Galdo (20 January 1992), daughter of Princess Mafalda Margarethe of Hesse (6 July 1965) and her 2nd husband (of 3) Carlo Galdo. She is a maternal granddaughter of Princess Tatiana of Sayn-Wittgenstein-Berleburg and late Moritz, Landgrave of Hesse.


Princess Tatiana Victoria Maureen of Leiningen (27 August 1989),Daughter of Deborah Cully (2 December 1961) and Prince Hermann Friedrich of Leiningen (16 April 1963). She married Clayton Reynolds on 17 June 2017.


Countess Tatiana Alexandrovna de Ribeaupierre (29 June 1828 – 14 January 1879). Wife of  Prince Nicholas Borisovich Yusupov (12 October 1827 – 31 July 1891). Princess Zinaida Nikolayevna Yusupova was their only surviving child. Princess Zinaida was an Imperial Russian noblewoman, the only heiress of Russia's largest private fortune of her time. Famed for her beauty and the lavishness of her hospitality, she was a leading figure in pre-Revolutionary Russian society. In 1882, she married Count Felix Felixovich Sumarokov-Elston, who served briefly as General Governor of Moscow (1914–1915). Zinaida is best known as the mother of Prince Felix Yusupov, the murderer of Rasputin.


Tatiana Sfiris (28 August 1968), daughter of Countess Xenia Nikolaevna Sheremeteva (1 March 1942) and Ilias Sfiris (born 20 August 1932). In maternal line a granddaughter of Princess Irina Felixovna Yusupova (Russian: Ирина Феликсовна Юсупова), nicknamed "Bébé", (21 March 1915 – 30 August 1983) and Count Nikolai Dmitrievich Sheremetev (28 October 1904, Moscow, Russia – 5 February 1979). Her grandmother was the only child of Prince Felix Yusupov and Princess Irina of Russia. Tatiana married on May 1996 in Athens, Greece, to Alexis Giannakoupoulos (born 1963), divorced, no issue; married Anthony Vamvakidis and has issue



Tatiana "Tanja" Tolstoy-Paus[a] (20 September 1914 – 29 January 2007) (née Countess Tatyana Lvovna Tolstaya; Russian: Графиня Татья́на Льво́вна Толста́я) was a Russian-Swedish countess, socialite and a member of the Tolstoy family. She was the last surviving grandchild of Leo Tolstoy. The daughter of novelist and sculptor Lev Lvovich Tolstoy and his Swedish wife Dora Westerlund. As a result of the Russian revolution, the family fled to Sweden in 1917. In 1940 she married Norwegian-born estate owner and former competitive skier Herman Paus, the owner of the major Herresta estate outside Stockholm. They had four children.


Countess Tatiana Lvovna Sukhotina-Tolstaya (Russian: Графиня Татья́на Льво́вна Сухо́тина-Толста́я) (4 October 1864 – 21 September 1950), was a Russian painter and memoirist. She is the second child and oldest daughter of writer Leo Tolstoy. Devoted to her father and his ideals, she had rejected a number of suitors. In 1897, Tatiana (known in her family as Tanya)  fell in love with Mikhail Sergeevich Sukhotin, although he was in his 50s and married with six children.For several months Tatiana had a platonic friendship with Sukhotin, despite having misgivings. Sukhotin's wife died later that year, and on 9 October, Tatiana announced her desire to marry Sukhotin to her father, who responded with a fiercely uncompromising rejection. Tatiana gave in for the time being, but finally insisted, and on 14 November 1899 the couple were married. On 19 November 1905, she gave birth at Yasnaya Polyana to her only child, a daughter also called Tatiana. After her husband's death in 1914, Tatiana moved back to Yasnaya Polyana, which was eventually turned into a museum. From 1917 to 1923 she was guardian of the museum; from 1923 to 1925 she was director of the Lev Tolstoy State Museum in Moscow. In 1925, together with her daughter, she immigrated to Paris.  From Paris she moved to Italy, where she spent her final years.


Countess Tatiana  Sukhotina (19 November 1905 - ?) daughter of  Countess Tatiana Lvovna Sukhotina-Tolstaya and Mikhail Sergeevich Sukhotin.


Lady Tatiana Helen Georgia Mountbatten (16 April 1990) is an English equestrian. Daughter of  George Mountbatten, 4th Marquess of Milford Haven and his wife, Sarah Georgina (née Walker). Her paternal great-grandparents, Prince George of Battenberg and Countess Nadejda Mikhailovna de Torby, were morganatic descendants of German and Russian royal houses. Her great-grandparents gave up their German titles in exchange for titles within the British peerage, and Anglicized their family name from Battenberg to Mountbatten.


Lady Tatiana Elizabeth Mountbatten (16 December 1917 – 15 May 1988), daughter of  Prince George of Battenberg, later the 2nd Marquess of Milford Haven (6 December 1892 – 8 April 1938) and Countess Nadejda de Torby (28 March 1896 – 22 January 1963). She died unmarried.


Countess Tatiana Razumovsky von Wigstein (?)






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« Reply #597 on: June 22, 2020, 11:59:47 AM »

Based on the 4 daughters of Nicholas II of Russia & Alix of Hesse by Rhine. Part IV


Anastasia (from Greek Anastasía (Ἀναστασία)) is a feminine given name and the female equivalent of the male name Anastasius. The name is of Greek origin, coming from the Greek word anástasis (ἀνάστασις), meaning "resurrection". It is a popular name in Eastern Europe, particularly in Russia, where it was the most used name for decades until 2008, when its place was taken by Sophia. It is still heavily used.


Grand Duchess Anastasia Nikolaevna of Russia (Russian: Анастаси́я Никола́евна Рома́нова, tr. Anastasíya Nikoláyevna Románova)(June 18 [O.S. June 5] 1901 – July 17, 1918) was the youngest daughter of Tsar Nicholas II, the last sovereign of Imperial Russia, and his wife, Tsarina Alexandra Feodorovna. Anastasia was the younger sister of Grand Duchesses Olga, Tatiana, and Maria, and was the elder sister of Alexei Nikolaevich, Tsarevich of Russia. She was murdered with her family by a group of Bolsheviks in Yekaterinburg on July 17, 1918. Persistent rumors of her possible escape circulated after her death, fueled by the fact that the location of her burial was unknown during the decades of Communist rule. The abandoned mine serving as a mass grave near Yekaterinburg which held the acidified remains of the Tsar, his wife, and three of their daughters was revealed in 1991. These remains were put to rest at Peter and Paul Fortress in 1998. The bodies of Alexei Nikolaevich and the remaining daughter—either Anastasia or her older sister Maria—were discovered in 2007. Her possible survival has been conclusively disproved. Scientific analysis including DNA testing confirmed that the remains are those of the imperial family, showing that all four grand duchesses were killed in 1918. Several women falsely claimed to have been Anastasia; the best known impostor is Anna Anderson. Anderson's body was cremated upon her death in 1984, but DNA testing in 1994 on available pieces of Anderson's tissue and hair showed no relation to the Romanov family.

Anastasia (sister of Constantine I) (c.290–after 314), half sister of Emperor Constantine I

Anastasia (wife of Constantine IV) (c.650–after 711), Empress consort of Constantine IV of the Byzantine Empire

Anastasia of Kiev (c.1023–1074/1096), Queen consort of Hungary

Princess Anastasia of Greece and Denmark (née Nonie May Stewart)( 20 January 1878 – 29 August 1923) was an American-born heiress and member of the Greek Royal Family. She was married to Prince Christopher of Greece and Denmark, the youngest child of King George I of Greece and his consort, Grand Duchess Olga Constantinovna of Russia, but was created a princess suo jure. She was born as May Stewart in Zanesville, Ohio, to William Charles Stewart, a wealthy merchant, and his wife, Mary Holden. As "Nonie May Stewart", on 1 October 1894 in Cleveland, she married George Ely Worthington, son of Ralph Worthington. The marriage license inaccurately states that she was born in 1876, since Ohio law required that females be at least 18 years of age to marry. The couple lived as husband and wife for four years, having no children. It is unclear how or where, but the marriage ended on 23 March 1899 by divorce, annulment or abandonment. On 3 August 1900, May married for the second time in Cleveland: the groom was William Bateman Leeds, a wealthy businessman who was born on 10 September 1861. This was also Leeds' second marriage, the previous one having ended in 1896, at which time he settled one million dollars on his ex-wife. Nonie May and Leeds had one son, William Bateman Leeds, Jr., born on 19 September 1902. Leeds died in 1908 in Paris leaving a fortune estimated at 35 million dollars The wealthy, 30-year-old widow, soon to be known in Europe as "Nancy May Leeds", chose to remain in Europe, where she socialised among the aristocracy. In 1920, six years after their engagement, Nancy May Leeds married  Prince Christopher of Greece and Denmark (1888–1940). Four days later, the bride joined the Greek Orthodox church and took, as was usual, a new Christian name: Anastasia. Thereafter, she was officially styled as HRH Princess Anastasia of Greece. Anastasia's 19-year-old son, William B. Leeds, Jr., married her third husband's 18-year-old niece, Princess Xenia Georgievna of Russia, they divorced in March 1930. Shortly after her marriage to Prince Christopher, Anastasia was diagnosed with cancer. She died three years later in 1923. In 1929, Prince Christopher married Princess Françoise of Orléans (1902–1953) and fathered a son, Prince Michael of Greece and Denmark (1939). Prince Christoph died a year later.


Princess Anastasia Victoria Cecilia Hermine of Prussia (14 February 1944); daughter of  Prince Hubertus of Prussia (Hubertus Karl Wilhelm) (30 September 1909 – 8 April 1950) and his 2nd wife Princess Magdalena Reuss of Köstritz (20 August 1920 – 10 October 2009). She married Alois-Konstantin, 9th Prince of Löwenstein-Wertheim-Rosenberg and had issue.

Princess Anastasia of Saxony (German: Anastasia-Luise Alexandra Elisabeth Jutta Sibylle Marie-Auguste Henriette Prinzessin von Anhalt) (Anastasia-Luise Alexandra Elisabeth Jutta Sibylle Marie-Auguste Henriette)( 22 December 1940) is a member of the House of Ascania. The only child of Prince Eugen of Anhalt and his wife Anastasia Jungmeier. In 1962 Anastasia married Prince Maria Emanuel of Saxony, eldest child of Friedrich Christian, Margrave of Meissen and his wife, Princess Elisabeth Helene of Thurn and Taxis. Anastasia and Maria Emanuel do not have children.

Princess Anastasia of Georgia (Georgian: ანასტასია)(3 November 1763 – 17 May 1838) was a Georgian princess royal (batonishvili), a daughter of King Heraclius II of Georgia of his third marriage to Darejan Dadiani. She was married into the princely family of Eristavi, former Ducal House of Ksani.On 12 November 1797, at the age of 34, she married Prince Revaz (Roman) Eristavi (c. 1757–1813), a son of Giorgi, Duke of Ksani, who had been dispossessed by Heraclius II of his hereditary duchy in the Ksani valley. Princess Anastasia had five children with Revaz Eristavi.


Princess Anastasia Petrović-Njegoš of Montenegro (4 January [O.S. 23 December] 1867 – 25 November 1935) was the daughter of King Nikola I Petrović-Njegoš of Montenegro (1841–1921) and his wife, Milena Vukotić (1847–1923). She retained her childhood name of "Stana" to close relations. On 28 August n.s., 1889, at the Imperial Russian Palace of Peterhof, Stana married Prince George Maximilianovich of Leuchtenberg (later the Duke of Leuchtenberg.) The Duke had previously been married and widowed, with one son, Alexander Georgievich, from his prior marriage to Princess Therese of Oldenburg. The couple had two children before divorcing in St. Petersburg on 15 November 1906. On 29 April 1907, at the age of 39, Anastasia was married to Grand Duke Nicholas Nikolaevich of Russia (1856–1929). The marriage was childless. Both her husbands were descendants of Emperor Nicholas I of Russia (1796–1855): the first one was his grandson through a maternal line, and the second one was his grandson through a direct male line.Anastasia and her sister were intrigued by the more mystical side of the Eastern Orthodox religion; they were early supporters of the French seer "Dr." Philippe Vachot and of the starets Rasputin, and introduced both in turn to the Empress Alexandra Feodorovna, the last Tsarina of Russia.


Duchess Anastasia Alexandrine Cecile Marie Luise Wilhelmine of Mecklenburg-Schwerin (Full German name: Anastasia Alexandrine Cecile Marie Luise Wilhelmine Herzogin zu Mecklenburg-Schwerin), (11 November 1923 – 25 January 1979) Anastasia was the youngest child and youngest daughter of Frederick Francis IV, Grand Duke of Mecklenburg-Schwerin and his wife Princess Alexandra of Hanover and Cumberland. In 1943 Anastasia married Prince Friedrich Ferdinand of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg, youngest son of Prince Albrecht of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg and his wife Countess Ortrud of Ysenburg and Büdingen. Friedrich Ferdinand and Anastasia had four daughters.


Anastasia de Montfort, Countess of Nola (born c.1274), was an Italian noblewoman and a wealthy heiress. She was the eldest daughter of Guy de Montfort, Count of Nola, himself the son of Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester. She held the title suo jure Countess of Nola after her father's death in 1291. She also held the titles of suo jure Dame de Chailly and suo jure Dame de Longjumeau. She was the wife of Romano Orsini, Senator of Rome, by whom she had at least three children.


Countess Anastasia Vasilyevna Hendrikova, (23 June 1887 – 4 September 1918), was a lady in waiting at the court of Tsar Nicholas II and Tsarina Alexandra. She was arrested by the Bolsheviks and shot to death outside Perm in the autumn of 1918. Hendrikova, who was nicknamed "Nastenka," was the daughter of Count Vassili Alexandrovich Hendrikov, Grand Master of Ceremonies of the Imperial Court, and his wife, Princess Sophia Petrovna Gagarine. She was a descendant of the sister of Catherine I of Russia, the wife of Peter the Great. Hendrikova was devoted to the Romanov family and followed them into exile after the Russian Revolution of 1917


Anastasia Robinson (c. 1692 – April 1755), later known as Anastasia, Countess of Peterborough, was an English soprano, later contralto, of the Baroque era.Robinson was the eldest daughter of Thomas Robinson, a portrait painter who worked for a time in Italy  In 1722 (or possibly 1723) she had secretly married Charles Mordaunt, 3rd Earl of Peterborough, although he did not acknowledge her status as his wife until 1735, just before his death; until then they lived separately, and society regarded her as his mistress.


Countess Anastasia Mikhailovna de Torby, CBE (9 September 1892 – 7 December 1977), otherwise styled Lady Zia Wernher, was the elder daughter of Grand Duke Michael Mikhailovich of Russia, a grandson of Tsar Nicholas I of Russia, by Countess Sophie of Merenberg. Like her mother, Anastasia was born of a morganatic marriage, and was ineligible to bear her father's title or rank. Following her parents' elopement to San Remo in 1891 and consequent banishment from Russia, Sophia was made Countess de Torby by Adolphe, Grand Duke of Luxembourg, which title extended to all three of the couple's children Through her mother, she descended from the renowned Russian poet Alexander Pushkin. On 20 July 1917 Countess Anastasia de Torby married British Major-General Sir Harold Wernher, 3rd Bt (1893–1973; son of wealthy financier, Sir Julius Wernher, Bt, who had made his fortune in South African diamonds) The couple had one son and two daughters


Anastasia Margriet Josephine  van Lippe-Biesterfeld van Vollenhoven (known as Anna) (15 april 2001) eldest child and daughter of Maurits Willem Pieter Hendrik, Prince van Oranje-Nassau, Van Vollenhoven (17 april 1968) and his wife Marilène van den Broek. She is the eldest great grandchild of former Queen Juliana and Prince Bernhard of the Netherlands on paternal side. She is also the eldest grandchild of Princess Margriet and Mr. Pieter van Vollenhoven. Princess Margriet is the 3rd daughter of former Queen Juliana.
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« Reply #598 on: June 22, 2020, 02:34:31 PM »

Based on the 4 daughters of Nicholas II of Russia & Alix of Hesse by Rhine. Part II

Tatiana (or Tatianna, also romanized as Tatyana, Tatjana, Tatijana, etc.) is a female name of Roman origin. The short form of the name in some Slavic languages is Tanya (Russian: Таня).

Grand Duchess Tatiana Nikolaevna of Russia (Tatiana Nikolaevna Romanova; Russian: Великая Княжна Татьяна Николаевна)(10 June [O.S. 29 May] 1897– 17 July 1918) was the second daughter of Tsar Nicholas II, the last monarch of Russia, and of Tsarina Alexandra (née Alix of Hesse).Tatiana was the younger sister of Grand Duchess Olga and the elder sister of Grand Duchess Maria, Grand Duchess Anastasia and Tsarevich Alexei. She was known amongst her siblings as "the governess" for her domineering but also maternal ways. Tatiana was the closest out of all the children to her mother (Tsarina Alexandra), often spending many hours reading to her. She was often thought to be the most beautiful of all her sisters, and was the most aristocratic in appearance. Her murder by communist revolutionaries on 17 July 1918 resulted in her being named as a passion bearer by the Russian Orthodox Church. Tatiana and all of her siblings were falsely rumored to have survived the assassination and dozens of impostors claimed to be surviving Romanovs. Author Michael Occleshaw speculated that a woman named Larissa Tudor might have been Tatiana; however, all of the Romanovs, including Tatiana, were killed by the Bolsheviks.

Princess Tatiana Konstantinovna of Russia (Russian: Княжна Татьяна Константиовна)(23 January 1890 – 28 August 1979) was the third child and oldest daughter of Grand Duke Konstantin Konstantinovich of Russia and wife, Princess Elisabeth of Saxe-Altenburg. On 14 July 1886, Emperor Alexander III of Russia modified the Romanov house laws by restricting the title of Grand Duke/Duchess to children and grandchildren in the male line of a Russian emperor. More distant agnatic descendants would henceforth bear the title of "Prince(ess) of the Blood Imperial". Thus, Tatiana, being a great-granddaughter of Nicholas I of the so-called "Konstantinovich" branch of the Romanovs was only a princess from birth, entitled to the style of Highness, as opposed to Imperial Highness. Her name, Tatiana, was the idea of her grandfather, and was taken from the character Tatiana Larina from Alexander Pushkin's novel Eugene Onegin. She was close friends with Tsar Nicholas II's two eldest daughters, Olga and Tatiana Nikolaevna, and was mentioned frequently in both their diaries. In early 1911, Tatiana was rumored to be marrying Prince Alexander of Serbia (later Alexander I of Yugoslavia),but nothing came of this; Alexander later married Princess Maria of Romania.In the spring of 1911, Tatiana Konstantinovna became engaged to Prince Constantine Bagration of Mukhrani (2 March 1889, Tbilisi, - 19 May 1915, Jarosław), a Georgian by birth who was serving in a Russian Imperial Guards regiment, and died in World War I. She was to be the first daughter of the Romanovs to openly marry a Russian subject or non-dynastic prince since the dynasty ascended the throne in 1613. Legally Tatiana Konstantinovna's marriage was morganatic. Her father did not approve of the match, and initially sent Tatiana away to the Crimea to visit her relative Dowager Empress Maria Feodorovna. It was there that KR found his daughter with Konstantin, and gave his blessing. Finally, Tatiana Konstantinovna and her Georgian prince were married, at her father's estate at Pavlovsk, on 3 September 1911. Tatiana and Prince Constantine Bagration of Mukhrani had two children. Tatiana Konstantinovna is reported to have become especially close to her uncle, Grand Duke Dmitri Konstantinovich during her widowhood. After the February Revolution, she stayed with him in his palace, where she fell in love with his aide-de-camp, Alexander Korochenzov (17 August 1877 – 6 February 1922). Urged by her uncle, after they were ordered back to Petersburg from previous exile, she left Russia with Korochenzov and her young children. They were fortunate enough to escape, as Dmitri Konstantinovich was executed in St. Petersburg in January 1919. In November 1921, she married Korochenzov in Geneva. Not quite three months later, however, Tatiana became a widow for the second time when Alexander died in Lausanne. Tatiana raised her children alone, giving them the best education she possibly could, and, after both were grown and married, she took the veil, in Switzerland in 1946, just after the end of the second World War, which was her father's dream. At first she served at St. Mary Magdalene Convent in Jerusalem, coincidentally where relics of her aunt, Elisabeth Feodorovna were moved. She later served as Abbess at the Mount of Olives Convent in Jerusalem, and died as Mother Tamara (named so after the medieval Georgian queen Tamar, a remote ancestor of Tatiana's first husband), on 28 August 1979.

Princess Tatiana Radziwiłł (born 1939), only daughter of Princess Eugénie of Greece and Denmark and her 1st husband Prince Dominik Rainer Radziwiłł. She married Jean Henri Fruchaud and has issue. Tatiana was a bridesmaid at the 1962 wedding of Prince Juan Carlos of Spain and Princess Sophia of Greece and Denmark.

Princess Tatiana of Greece and Denmark (born Tatiana Ellinka Blatnik)(28 August 1980) is the wife of Prince Nikolaos, 2nd son of Constantine II, who reigned as King of Greece until the monarchy was abolished in 1973. Tatiana and her brother, Boris Blatnik (21 February 1978), are the natural children of Ladislav Vladimir Blatnik, born in Slovenia, and Marie Blanche Bierlein (10 December 1954) Her biological father died when she was six, and she was raised by her mother. Her stepfather, Attilio Brillembourg, is the owner of a New York area financial services company. On 25 August 2010 she married prince Nikolaos of Greece.


Princess Tatiana Desirée von Fürstenberg (Tatiana Desirée Prinzessin zu Fürstenberg)(February 16, 1971) is an American art curator, singer-songwriter, actress, philanthropist, and filmmaker Von Fürstenberg was born on February 16, 1971, in New York City to fashion designers Prince Egon von Fürstenberg and Princess Diane von Fürstenberg. Her parents divorced in 1972, and she was raised mostly by her maternal and paternal grandmothers, Holocaust survivor Liliane Nahmias and Agnelli. In 2000 von Fürstenberg, who was dating actor and writer Russell Steinberg, gave birth to their daughter Antonia. They married two years later and divorced in 2014.


Princess Tatjana Nora Maria of Liechtenstein (10 April 1973) is the fourth child and only daughter of Prince Hans-Adam II and Princess Marie. She married Baron Philipp von Lattorff (25 March 1968) at St. Florin's Cathedral in Vaduz on 5 June 1999. They have seven children (2 sons and 5 daughters). Previous to her marriage, she was considered a candidate to marry King Felipe VI of Spain, then Prince of Asturias.


Princess Tatiana of Sayn-Wittgenstein-Berleburg (Tatiana Louise Ursula Therese Elsa)(31 July 1940) is the fourth child and second daughter of Gustav Albrecht, 5th Prince of Sayn-Wittgenstein-Berleburg, and his wife, Margareta Fouché d'Otrante. Tatjana is the former wife of the late Moritz, Landgrave of Hesse, from 1980 head of the House of Hesse. Their marriage took place in the summer of 1964 in Gießen. They divorced in 1974. Moritz and Tatiana had four children.


Tatiana Marie Galdo (20 January 1992), daughter of Princess Mafalda Margarethe of Hesse (6 July 1965) and her 2nd husband (of 3) Carlo Galdo. She is a maternal granddaughter of Princess Tatiana of Sayn-Wittgenstein-Berleburg and late Moritz, Landgrave of Hesse.


Princess Tatiana Victoria Maureen of Leiningen (27 August 1989),Daughter of Deborah Cully (2 December 1961) and Prince Hermann Friedrich of Leiningen (16 April 1963). She married Clayton Reynolds on 17 June 2017.


Countess Tatiana Alexandrovna de Ribeaupierre (29 June 1828 – 14 January 1879). Wife of  Prince Nicholas Borisovich Yusupov (12 October 1827 – 31 July 1891). Princess Zinaida Nikolayevna Yusupova was their only surviving child. Princess Zinaida was an Imperial Russian noblewoman, the only heiress of Russia's largest private fortune of her time. Famed for her beauty and the lavishness of her hospitality, she was a leading figure in pre-Revolutionary Russian society. In 1882, she married Count Felix Felixovich Sumarokov-Elston, who served briefly as General Governor of Moscow (1914–1915). Zinaida is best known as the mother of Prince Felix Yusupov, the murderer of Rasputin.


Tatiana Sfiris (28 August 1968), daughter of Countess Xenia Nikolaevna Sheremeteva (1 March 1942) and Ilias Sfiris (born 20 August 1932). In maternal line a granddaughter of Princess Irina Felixovna Yusupova (Russian: Ирина Феликсовна Юсупова), nicknamed "Bébé", (21 March 1915 – 30 August 1983) and Count Nikolai Dmitrievich Sheremetev (28 October 1904, Moscow, Russia – 5 February 1979). Her grandmother was the only child of Prince Felix Yusupov and Princess Irina of Russia. Tatiana married on May 1996 in Athens, Greece, to Alexis Giannakoupoulos (born 1963), divorced, no issue; married Anthony Vamvakidis and has issue



Tatiana "Tanja" Tolstoy-Paus[a] (20 September 1914 – 29 January 2007) (née Countess Tatyana Lvovna Tolstaya; Russian: Графиня Татья́на Льво́вна Толста́я) was a Russian-Swedish countess, socialite and a member of the Tolstoy family. She was the last surviving grandchild of Leo Tolstoy. The daughter of novelist and sculptor Lev Lvovich Tolstoy and his Swedish wife Dora Westerlund. As a result of the Russian revolution, the family fled to Sweden in 1917. In 1940 she married Norwegian-born estate owner and former competitive skier Herman Paus, the owner of the major Herresta estate outside Stockholm. They had four children.


Countess Tatiana Lvovna Sukhotina-Tolstaya (Russian: Графиня Татья́на Льво́вна Сухо́тина-Толста́я) (4 October 1864 – 21 September 1950), was a Russian painter and memoirist. She is the second child and oldest daughter of writer Leo Tolstoy. Devoted to her father and his ideals, she had rejected a number of suitors. In 1897, Tatiana (known in her family as Tanya)  fell in love with Mikhail Sergeevich Sukhotin, although he was in his 50s and married with six children.For several months Tatiana had a platonic friendship with Sukhotin, despite having misgivings. Sukhotin's wife died later that year, and on 9 October, Tatiana announced her desire to marry Sukhotin to her father, who responded with a fiercely uncompromising rejection. Tatiana gave in for the time being, but finally insisted, and on 14 November 1899 the couple were married. On 19 November 1905, she gave birth at Yasnaya Polyana to her only child, a daughter also called Tatiana. After her husband's death in 1914, Tatiana moved back to Yasnaya Polyana, which was eventually turned into a museum. From 1917 to 1923 she was guardian of the museum; from 1923 to 1925 she was director of the Lev Tolstoy State Museum in Moscow. In 1925, together with her daughter, she immigrated to Paris.  From Paris she moved to Italy, where she spent her final years.


Countess Tatiana  Sukhotina (19 November 1905 - ?) daughter of  Countess Tatiana Lvovna Sukhotina-Tolstaya and Mikhail Sergeevich Sukhotin.


Lady Tatiana Helen Georgia Mountbatten (16 April 1990) is an English equestrian. Daughter of  George Mountbatten, 4th Marquess of Milford Haven and his wife, Sarah Georgina (née Walker). Her paternal great-grandparents, Prince George of Battenberg and Countess Nadejda Mikhailovna de Torby, were morganatic descendants of German and Russian royal houses. Her great-grandparents gave up their German titles in exchange for titles within the British peerage, and Anglicized their family name from Battenberg to Mountbatten.


Lady Tatiana Elizabeth Mountbatten (16 December 1917 – 15 May 1988), daughter of  Prince George of Battenberg, later the 2nd Marquess of Milford Haven (6 December 1892 – 8 April 1938) and Countess Nadejda de Torby (28 March 1896 – 22 January 1963). She died unmarried.


Countess Tatiana Razumovsky von Wigstein (?)








Tatiana Alexandra (b. 1986) the natural daughter of Prince Michael Mihailovich Romanoff (31 July 1959 – 24 January 2001) and Maria de las Mercedes Ustrell-Cabani (b. 1960). In 1994 her mother married her paternal grandfather Prince Michael Feodorovich Romanoff (French: Michel Romanoff)(4 May 1924 – 22 September 2008), who in 1995 adopted Tatiana Alexandra. So she became the adopted daughter of her paternal grandfather.

Tatiana Beadleston (b. 1968) daughter of Princess Marina Romanov (22 May 1940) and William Beadleston (31 July 1938). Princess Marina is a daughter of Prince Vasili Alexandrovich of Russia (7 July [O.S. 24 June] 1907 – 24 June 1989) who was the sixth son and youngest child of Grand Duke Alexander Mikhailovich of Russia and Grand Duchess Xenia Alexandrovna of Russia.
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« Reply #599 on: June 29, 2020, 05:38:15 PM »

Based on the 4 daughters of Nicholas II of Russia & Alix of Hesse by Rhine. Part III

Maria is a feminine given name. It is given in many languages influenced by Latin Christianity. It has its origin as the feminine form of the Roman name Marius (see Maria (gens)), and, after Christian religion has spread across the Roman empire, it became the Latinised form of the name of Miriam: Mary, mother of Jesus. Maria (Μαρία) is a form of the name used in the New Testament, standing alongside Mariam Μαριάμ. It reflects the Syro-Aramaic name Maryam, which is in turn derived from the Biblical Hebrew name Miriam. As a result of their similarity and syncretism, the Latin original name Maria and the Hebrew-derived Maria combined to form a single name.The name is also sometimes used as a male (middle) name. This was historically the case in many Central European countries and still is the case in countries with strong Catholic traditions, where it signified patronage of the Virgin Mary (French-speakers often did the same with Marie). Besides Maria, Mother of Jesus there are three other women named Maria in the New Testament: Maria Magdalena and Maria Salomé, disciples of Jesus, and Maria Betânia, sister of Lazarus. In Quranic tradition, the name is rendered Maryam, but Arabic reflects the Christian given name as Mārya مارية or Māryā ماريا; for example, Mārya al-Qibiṭiyya, a Coptic Egyptian woman who was a bondmaid to prophet Muhammad.

Marie is the French form of the name Maria, but also used in several other countries (a.o. the Netherlands)

Mary is the English form of the name Maria

Maria and Marie are very often used in combined names, such as Maria Theresa.

Maria/Marie/Mary

Grand Duchess Maria Nikolaevna of Russia (Maria Nikolaevna Romanova); Russian: Великая Княжна Мария Николаевна, 26 June [O.S. 14 June] 1899 – 17 July 1918) was the third daughter of Tsar Nicholas II of Russia and Tsarina Alexandra Feodorovna. Her murder following the Russian Revolution of 1917 resulted in her canonization as a passion bearer by the Russian Orthodox Church.She was an elder sister of Grand Duchess Anastasia Nikolaevna of Russia, whose alleged escape from the assassination of the imperial family was rumored for nearly 90 years.However, it was later proven that Anastasia did not escape. In the 1990s, it was suggested that Maria might have been the grand duchess whose remains were missing from the Romanov grave that was discovered near Yekaterinburg, Russia and exhumed in 1991. However, further remains were discovered in 2007, and DNA analysis subsequently proved that the entire Imperial family had been murdered in 1918. A funeral for the remains of Maria and Alexei to be buried with their family in October 2015 was postponed indefinitely by the Russian Orthodox Church, which took custody of the remains in December and declared without explanation that the case required further study; the 44 partial bone fragments remain stored in a Russian state repository.


Maria of Borovsk (1418-1484), wife of Vasily II of Moscow and mother of Ivan III of Russia

Maria of Tver (1442-1467), first wife of Ivan III of Russia and mother of Ivan the Young

Maria Vladimirovna of Staritsa (1560-1610), cousin of Ivan IV of Russia; wife of Magnus, King of Livonia, and was the last known descendant of Zoe Palaiologina

Maria Temryukovna (1544–1569), second wife of Ivan IV of Russia

Maria Dolgorukaya (died 1580), seventh wife of Ivan IV of Russia

Maria Nagaya (died 1608), eighth wife of Ivan IV of Russia

Maria Grigorievna Skuratova-Belskaya (died 1605), wife of Boris Godunov

Maria Buynosova-Rostovskaya (d. 1626), second wife of Vasili IV of Russia

Maria Dolgorukova (1601–1625), first wife of Michael I of Russia

Maria Miloslavskaya (1625–1669), first wife of Alexis I of Russia

Maria Feodorovna (Sophie Dorothea of Württemberg) (1759–1828), wife of Paul I of Russia

Maria Alexandrovna (Russian: Мария Александровна), born Princess Marie of Hesse and by Rhine (8 August 1824 – 3 June 1880) was Empress of Russia as the first wife of Emperor Alexander II. She was the mother of Emperor Alexander III and the paternal grandmother of Nicholas II. She was a daughter of Ludwig II, Grand Duke of Hesse, and Princess Wilhelmine of Baden. She was only fourteen years old when the Tsarevich Alexander Nikolaevich, later Tsar Alexander II of Russia, fell in love with her while he was traveling to Western Europe. She arrived in Russia in September 1840, converted to the Orthodox Church, took the title of Grand Duchess of Russia and traded the name Marie for Maria Alexandrovna. She married Alexander on 16 April 1841. The couple had eight children: two daughters and six sons. For fourteen years (1840–1855), she was Tsarevna, the wife of the heir of the Russian throne. She became the Russian Empress consort after the death of her father-in-law, Tsar Nicholas I. Maria Alexandrovna learned the Russian language quickly; she was pious and identified with her adopted country. She did not enjoy court life or the duties of representation as she was shy and of a withdrawn nature. As a consequence, she was not popular. She took a more focused interest in charitable activities after the death of her mother-in-law the Dowager Empress Alexandra Feodorovna in 1860. Maria Alexandrovna was particularly active in the field of female education, establishing Russia's first all-female schools. She organized the Russian Red Cross and expanded its activities during the Russo-Turkish War of 1877–78. She was deeply affected by the death of her eldest son the Tsarevich Nicholas Alexandrovich in 1865. By then, her fragile constitution was undermined by her numerous pregnancies and by tuberculosis which afflicted her since 1863. To avoid the harsh Russian winters, she spent long sojourns in the Crimea and in southern Europe. Her marriage to Tsar Alexander II started as a love match and it was happy for some years, but Alexander II had many affairs and in 1866 he fell in love with Catherine Dolgorukova and had four children with his mistress. Maria Alexandrovna was treated with respect by her philanderer husband and she was much loved by her surviving children. After a long illness, she died in 1880. Maria Alexandrovna knew Alexander was unfaithful and had many lovers. The Tsar had three children with his mistress, Princess Catherine Dolgoruki, whom he moved into the Imperial Palace, along with their children, during Maria's final illness. After the Empress's death, the two entered into a morganatic marriage on 18 July [O.S. 6 July] 1880. She was buried with full dignity as The Empress and remembered for her gracious manner and wisdom.



Maria Feodorovna (Dagmar of Denmark) (1847–1928), wife of Alexander III of Russia. She was the second daughter and fourth child of King Christian IX of Denmark and Louise of Hesse-Kassel. The rise of Slavophile ideology in the Russian Empire led Alexander II of Russia to search for a bride for the heir apparent, Tsarevich Nicholas Alexandrovich, in countries other than the German states that had traditionally provided consorts for the tsars. In 1864, Nicholas, or "Nixa" as he was known in his family, went to Denmark where he was betrothed to Dagmar. On 22 April 1865 he died from meningitis. His last wish was that Dagmar would marry his younger brother, the future Alexander III. Dagmar was distraught after her young fiancé's death. She was so heartbroken when she returned to her homeland that her relatives were seriously worried about her health. She had already become emotionally attached to Russia and often thought of the huge, remote country that was to have been her home. The disaster had brought her very close to "Nixa's" parents, and she received a letter from Alexander II in which the Emperor attempted to console her. He told Dagmar in very affectionate terms that he hoped she would still consider herself a member of their family In June 1866, while on a visit to Copenhagen, the Tsarevich Alexander asked Dagmar for her hand. She converted to Orthodoxy and became Grand Duchess Maria Feodorovna of Russia. The lavish wedding took place on 9 November [O.S. 28 October] 1866 Maria Feodorovna was beautiful and well received by her Russian peers. Early on she made it a priority to learn the Russian language and to try to understand the Russian people. She rarely interfered with politics, preferring to devote her time and energies to her family, charities, and the more social side of her position. Her one exception to official politics was her militant anti-German sentiment due to the annexation of Danish territories by Prussia in 1864, a sentiment also expressed by her sister, Alexandra. On 18 May 1868, Maria Feodorovna gave birth to her eldest son, Nicholas. Her next son, Alexander Alexandrovich, born in 1869, died from meningitis in infancy. She would bear Alexander four more children who reached adulthood: George (b. 1871), Xenia (b. 1875), Michael (b. 1878), and Olga (b. 1882). As a mother, she doted on and was quite possessive of her sons. She had a more distant relationship with her daughters. On the morning of 13 March 1881, her father-in-law Alexander II of Russia, aged 62, was killed by a bomb on the way back to the Winter Palace from a military parade. In her diary, Maria later described how the wounded, still living Emperor was taken to the palace: "His legs were crushed terribly and ripped open to the knee; a bleeding mass, with half a boot on the right foot, and only the sole of the foot remaining on the left."[10] Alexander II died a few hours later. Although the people were not enamoured of the new emperor, they adored Russia's new empress. As Maria's contemporaries said of her: "She is truly an empress." She was not altogether pleased with her new status. In her diary she wrote, "Our happiest and serenest times are now over. My peace and calm are gone, for now I will only ever be able to worry about Sasha."  Maria is described as a success in her social role as Empress, loved to dance at the balls of high society and became a popular socialite and hostess of the Imperial balls; her daughter Olga commented, “Court life had to run in splendor, and there my mother played her part without a single false step.” As tsarevna, and then as tsarina, Maria Feodorovna had something of a social rivalry with the popular Grand Duchess Marie Pavlovna, wife of her Russian brother-in-law, Grand Duke Vladimir. This rivalry had echoed the one shared by their husbands, and served to exacerbate the rift within the family. During Alexander III's reign, the monarchy's opponents quickly disappeared underground. A group of students had been planning to assassinate Alexander III on the sixth anniversary of his father's death at the Peter and Paul Cathedral in St. Petersburg. The plotters had stuffed hollowed-out books with dynamite, which they intended to throw at the Tsar when he arrived at the cathedral. However, the Russian secret police uncovered the plot before it could be carried out. Five students were hanged in 1887; amongst them was Aleksandr Ulyanov, older brother of Vladimir Lenin. The biggest threat to the lives of the tsar and his family, however, came not from terrorists, but from a derailment of the imperial train in the fall of 1888. When Maria's eldest sister Alexandra visited Gatchina in July 1894, she was surprised to see how weak her brother-in-law Alexander III had become. At the time Maria had long known that he was ill and did not have long left. On 1 November 1894, Alexander III died aged just 49. In her diary Maria wrote, "I am utterly heartbroken and despondent, but when I saw the blissful smile and the peace in his face that came after, it gave me strength." Maria Feodorovna's birthday was a week after the funeral, and as it was a day in which court mourning could be somewhat relaxed, Nicholas used the day to marry Alix of Hesse-Darmstadt, who took the name Alexandra Feodorovna Maria Feodorovna disliked Rasputin, whom she regarded to be a dangerous charlatan, and when his activities damaged the reputation of the Tsar, she asked the Tsar and Empress to remove him from their vicinity. When the Tsar remained silent and Empress Alexandra answered and refused for both of them, Maria assumed the empress was the true regent and that she also lacked the capability for such a position: “My poor daughter-in-law does not perceive that she is ruining the dynasty and herself. She sincerely believes in the holiness of an adventurer, and we are powerless to ward off the misfortune, which is sure to come." Despite the overthrow of the monarchy in 1917, the former Empress Dowager Maria at first refused to leave Russia. Only in 1919, at the urging of her sister, Queen Dowager Alexandra, did she begrudgingly depart, fleeing Crimea over the Black Sea to London. King George V sent the warship HMS Marlborough to retrieve his aunt. The party of 17 Romanovs included her daughter the Grand Duchess Xenia and five of Xenia's sons plus six dogs and a canary. At first she stayed with her elder sister Alexandra in Great Britain, but eventually returned to her native Denmark.  On 13 October 1928 near Copenhagen, in a house she had once shared with her sister Queen Alexandra, Maria died at the age of 80, having outlived four of her six children Following services in Copenhagen's Russian Orthodox Alexander Nevsky Church, the Empress was interred at Roskilde Cathedral. In 2005, Queen Margrethe II of Denmark and President Vladimir Putin of Russia and their respective governments agreed that the Empress's remains should be returned to St. Petersburg in accordance with her wish to be interred next to her husband. A number of ceremonies took place from 23 to 28 September 2006. The funeral service, attended by high dignitaries, including the Crown Prince and Crown Princess of Denmark and Prince and Princess Michael of Kent, did not pass without some turbulence. The crowd around the coffin was so great that a young Danish diplomat fell into the grave before the coffin was interred. On 26 September 2006, a statue of Maria Feodorovna was unveiled near her favourite Cottage Palace in Peterhof. Following a service at Saint Isaac's Cathedral, she was interred next to her husband Alexander III in the Peter and Paul Cathedral on 28 September 2006, 140 years after her first arrival in Russia and almost 78 years after her death.
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