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Miss Marple

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« Reply #735 on: May 30, 2021, 11:56:11 PM »

Sure, no problem "Gert" is a spear. So you have a strong spear :-)
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« Reply #736 on: May 31, 2021, 01:30:01 PM »

Sure, no problem "Gert" is a spear. So you have a strong spear :-)

Thanks!

BTW in the Netherlands and Belgium you have many males named Gert or Geert. Makes me wonder if it has the same meaning / origin. Also in the Netherlands I also know Gertrudes, or other females going by the name Gertie.
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« Reply #737 on: May 31, 2021, 05:04:11 PM »

Sure, no problem "Gert" is a spear. So you have a strong spear :-)

Thanks!   Beer
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« Reply #738 on: May 31, 2021, 05:27:55 PM »

Willem is a Dutch and West Frisian masculine given name. The name is Germanic, and can be seen as the Dutch equivalent of the name William in English, Guillaume in French, Guilherme in Portuguese, Guillermo in Spanish, Vilhelm in Scandanavia and Wilhelm in German.

Nicknames in Dutch that are derived from Willem are Jelle, Pim, Willie, Willy and Wim.

This names in all its variants is a well known name in royal circles. A.o. in abundance in the Dutch, British (UK), Luxembourg and German royalty.
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« Reply #739 on: May 31, 2021, 06:25:52 PM »

Willem (April 24, 1533 – July 10, 1584), Prince of Orange, Count of Nassau-Dillenburg, better known as William of Orange or by his nickname Willem the Silent and often called Father of the Fatherland in the Netherlands, was initially stadtholder (deputy) for the reigning lord of the Netherlands. He began his career in the service of the Roman-German Emperor Charles V. Disagreements with Charles's successor Philip eventually led to the Eighty Years' War. Willem of Orange has been married 4 times and had 15 children with his wifes in total, besides some illegitimate offspring.

Filip Willem (December 19, 1554 - February 20, 1618), Prince of Orange, Count of Nassau, Count of Buren, was the eldest son of William of Orange and his first wife Anna van Egmont.Anna died three years after the birth of Filips Willem. Filip Willem is partly named after Philip, the son of Charles V, who would later succeed his father as lord of Holland and king of Spain.When his father Willem the Silent ignored Alva's summons to return to Brussels, remaining in Germany, Filip Willem, only a boy of 13, was studying at the University at Leuven in Brabant. He was seized in February 1568, and taken to Spain partly as a hostage, but especially to be raised as a good Catholic and loyal subject. He would never see his father again (his mother had already died ten years earlier). In 1606 in Fontainebleau, Filip Willem was married to Eleonora of Bourbon-Condé, daughter of Henry I, Prince de Condé, and cousin of King Henry IV of France, but he died in 1618 without any children.


Willem II of Orange (May 27, 1626 - November 6, 1650), Prince of Orange and Count of Nassau-Orange, was stadtholder of Holland, Zeeland, Utrecht, Overijssel, Gelre and Zutphen, Groningen and Drenthe between 1647 and 1650. He was the son of stadtholder and prince Frederik Hendrik of Orange and his grandniece Amalia van Solms. He married nine-year-old Maria Henriëtte Stuart, the eldest daughter of King Charles I of England, at the age of 14. In October 1650, after a hunt on the Veluwe, the prince developed a fever. He was found to be suffering from smallpox and died on November 6 at the age of 24. Eight days later, his heir was born, the later stadtholder Willem III.


Willem Hendrik van Oranje (November 14, 1650 - March 19, 1702) was a sovereign Prince of Orange of the House of Orange-Nassau since his birth.Willem III of Orange was born eight days after the sudden passing of his father, Stadtholder Willem II, who died of smallpox. His mother was Maria Henriëtte Stuart, the English Princess Royal. He married  in 1677, his first cousin Mary, elder surviving daughter of the Duke of York, later King James II of England (James VII of Scotland). Mary was eleven years his junior and he anticipated resistance to a Stuart match from the Amsterdam merchants who had disliked his mother (another Mary Stuart), but Willem believed that marrying Mary would increase his chances of succeeding to Charles's kingdoms, and would draw England's monarch away from his pro-French policies. Mary became pregnant soon after the marriage, but miscarried. After a further illness later in 1678, she never conceived again. During the Glorious revolution Willem III invaded the UK and eventually ruled as King William III and Queen Mary II.


Willem Karel Hendrik Friso ; Willem IV (1 September 1711 – 22 October 1751), was Prince of Orange and Prince of Orange-Nassau. He was the first hereditary stadtholder of the Republic of the United Provinces. He was distinguished, peaceful and affable in his conduct, but had to contend with poor health and a deformity of his back that would increasingly hinder his political-administrative conduct. Willem Karel Hendrik Friso was born in Leeuwarden as the son of Johan Willem Friso van Nassau-Dietz, who had died shortly before, and Maria Louise van Hessen-Kassel. The fall of a horse, in 1717 in the garden of Paleis Soestdijk, the summer residence, caused fear for his life. He was left with a deformed spine, complications of which would later lead to his death. Already in 1721 there was talk of a marriage with the English princess Anna of Hanover. The English ambassador William Cadogan, the first Earl Cadogan, who was married to Margaret Cecilia Munter, may have played an important role. The negotiations for the marriage of Princess Anna with the Dutch monarch would last twelve years. The cause lay largely in the international political sphere. After the death of King-Stadtholder William/Willem III, during the Second Stadtholderless Era, Prussian and also English diplomats and lawyers were busy claiming for their monarch the desirable title of 'Prince of Orange', with all the associated emoluments. and possessions.When Stadtholder William III's estate was settled in a secret treaty known as the Traité de partage, and both Willem Karel Hendrik Friso and King Frederick William I of Prussia were recognized as Prince of Orange, but the former obtained the most possessions – Willem renounced Lingen and van Meurs – and the second reportedly most indebted, William's value in the marriage market rose considerably. In 1732, Huis ten Bosch Palace, which was part of the inheritance issue, came into the possession of Prince Willem IV, after which he had it restored between 1734 and 1737 and expanded with two large side wings, after a design by Daniël Marot. He now owned a palace in The Hague that lived up to the stature of a monarch. Important given his dynastic ambitions. In 1733 Willem IV finally married Anna. They would have 4 children, among others 2 stillborn.


Willem V, calling himself Willem Batavus (8 March 1748 - 9 April 1806), Prince of Orange, Prince of Orange-Nassau, was the last heirloom stadtholder of the Republic of the United Netherlands (1751-1795). Willem was born in The Hague as the son of hereditary stadtholder Willem IV and Anna van Hannover. Willem was three years old when his father died. He was raised by his mother and Douwe Sirtema van Grovestins and from 1759 by his guardian Duke Lodewijk Ernst of Brunswijk-Wolfenbüttel. The prince was limping and probably missing two front teeth after falling from his horse in his youth. The result was a pout. In 1754, a disagreement arose about the year in which he would be declared of age. In 1763 he became seriously ill, people feared for his position as successor. It was a matter of finding a suitable suitor. The prince had his eye on his cousin Caroline Mathilde of Wales, but she was married off to a Danish prince. Frederick V of Denmark recommended to his daughters, and Frederick the Great brought attention to some of his nieces. On October 4, 1767, the prince married Wilhelmina of Prussia (1751-1820), a niece of Frederick the Great, in Berlin. The couple would have 5 children. After struggles, the Stadtholder and his family went into exile in 1795.


Willem Frederik Prins van Oranje-Nassau (August 24, 1772 – December 12, 1843) was the first king of the Netherlands from the House of Orange-Nassau. Willem Frederik was born as the third son of Stadtholder Willem V of Orange-Nassau and Princess Wilhelmina of Prussia, a niece of King Frederick II of Prussia. After the death of Stadholder Willem V, he was known as Willem VI until 1815. Willem Frederik married his first cousin Wilhelmina van Prussia, a sister of Frederik Wilhelm III, King of Prussia, in 1791. Five children were born from this marriage, including the future King Willem II of the Netherlands. On November 30, 1813, Willem set foot on Dutch soil again after eighteen years. In London he was invited by letter to take over the government as "sovereign monarch". In 1815 Napoleon returned briefly and Willem was promised at the Congress of Vienna the former Austrian Netherlands (which he had already tacitly occupied). England and Prussia hoped that the Netherlands would form a strong buffer state on France's northern border. On March 16, 1815, sovereign Prince Willem I himself assumed the title of King of the Netherlands. As compensation for the Nassau hereditary lands taken from him as private property, he also received Luxembourg and thus became Grand Duke of Luxembourg. In 1830, the Belgian Revolution broke out in Brussels, which resulted in an independent kingdom of Belgium under strong military support from France. Willem sent an army to Belgium in 1831 to recapture Brussels. It was commanded by Crown Prince Willem and, among others, by the king's second son, Frederik and Charles Bernhard of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach. Despite initial successes, this Ten Day Campaign was a fiasco, because the French king sent troops to help the now sworn in King Leopold. The Belgian king, who spoke German, Russian, English and French, but no Dutch that he took to be a German dialect, had a great alliance diplomatically.Willem was obliged under great diplomatic pressure to accept the independence of the Kingdom of Belgium. Although Willem lost the support of the great powers, he stubbornly resisted peace. The merchant king practically bankrupted the state with his persistence policy, and his reputation as a reliable financial genius was dented. In 1839 he finally recognized the fledgling Belgian state. In 1840 Willem I intended to remarry the Catholic Belgian Countess Henriëtte d'Oultremont de Wégimont, a former lady-in-waiting of Willem's first wife Wilhelmina. This marriage sparked much public outcry and this was the ultimate reason for his abdication.


Willem Frederik George Lodewijk (December 6, 1792 - March 17, 1849), Prince of Orange-Nassau, was King of the Netherlands, Grand Duke of Luxembourg and Duke of Limburg from October 7, 1840 until his death in 1849. Willem (nickname Guillot) was born in 1792 in The Hague. His parents were the future King William I of the Netherlands and Wilhelmina of Prussia. His grandfathers were the reigning stadtholder Willem V and the Prussian king Frederik Wilhelm II of Prussia. After the proclamation of the Batavian Republic in January 1795, the entire stadtholder's family, including the then two-year-old Willem, fled to England. From 1797 Willem resided with his parents at the court of the King of Prussia in Berlin. From December 1813 to May 1814, Willem was betrothed to the British Crown Princess Charlotte Augusta, daughter of the future King George IV. She broke off their engagement and eventually married Leopold of Saxe-Coburg, later King Leopold I of Belgium. Willem II married Anna Pavlovna, a daughter of Tsar Paul I of Russia, on 21 February 1816. Five children were born of the marriage.



Willem Alexander Paul Frederik Lodewijk (February 19, 1817 –November 23, 1890), Prince of Orange-Nassau, was King of the Netherlands and Grand Duke of Luxembourg from March 17, 1849 until his death in 1890. He was also Duke of Limburg of 1849 until the abolition of the duchy in 1866. Willem was the son of King Willem II and Queen Anna Pavlovna. After the abdication of William I in 1840, he became the Prince of Orange. After the death of his father, he succeeded him as king of the Netherlands. Willem married his first cousin Princess Sophie van Wurtemberg in 1839. They had three sons, all of whom died before their father: Willem, Maurits and Alexander. After the death of his wife, he remarried in 1879 to Princess Emma zu Waldeck und Pyrmont. They had one daughter, Wilhelmina, who succeeded him.


Willem Nicolaas Alexander Frederik Karel Hendrik (September 4, 1840 – June 11, 1879), Prince of Orange, Prince of the Netherlands, Prince of Orange-Nassau, was from 17 March 1849 crown prince of the Kingdom of the Netherlands and heir apparent of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg. Prince Willem was the eldest child of King Willem III's marriage to Queen Sophie. His nickname was Wiwill.Prince Willem and his father King Willem III had a far from good relationship, culminating in Willem's self-imposed exile after the King and Queen disapproved of his marriage plans with the Dutch Countess Mathilde of Limburg Stirum. Such a marriage was unsuitable from the point of view of the class consciousness at the time. The council of ministers was initially also against it, but eventually accepted it, because it was feared that otherwise he would not marry at all and there would then be no heir to the throne. His only surviving brother Alexander was not to be married either. Willem III preferred that his eldest son marry a foreign princess, but indicated that he might still agree to a marriage with a foreign countess or duchess. He wanted to prevent the throne from passing to the children of his sister Sophie. A marriage with a Dutch lady remained out of the question for him, however. Willem then left for Paris for good. The Parisian tabloid press regularly devoted scandalous stories to his debauched dealings. According to the biographer and historian Dik van der Meulen, he may have owed his nickname Prince Citron there to his moodiness, with a reference to his principality of Orange, which stands for 'orange'. Since he was associated with the family of the ex-Emperor Napoleon III, he was shadowed by French government agents. In the end Prince Willem got into financial difficulties. He had borrowed millions of francs, which he spent partly on swindlers, but also on prostitutes. On May 25, 1879, Willem had a "serious period". Pneumonia was the cause of this. He was treated with quinine, but died on June 11, aged just 38. Yet he had never completely lost his stature in Paris either; by his bier lay a wreath of ex-Empress Eugénie of France and one of the English Crown Prince Edward. He was interred in the crypt of Oranje-Nassau in the Nieuwe Kerk in Delft on June 26, 1879. His brother Alexander succeeded him as Prince of Orange, but was also survived by his father after his death in 1884. Therefore, after his death in 1890, Willem III was succeeded by his daughter Wilhelmina, born in 1880, as Queen of the Netherlands.



Willem-Alexander Claus George Ferdinand, King of the Netherlands, Prince of Orange-Nassau, Jonkheer van Amsberg (27 April 1967) has been King of the Netherlands since 30 April 2013. He is the eldest child from the marriage of Beatrix, Princess of the Netherlands, and Claus, Prince of the Netherlands, Jonkheer van Amsberg. His call sign is Alex/Alexander. On February 2, 2002 he married Argentinian Máxima Zorreguieta. The couple has 3 daughters.
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Miss Marple

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« Reply #740 on: May 31, 2021, 10:11:08 PM »

Sure, no problem "Gert" is a spear. So you have a strong spear :-)

Thanks!

BTW in the Netherlands and Belgium you have many males named Gert or Geert. Makes me wonder if it has the same meaning / origin. Also in the Netherlands I also know Gertrudes, or other females going by the name Gertie.

Gert derives from Gerhard. Germanic name as well, Gert is spear again, and hart is hard/strong/determined.
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« Reply #741 on: June 01, 2021, 12:56:45 AM »

Sure, no problem "Gert" is a spear. So you have a strong spear :-)

Thanks!

BTW in the Netherlands and Belgium you have many males named Gert or Geert. Makes me wonder if it has the same meaning / origin. Also in the Netherlands I also know Gertrudes, or other females going by the name Gertie.

Gert derives from Gerhard. Germanic name as well, Gert is spear again, and hart is hard/strong/determined.


The official name of my paternal grandfather was Gerhardus, but he was predominantly know as Gait (a Low Saxon variation). Several of his grandchildren were named after him, mainly as Gerard or Gerardus. Until the birth of the youngest, his mother empasized he would be known as Gerhard, because that was the official name of grandpa  Roll Eyes
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Miss Marple

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« Reply #742 on: June 01, 2021, 08:40:15 AM »

@Principessa - that is a very Germanic idea - naming sons after the head of the clan :-).
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« Reply #743 on: June 01, 2021, 08:55:03 AM »

@Principessa - that is a very Germanic idea - naming sons after the head of the clan :-).

Yup  Grin

It happened more often in the past than in the present, then you often saw a certain name keep on appearing in a family. My parents really grew up in the time when children were named in a sort of order. Not always via their given name, but often via 1 of the baptismal names. If I remember correctly, my father was named after his father's sister. My siblings and I are only named after both of our sets of grandparents (the men after both the grandfathers and the women after both the grandmothers).


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« Reply #744 on: June 01, 2021, 08:57:13 AM »

Sure, no problem "Gert" is a spear. So you have a strong spear :-)

Thanks!

BTW in the Netherlands and Belgium you have many males named Gert or Geert. Makes me wonder if it has the same meaning / origin. Also in the Netherlands I also know Gertrudes, or other females going by the name Gertie.

Gert derives from Gerhard. Germanic name as well, Gert is spear again, and hart is hard/strong/determined.


The official name of my paternal grandfather was Gerhardus, but he was predominantly know as Gait (a Low Saxon variation). Several of his grandchildren were named after him, mainly as Gerard or Gerardus. Until the birth of the youngest, his mother empasized he would be known as Gerhard, because that was the official name of grandpa  Roll Eyes

In addition, according to a Low Saxon wiki  Tongue :

"..Gait is a Low Saxon  given name that comes from the Germanic word ger + hard and means strong with the spear..."
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« Reply #745 on: June 01, 2021, 09:01:56 AM »

In my experience, several of the German male names have an 'h' in them, while many of the Dutch equivalents lack this 'h'. For example Gerhard - Gerard and Bernhard - Bernard.
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« Reply #746 on: June 01, 2021, 09:33:19 AM »

Adolphe (Adolf Wilhelm August Karl Friedrich)(24 July 1817 – 17 November 1905) was Grand Duke of Luxembourg from 23 November 1890 to his death. The first grand duke from the House of Nassau-Weilburg, he succeeded King Willem III of the Netherlands, ending the personal union between the Netherlands and Luxembourg. This was according to the Nassau House pact. In his line there were also Willems, spelled as the French Guillaume. BTW Adolphe's father was also named Wilhelm.


Guillaume IV (Guillaume Alexandre)(22 April 1852 – 25 February 1912), son Adolphe (24 July 1817 – 17 November 1905) and his second wife Princess Adelheid-Marie of Anhalt-Dessau (25 December 1833 – 24 November 1916). On 21 June 1893 in Fischhorn Castle, Zell am See, he married Infanta Marie Anne of Portugal, daughter of the deposed king Miguel I of Portugal and Adelaide of Löwenstein-Wertheim-Rosenberg. The couple had six daughters


Prince Guillaume of Luxembourg (Guillaume Marie Louis Christian)(1 May 1963) is the third son and youngest child of Grand Duke Jean and Grand Duchess Josephine-Charlotte of Luxembourg. Prince Guillaume married Sibilla Sandra Weiller y Torlonia, the second child of millionaire Paul-Annik Weiller and the Italian noblewoman Donna Olimpia Torlonia di Civitella-Cesi (daughter of Alessandro Torlonia, 5th Prince of Civitella-Cesi and Infanta Beatriz of Spain) in 1994. Guillaume and Sibilla have four children.


Prince Guillaume, Hereditary Grand Duke of Luxembourg (Guillaume Jean Joseph Marie)(11 November 1981), is the heir apparent to the crown of Luxembourg since his father's accession in 2000. Prince Guillaume was born on 11 November 1981 at the Grand Duchess Charlotte Maternity Hospital in Luxembourg City and is the eldest child of Grand Duke Henri of Luxembourg and his wife, Cuban-born Grand Duchess Maria Teresa. He was named after his father's youngest brother Prince Guillaume of Luxembourg. In 2012 he married Belgian Countess Stéphanie de Lannoy (18 February 1984).  Guillaume and Stéphanie share a common descent from Charles Marie, Prince & 5th Duke d’Arenberg, which means that Guillaume's father and Stéphanie are 7th cousins; thus Guillaume is Stéphanie's 7th cousin once removed. Guillaume and Stéphanie have a son, named Prince Charles, born on 10 May 2020.



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« Reply #747 on: June 01, 2021, 09:47:15 AM »

Hohenzollern and German Empire:

Wilhelm I (German: Wilhelm Friedrich Ludwig)(22 March 1797 – 9 March 1888) of the House of Hohenzollern was King of Prussia from 2 January 1861 until his death. was the first head of state of a united Germany, and was also de facto head of state of Prussia from 1858 to 1861, serving as regent for his brother, Friedrich Wilhelm IV. Under the leadership of Wilhelm and his minister president Otto von Bismarck, Prussia achieved the unification of Germany and the establishment of the German Empire. Wilhelm was the second son of Louise of Mecklenburg-Strelitz and Prince Friedrich Wilhelm, himself son of King  Friedrich Wilhelm II, Wilhelm was not expected to ascend to the throne.  In 1829, Wilhelm married Princess Augusta, the daughter of Grand Duke Karl Friedrich of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach and Maria Pavlovna, the sister of Nicholas I. Their marriage was outwardly stable, but not a very happy one. On 2 January 1861, Friedrich Wilhelm IV died and Wilhelm ascended the throne as Wilhelm I of Prussia. Wilhelm and Augusta of Saxe-Weimar had two children


Wilhelm II (Friedrich Wilhelm Viktor Albert)(27 January 1859 – 4 June 1941) was the last German Emperor (Kaiser) and King of Prussia, reigning from 15 June 1888 until his abdication on 9 November 1918. Wilhelm was born in Berlin on 27 January 1859 — at the Crown Prince's Palace — to Victoria, Princess Royal, the eldest daughter of Britain's Queen Victoria, and Prince Friedrich Wilhelm of Prussia (the future Friedrich III). Wilhelm and his first wife, Princess Augusta Victoria of Schleswig-Holstein, were married on 27 February 1881. They had seven children. Empress Augusta, known affectionately as "Dona", was a constant companion to Wilhelm, and her death on 11 April 1921 was a devastating blow. It also came less than a year after their son Joachim committed suicide. The following January, Wilhelm received a birthday greeting from a son of the late Prince Johann George Ludwig Ferdinand August Wilhelm of Schönaich-Carolath. The 63-year-old Wilhelm invited the boy and his mother, Princess Hermine Reuss of Greiz, to Doorn. Wilhelm found Hermine very attractive, and greatly enjoyed her company. The couple were wed in Doorn on 9 November 1922, despite the objections of Wilhelm's monarchist supporters and his children. Hermine's daughter, Princess Henriette, married the late Prince Joachim's son, Karl Franz Josef, in 1940, but divorced in 1946. Hermine remained a constant companion to the aging former emperor until his death.


Wilhelm, German Crown Prince, Crown Prince of Prussia (Friedrich Wilhelm Victor August Ernst)(6 May 1882 – 20 July 1951) was the eldest child and heir of the last German Emperor, Wilhelm II, and the last Crown Prince of the German Empire and the Kingdom of Prussia. He was the eldest son of Wilhelm II, the last German Kaiser (Emperor) (1859–1941), and his first wife, Princess Augusta Victoria of Schleswig-Holstein (1858–1921). Wilhelm married Duchess Cecilie of Mecklenburg-Schwerin (20 September 1886 – 6 May 1954) in Berlin on 6 June 1905. Cecilie was the daughter of Grand Duke Frederick Francis III, Grand Duke of Mecklenburg-Schwerin (1851–1897) and his wife, Grand Duchess Anastasia Mikhailovna of Russia (1860–1922). The couple had 6 children.


Prince Wilhelm Friedrich Franz Joseph Christian Olaf of Prussia (4 July 1906 – 26 May 1940) was the eldest child of Wilhelm, German Crown Prince, and Duchess Cecilie of Mecklenburg-Schwerin. At his birth, he was second in line to the German throne and was expected to succeed to the throne after the deaths of his grandfather, Emperor Wilhelm II, and his father, Crown Prince Wilhelm. Both, however, outlived him. His father was Crown Prince Wilhelm, the eldest son and heir to the German Emperor, Wilhelm II. His mother was Duchess Cecilie of Mecklenburg-Schwerin. While a student at Bonn, Wilhelm fell in love with a fellow student, Dorothea von Salviati (10 September 1907 – 7 May 1972). Her parents were Alexander Hermann Heinrich August von Salviati and Helene "Ella" Crasemann (of the well-established Hamburg merchant family, Crasemann). Wilhelm's grandfather did not approve of the marriage of a member of the minor nobility with the second in line to the German throne. At the time, the former Kaiser still believed in the possibility of a Hohenzollern restoration, and he would not permit his grandson to make an unequal marriage. Wilhelm told his grandson, "Remember, there is every possible form of horse. We are thoroughbreds, however, and when we conclude a marriage such as with Fräulein von Salviati, it produces mongrels, and that cannot be allowed to happen." However, Wilhelm was determined to marry Dorothea. He renounced any rights to the succession for himself and his future children in 1933. Wilhelm and Dorothea married on 3 June 1933 in Bonn. They had two daughters. In 1940, the ex-Emperor recognised the marriage as dynastic and the girls were accorded the style of Princesses of Prussia, although their father was not restored to his former place in the putative line of succession. In May 1940, Wilhelm took part in the invasion of France. He was wounded during the fighting in Valenciennes and died in a field hospital in Nivelles on 26 May 1940.


Prince Wilhelm-Karl Adalbert Erich Detloff of Prussia (20 January 1922 – 9 April 2007), son of Countess Ina-Marie Helene Adele Elise von Bassewitz (27 January 1888 – 17 September 1973) and Prince Oskar of Prussia (27 July 1888 – 27 January 1958). Oskar was the 5th son of Emperor Wilhelm II and his 1st wife. Wilhelm-Karl married Irmgard von Veltheim on 1 March 1952, with issue.


Wilhelm von Brandenburg (30 June 1498 – 4 February 1563) was the Archbishop of Riga from 1539 to 1561.A member of the House of Hohenzollern, Wilhelm was the son of Friedrich I, Margrave of Brandenburg-Ansbach, the brother of Albert, Duke of Prussia, and the grandson of Albert III Achilles, Elector of Brandenburg and Casimir IV Jagiellon.
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« Reply #748 on: June 10, 2021, 11:41:11 AM »

Hesse:

Prince Wilhelm of Hesse-Kassel (24 December 1787 – 5 September 1867), was the first son of Prince Frederick of Hesse-Kassel and Princess Caroline of Nassau-Usingen. On 10 November 1810, Wilhelm was married in Amalienborg Palace to Princess Louise Charlotte of Denmark (1789–1864) daughter of Hereditary Prince Frederick of Denmark and Norway (1753–1805) and Sophia Frederica of Mecklenburg-Schwerin (1758–1794). They had 6 children.

Wilhelm Chlodwig Friedrich Ernst Hermann Paul Philipp Heinrich Prince and Landgrave of Hesse (born August 14, 1933) is the current head of the House of Hesse-Philippsthal-Barchfeld. In 1961 he married Oda-Mathilde von Garmissen (12 February1935 - 3 June 2017). They had two sons

Wilhelm of Hesse-Philippsthal-Barchfeld (1 January 1963), eldest son of Wilhelm, Prince and Landgrave of Hesse and Oda-Mathilde von Garmissen. Married to Alexandra von Kaufmann. They have 3 sons.

Wilhelm of Hesse-Philippsthal-Barchfeld (?) son of Wilhelm of Hesse-Philippsthal-Barchfeld and Alexandra von Kaufmann.

Wilhelm Ludwig Friedrich Georg Emil Philipp Gustav Ferdinand of Hesse and the Rhine (November 16, 1845 -24 May 1900) was a Prince of Hesse and the Rhine and a general of the infantry. Wilhelm was the younger son of Prince Karl of Hesse and the Rhine (1809–1877) from his marriage to Elisabeth of Prussia (1815–1885). He married on February 24, 1884 in France Josephine Bender, wife of Lichtenberg (August 11, 1857 - February 24, 1942) and was the father of Gottfried von Lichtenberg (born November 19, 1877 - September 6, 1914), who in the first World War fell.

Wilhelm I of Hesse, "the Elder" (July 4, 1466-February 8, 1515) was Landgrave of the Landgraviate of Hesse.

Wilhelm II of Hesse, "the middle one" (born April 29, 1469, † July 11, 1509) was Landgrave of the Landgraviate of Hesse.

Wilhelm III, "the Younger", Landgrave of Hesse (September 8, 1471-February 17, 1500), ruled over the part of the Landgraviate of Upper Hesse, with his residence in Marburg.

Wilhelm von Hessen-Philippsthal (August 29, 1726 - August 8, 1810) from the House of Hessen was paraged Landgrave of Hessen-Philippsthal.

Wilhelm (November 25, 1758 - September 17, 1760) son of Wilhelm von Hessen-Philippsthal and his wife Ulrike Eleonore (April 27, 1732 - February 2, 1795), daughter of Landgrave Wilhelm von Hessen-Philippsthal-Barchfeld

Wilhelm (October 10, 1765 - February 23, 1766) son of Wilhelm von Hessen-Philippsthal and his wife Ulrike Eleonore

Wilhelm (August 9, 1798-1799), son of Ludwig von Hessen-Philippsthal (October 8, 1766 - February 16, 1816) and his wife Countess Marie Franziska Berghe von Trips (August 8, 1771-1805).

Wilhelm Eduard (1817–1819), son of Ernst Konstantin von Hessen-Philippsthal (August 8, 1771 - December 25, 1849) and his 2nd wife (who was cousin) Karoline (1793–1872), daughter of Prince Karl of Hesse -Philippsthal.

Wilhelm IV of Hesse-Kassel, called the Wise, (June 24, 1532 - August 25, 1592) from the House of Hesse was the first Landgrave of Hesse to Kassel and founder of the Hesse-Kassel line from 1567 to 1592.

Wilhelm V of Hessen-Kassel, called the Steadfast, (February 14, 1602 - September 21, 1637) from the House of Hessen, son of Landgrave Moritz von Hessen-Kassel, was Landgrave of Hessen-Kassel from 1627 to 1637. Wilhelm V married Amalie Elisabeth on September 21, 1619, a daughter of the Reformed Count Philipp Ludwig II of Hanau-Munzenberg. The couple had 12 children.

Wilhelm (1625–1626), Hereditary Prince of Hessen-Kassel, son of Wilhelm V of Hessen-Kassel and Amalie Elisabeth.

William VI. von Hessen-Kassel (born May 23, 1629 - July 16, 1663) from the House of Hessen was Landgrave of Hessen-Kassel from 1637 to 1663. William VI. was the son of Landgrave Wilhelm V and his wife Amalie Elisabeth, a born Countess of Hanau-Munzenberg. He was the only of six sons who reached adulthood. In 1649, Wilhelm married Princess Hedwig Sophie of Brandenburg (1623–1683), daughter of Elector Georg Wilhelm of Brandenburg and Elisabeth Charlotte of the Palatinate. The couple had 7 children.

Wilhelm VII of Hessen-Kassel (June 21, 1651 - November 21, 1670) was Landgrave of Hessen-Kassel. Wilhelm was the eldest son of Landgrave Wilhelm VI. from Hessen-Kassel from the House of Hessen. After the death of his father in 1663, his mother Hedwig Sophie von Brandenburg took over the guardianship of the minor. She also determined the politics of the Landgraviate. When he came of age, Landgrave Wilhelm was betrothed to Amalia von Kurland, daughter of Duke Jakob von Kurland. She was a cousin of Wilhelm VII, the mothers were sisters. Almost at the same time he set out on a grand tour of the Netherlands, England and France. In Paris he fell seriously ill with "a fever" and died. The French doctors had literally cured the 19-year-old to death with laxatives and emetics, bloodletting and enema. His fiancée was married to his younger brother and successor, Landgrave Karl.

Wilhelm (1674–1676), son of Karl von Hessen - Kassel (August 3, 1654 - March 23, 1730) and his wife Amalia von Kurland (born June 12, 1653 - June 16, 1711) who was a princess of Courland of the Kettler family


Wilhelm VIII of Hesse-Kassel (born March 10, 1682 - February 1, 1760) from the House of Hesse was Landgrave of Hesse-Kassel from 1751 until his death. Wilhelm was the sixth son of Landgrave Karl von Hessen-Kassel (1654–1730) from his marriage to Marie Amalia (1653–1711), daughter of Duke Jakob Kettler von Kurland. Wilhelm married on September 27, 1717 in Zeitz Dorothea Wilhelmine (1691–1743), daughter of Duke Moritz Wilhelm of Saxony-Zeitz. He had three children with her.

Wilhelm (1741–1742) Wilhelm was born the son of Hereditary Prince Friedrich II of Hesse-Kassel and Princess Maria, a daughter of King George II of Great Britain.

Wilhelm I. von Hessen-Kassel (born June 3, 1743 - February 27, 1821) from the House of Hesse was named Wilhelm IX. from 1760 Count von Hanau, from 1764 regent there and from 1785 ruling Landgrave of Hesse-Kassel. After his elevation to electoral in the course of the Reichsdeputationshauptschluss (1803), he called himself Wilhelm I. Wilhelm was born as the son of the Hereditary Prince Friedrich II of Hesse-Kassel and Princess Maria, a daughter of King George II of Great Britain. On September 1, 1764, Wilhelm married Princess Wilhelmine Karoline of Denmark (1747-1820) in Copenhagen. With her he had two sons and two daughters


Wilhelm II (* July 28, 1777 - November 20, 1847-), from the House of Hesse, was Landgrave and Elector of Hesse-Kassel from 1821 until his death. Wilhelm was the second son and fourth child of Landgrave Wilhelm I of Hesse-Kassel, who was raised elector in 1803, and his wife Wilhelmine Karoline of Denmark (1747-1820). On February 13, 1797, Wilhelm married Princess Auguste (1780–1841), daughter of the Prussian King Friedrich Wilhelm II. They had 6 children.

Wilhelm Friedrich Karl Ludwig (born April 9, 1798 - October 25, 1802), son of Wilhelm II. & Princess Auguste (1780–1841) of Prussia.

Wilhelm von Hanau (born February 19, 1836 - June 3, 1902). Wilhelm was the third son of Elector Friedrich Wilhelm I of Hessen-Kassel (1802–1875) and his morganatic wife Gertrude Falkenstein (1803–1882), divorced Lehmann and later Countess von Schaumburg and Princess von Hanau and zu Hořowitz. After the death of his older brother Moritz, he was Prince of Hanau from 1889 to 1902. On January 29, 1866, he married Princess Elisabeth zu Schaumburg-Lippe (1841–1926) in Frankfurt am Main. The marriage was a dynastic project of his parents, who succeeded for the first time in marrying off one of their incongruous sons to a daughter from the high nobility. Elisabeth's brother, Adolf I. Georg, Prince of Schaumburg-Lippe, viewed this game as a miscarriage and resisted - albeit in vain. After the end of the electoral state in the summer of 1866, the political purpose of the marriage largely ceased, and they divorced on April 22, 1868. In his second marriage, Wilhelm married Countess Elisabeth zur Lippe-Weißenfeld (1868–1952) in Döberkitz near Bautzen (1868–1952) on May 12, 1890. [Both marriages remained childless.
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« Reply #749 on: June 10, 2021, 01:10:54 PM »

Bayern:

Wilhelm I. (Bayern) (1330–1389), Herzog von Straubing-Holland

Wilhelm II. (Bayern) (1365–1417), Herzog von Straubing-Holland

Wilhelm III. (Bayern) (1375–1435), Herzog von Bayern-München

Wilhelm von Bayern-München (1435–1435), Sohn von Wilhelm III. von Bayern

Wilhelm IV. (Bayern) (1493–1550), Herzog von Bayern

Wilhelm V. (Bayern) (1548–1626), Herzog von Bayern

Wilhelm II. von Bayern († 1657), Fürstabt von Stablo und Malmedy
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