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« Reply #750 on: June 10, 2021, 01:24:45 PM »

Württemberg

Wilhelm Nicolaus Herzog von Württemberg (* 20. Juli 1828-6. November 1896 ) war ein österreichischer und württembergischer General. Duke Wilhelm was the son of Duke Eugen von Württemberg (1788-1857) and his second wife Helene, born Princess zu Hohenlohe-Langenburg (1807-1880).Wilhelm was unmarried and of a slight stature. The consequences of the war wounds and a car accident in Italy impaired his health. He died during a vacation in Merano.

Wilhelm Eugen (IV.) August Georg von Württemberg (born August 20, 1846 - January 27, 1877) was a Württemberg staff officer. Wilhelm Eugen was the son of Duke Eugen Erdmann of Württemberg (1820–1875) and his wife Mathilde, née Princess zu Schaumburg-Lippe (1818–1891). On May 8, 1874, he married the Grand Duchess Vera Konstantinowna of Russia (1854–1912), a niece and adopted daughter of Queen Olga who grew up at the court in Stuttgart. They had three children together: Karl Eugen, who died as an infant, and the twins Elsa and Olga.

Wilhelm Eugen (IV.) August Georg von Württemberg (born August 20, 1846 - January 27, 1877) was a Württemberg staff officer. Wilhelm Eugen was the son of Duke Eugen Erdmann of Württemberg (1820–1875) and his wife Mathilde, née Princess zu Schaumburg-Lippe (1818–1891). On May 8, 1874, he married the Grand Duchess Vera Konstantinowna of Russia (1854–1912), a niece and adopted daughter of Queen Olga who grew up at the court in Stuttgart. They had three children together: Karl Eugen, who died as an infant, and the twins Elsa and Olga.


Duke Wilhelm Friedrich Philipp von Württemberg (born December 27, 1761 - August 10, 1830) was a Prince of Württemberg and Minister of War. Prince Wilhelm was the fourth son of Duke Friedrich II. Eugen von Württemberg and his wife Friederike Dorothea Sophia von Brandenburg-Schwedt, eldest daughter of Margrave Friedrich Wilhelm von Brandenburg-Schwedt and Sophie Dorothea Marie von Prussia, a niece of the Prussian King Friedrich II. On August 23, 1800, Prince Wilhelm married a lady-in-waiting of his mother in Coswig: Wilhelmine Freiin von Tunderfeld-Rhodis (* 1777 ; † 1822), the daughter of Baron Karl August Wilhelm von Tunderfeld-Rhodis. This was the scion of a soldier family from Sweden and originally from the Baltic States. Since this was an unequal marriage according to the laws of the House of Württemberg, Prince Wilhelm already declared on August 1, 1801 that his descendants would renounce the succession to the throne. They had 5 children.

Friedrich Wilhelm Alexander Ferdinand Count of Württemberg, since 1867 Wilhelm I Duke of Urach (born July 6, 1810 - July 17, 1869) was a German nobleman from a branch line of the House of Württemberg and an officer in the Württemberg army. He was born the son of Duke Wilhelm Friedrich Philipp von Württemberg (1761-1830), brother of King Friedrich von Württemberg, and Wilhelmine nee Freiin von Tunderfeld-Rhodis. Count Wilhelm married Princess Theodelinde von Leuchtenberg, daughter of Eugène de Beauharnais, on February 8, 1841. They had four daughters. Widowed in 1857, he married Princess Florestine of Monaco for the second time on February 16, 1863. They had two sons.


Wilhelm (II.), Duke of Urach, Count of Württemberg (born March 3, 1864-March 24, 1928), from 1869 head of the House of Urach, a Württemberg branch, general of the cavalry in the Württemberg army, was a candidate for the throne several times various European crowns in discussion, for example in 1910 for Monaco, 1913 for Albania and during the First World War for Poland as well as for a newly created Grand Duchy of Alsace-Lorraine. In July 1918 he was elected King of Lithuania by the Taryba, the Lithuanian Provincial Council - as such he was to bear the name Mindaugas II. However, he did not accept the crown as the German authorities did not recognize the election. By November 1918, the Taryba also revoked the election. Born as Wilhelm Karl Florestan Gero Crescentius, Count of Württemberg, he was the eldest son of Wilhelm (I) Duke of Urach, Count of Württemberg, and his second wife, Princess Florestine of Monaco, daughter of Prince Florestan of Monaco. His first marriage was on July 4, 1892 in Tegernsee Amalie Maria Duchess in Bavaria. He had nine children with her. Amalie died in childbed in 1912. On November 26, 1924, Wilhelm married Wiltrud Marie Alix Princess of Bavaria, daughter of Ludwig III. from Bavaria. This marriage remained childless.


Wilhelm (III.) Prince of Urach (born September 27, 1897 - August 8, 1957) was a German mechanical engineer. Prince Wilhelm von Urach was the son of Wilhelm (II.), Duke of Urach, Count of Württemberg and Amalie, Duchess of Urach, Countess of Württemberg, née Duchess in Bavaria. Against his father's resistance, Wilhelm married Elisabeth Theurer on June 19, 1928. She was the daughter of Richard Theurer, the general director of G. Siegle & Co. and Kast & Ehinger, and Elisabeth nee Groß. Due to the marriage, Wilhelm renounced the succession as (third) Duke and head of the House of Urach and the title of Count of Württemberg. After the death of Wilhelm (II.) Duke of Urach, the title of duke was passed on to Wilhelm's younger brother, Karl Gero (1899–1981). The daughters Elisabeth (* 1932) and Maria Christine (1933–1990) emerged from the marriage with Elisabeth Theurer.
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« Reply #751 on: June 17, 2021, 09:03:01 AM »

Alexander is a male given name. The most prominent bearer of the name is Alexander the Great, the king of the Ancient Greek kingdom of Macedonia who created one of the largest empires in ancient history. The name Alexander is derived from the Greek: Ἀλέξανδρος (Aléxandros; 'Defender of the people', 'Defending men', or 'Protector of men'). It is a compound of the verb ἀλέξειν (aléxein; 'to ward off, avert, defend') and the noun ἀνήρ (anḗr, genitive: ἀνδρός, andrós; meaning 'man'). It is an example of the widespread motif of Greek names expressing "battle-prowess", in this case the ability to withstand or push back an enemy battle line.

Alexander (Alexandros of Ilion), more often known as Paris of Troy

Alexander of Corinth, 10th king of Corinth (816–791 BC)

Alexander I of Macedon

Alexander II of Macedon

Alexander III of Macedon, commonly known as Alexander the Great

Alexander IV of Macedon

Alexander V of Macedon

Alexander of Pherae despot of Pherae between 369 and 358 BC

Alexander I of Epirus king of Epirus about 342 BC

Alexander II of Epirus king of Epirus 272 BC

Alexander of Corinth, viceroy of Antigonus Gonatas and ruler of a rump state based on Corinth c. 250 BC

Alexander (satrap) (died 220 BC), satrap of Persis under Seleucid king Antiochus III

Alexander Balas, ruler of the Seleucid kingdom of Syria between 150 and 146 BC

Alexander Zabinas, ruler of part of the Seleucid kingdom of Syria based in Antioch between 128 and 123 BC

Alexander Jannaeus king of Judea, 103–76 BC

Alexander of Judaea, son of Aristobulus II, king of Judaea

Alexander Severus (208–235), Roman emperor

Julius Alexander, lived in the 2nd century, an Emesene nobleman

Domitius Alexander, Roman usurper who declared himself emperor in 308



Alexander, Byzantine Emperor (912–913)

Alexander I of Scotland (c. 1078–1124)

Alexander II of Scotland (1198–1249)

Alexander Nevsky (1220–1263), Prince of Novgorod and Grand Prince of Vladimir

Alexander III of Scotland (1241–1286)

Nicholas Alexander of Wallachia, Voivode of Wallachia (?-1364)

Ivan Alexander of Bulgaria, tsar of Bulgaria (beginnings of the 14th century-1371)

Aleksandr Mikhailovich of Tver, Prince of Tver as Alexander I and Grand Prince of Vladimir-Suzdal as Alexander II (1301–1339)

Aleksander (1338–before 1386), Prince of Podolia (son of Narymunt)

Sikandar Shah Miri, better known as Sikandar Butshikan ("Sikandar the Iconoclast"), sixth sultan of the Shah Miri dynasty of Kashmir (1353–1413)

Sikandar Shah, Sultan of Bengal (1358–1390)

Alexander I of Georgia (1412–1442)

Alexander II of Georgia (1483–1510)

Alexandru I Aldea, ruler of the principality of Wallachia (1431–1436)

Eskender, Emperor of Ethiopia (1472–1494)

Alexander Jagiellon (Alexander of Poland), King of Poland (1461–1506)

Sikandar Shah II, Sultan of Bengal (around 1481)

Alexandru Lăpuşneanu, Voivode of Moldavia (1499–1568)

Sikandar Shah of Gujarat, ruler of Gujarat Sultanate (?-1526)

Sikandar Shah Suri, Sur dynasty, Shah of Delhi (?-1559)

Alexandru II Mircea, Voivode or Prince of Wallachia (1529–1577)


Alexander I of Russia (1777–1825), emperor of Russia

Alexander II of Russia (1818–1881), emperor of Russia

Alexander III of Russia (1845–1894), emperor of Russia

Alexander Karađorđević, Prince of Serbia (1842–1858)

Alexander of Bulgaria (1857–1893), first prince of modern Bulgaria

Alexandru Ioan Cuza, first prince of unified Romania (1859–1866)

Alexander I Obrenović of Serbia (1876–1903), king of Serbia

Alexander, Prince of Lippe (1831–1905), prince of Lippe

Alexander I (Serbian Cyrillic: Александар I Карађорђевић, romanized: Aleksandar I Karađorđević)(16 December 1888 [O.S. 4 December] – 9 October 1934), also known as Alexander the Unifier, was a prince regent of the Kingdom of Serbia from 1914 and later a king of Yugoslavia from 1921 to 1934 (prior to 1929 the state was known as the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes). He was assassinated by the Bulgarian Vlado Chernozemski, during a 1934 state visit to France. He was the fourth child (second son) of Peter Karađorđević (son of Prince Alexander of Serbia who thirty years earlier in 1858 was forced to abdicate and surrender power in Serbia to the rival House of Obrenović) and Princess Zorka of Montenegro (eldest daughter of Prince Nicholas of Montenegro). In 1922 he married Maria of Romania (6 January 1900 – 22 June 1961), the couple had 3 sons.

Alexander, Crown Prince of Yugoslavia (born 1945), head of the Yugoslav Royal Family. He is the heir to the defunct throne of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia and currently claimant to the abolished throne of the precursor Kingdom of Serbia. He is the head of the House of Karađorđević. Alexander is the only child of former King Peter II and his wife, Princess Alexandra of Greece and Denmark. On 1 July 1972 at Villamanrique de la Condesa, near Seville, Spain, he married Princess Maria da Gloria of Orléans-Braganza, from the Brazilian imperial family. They are 4th cousins once removed They have three sons. Alexander and Maria da Gloria divorced in 1985. Crown Prince Alexander married for the second time, Katherine Clairy Batis in 1985. Since their marriage, she is known as Princess Katherine, as per the royal family's website. They have no children.

Zog I, also known as Skenderbeg III (1895–1961), king of Albanians

Alexander of Greece (1893–1920), king of Greece

Leka, Crown Prince of Albania (1939–2011), king of Albanians (throne pretender)

Willem-Alexander, King of the Netherlands (born 1967), eldest child of Queen Beatrix and Prince Claus. He became Prince of Orange as heir apparent upon his mother's accession as Queen on 30 April 1980, and succeeded her following her abdication on 30 April 2013. On 2 February 2002, he married Máxima Zorreguieta Cerruti The couple has 3 daughters: Amalia, Alexia and Ariane.

Prince Alexander of the Netherlands, Prince of Orange-Nassau (William Alexander Frederick Constantine Nicholas Michael, Dutch: Willem Alexander Frederik Constantijn Nicolaas Michiel, Prins der Nederlanden)(2 August 1818 – 20 February 1848) was born at Soestdijk Palace, the second son to King Willem II of The Netherlands and Queen Anna Paulovna, daughter of Tsar Paul I of Russia. He was nicknamed Sasha within his family.

Alexander, Prince of Orange (Willem Alexander Karel Hendrik Frederik)(25 August 1851 – 21 June 1884), was heir apparent to his father King Willem III of the Netherlands from 11 June 1879 until his death. He was the third child of King Willem III and his 1st wife Queen Sophie (née Princess Sophie of Würrtemberg). His second brother, Prince Maurice had died the previous year. Unlike his brother William, the heir-apparent, he was disciplined, intellectual and well-read. His mother, Queen Sophie died in 1877. After Prince William's death two years later on 11 June 1879, he became heir apparent to the Dutch throne and as such the Prince of Orange.

Alexander, Judean Prince, one of the sons of Herod the Great from his wife Mariamne

Alexander Helios, Ptolemaic prince, one of the sons of Cleopatra and Mark Anthony

Alexander, Judean Prince, son to the above Alexander and Cappadocian princess Glaphyra

Alexander (d. 1418), son of Bulgarian tsar Ivan Shishman

Prince Alexander John of Wales (1871), short-lived son of Edward VII

Prince Alexandre of Belgium (1942–2009), son of King Leopold III and his second wife Liliane Beals.

Olav V of Norway ( = Prince Alexander of Denmark) (1903–1991)

Prince Alexander Erik Hubertus Bertil, Duke of Södermanland (19 April 2016), oldest child and son of Prince Carl Philip of Sweden and his wife Sofia Hellqvist.

Prince Alexander, Duke of Mecklenburg (Georg Alexander Michael Heinrich Ernst Franz Ferdinand Johannes Maria)(17 July 1991), the hereditary prince. He is the second child and elder son of Duke Borwin and Duchess Alice. In December 2020 the engagement between Alexander and Hande Macit, a Turkish born Dutch businesswoman, was announced. The couple lives in Rotterdam, the Netherlands.
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« Reply #752 on: June 18, 2021, 10:46:06 AM »

Bernhard is both a given name and a surname.

The name is derived from the Old High German bero for bear and hart for strong or bold. It is an extension of Berahart, Berinhard, Bernhard. It achieved great popularity in German-speaking countries, especially at the end of the 19th century. The trend has been falling since the 1940s.


Bernard of Saxe-Weimar (German: Bernhard von Sachsen-Weimar)(16 August 1604 – 18 July 1639) was a German prince and general in the Thirty Years' War. Born in Weimar within the Duchy of Saxe-Weimar, Bernard was the eleventh son of Johann, Duke of Saxe-Weimar, and Dorothea Maria of Anhalt.


Prince Carl Bernhard of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach (30 May 1792 – 31 July 1862) was a distinguished soldier, who, in 1815, after the congress of Vienna, became colonel of a regiment in the service of the king of the Netherlands. He fought at the Battle of Quatre Bras and the Battle of Waterloo where he commanded the 2nd Brigade of the 2nd Dutch Division and became a Chief Commander of the Royal Netherlands East Indies Army. Prince Bernhard, the seventh child of Charles Augustus, Grand Duke of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach and Princess and Landgravine Louise of Hesse-Darmstadt (30 January 1757 – 14 February 1830). He married Princess Ida of Saxe-Meiningen, daughter of Georg I, Duke of Saxe-Meiningen, on 30 May 1816 in Meiningen They had 8 children.



Prince Bernhard of Lippe (Bernhard Kasimir Wilhelm Friedrich Gustav Heinrich Eduard)(26 August 1872 – 19 June 1934) was a member of the Lippe-Biesterfeld line of the House of Lippe. He was the father of Prince Bernhard of Lippe-Biesterfeld, the prince consort of Queen Juliana of the Netherlands. Prince Bernhard of Lippe, born as Count of Lippe-Biesterfeld in Oberkassel on 26 August 1872, was the 2nd son of Ernest II, Count of Lippe-Biesterfeld, regent (1897–1904) of Principality of Lippe, and his wife Countess Karoline von Wartensleben. He was a younger brother of Leopold IV, Prince of Lippe, who succeeded as reigning Prince of Lippe in 1905. On 4 March 1909, Bernhard entered into a morganatic marriage with Baroness Armgard von Sierstorpff-Cramm, widowed Countess von Oeynhausen. Before this marriage, his wife was granted the title Countess of Biesterfeld (Gräfin von Biesterfeld) on 8 February 1909. She and her two sons Bernhard and Aschwin were created Princess (Prince) of Lippe-Biesterfeld (Prinzessin (Prinz) zur Lippe-Biesterfeld) on 24 February 1916 with the style Serene Highness, which brought their children into a more senior place in the line of succession, in which they hitherto had been the very last. The suffix Biesterfeld was revived to mark the beginning of a new cadet line. They had two sons.


Prince Bernhard of Lippe-Biesterfeld (later Prince Bernhard of the Netherlands, German: Bernhard Leopold Friedrich Eberhard Julius Kurt Karl Gottfried Peter Prinz zur Lippe-Biesterfeld)( 29 June 1911 – 1 December 2004) was a German-born nobleman. Bernhard was born Bernhard Leopold Friedrich Eberhard Julius Kurt Karl Gottfried Peter, Count of Biesterfeld in Jena, Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach, German Empire on 29 June 1911, the elder son of Prince Bernhard of Lippe and his wife, Baroness Armgard von Sierstorpff-Cramm. He was a grandson of Ernest, Count of Lippe-Biesterfeld, who was regent of the Principality of Lippe until 1904. He was also a nephew of the principality's last sovereign, Leopold IV, Prince of Lippe. Because his parents' marriage did not conform with the marriage laws of the House of Lippe, it was initially deemed morganatic, so Bernhard was granted only the title of Count of Biesterfeld at birth. He and his brother could succeed to the Lippian throne only if the entire reigning House became extinct. In 1916, his uncle Leopold IV as reigning Prince raised Bernhard and his mother to Prince and Princess of Lippe-Biesterfeld, thereby retroactively according his parents' marriage dynastic status. The suffix Biesterfeld was revived to mark the beginning of a new cadet line of the House of Lippe. After World War I, Bernhard's family lost their German Principality and the revenue that had accompanied it. But the family was still reasonably well-off. Bernhard spent his early years at Reckenwalde castle (Wojnowo, Poland), the family's new estate in East Brandenburg, thirty kilometres east of the River Oder. He was taught privately and received his early education at home. When he was twelve, he was sent to board at the Gymnasium in Züllichau (Sulechów). Several years later he was sent to board at a Gymnasium in Berlin, from which he graduated in 1929. Bernhard suffered from poor health as a boy. Doctors predicted that he would not live very long. This prediction might have inspired Bernhard's reckless driving and the risks that he took in the Second World War and thereafter. The prince wrecked several cars and planes in his lifetime.Bernhard studied law at the University of Lausanne, Switzerland and in Berlin. In the latter city, he also acquired a taste for fast cars, horse riding, and big-game hunting safaris. He was nearly killed in a boating accident and an aeroplane crash. He suffered a broken neck and crushed ribs in a 160 km/h (100 mph) car crash in 1938. While at university, Bernhard joined the Nazi Party. He also enrolled in the Sturmabteilung (SA), which he left in December 1934 when he graduated and went to work for IG Farben.[4] The Prince later denied that he had belonged to SA, to the Reiter-SS (SS Cavalry Corps), and to the NSKK, but these are well-documented memberships. While he was not a fierce champion of democracy, the Prince was never known to hold any radical political views or express any racist sentiments, although he admitted that he briefly had sympathised with Adolf Hitler's regime. Bernhard met then-Princess Juliana at the 1936 Winter Olympics at Garmisch-Partenkirchen. Juliana's mother, Queen Wilhelmina, had spent most of the 1930s looking for a suitable husband for Juliana. As a Protestant of royal rank (the Lippes were a sovereign house in the German Empire), Bernhard was deemed acceptable for the devoutly religious Wilhelmina. They were distantly related, 7th cousins in particular, both descending from Lebrecht, Prince of Anhalt-Zeitz-Hoym. Wilhelmina left nothing to chance, and had her lawyers draft a very detailed prenuptial agreement that specified exactly what Bernhard could and could not do. The couple's engagement was announced on 8 September 1936, and they were married at The Hague on 7 January 1937. Earlier, Bernhard had been granted Dutch citizenship and changed the spelling of his names from German to Dutch. Previously styled as Serene Highness, he became a Royal Highness by Dutch law. His appropriateness as consort of the future Queen would later become a matter of some public debate. Prince Bernhard fathered six children, four of them with Queen Juliana. The eldest daughter is Beatrix, (born 1938), who later became Queen of the Netherlands. His other daughters with Juliana are Irene (born 1939), Margriet (born 1943) and Christina (1947–2019). He had two "natural", or illegitimate, daughters. The first is Alicia von Bielefeld (born in San Francisco on 21 June 1952), whose mother has been identified as Alicia Webber, a 19 years old German national, illegitimate daughter of German aviator and test pilot Hanna Reitsch. Von Bielefeld has become a landscape architect and lives in the United States. His sixth daughter, Alexia Grinda (a.k.a. Alexia Lejeune or Alexia Grinda-Lejeune, born in Paris on 10 July 1967), is his child by Hélène Grinda, a French socialite and fashion model. Although rumours about these two children were already widespread, their status as his daughters was made official after his death. In December 2008, Dutch historian Cees Fasseur claimed that Jonathan Aitken, former British Conservative Cabinet Minister, was also a child of Prince Bernhard, the result of his wartime affair with Penelope Maffey.


Prince Bernhard Lucas Emmanuel of Orange-Nassau, van Vollenhoven (25 December 1969) is the second son of Princess Margriet of the Netherlands and Pieter van Vollenhoven. Before the succession of his cousin Willem-Alexander as King, he was a member of the Dutch Royal House and eleventh in the line of succession to the Dutch throne. With Willem-Alexander's succession however, he is no longer a member of the Dutch Royal House, and is no longer in line to direct succession to the Dutch throne, but still retains his membership of the Dutch Royal Family. While studying in Groningen, Prince Bernhard met Annette Sekrève, (born 18 April 1972). The couple announced their engagement on 11 March 2000. They married in July 2000. The civil ceremony was performed on 6 July 2000 by the Mayor of Utrecht, Annie Brouwer-Korf, in the Spiegelzaal of the Paushuize in Utrecht. The marriage was blessed two days later, on 8 July 2000, by Dr. Anne van der Meiden in the Cathedral of Saint Martin, Utrecht. Prince Bernhard and Princess Annette have three children: Isabella Lily Juliana (born 2002), Samuel Bernhard Louis (born 2004), and Benjamin Pieter Floris (born 2008). According to a royal decree of 5 July 2000 the children were granted the family name van Vollenhoven, without titles.



Bernhard, Hereditary Prince of Baden (Bernhard Max Friedrich August Gustav Louis Kraft)(27 May 1970) is a German nobleman and heir to the head of the House of Baden. Prince Bernhard was born in Schloss Salem, Salem, Baden-Württemberg, Germany, the eldest son of Maximilian, Margrave of Baden, and Archduchess Valerie of Austria. He married Stephanie Anne Kaul (27 June 1966), daughter of Christian Kaul and wife Hannelore Scheel, in 2001. The marriage was acknowledged as dynastic by his father. The couple has three children.



Bernhard Graf zu Stolberg-Stolberg (20 January 1881 - 1952) He married Hedwig Archduchess of Austria, daughter of Franz Salvator Archduchess of Austria and Marie Valerie Archduchess of Austria, on April 24, 1918 at Schloss Wallsee, Austria.



Count Bernhard Friedrich Hubertus zu Stolberg-Stolberg (1922-1958) son of Bernhard Graf zu Stolberg-Stolberg and Hedwig Archduchess of Austria.






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« Reply #753 on: June 18, 2021, 11:16:24 AM »

Alexander is a male given name. The most prominent bearer of the name is Alexander the Great, the king of the Ancient Greek kingdom of Macedonia who created one of the largest empires in ancient history. The name Alexander is derived from the Greek: Ἀλέξανδρος (Aléxandros; 'Defender of the people', 'Defending men', or 'Protector of men'). It is a compound of the verb ἀλέξειν (aléxein; 'to ward off, avert, defend') and the noun ἀνήρ (anḗr, genitive: ἀνδρός, andrós; meaning 'man'). It is an example of the widespread motif of Greek names expressing "battle-prowess", in this case the ability to withstand or push back an enemy battle line.

Alexander (Alexandros of Ilion), more often known as Paris of Troy

Alexander of Corinth, 10th king of Corinth (816–791 BC)

Alexander I of Macedon

Alexander II of Macedon

Alexander III of Macedon, commonly known as Alexander the Great

Alexander IV of Macedon

Alexander V of Macedon

Alexander of Pherae despot of Pherae between 369 and 358 BC

Alexander I of Epirus king of Epirus about 342 BC

Alexander II of Epirus king of Epirus 272 BC

Alexander of Corinth, viceroy of Antigonus Gonatas and ruler of a rump state based on Corinth c. 250 BC

Alexander (satrap) (died 220 BC), satrap of Persis under Seleucid king Antiochus III

Alexander Balas, ruler of the Seleucid kingdom of Syria between 150 and 146 BC

Alexander Zabinas, ruler of part of the Seleucid kingdom of Syria based in Antioch between 128 and 123 BC

Alexander Jannaeus king of Judea, 103–76 BC

Alexander of Judaea, son of Aristobulus II, king of Judaea

Alexander Severus (208–235), Roman emperor

Julius Alexander, lived in the 2nd century, an Emesene nobleman

Domitius Alexander, Roman usurper who declared himself emperor in 308



Alexander, Byzantine Emperor (912–913)

Alexander I of Scotland (c. 1078–1124)

Alexander II of Scotland (1198–1249)

Alexander Nevsky (1220–1263), Prince of Novgorod and Grand Prince of Vladimir

Alexander III of Scotland (1241–1286)

Nicholas Alexander of Wallachia, Voivode of Wallachia (?-1364)

Ivan Alexander of Bulgaria, tsar of Bulgaria (beginnings of the 14th century-1371)

Aleksandr Mikhailovich of Tver, Prince of Tver as Alexander I and Grand Prince of Vladimir-Suzdal as Alexander II (1301–1339)

Aleksander (1338–before 1386), Prince of Podolia (son of Narymunt)

Sikandar Shah Miri, better known as Sikandar Butshikan ("Sikandar the Iconoclast"), sixth sultan of the Shah Miri dynasty of Kashmir (1353–1413)

Sikandar Shah, Sultan of Bengal (1358–1390)

Alexander I of Georgia (1412–1442)

Alexander II of Georgia (1483–1510)

Alexandru I Aldea, ruler of the principality of Wallachia (1431–1436)

Eskender, Emperor of Ethiopia (1472–1494)

Alexander Jagiellon (Alexander of Poland), King of Poland (1461–1506)

Sikandar Shah II, Sultan of Bengal (around 1481)

Alexandru Lăpuşneanu, Voivode of Moldavia (1499–1568)

Sikandar Shah of Gujarat, ruler of Gujarat Sultanate (?-1526)

Sikandar Shah Suri, Sur dynasty, Shah of Delhi (?-1559)

Alexandru II Mircea, Voivode or Prince of Wallachia (1529–1577)


Alexander I of Russia (1777–1825), emperor of Russia

Alexander II of Russia (1818–1881), emperor of Russia

Alexander III of Russia (1845–1894), emperor of Russia

Alexander Karađorđević, Prince of Serbia (1842–1858)

Alexander of Bulgaria (1857–1893), first prince of modern Bulgaria

Alexandru Ioan Cuza, first prince of unified Romania (1859–1866)

Alexander I Obrenović of Serbia (1876–1903), king of Serbia

Alexander, Prince of Lippe (1831–1905), prince of Lippe

Alexander I (Serbian Cyrillic: Александар I Карађорђевић, romanized: Aleksandar I Karađorđević)(16 December 1888 [O.S. 4 December] – 9 October 1934), also known as Alexander the Unifier, was a prince regent of the Kingdom of Serbia from 1914 and later a king of Yugoslavia from 1921 to 1934 (prior to 1929 the state was known as the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes). He was assassinated by the Bulgarian Vlado Chernozemski, during a 1934 state visit to France. He was the fourth child (second son) of Peter Karađorđević (son of Prince Alexander of Serbia who thirty years earlier in 1858 was forced to abdicate and surrender power in Serbia to the rival House of Obrenović) and Princess Zorka of Montenegro (eldest daughter of Prince Nicholas of Montenegro). In 1922 he married Maria of Romania (6 January 1900 – 22 June 1961), the couple had 3 sons.

Alexander, Crown Prince of Yugoslavia (born 1945), head of the Yugoslav Royal Family. He is the heir to the defunct throne of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia and currently claimant to the abolished throne of the precursor Kingdom of Serbia. He is the head of the House of Karađorđević. Alexander is the only child of former King Peter II and his wife, Princess Alexandra of Greece and Denmark. On 1 July 1972 at Villamanrique de la Condesa, near Seville, Spain, he married Princess Maria da Gloria of Orléans-Braganza, from the Brazilian imperial family. They are 4th cousins once removed They have three sons. Alexander and Maria da Gloria divorced in 1985. Crown Prince Alexander married for the second time, Katherine Clairy Batis in 1985. Since their marriage, she is known as Princess Katherine, as per the royal family's website. They have no children.

Zog I, also known as Skenderbeg III (1895–1961), king of Albanians

Alexander of Greece (1893–1920), king of Greece

Leka, Crown Prince of Albania (1939–2011), king of Albanians (throne pretender)

Willem-Alexander, King of the Netherlands (born 1967), eldest child of Queen Beatrix and Prince Claus. He became Prince of Orange as heir apparent upon his mother's accession as Queen on 30 April 1980, and succeeded her following her abdication on 30 April 2013. On 2 February 2002, he married Máxima Zorreguieta Cerruti The couple has 3 daughters: Amalia, Alexia and Ariane.

Prince Alexander of the Netherlands, Prince of Orange-Nassau (William Alexander Frederick Constantine Nicholas Michael, Dutch: Willem Alexander Frederik Constantijn Nicolaas Michiel, Prins der Nederlanden)(2 August 1818 – 20 February 1848) was born at Soestdijk Palace, the second son to King Willem II of The Netherlands and Queen Anna Paulovna, daughter of Tsar Paul I of Russia. He was nicknamed Sasha within his family.

Alexander, Prince of Orange (Willem Alexander Karel Hendrik Frederik)(25 August 1851 – 21 June 1884), was heir apparent to his father King Willem III of the Netherlands from 11 June 1879 until his death. He was the third child of King Willem III and his 1st wife Queen Sophie (née Princess Sophie of Würrtemberg). His second brother, Prince Maurice had died the previous year. Unlike his brother William, the heir-apparent, he was disciplined, intellectual and well-read. His mother, Queen Sophie died in 1877. After Prince William's death two years later on 11 June 1879, he became heir apparent to the Dutch throne and as such the Prince of Orange.

Alexander, Judean Prince, one of the sons of Herod the Great from his wife Mariamne

Alexander Helios, Ptolemaic prince, one of the sons of Cleopatra and Mark Anthony

Alexander, Judean Prince, son to the above Alexander and Cappadocian princess Glaphyra

Alexander (d. 1418), son of Bulgarian tsar Ivan Shishman

Prince Alexander John of Wales (1871), short-lived son of Edward VII

Prince Alexandre of Belgium (1942–2009), son of King Leopold III and his second wife Liliane Beals.

Olav V of Norway ( = Prince Alexander of Denmark) (1903–1991)

Prince Alexander Erik Hubertus Bertil, Duke of Södermanland (19 April 2016), oldest child and son of Prince Carl Philip of Sweden and his wife Sofia Hellqvist.

Prince Alexander, Duke of Mecklenburg (Georg Alexander Michael Heinrich Ernst Franz Ferdinand Johannes Maria)(17 July 1991), the hereditary prince. He is the second child and elder son of Duke Borwin and Duchess Alice. In December 2020 the engagement between Alexander and Hande Macit, a Turkish born Dutch businesswoman, was announced. The couple lives in Rotterdam, the Netherlands.


Alexander Georgievich, 7th Duke of Leuchtenberg (13 November 1881 – 26 September 1942), also known as Prince Alexander Georgievich Romanovsky or less commonly Alexander de Beauharnais, was the only son of George Maximilianovich, 6th Duke of Leuchtenberg by his first wife, Duchess Therese of Oldenburg. He was a descendant of Paul I of Russia through both of his parents. In 1909, Alexander featured in many newspapers after rumors spread that he would enter into a morganatic marriage with American Marjorie Gould, a daughter of wealthy railroad executive George Jay Gould I. They reported Alexander met Marjorie the previous summer in Paris, and that his father later approached George Gould and asked for his daughter's hand for his son. One stated Alexander's father "would not sanction a marriage merely for love, and would insist that the Prince's bride must bring with her a fortune suitable to the rank of an Imperial Princess". George Gould and others put down these rumors vehemently, stating there the two were mere friends and there was no engagement. In 1912, Alexander was reported to have gained the reluctant consent of Emperor Nicholas to marry the wealthy Marianne Friedländer-Fuld, but only on the condition that the union would be considered unequal, with none of his titles being passed onto his wife or possible children. Despite being the senior descendant of Eugène de Beauharnais (son of Empress Joséphine), Alexander was far from rich, and served as a captain of the Russian Hussars of the guard and as an aide-de-camp to the Emperor. He was however the principal heir to his grandfather. Alexander later morganatically married to Nadezhda (or Nadejda) Nicolaevna Caralli (14 July 1883 – 1964) on 22 January 1917 in Petrograd.


Alexander Nikolayevich Prince Iskander  (15 November 1887 N.S. – 26 January 1957), son of Nadezhda (variantly spelled Nadejda) Alexandrovna von Dreyer (1861–1929) and Grand Duke Nicholas Constantinovich of Russia (14 February 1850 – 26 January 1918) He married Olga Iosifovna Rogovskaya / Rogowska (1893–1962) on 5 May 1912. The couple had two children. Alexander and Olga were later divorced, and Alexander married Natalya Khanykova (30 December 1893 – 20 April 1982) in 1930. No children resulted from the latter marriage.


Prince Alexander of Yugoslavia (Serbian: Александар П. Карађорђевић / Aleksandar P. Karađorđević)( 13 August 1924 – 12 May 2016) was the elder son of Prince Paul, who served as Regent of Yugoslavia in the 1930s, and his wife, Princess Olga of Greece and Denmark. On 12 February 1955, Alexander married Princess Maria Pia of Savoy, daughter of King Umberto II of Italy and of his wife, Princess Marie José of Belgium. Alexander and Maria Pia have twin sons born in 1958. Another set of twins was born five years later, this time a girl and a boy. Alexander and Maria Pia divorced in 1967, and in 2003 she married Prince Michel of Bourbon-Parma, himself divorced from Princess Yolande de Broglie-Revel. On 2 November 1973, Alexander married in a civil ceremony in Paris Princess Barbara of Liechtenstein  (9 July 1942), daughter of Prince Johannes of Liechtenstein (also first cousin once removed to both Prince Hans-Adam II of Liechtenstein and Princess Marie) and Countess Caroline of Ledebur-Wicheln On 28 October 1995 Prince Alexander and Princess Barbara were married in the Orthodox faith in Oplenac, and had issue (1 son).


Prince Alexander of Hesse and by Rhine (14 April 1933 - 16 November 1937) second son of Georg Donatus, Hereditary Grand Duke of Hesse and by Rhine and Princess Cecilie of Greece and Denmark (Greek: Καικιλία; 22 June 1911 – 15 November 1937). Died in a plane crash together with his elder brother, his father and pregnant mother.

Alexander of Schaumburg-Lippe (20 January 1901 – 26 November 1923) son of Albrecht of Schaumburg-Lippe (24 October 1869 – 25 December 1942) and Elsa of Württemberg (1 March 1876 – 27 May 1936)

Prince Alexander Nikitich Romanov (4 November 1929 – 22 September 2002) was a member of the Romanov family. He was a son of Prince Nikita Alexandrovich of Russia and a great nephew of Nicholas II of Russia, the last Tsar. Born in France, he took British citizenship in 1938 and lived with his grand mother Grand Duchess Xenia Alexandrovna in England until her death in 1960. The following year, Prince Alexander Nikitich became the first member of the Romanov family to visit Russia after the Revolution.Prince Alexander married Maria Valguarnera di Niscemi (born 29 November 1931), an Italian aristocrat, on 23 February 1971 in New York City in a civil ceremony, and in a religious ceremony on 18 July 1971 in Cannes. His wife converted to Orthodox Christianity before their marriage. The couple lived in New York City and in London. They had no children.


Alexander Friedrich Antonius Johannes, Hereditary Prince of Hohenzollern ( 16 March 1987), eldest son of Karl Friedrich, Prince of Hohenzollern (given names: Karl Friedrich Emich Meinrad Benedikt Fidelis Maria Michael Gerold)(20 April 1952) and his 1st wife Countess Alexandra Schenck von Stauffenberg
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« Reply #754 on: June 18, 2021, 01:33:39 PM »

Alexander is a male given name. The most prominent bearer of the name is Alexander the Great, the king of the Ancient Greek kingdom of Macedonia who created one of the largest empires in ancient history. The name Alexander is derived from the Greek: Ἀλέξανδρος (Aléxandros; 'Defender of the people', 'Defending men', or 'Protector of men'). It is a compound of the verb ἀλέξειν (aléxein; 'to ward off, avert, defend') and the noun ἀνήρ (anḗr, genitive: ἀνδρός, andrós; meaning 'man'). It is an example of the widespread motif of Greek names expressing "battle-prowess", in this case the ability to withstand or push back an enemy battle line.

Alexander (Alexandros of Ilion), more often known as Paris of Troy

Alexander of Corinth, 10th king of Corinth (816–791 BC)

Alexander I of Macedon

Alexander II of Macedon

Alexander III of Macedon, commonly known as Alexander the Great

Alexander IV of Macedon

Alexander V of Macedon

Alexander of Pherae despot of Pherae between 369 and 358 BC

Alexander I of Epirus king of Epirus about 342 BC

Alexander II of Epirus king of Epirus 272 BC

Alexander of Corinth, viceroy of Antigonus Gonatas and ruler of a rump state based on Corinth c. 250 BC

Alexander (satrap) (died 220 BC), satrap of Persis under Seleucid king Antiochus III

Alexander Balas, ruler of the Seleucid kingdom of Syria between 150 and 146 BC

Alexander Zabinas, ruler of part of the Seleucid kingdom of Syria based in Antioch between 128 and 123 BC

Alexander Jannaeus king of Judea, 103–76 BC

Alexander of Judaea, son of Aristobulus II, king of Judaea

Alexander Severus (208–235), Roman emperor

Julius Alexander, lived in the 2nd century, an Emesene nobleman

Domitius Alexander, Roman usurper who declared himself emperor in 308



Alexander, Byzantine Emperor (912–913)

Alexander I of Scotland (c. 1078–1124)

Alexander II of Scotland (1198–1249)

Alexander Nevsky (1220–1263), Prince of Novgorod and Grand Prince of Vladimir

Alexander III of Scotland (1241–1286)

Nicholas Alexander of Wallachia, Voivode of Wallachia (?-1364)

Ivan Alexander of Bulgaria, tsar of Bulgaria (beginnings of the 14th century-1371)

Aleksandr Mikhailovich of Tver, Prince of Tver as Alexander I and Grand Prince of Vladimir-Suzdal as Alexander II (1301–1339)

Aleksander (1338–before 1386), Prince of Podolia (son of Narymunt)

Sikandar Shah Miri, better known as Sikandar Butshikan ("Sikandar the Iconoclast"), sixth sultan of the Shah Miri dynasty of Kashmir (1353–1413)

Sikandar Shah, Sultan of Bengal (1358–1390)

Alexander I of Georgia (1412–1442)

Alexander II of Georgia (1483–1510)

Alexandru I Aldea, ruler of the principality of Wallachia (1431–1436)

Eskender, Emperor of Ethiopia (1472–1494)

Alexander Jagiellon (Alexander of Poland), King of Poland (1461–1506)

Sikandar Shah II, Sultan of Bengal (around 1481)

Alexandru Lăpuşneanu, Voivode of Moldavia (1499–1568)

Sikandar Shah of Gujarat, ruler of Gujarat Sultanate (?-1526)

Sikandar Shah Suri, Sur dynasty, Shah of Delhi (?-1559)

Alexandru II Mircea, Voivode or Prince of Wallachia (1529–1577)


Alexander I of Russia (1777–1825), emperor of Russia

Alexander II of Russia (1818–1881), emperor of Russia

Alexander III of Russia (1845–1894), emperor of Russia

Alexander Karađorđević, Prince of Serbia (1842–1858)

Alexander of Bulgaria (1857–1893), first prince of modern Bulgaria

Alexandru Ioan Cuza, first prince of unified Romania (1859–1866)

Alexander I Obrenović of Serbia (1876–1903), king of Serbia

Alexander, Prince of Lippe (1831–1905), prince of Lippe

Alexander I (Serbian Cyrillic: Александар I Карађорђевић, romanized: Aleksandar I Karađorđević)(16 December 1888 [O.S. 4 December] – 9 October 1934), also known as Alexander the Unifier, was a prince regent of the Kingdom of Serbia from 1914 and later a king of Yugoslavia from 1921 to 1934 (prior to 1929 the state was known as the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes). He was assassinated by the Bulgarian Vlado Chernozemski, during a 1934 state visit to France. He was the fourth child (second son) of Peter Karađorđević (son of Prince Alexander of Serbia who thirty years earlier in 1858 was forced to abdicate and surrender power in Serbia to the rival House of Obrenović) and Princess Zorka of Montenegro (eldest daughter of Prince Nicholas of Montenegro). In 1922 he married Maria of Romania (6 January 1900 – 22 June 1961), the couple had 3 sons.

Alexander, Crown Prince of Yugoslavia (born 1945), head of the Yugoslav Royal Family. He is the heir to the defunct throne of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia and currently claimant to the abolished throne of the precursor Kingdom of Serbia. He is the head of the House of Karađorđević. Alexander is the only child of former King Peter II and his wife, Princess Alexandra of Greece and Denmark. On 1 July 1972 at Villamanrique de la Condesa, near Seville, Spain, he married Princess Maria da Gloria of Orléans-Braganza, from the Brazilian imperial family. They are 4th cousins once removed They have three sons. Alexander and Maria da Gloria divorced in 1985. Crown Prince Alexander married for the second time, Katherine Clairy Batis in 1985. Since their marriage, she is known as Princess Katherine, as per the royal family's website. They have no children.

Zog I, also known as Skenderbeg III (1895–1961), king of Albanians

Alexander of Greece (1893–1920), king of Greece

Leka, Crown Prince of Albania (1939–2011), king of Albanians (throne pretender)

Willem-Alexander, King of the Netherlands (born 1967), eldest child of Queen Beatrix and Prince Claus. He became Prince of Orange as heir apparent upon his mother's accession as Queen on 30 April 1980, and succeeded her following her abdication on 30 April 2013. On 2 February 2002, he married Máxima Zorreguieta Cerruti The couple has 3 daughters: Amalia, Alexia and Ariane.

Prince Alexander of the Netherlands, Prince of Orange-Nassau (William Alexander Frederick Constantine Nicholas Michael, Dutch: Willem Alexander Frederik Constantijn Nicolaas Michiel, Prins der Nederlanden)(2 August 1818 – 20 February 1848) was born at Soestdijk Palace, the second son to King Willem II of The Netherlands and Queen Anna Paulovna, daughter of Tsar Paul I of Russia. He was nicknamed Sasha within his family.

Alexander, Prince of Orange (Willem Alexander Karel Hendrik Frederik)(25 August 1851 – 21 June 1884), was heir apparent to his father King Willem III of the Netherlands from 11 June 1879 until his death. He was the third child of King Willem III and his 1st wife Queen Sophie (née Princess Sophie of Würrtemberg). His second brother, Prince Maurice had died the previous year. Unlike his brother William, the heir-apparent, he was disciplined, intellectual and well-read. His mother, Queen Sophie died in 1877. After Prince William's death two years later on 11 June 1879, he became heir apparent to the Dutch throne and as such the Prince of Orange.

Alexander, Judean Prince, one of the sons of Herod the Great from his wife Mariamne

Alexander Helios, Ptolemaic prince, one of the sons of Cleopatra and Mark Anthony

Alexander, Judean Prince, son to the above Alexander and Cappadocian princess Glaphyra

Alexander (d. 1418), son of Bulgarian tsar Ivan Shishman

Prince Alexander John of Wales (1871), short-lived son of Edward VII

Prince Alexandre of Belgium (1942–2009), son of King Leopold III and his second wife Liliane Beals.

Olav V of Norway ( = Prince Alexander of Denmark) (1903–1991)

Prince Alexander Erik Hubertus Bertil, Duke of Södermanland (19 April 2016), oldest child and son of Prince Carl Philip of Sweden and his wife Sofia Hellqvist.

Prince Alexander, Duke of Mecklenburg (Georg Alexander Michael Heinrich Ernst Franz Ferdinand Johannes Maria)(17 July 1991), the hereditary prince. He is the second child and elder son of Duke Borwin and Duchess Alice. In December 2020 the engagement between Alexander and Hande Macit, a Turkish born Dutch businesswoman, was announced. The couple lives in Rotterdam, the Netherlands.


Alexander Georgievich, 7th Duke of Leuchtenberg (13 November 1881 – 26 September 1942), also known as Prince Alexander Georgievich Romanovsky or less commonly Alexander de Beauharnais, was the only son of George Maximilianovich, 6th Duke of Leuchtenberg by his first wife, Duchess Therese of Oldenburg. He was a descendant of Paul I of Russia through both of his parents. In 1909, Alexander featured in many newspapers after rumors spread that he would enter into a morganatic marriage with American Marjorie Gould, a daughter of wealthy railroad executive George Jay Gould I. They reported Alexander met Marjorie the previous summer in Paris, and that his father later approached George Gould and asked for his daughter's hand for his son. One stated Alexander's father "would not sanction a marriage merely for love, and would insist that the Prince's bride must bring with her a fortune suitable to the rank of an Imperial Princess". George Gould and others put down these rumors vehemently, stating there the two were mere friends and there was no engagement. In 1912, Alexander was reported to have gained the reluctant consent of Emperor Nicholas to marry the wealthy Marianne Friedländer-Fuld, but only on the condition that the union would be considered unequal, with none of his titles being passed onto his wife or possible children. Despite being the senior descendant of Eugène de Beauharnais (son of Empress Joséphine), Alexander was far from rich, and served as a captain of the Russian Hussars of the guard and as an aide-de-camp to the Emperor. He was however the principal heir to his grandfather. Alexander later morganatically married to Nadezhda (or Nadejda) Nicolaevna Caralli (14 July 1883 – 1964) on 22 January 1917 in Petrograd.


Alexander Nikolayevich Prince Iskander  (15 November 1887 N.S. – 26 January 1957), son of Nadezhda (variantly spelled Nadejda) Alexandrovna von Dreyer (1861–1929) and Grand Duke Nicholas Constantinovich of Russia (14 February 1850 – 26 January 1918) He married Olga Iosifovna Rogovskaya / Rogowska (1893–1962) on 5 May 1912. The couple had two children. Alexander and Olga were later divorced, and Alexander married Natalya Khanykova (30 December 1893 – 20 April 1982) in 1930. No children resulted from the latter marriage.


Prince Alexander of Yugoslavia (Serbian: Александар П. Карађорђевић / Aleksandar P. Karađorđević)( 13 August 1924 – 12 May 2016) was the elder son of Prince Paul, who served as Regent of Yugoslavia in the 1930s, and his wife, Princess Olga of Greece and Denmark. On 12 February 1955, Alexander married Princess Maria Pia of Savoy, daughter of King Umberto II of Italy and of his wife, Princess Marie José of Belgium. Alexander and Maria Pia have twin sons born in 1958. Another set of twins was born five years later, this time a girl and a boy. Alexander and Maria Pia divorced in 1967, and in 2003 she married Prince Michel of Bourbon-Parma, himself divorced from Princess Yolande de Broglie-Revel. On 2 November 1973, Alexander married in a civil ceremony in Paris Princess Barbara of Liechtenstein  (9 July 1942), daughter of Prince Johannes of Liechtenstein (also first cousin once removed to both Prince Hans-Adam II of Liechtenstein and Princess Marie) and Countess Caroline of Ledebur-Wicheln On 28 October 1995 Prince Alexander and Princess Barbara were married in the Orthodox faith in Oplenac, and had issue (1 son).


Prince Alexander of Hesse and by Rhine (14 April 1933 - 16 November 1937) second son of Georg Donatus, Hereditary Grand Duke of Hesse and by Rhine and Princess Cecilie of Greece and Denmark (Greek: Καικιλία; 22 June 1911 – 15 November 1937). Died in a plane crash together with his elder brother, his father and pregnant mother.

Alexander of Schaumburg-Lippe (20 January 1901 – 26 November 1923) son of Albrecht of Schaumburg-Lippe (24 October 1869 – 25 December 1942) and Elsa of Württemberg (1 March 1876 – 27 May 1936)

Prince Alexander Nikitich Romanov (4 November 1929 – 22 September 2002) was a member of the Romanov family. He was a son of Prince Nikita Alexandrovich of Russia and a great nephew of Nicholas II of Russia, the last Tsar. Born in France, he took British citizenship in 1938 and lived with his grand mother Grand Duchess Xenia Alexandrovna in England until her death in 1960. The following year, Prince Alexander Nikitich became the first member of the Romanov family to visit Russia after the Revolution.Prince Alexander married Maria Valguarnera di Niscemi (born 29 November 1931), an Italian aristocrat, on 23 February 1971 in New York City in a civil ceremony, and in a religious ceremony on 18 July 1971 in Cannes. His wife converted to Orthodox Christianity before their marriage. The couple lived in New York City and in London. They had no children.


Alexander Friedrich Antonius Johannes, Hereditary Prince of Hohenzollern ( 16 March 1987), eldest son of Karl Friedrich, Prince of Hohenzollern (given names: Karl Friedrich Emich Meinrad Benedikt Fidelis Maria Michael Gerold)(20 April 1952) and his 1st wife Countess Alexandra Schenck von Stauffenberg


Grand Duke Alexander Alexandrovich of Russia (Russian: Великий Князь Александр Александрович Романов)( 7 June 1869 – 2 May 1870) was the infant son of then-Tsesarevich Alexander Alexandrovich and his wife, Tsesarevna Maria Feodorovna. Grand Duke Alexander's father was heir apparent to the Russian throne as the eldest living son of Emperor Alexander II of Russia. The Grand Duke was Alexander and Marie's second child, second son, and the younger brother of the future Emperor Nicholas II. Though his father eventually succeeded to the Russian throne as Alexander III, Grand Duke Alexander died before this.


Grand Duke Alexander Mikhailovich of Russia (Russian: Александр Михайлович Aleksandr Mikhailovich)( 13 April 1866 – 26 February 1933) was a dynast of the Russian Empire, a naval officer, an author, explorer, the brother-in-law of Emperor Nicholas II and advisor to him. Alexander was born in Tiflis, in the Tiflis Governorate of the Russian Empire (present-day Georgia). He was the son of Grand Duke Michael Nikolaevich of Russia, the youngest son of Nicholas I of Russia, and Grand Duchess Olga Feodorovna (Cecily of Baden). He was mostly known as "Sandro". He married his first cousin's daughter, Grand Duchess Xenia Alexandrovna, the eldest daughter of Alexander III on 6 August [O.S. 25 July] 1894. The couple had 7 children.

Prince Alexander Vladimirovich Baryatinsky (22 May 1870 – 8 March 1910) was a Russian nobleman, staff captain, and bon vivant, widely known for his romance with the beautiful Italian Lina Cavalieri.Baryatinsky was the eldest son of Prince Vladimir Anatolyevich Baryatinsky (1843–1914), a general in the army, by his marriage to Countess Nadezhda Aleksandrovna Stenbock-Fermor (1847–1920). He was the grandson of Lieutenant-General Prince Anatoly Baryatinsky (1821–1881) and a cousin of Field Marshal Prince Alexander Baryatinsky (1815–1879). On his mother’s side, he was descended from the millionaire business man S. Y. Yakovlev.Baryatinsky was one of the richest men in Russia, which allowed him to lead a life of luxury. In 1897, he began an open affair with the famous opera singer and beauty Lina Cavalieri and spent huge sums of money on her. His passion for her was serious, and he asked the Emperor Nicholas II to give him permission to marry her, but his parents did all they could to prevent this from happening. In the summer of 1896, they had already had similar trouble, as they saw it, when their youngest son, Vladimir Baryatinsky, secretly married an actress, Yavorskaya. Their oldest son was heir to the dynasty of the Baryatinsky, and a marriage with Cavalieri would have discredited the whole family. They were supported by the Emperor, and Baryatinsky obeyed their will. On 5 October 1901, in Biarritz, Baryatinsky married the “amazingly beautiful” Princess Catherine Alexandrovna Yurievskaya (1878-1959), a daughter of the Emperor Alexander II by his morganatic marriage with Catherine Dolgorukov. After the wedding, they lived mainly abroad, where Baryatinsky was well-known in high society. Their sons Andrei Alexandrovich and Alexander were born in 1902 and 1905 respectively. In 1910 Alexander  died of acute meningitis. On 6 October 1916, at Yalta, Catherine Baryatinsky married secondly Prince Serge Obolensky (1890–1978), a son of General Prince Platon Sergeievich Obolensky.

Alexander Alexandrovich Baryatinsky (1905–1992) son of Prince Alexander Vladimirovich Baryatinsky and  Princess Catherine Alexandrovna Yurievskaya (1878-1959). A godson of Grand Duke Michael Nikolaevich, was twice married, but did not have children. He died in Grants Pass, Oregon.

Count Alexander Adolf (1896–1897) son of Princess Olga Alexandrovna Yurievskaya (Russian: О́льга Александровна Юрьевская; 7 November 1874 – 10 August 1925) (a natural daughter of Alexander II of Russia by his mistress (later his wife), Princess Catherine Dolgorukova. In 1880, she was legitimated by her parents' morganatic marriage.) and  Count George-Nicholas von Merenberg (1871–1948) (who was a son of Prince Nikolaus Wilhelm of Nassau (1832-1905), who married Natalia Alexandrovna Pushkina (1836-1913), former wife of Russian General Mikhail Leontievich von Dubelt.  Natalia was a daughter of Alexander Pushkin, the most renowned Russian writer who ranked, however, only as a dvoryanin; an untitled member of the lower nobility. Therefore, Natalia was created Countess von Merenberg, a title without territory, as she was not legally permitted to share her husband's princely title or rank, even though his family had ceased to be hereditary rulers when the kingdom of Prussia annexed Nassau.)


Alexander (1798 - 1876), lieutenant-captain of the Cavalry Regiment, district marshal of the nobility in the Smolensk region, died single in Moscow Son of Princess Alexandra Petrovna Golitsyna (Russian: Александра Петровна Голицына, née Протасова)(1774-1842) and Prince Alexei Golitsyn (1767-1800)








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« Reply #755 on: June 18, 2021, 02:12:28 PM »

Alexandra (Greek: Ἀλεξάνδρα) is the feminine form of the given name Alexander (Greek: Ἀλέξανδρος, Aléxandros). Etymologically, the name is a compound of the Greek verb ἀλέξειν (alexein; meaning 'to defend') and ἀνήρ (anēr; GEN ἀνδρός, andros; meaning 'man'). Thus it may be roughly translated as "defender of man" or "protector of man". The name Alexandra was one of the epithets given to the Greek goddess Hera and as such is usually taken to mean "one who comes to save warriors".


Salome Alexandra or Alexandra of Jerusalem (Hebrew: שְׁלוֹמְצִיּוֹן אלכסנדרה‎, Shelomtzion or Shlom Tzion)(141–67 BCE),[1] was one of only two women to rule over Judea (the other being Athaliah). The wife of Aristobulus I, and afterward of Alexander Jannaeus, she was the last queen of Judea, and the last ruler of ancient Judea to die as the ruler of an independent kingdom from 76 to 67 BCE.

Alexandra the Maccabee (died ca. 28 BC) was the daughter of Hyrcanus II (died 30 BC), who was the son of Alexander Jannaeus. She married her cousin Alexander of Judaea (died 48 BC), who was the son of Aristobulus II. Their grandfather was Alexander Jannaeus, the second eldest son of John Hyrcanus.Their daughter was the Hasmonean Mariamne and son was Aristobulus III.
Alexandra opposed her son-in-law Herod, and when he became sick with grief after having Mariamne executed, Alexandra tried to seize power, but was unsuccessful and was herself executed.


Grand Duchess Alexandra Nikolaevna of Russia (24 June 1825 – 10 August 1844) was the youngest daughter and fourth child of Tsar Nicholas I, Emperor of Russia, and his wife, Princess Charlotte of Prussia. She was a younger sister of Tsar Alexander II of Russia. She was the namesake of her paternal aunt, Grand Duchess Alexandra Pavlovna, who died in childbirth along with her stillborn daughter in 1801, but in the family she was known by her affectionate nickname, "Adini". On 28 January 1844, Alexandra married Prince Frederick William of Hesse (1820–1884) in St. Petersburg. Her husband was the only son of Prince William of Hesse and Princess Louise Charlotte of Denmark. "Fritz", as he was called, had come to St. Petersburg as a prospective bridegroom for Olga, but fell in love with Adini instead on the first evening he spent with the family. Although Olga was the elder daughter and also found Fritz to be an engaging young man, she graciously stepped aside in favour of her sister, and even chaperoned the couple when they wanted to spend time together away from the prying eyes of the court. The emperor and empress then gave their permission for Alexandra and Fritz to be married. Alexandra became acutely ill with tuberculosis shortly before her wedding, and this complicated the pregnancy which soon followed. She was never well enough to travel to Hesse and take up her new position with her husband. They stayed in St. Petersburg, where her health rapidly declined. She went into labor prematurely, three months before the child was due, and gave birth to a son, Wilhelm. The infant died shortly after he was born, and Alexandra died later the same day. She was the first of her parents' children to die. Her parents were devastated and their grief would last until the end of their lives. She was buried at the Peter and Paul Fortress in St. Petersburg. Her son was buried in Rumpenheim (Germany). Nine years later, Fritz married Adini's first cousin, Princess Anna of Prussia (1836–1918), as his second wife. Eventually he became head of the House of Hesse-Kassel. Although they had six children together, Fritz and Anna were never emotionally close, and it is speculated that one reason was because Fritz was unable to overcome his grief for his first wife.


Alexandra of Denmark (Alexandra Caroline Marie Charlotte Louise Julia; 1 December 1844 – 20 November 1925) was Queen of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions and Empress of India from 1901 to 1910 as the wife of King-Emperor Edward VII.  Princess Alexandra Caroline Marie Charlotte Louise Julia, or "Alix", as her immediate family knew her, was the eldest daughter of Prince Christian of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg and  Princess Louise of Hesse-Kassel. Alexandra's family had been relatively obscure until 1852, when her father, Prince Christian of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg, was chosen with the consent of the major European powers to succeed his second cousin Frederick VII as king of Denmark. At the age of sixteen Alexandra was chosen as the future wife of Albert Edward, Prince of Wales, the heir apparent of Queen Victoria. The couple married eighteen months later in 1863, the year in which her father became king of Denmark as Christian IX and her brother was appointed king of Greece as George I.  Alexandra and Edward had 6 children.


Princess Alexandra, The Honourable Lady Ogilvy, (Alexandra Helen Elizabeth Olga Christabel)(25 December 1936) is a member of the British royal family. Alexandra was born to Prince George, Duke of Kent, and Princess Marina of Greece and Denmark. She is a first cousin of the current British monarch, Queen Elizabeth II, and since her mother was a first cousin of the queen's husband, Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, she was also his first cousin once removed. She was named after her paternal great-grandmother, Queen Alexandra. On 24 April 1963, she married the Hon. Angus James Bruce Ogilvy (1928–2004), the second son of the 12th Earl of Airlie and Lady Alexandra Coke. Angus Ogilvy was knighted in 1988 (when Princess Alexandra assumed the style of The Hon. Lady Ogilvy), later being sworn of the Privy Council in 1997. Princess Alexandra and Sir Angus had two children.


Princess Alexandra Amalie of Bavaria (26 August 1826 – 21 September 1875) was a member of the House of Wittelsbach and devoted her life to literature. Alexandra was born in Schloss Johannisburg in Aschaffenburg, the eighth child and fifth daughter of King Ludwig I of Bavaria and of his wife, Princess Therese of Saxe-Hildburghausen. Alexandra never married, and instead was appointed abbess of the Royal Chapter for Ladies of Saint Anne in Munich and Würzburg; this was a religious community specifically for noble ladies. In the 1850s, Prince Louis Lucien Bonaparte asked King Ludwig for Alexandra's hand in marriage, but he was divorced from his wife, and Ludwig refused, using as an excuse Alexandra's delicate health. n 1852, Alexandra began a literary career.  

Princess Alexandra of Greece and Denmark (Greek: Αλεξάνδρα)(30 August [O.S. 18 August] 1870 – 24 September 1891), later known as Grand Duchess Alexandra Georgievna of Russia (Russian: Алекса́ндра Гео́ргиевна), was a member of the Greek royal family and of the Russian imperial family. She was the daughter of George I of Greece and Olga Constantinovna of Russia. She died of childbirth complications. When she was eighteen years old, she was married to Grand Duke Paul Alexandrovich of Russia, her maternal first cousin once removed and the youngest child and sixth son of Emperor Alexander II and his first wife, Princess Marie of Hesse and by Rhine. They had become close when Grand Duke Paul spent winters in Greece due to his frequent respiratory illnesses. The Greek royal family also frequently spent holidays with the Romanov family on visits to Russia or Denmark. The wedding took place on 17 June [O.S. 5 June] 1889 in St. Petersburg, at the chapel of the Winter Palace. They had two children. Seven months into her second pregnancy, Alexandra took a walk with her friends on the bank of the Moskva River and jumped directly into a boat that was permanently moored there, but fell as she got in. The next day, she collapsed in the middle of a ball from violent labour pains. She gave birth to her son, Dimitri, lapsed into a fatal coma, and she died six days later in the Romanovs' estate Ilyinskoe near Moscow. The Grand Duchess was buried in the Peter and Paul Cathedral, St. Petersburg. Her grieving husband had to be restrained from throwing himself into the grave with her. Her husband later morganatically remarried Olga Karnovich. Alexandra’s son would be involved in the murder of Grigori Rasputin, a favorite of Tsarina Alexandra Feodorvna, in 1916. In 1939 when Alexandra's nephew George II of Greece was reigning, the Greek government obtained permission from the Soviet government under Joseph Stalin to rebury Princess Alexandra in Greece. Her body was removed from the vault in Leningrad and transferred by a Greek ship to Athens. It was finally laid to rest near the Tatoi Palace. Alexandra's marble tombstone over an empty tomb is still in its place in the Peter and Paul Cathedral.

Alexandra of Yugoslavia (Greek: Αλεξάνδρα, Serbo-Croatian: Александра/Aleksandra; 25 March 1921 – 30 January 1993) was, by marriage to King Peter II, the last Queen of Yugoslavia. Posthumous daughter of King Alexander of Greece and his morganatic wife Aspasia Manos, Alexandra was not part of the Greek royal family until July 1922, when at the behest of Queen Sophia, a law was passed which retroactively recognized marriages of members of the royal family, although on a non-dynastic basis; in consequence, she obtained the style and name of Her Royal Highness Princess Alexandra of Greece and Denmark. Again exiled, Alexandra met in London the young King Peter II of Yugoslavia, who also went into exile after the invasion of his country by the Germans.
Quickly, Alexandra and Peter II fell in love and planned to marry. Opposition from both Peter's mother, Maria, and the Yugoslav government in exile forced the couple to delay their marriage plans until 1944, when they finally celebrated their wedding. A year later, Alexandra gave birth to her only son, Alexander, Crown Prince of Yugoslavia. However, the happiness of the family was short-lived: on 29 November 1945, Marshal Tito proclaimed the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia and Alexandra, who had never set foot in her adopted country, was left without a crown. The abolition of the Yugoslav monarchy had very serious consequences for the royal couple. Penniless and unable to adapt to the role of citizen, Peter II turned to alcoholism and multiple affairs with other women. Depressed by the behavior of her husband, Alexandra neglected her son and made several suicide attempts. After the death of Peter II in 1970, Alexandra's health continued to deteriorate. She died of cancer in 1993 and her remains were buried in the Royal Cemetery Plot in the park of Tatoi in Greece, before being transferred to the Royal Mausoleum of Oplenac in 2013.


Princess Alexandra of Greece (1968), first daughter of Prince Michael of Greece and Denmark and his wife (née Marina Karella). She married Nicolas Mirzayantz on 27 June 1998. They have two sons: Tigran (16 August 2000) and Darius (April 2002).


Alexandra Feodorovna (Russian: Алекса́ндра Фёдоровна, IPA: [ɐlʲɪˈksandrə ˈfjɵdərəvnə]), born Princess Charlotte of Prussia (13 July 1798 – 1 November 1860), was Empress of Russia as the wife of Emperor Nicholas I (r. 1825–1855). Charlotte was the eldest surviving daughter of King Frederick William III of Prussia (r. 1797–1840) and of Queen Louise of Prussia. Her childhood was marked by the Napoleonic Wars and by the death (1810) of her mother when Charlotte was just twelve years old. In 1814 the Russian imperial family arranged her marriage – for political reasons – with Grand Duke Nicholas Pavlovich of Russia, who later became Emperor Nicholas I. The couple married on 1 July 1817. Upon her marriage, Charlotte converted to Russian Orthodoxy, and took the Russian name Alexandra Feodorovna. Ideally matched with her husband, she had a happy marriage that produced a large family; seven of her children survived childhood.
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« Reply #756 on: June 18, 2021, 02:12:50 PM »

Alexandra Feodorovna (6 June [O.S. 25 May] 1872 – 17 July 1918) was the empress consort of Emperor Nicholas II of Russia from their marriage on 26 November 1894 until his forced abdication on 15 March [O.S. 2 March] 1917. Originally Princess Alix of Hesse and by Rhine at birth, she was given the name and patronymic Alexandra Feodorovna when she converted and was received into the Russian Orthodox Church. She and her immediate family were all killed while in Bolshevik captivity in 1918, during the Russian Revolution. In 2000 the Russian Orthodox Church canonized her as Saint Alexandra the Passion Bearer.  Alexandra was born on 6 June 1872 at the New Palace in Darmstadt as Princess Alix Viktoria Helene Luise Beatrix of Hesse and by Rhine, a Grand Duchy then part of the German Empire. She was the sixth child and fourth daughter among the seven children of Louis IV, Grand Duke of Hesse, and his first wife, Princess Alice of the United Kingdom, the second daughter of Queen Victoria and her husband Albert, Prince Consort. Queen Victoria greatly favored Alix and she wanted Alix to become the Queen Consort of the United Kingdom, which she considered "the greatest position there is." She pressured Alix to accept a proposal from her first cousin and the heir apparent to the British throne, Prince Albert Victor, Duke of Clarence and Avondale. In 1889, Victoria invited Alix and Eddy to Balmoral in hopes that they would fall in love. Eddy grew infatuated with her and proposed, but Alix was not interested in him and rejected his proposal. However, Victoria still persisted and tried to convince Alix of the benefits of the match. Victoria wrote to Princess Victoria of Hesse and by Rhine, Alix's older sister, that Alix "should be made to reflect seriously on the folly of throwing away the chance of a very good husband, kind, affectionate and steady, and of entering a united happy family and a very good position which is second to none in the world!" In 1891, Queen Victoria tried to arrange a match between Alix and Prince Maximilian of Baden. She asked Louis to invite Max to Darmstadt as soon as possible. When he arrived in Darmstadt, Max told Alix that he intended to propose to her. Alix was surprised and unhappy, and she later reflected that "I did not know him at all." She asked her older sister Victoria to intervene and help her reject Max politely. In 1884, Alix attended the wedding of her sister Elisabeth to Grand Duke Sergei Alexandrovich in St. Petersburg. At this wedding, the 12-year-old Alix met the 16-year-old Grand Duke Nicholas, nephew of the groom and heir-apparent to the imperial throne of Russia. In his diary Nicholas called Alix "sweet little Alix" and declared "we love each other." He gave her a brooch as a sign of his affection, and they scratched their names into a window pane. In January 1890, Alix visited her sister Ella in Russia. She and Nicholas skated together, met at tea parties, and played badminton. Nicholas wrote in his diary: "It is my dream to one day marry Alix H. I have loved her for a long time, but more deeply and strongly since 1889 when she spent six weeks in Petersburg. For a long time, I have resisted my feeling that my dearest dream will come true." Alix's sister Ella and her husband Sergei were enthusiastically in favor of the match between Nicholas and Alix. The future Edward VII told his mother Queen Victoria that "Ella will move heaven and earth to get [Alix] to marry a Grand Duke." Ella wrote to Ernest, “God grant this marriage will come true." Nicholas and Alix were second cousins through a great-grandmother, Princess Wilhelmina of Baden, and they were third cousins once removed through King Frederick William II of Prussia, who was Alix's great-great-grandfather and Nicholas's great-great-great-grandfather. Nicholas's mother, Empress Maria Feodorovna (Dagmar of Denmark), was Alix's godmother and the younger sister of Alexandra of Denmark, who married Alix's uncle Edward VII. Her sister Ella had married Nicholas's uncle Sergei. Queen Victoria opposed the match to Nicholas. She personally liked Nicholas, but she disliked Russia and Nicholas's father and worried that Alix would not be safe in Russia. She wrote to Alix's older sister Victoria of her suspicions that Sergei and Ella were encouraging the match. After the betrothal was announced, she reflected: “The more I think of sweet Alicky's marriage the more unhappy I am. Not as to the personality for I like [Nicholas] very much but on account of the country and the awful insecurity to which that poor child will be exposed." Alexander and Maria Feodorovna were both vehemently anti-German and did not want Alix as a daughter-in-law. Maria Feodorovna told her sister Alexandra of Denmark that the youngest daughter of an undistinguished grand duke was not worthy to marry the heir to the Russian throne, and she believed that Alix was too tactless and unlikeable to be a successful Empress. Alexander favored Princess Hélène, the tall, dark-haired daughter of Philippe, Comte de Paris, pretender to the throne of France. Nicholas was not attracted to Hélène, writing in his diary: "Mama made a few allusions to Hélène, daughter of the Comte de Paris. I myself want to go in one direction and it is evident that Mama wants me to choose the other one." Hélène also resisted this match, as she was Roman Catholic and her father refused to allow her to convert to Russian Orthodoxy. Alexander sent emissaries to Princess Margaret of Prussia, sister of German Emperor Wilhelm II, and a granddaughter of Queen Victoria. Nicholas declared that he would rather become a monk than marry Margaret; she in turn was unwilling to convert to the Russian Orthodox Church from being Protestant. When his health failed in 1894, Alexander III decided to allow Nicholas to marry Alix so that he could secure the succession. Marie reluctantly permitted Nicholas to propose to Alix. Nicholas was ecstatic and immediately inquired about Alix. Despite her love for Nicholas, Alix was initially reluctant to marry Nicholas because she didn't want to renounce her Lutheran faith to join the Orthodox church. On 1 November 1894, Alexander III died at the age of forty-nine. Nicholas was confirmed as Tsar Nicholas II. The next day, Alix was received into the Russian Orthodox Church as "the truly believing Grand Duchess Alexandra Feodorovna." However, she was not required to repudiate Lutheranism or her former faith. Alix wanted to take the name Yekaterina, but Nicholas wanted her to take the name Alexandra so that they could be a second Nicholas and Alexandra. He was inspired by his great-grandfather Nicholas I and his great-grandmother Alexandra Feodorovna. On 26 November 1894, Alexandra and Nicholas married in the Grand Church of the Winter Palace of Saint Petersburg. Court mourning could be relaxed because it was the birthday of Nicholas's mother, now Dowager Empress Maria Feodorovna. The couple would have 4 daughters and 1 son. Unfortunately their son suffered from hemophilia.


Princess Alexandra Romanovskaja (9 April 1840 - 12 August 1843), daughter and oldest child of Grand Duchess Maria Nikolaievna of Russia (Russian: Мария Николаевна) (18 August 1819 – 21 February 1876) and Maximilian Joseph Eugene Auguste Napoleon de Beauharnais, 3rd Duke of Leuchtenberg, Prince Romanowsky (2 October 1817 – 1 November 1852)


Princess Marie Alexandra of Baden (Marie Alexandra Thyra Victoria Louise Carola Hilda)(1 August 1902 – 29 January 1944) was a Hessian princess by marriage. She was the only daughter and elder child of Prince Maximilian of Baden (1867–1929) and Princess Marie Louise of Hanover and Cumberland. On 17 September 1924, she married her fourth cousin Prince Wolfgang of Hesse (1896–1989). They had no children. Princess Marie Alexandra was killed in an attack by the U.S. Army Air Forces during an air-raid on Frankfurt am Main on 29–30 January 1944 during World War II. She and seven other women, who were aid workers, were killed when the cellar, in which they had taken refuge, collapsed under the weight of the building, rendering Marie Alexandra's body barely recognisable.


Grand Duchess Alexandra Iosifovna of Russia (born Princess Alexandra of Saxe-Altenburg)(8 July 1830 – 6 July 1911) was the fifth daughter of Joseph, Duke of Saxe-Altenburg and Duchess Amelia of Württemberg. She is an ancestress of the British, Greek, Romanian, Yugoslav, and Spanish Royal Families through her elder daughter Olga. In the summer of 1846, she met Grand Duke Konstantin Nikolayevich of Russia when he visited Altenburg. He was the second son of Nicholas I, Emperor of Russia, and Empress Alexandra Feodorovna, née Princess Charlotte of Prussia. Konstantin was intellectual and liberal, whereas Alexandra was conservative and rather high spirited. Although their temperaments differed, they both shared an interest in music, and enjoyed playing duets at the piano. Konstantin was captivated by Alexandra's youthful beauty: she being tall, slender and attractive. He quickly became besotted, and was eager to marry her "I don't know what is happening to me. It is as if I am a completely new person. Just one thought moves me, just one image fills my eyes: forever and only she, my angel, my universe. I really do think I’m in love. However, what can it mean? I've only know her just a few hours and I'm already up to my ears in Passion". She was only sixteen and Konstantin nineteen; they were engaged but had to wait two more years before they could finally marry. Alexandra arrived in Russia on 12 October 1847, and was greeted by much fanfare and popular celebration, with jubilant crowds lining the streets and balconies. It was said that Alexandra looked so much like her fiance's sister, the Grand Duchess Alexandra Nikolayevna, who died in childbirth, that her prospective mother-in-law burst into tears at their first meeting. In February 1848, Alexandra converted to Russian Orthodoxy, taking the name of Grand Duchess Alexandra Iosifovna, which reflected her father's name Joseph (unlike many princesses she took a patronymic, choosing to reflect her parentage rather than the usual religious or dynastic associations which was also possible because Iosif was a common name in Russia). Alexandra and Konstantin were married in The Winter Palace in St Petersburg, on 11 September 1848. Konstantin and Alexandra had 6 children.


Princess Alexandra Chavchavadze (24 December 1954), daughter of  Helen Husted and Prince David Chavchavadze (May 20, 1924 – October 5, 2014) She married Puthukuty Krishnan Ramani on 26 November 1988. They have two children. David Chavchavadze was born in London to Prince Paul Chavchavadze (1899–1971) and Princess Nina Georgievna of Russia (Romanov) (1901–1974), a descendant of a prominent Georgian noble family and the Imperial Russian dynasty.


Alexandra Wynkoop, daughter of Nancy Helen Marie Leeds Wynkoop and  Edward Judson Wynkoop Jr.  Her mother Nancy was the daughter of William Bateman Leeds Jr. (19 September 1902-31 December 1971) and Princess Xenia Georgievna of Russia (22 August 1903 – 17 September 1965).


Alexandra Gabriella Grundland (17 September 1971); daughter of Nobile Nicoletta Farace (23 July 1938) and Alberto Grundland. A maternal granddaughter of Princess Catherine Ivanovna of Russia (Russian: Княжна Екатери́на Иоа́нновна)(12 July 1915 (O.S.) – 13 March 2007) She married on 24 March 2001 to Roberto Castro Padula and had one son.
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« Reply #757 on: June 18, 2021, 02:13:08 PM »

Grand Duchess Alexandra Petrovna of Russia (Russian: Алекса́ндра Петро́вна Ольденбургская, tr. Alexandra Petrovna Olʹdenburgskaya; Born Duchess Alexandra Frederica Wilhelmina of Oldenburg)(2 June 1838 – 25 April 1900) was a great-granddaughter of Emperor Paul I of Russia and the wife of Grand Duke Nicholas Nikolaevich of Russia, the elder. Born Duchess Alexandra of Oldenburg, she was the eldest daughter of Duke Peter of Oldenburg and his wife Princess Therese of Nassau-Weilburg. She grew up in Russia in close proximity to the Romanovs as her father was a nephew of Tsar Nicholas I of Russia. Alexandra’s parents were artistically gifted and passionate philanthropists. They provided a good education for her and inspired in Alexandra a life of service to those in need. Alexandra married in 1856, Grand Duke Nicholas Nikolaevich of Russia, the third son of Tsar Nicholas I and her first cousin once removed. Alexandra, who had been raised in the Lutheran church, converted to the Orthodox faith, and took the name Grand Duchess Alexandra Petrovna of Russia. The couple had two children: Grand Duke Nicholas Nikolaevich of Russia (1856–1929), the younger, and Grand Duke Peter Nikolaevich of Russia (1864–1931).


Alexandra Anastasia Hamilton, Duchess of Abercorn, OBE (née Phillips)(27 February 1946 – 10 December 2018), was a philanthropist, an aristocrat of Russian descent and the wife of The 5th Duke of Abercorn. The eldest daughter of Lt.-Col. Harold Pedro Joseph 'Bunnie' Phillips (1909–1980) and his wife, Georgina Wernher (1919–2011),[5] one of her younger sisters was Natalia, Duchess of Westminster. Her paternal grandparents were Col. Joseph Harold John Phillips and his wife Mary Mercedes Bryce, whose niece, Janet Mercedes Bryce (daughter of Major Francis Bryce of Hamilton, Bermuda), married The 3rd Marquess of Milford Haven, son of Nadejda, Marchioness of Milford Haven, sister of Alexandra's grandmother. 'Sacha', as she was always known to family and friends. On 20 October 1966, at the age of 20, Alexandra Anastasia Phillips married the Ulster nobleman James Hamilton, Marquess of Hamilton, son and heir apparent of The 4th Duke of Abercorn and his wife, the former Lady Mary Katherine Crichton, in Westminster Abbey. In June 1979, James succeeded as The 5th Duke of Abercorn. The Duke and Duchess of Abercorn have three children


Alexandra, Countess of Frederiksborg, RE (née Alexandra Christina Manley)(30 June 1964) is the former wife of Prince Joachim of Denmark, the younger son of Margrethe II of Denmark. Of English, Chinese, Czech, Iranian, Armenian and Austrian ancestry, Alexandra Manley was born in Hong Kong, as the eldest of three daughters of Richard Nigel Manley (11 August 1924 - 12 January 2010) and Christa Maria Manley of Czech and Austrian descent (born Christa Maria Nowotny in Austria in 1933). Alexandra met Prince Joachim at a private dinner in Hong Kong in January 1994, where he was working for a Danish shipping company. After a whirlwind courtship, thought to have begun in late 1994, Prince Joachim presented Alexandra with a diamond and ruby engagement ring while on vacation in the Philippines. Their engagement was officially announced in May 1995. They were married on 18 November 1995. When Alexandra married Joachim, she gave up her career in marketing. It is believed that she had renounced her British citizenship prior to become a Danish subject upon her marriage. Through the span of their 9-year marriage, Joachim and Alexandra welcomed two sons. On 28 August 1999, Prince Nikolai, the first grandchild of the Queen and Prince Consort, was born. His younger brother, Prince Felix, followed three years later on 22 July 2002. Alexandra became popular with the Danish people. Known for her fashion sense and charity work, she was dubbed the Diana of the North. She is a native English and German speaker (through her father and mother, respectively), and her fluency in German helped her pick up the Danish language quickly. Within a few months she spoke it nearly without accent, which further endeared her to the Danes. On 16 September 2004, Alexandra and Joachim announced their separation and eventual intention to divorce. It would be the first in the Royal Family since 1846 On 23 June 2017, she announced that she would renounce her entitlement to the Danish civil list in July 2020, coinciding with the 18th birthday of Prince Felix. In mid-2005, there were reports and pictures of Alexandra with Martin Jørgensen, the son of Jacob Jørgensen, a well-known film producer whose company, JJ Film, has produced – and stille does – numerous documentaries in which the Danish royal family has participated. She married Martin Jørgensen on 3 March 2007 in a private ceremony at Øster Egede Church near Fakse. She was walked down the isle by her sons, Nikolai and Felix. In September 2015, it was announced that Jørgensen and the Countess were divorcing after eight and a half years of marriage. The divorce was finalised in 2015. Alexandra still occasionally attends events with the Danish royal family.

Princess Alexandra of Luxembourg (Alexandra Joséphine Teresa Charlotte Marie Wilhelmine)(16 February 1991) is the fourth child (of 5) and only daughter of Grand Duke Henri and Grand Duchess Maria Teresa.  Excluded from the line of succession from birth until 2011, when absolute primogeniture was adopted in respect to Grand Duke Henri's descendants, she is currently sixth in the line. Prince Louis gave up his place in the line of succession when he married Tessy Antony.


Grand Duchess Alexandra Pavlovna of Russia (Russian: Александра Павловна)( 9 August 1783 [OS 29 July]  – 16 March 1801) was a daughter of Emperor Paul I of Russia and sister of emperors Alexander I and Nicholas I. She married Archduke Joseph of Austria, Palatine (Governor) of Hungary. Her marriage was the only Romanov-Habsburg marital alliance that ever occurred. Grand Duchess Alexandra Pavlovna was born in Tsarskoye Selo as the third child and eldest daughter of Tsar Paul I of Russia and his second wife Sophie Dorothea of Württemberg (renamed Maria Feodorovna after her wedding).  In 1799, three years after her failed betrothal with the King of Sweden, another marital project originated for Alexandra. Previously in 1798, Dukes Ferdinand Augustus and Alexander Frederick of Württemberg who were the brothers of the Empress Maria Feodorovna, arrived in St. Petersburg to serve in the Russian army. They expressed the interest of Austria to join with Russia in a coalition against the rising power of the French Republic and Napoleon, and to cement this alliance, it was decided to arrange a marriage between Alexandra and Archduke Joseph of Austria, Palatine (Governor) of Hungary and a younger brother of Francis II, Holy Roman Emperor. The wedding took place on 30 October 1799 Soon Alexandra was expecting her first child. The pregnancy was hard, as she was tormented by bouts of nausea. The doctor, following the orders of Empress Maria Theresa, was "more skilled in intrigues than in medicine, and moreover, with rude manners"; in addition, the cook prepared meals that she could not eat. A daughter, Archduchess Alexandrine of Austria, was born on 8 March 1801, but died within hours. She was named after her mother. On the eighth day after the birth, Alexandra was allowed to get up, but in the evening she developed puerperal fever, which finally caused her early death on 16 March 1801 aged 17.


Grand Duchess Alexandra Alexandrovna of Russia (30 August 1842 – 10 July 1849) was the eldest child and first daughter of Tsar Alexander II of Russia and his first wife Marie of Hesse and by Rhine. She died from infant meningitis at the age of six and a half.

Princess Alexandra of Hanover and Cumberland (German: Alexandra Louise Marie Olga Elisabeth Therese Vera Prinzessin von Hannover und Cumberland)(29 September 1882 – 30 August 1963) was the wife of Frederick Francis IV, Grand Duke of Mecklenburg-Schwerin, the last ruling Duke of Mecklenburg-Schwerin. Alexandra was the second eldest daughter and third child of Ernest Augustus, Crown Prince of Hanover (1845–1923) and Princess Thyra of Denmark (1853–1933), the youngest daughter of Christian IX of Denmark (1818–1906) and Louise of Hesse-Kassel (1817–1898). Alexandra was a great-great-granddaughter of George III of the United Kingdom (1738–1820) and Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz (1744–1818). Alexandra married on 7 June 1904 in Gmunden, Austria-Hungary to Frederick Francis IV, Grand Duke of Mecklenburg-Schwerin (1882–1945), son of Frederick Francis III, Grand Duke of Mecklenburg-Schwerin and his wife Grand Duchess Anastasia Mikhailovna of Russia. The bridegroom gave Alexandra a diamond and aquamarine tiara by Faberge. Alexandra and Frederick Francis had five children.


Princess Arthur of Connaught, 2nd Duchess of Fife, RRC GCStJ (Alexandra Victoria Alberta Edwina Louise Duff; Princess Alexandra, Duchess of Fife before marriage)(17 May 1891 – 26 February 1959) was the eldest surviving grandchild of King Edward VII and a great-granddaughter of Queen Victoria. Alexandra's father was Alexander Duff, 1st Duke of Fife. Having succeeded his father as the 6th Earl Fife, he was elevated to Duke of Fife and Marquess of Macduff in the Peerage of the United Kingdom on his marriage in 1889 to Princess Louise of Wales, the eldest daughter of Albert Edward, Prince of Wales, the future Edward VII. Princess Louise accordingly became the Duchess of Fife. After ten years of marriage and the birth in 1893 of Alexandra's younger sister Maud, no more children would be born to Alexandra's parents and the dukedom and marquessate of Fife were headed toward extinction since only a male heir could inherit those titles. On 24 April 1900 Queen Victoria granted Alexander Duff a second dukedom of Fife, along with the earldom of Macduff, stipulating by special remainder that these two titles would jointly devolve, in default of sons born to him and the Queen's granddaughter, upon their daughters in order of seniority of birth, and upon their respective agnatic male descendants in the same order. As a female-line granddaughter of the British monarch, Alexandra was not entitled to the title of "Princess", nor to the style of Her Royal Highness. Instead she was styled Lady Alexandra Duff, as the daughter of a duke, even though she was born fifth in the line of succession to the British throne. Alexandra and her sister were unique among British princesses in that they were descended from both William IV (through his mistress, Dorothea Jordan), and William IV's niece, Queen Victoria, who succeeded him because he left no legitimate issue. Around 1910, Alexandra became secretly engaged to Prince Christopher of Greece and Denmark, a son of King George I of the Hellenes. The engagement was terminated when their disapproving parents learned of the liaison. On 15 October 1913, Princess Alexandra married her first cousin, once removed, Prince Arthur of Connaught. The couple had 1 son.
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« Reply #758 on: June 18, 2021, 02:13:31 PM »

Alexandra Prinzessin von Hannover (née Alexandra Sophie Cecilie Anna Maria Friederike Benigna Dorothea Prinzessin zu Ysenburg und Büdingen)( 23 October 1937 – 1 June 2015) was a German politician, philanthropist, and wife of Prince Welf Henry of Hanover. Hannover lastly served as a councilwoman representing the Niederrad district of Frankfurt on the Frankfurt City Council (German: Frankfurter Stadtverordnetenversammlung). She was a member of the Christian Democratic Union political party. She was the second eldest child and only daughter of Otto Friedrich III, Prince of Ysenburg und Büdingen zu Wächtersbach and his wife Felicitas Anna Eleonore Cecilie, Princess Reuss of Köstritz. Alexandra married Prince Welf Henry of Hanover, the fourth son of Ernest Augustus, Duke of Brunswick and his wife Princess Victoria Louise of Prussia, in 1960. The couple had no children.


Princess Alexandra of Hanover (Alexandra Charlotte Ulrike Maryam Virginia)(20 July 1999) is the fourth child of Princess Caroline of Monaco and third of Prince Ernst August of the defunct Kingdom of Hanover. She has half-siblings from her parents' previous marriages. From her father's previous marriage, she has two half-brothers. From her mother's previous marriage, she has two half-brothers and one half-sister. Alexandra is the only one of Princess Caroline's four children who bears any royal style or title. While she is formally styled as Her Royal Highness Princess Alexandra of Hanover in Monaco, she is afforded the style and title out of courtesy elsewhere. As the Kingdom of Hanover no longer exists, her legally recognized name in Germany is Alexandra Princess of Hanover, with Princess of Hanover forming her surname. She is 13th in the line of succession to the Monegasque throne. Through her father, she was in the line of succession to the British throne until she was confirmed into the Catholic Church.



Princess Alexandra of Sayn-Wittgenstein-Berleburg, Countess Ahlefeldt-Laurvig-Bille (Alexandra Rosemarie Ingrid Benedikte)(20 November 1970), is the first daughter and second of three children of Prince Richard of Sayn-Wittgenstein-Berleburg and Princess Benedikte of Denmark Under the succession rules set by King Frederik IX, since Princess Benedikte and her children, including Princess Alexandra, have not taken up permanent residence in Denmark, they have effectively waived their place in the line of succession to the Danish throne. Since 19 May 1998, Alexandra has been a Danish citizen. Alexandra was married on 6 June 1998 at Gråsten Palace to Count Jefferson von Pfeil und Klein-Ellguth and the couple has two children. The couple announced their intention to divorce in May 2017. On 18 May 2019 she married Count Michael of Ahlefeldt-Laurvig-Bille (b. 26 February 1965), a member of an ancient Ahlefeldt noble family of German and Danish descent.



Alexandra von Fürstenberg (née Alexandra Natasha Miller) is a Hong Kong-born American entrepreneur and furniture designer based in Los Angeles. She is the youngest daughter of American billionaire and DFS Group co-founder Robert Warren Miller. Alexandra von Fürstenberg was born on October 3, 1972, in British Hong Kong to American entrepreneur Robert Warren Miller and his Ecuadorian wife, María Clara (née Pesantes Becerra) She has two older sisters Pia and Marie-Chantal. Alexandra and her sisters grew up between Hong Kong, Paris and New York. In the 1990s, Alexandra and her sisters were popularly dubbed by New York high society as the Miller Sisters. On October 28, 1995, at the Church of St. Ignatius of Loyola in New York City, she married Prince Alexander von Fürstenberg, the son of the fashion designer Diane von Fürstenberg and Prince Egon von Fürstenberg They have two children, Princess Talita Natasha (born May 7, 1999) and Prince Tassilo Egon Maximilian (born August 21, 2001). The couple divorced in 2002. On July 7, 2015, Alexandra married longtime fiancé, architectural designer and developer Dax Miller. The couple wed on the seventh anniversary of the start of their relationship.


Princess Alexandra Louise Olga Victoria of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, VA, CI (1 September 1878 – 16 April 1942) was the fourth child and third daughter of Alfred, Duke of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, and Grand Duchess Maria Alexandrovna of Russia. As the wife of Ernst II, she was Princess consort of Hohenlohe-Langenburg. She was a granddaughter of both Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom and Tsar Alexander II of Russia. Alexandra was born Princess Alexandra of Edinburgh on 1 September 1878 at Rosenau Castle, Coburg. Her father was Prince Alfred, Duke of Edinburgh, the second-eldest son of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom and Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha. Her mother was Grand Duchess Maria Alexandrovna of Russia, the only surviving daughter of Alexander II of Russia and Marie of Hesse and by Rhine. Nicknamed 'Sandra' by her family. Alexandra's mother, Grand Duchess Maria Alexandrovna, believed in marrying her daughters young, before they began to think for themselves. At the end of 1895, she arranged Alexandra's engagement to Ernst, Hereditary Prince of Hohenlohe-Langenburg (13 September 1863 – 11 December 1950). Alexandra's grandmother, Queen Victoria, complained that she was too young. Alexandra's father objected to the status of his future son-in-law, who would become the 7th Prince of Hohenlohe-Langenburg. The House of Hohenlohe-Langenburg was mediatized — a formerly ruling family who had ceded their sovereign rights to others while (in theory) retaining their equal birth; it was not considered a brilliant match. The couple were also related. Alexandra was 17 and Ernst 32. They had five children.


Princess Alexandra Beatrice Leopoldine of Hohenlohe-Langenburg (2 April 1901 – 26 October 1963), daughter of Princess Alexandra Louise Olga Victoria of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha and Ernst, Prince of Hohenlohe-Langenburg


Princess Marie Alexandra of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg, since 1941 of Schleswig-Holstein[citation needed] (Marie Alexandra Caroline-Mathilde Viktoria Irene)(9 July 1927 – 14 December 2000) was a member of the House of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg. Marie Alexandra was the fourth and youngest child of Wilhelm Friedrich, Duke of Schleswig-Holstein and his wife Princess Marie Melita of Hohenlohe-Langenburg. Marie Alexandra married Douglas Barton-Miller (born 27 December 1929), son of Douglas Barton Miller and his wife, Harriet Maxine Deter in 1970. Marie Alexandra and Douglas did not have children.


Countess Alexandra (Sasha) Lvovna Tolstaya (Russian: Александра Львовна Толстая)( 18 June 1884 – 26 September 1979), often anglicized to Tolstoy, was the youngest daughter and secretary of the noted Russian novelist Leo Tolstoy. The youngest daughter of Leo Tolstoy (1828–1910) and of his wife Sophia (1844–1919), Alexandra was close to her father. In 1901, at the age of seventeen, she became his secretary. Although Alexandra shared her father's belief in non-violence, she felt it was her duty to take part in the events of the First World War and served as a nurse on the Turkish and German fronts. This led to her being gassed and admitted to hospital herself. After the war, she worked on an edition of her father's writings.  However, after allowing White Russians to meet in her Moscow home, she was arrested five times by the Bolsheviks and in 1920 was sent to prison for a year. In 1921 she became the director of the Tolstoy museum at Yasnaya Polyana. She was given permission to leave the Soviet Union in 1929 and went to Japan in the same year. Originally given permission to stay for six months to study schools, she ultimately stayed in the country for 18 months. She worked as a lecturer on Tolstoy and as a Russian teacher, and was supported by Japanese literary and academic circles. In 1931 she left Japan and settled in the United States, where she gave lectures and worked as a chicken farmer. Some years into this life, she was visited by Tatiana Schaufuss, an old friend who had spent several years in prison and in exile in Siberia. Together, in 1939 they founded the Tolstoy Foundation. Tolstaya became a naturalized U.S. citizen in 1941, abandoning the use of the title of countess.



Countess Alexandra Tolstoy-Miloslavsky FRGS (14 July 1973) is a British equine adventurer, broadcaster, socialite, and businesswoman. She has made several long distance journeys on horses which have provided the material for television documentaries, books, and talks. Tolstoy is the daughter of Count Nikolai Tolstoy and Georgia Brown.  She is an older sister of Xenia Sackville, Lady Buckhurst. In September 2003, Tolstoy and Uzbek show jumper Shamil Galimzyanov were married in the Russian Orthodox Cathedral in Bayswater, London. Tolstoy's marriage to Shamil Galimzyanov broke down in 2009, shortly after the birth of a baby boy, Alexei. Tolstoy decided not to return to her former home in Moscow and in April 2009 established herself with her son at a house in Chelsea. In June 2009, she was reported to have engaged "highly paid lawyers" to protect her private life. In the summer of 2009, Tolstoy was staying with Russian billionaire  Sergei  Pugachev at a villa in the South of France and was also helping him to find a country estate in England. In December, she acquired a farmhouse near Malvern in Herefordshire for herself. Her distant cousin Alexander Nekrassov broke the news that Pugachev was the father of Tolstoy's son. By 2011, Tolstoy and Pugachev were reported to be a couple, with homes in Monaco, London, and Moscow, but Pugachev, by then living in exile in London, remained married to Galina, with whom he has children and grandchildren. In 2010, the couple had another son, Ivan, and in 2012 a daughter, Maria. In 2013, Galimzyanov complained that Tolstoy was evicting him from the Moscow flat they had lived in together. In 2015, Pugachev moved to the south of France, after facing severe business difficulties in Russia, while Tolstoy remained in London with their children. In 2017, Tolstoy described Pugachev as controlling and feared that he might kidnap the children. In October 2018, she said in an interview that she was a single mother and stated that Pugachev had not supported her or the children financially for three years.
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« Reply #759 on: June 18, 2021, 02:13:51 PM »

Countess Alexandra Constantinovna von Zarnekau (Russian: графиня Александра Константиновна Зарнекау)(10 May 1883 - 28 May 1957) was the eldest daughter of Duke Constantine Petrovich of Oldenburg and his morganatic wife, Princess Agrippina Japaridze, Countess von Zarnekau, previously divorced from Prince Dadiani. At age 16, on 16 February 1900, Countess Alexandra married Prince George Alexandrovich Yuryevsky, the son of Tsar Alexander II by his mistress (and later wife), Ekaterina Mikhailovna Dolgorukova, the Princess Yourievskya. They one child, Prince Alexander Georgievich Yourievsky, who was born 21 December 1900. Alexandra and George divorced in 1908. Countess Alexandra married secondly to Leo Vassilievich Narishkin on 17 October 1908.



Countess Alexandra Schenck von Stauffenberg (?), former wife of Karl Friedrich, Prince of Hohenzollern (given names: Karl Friedrich Emich Meinrad Benedikt Fidelis Maria Michael Gerold)(20 April 1952) They were married from 1985 till 2010 and had 4 children.


Alexandra Vasilievna Zhukovskaya (11 November 1842  – 26 August 1899 ), was a Russian noble and lady in waiting. She was the daughter of Vasily Andreyevich Zhukovsky and Elizabeth von Reutern. She was made maid-of-honour at the Russian Imperial court.
In 1870, Alexandra is alleged to have married a very prominent Russian Royal, Grand Duke Alexei Alexandrovich, the son of Czar Alexander II of Russia. However no proof of such a marriage exists. Even if they were married she would have not been his Grand Duchess as such a marriage did not conform to the laws of the Imperial family. Alexandra and Alexei had one child, a son, Count Alexei Alexandrovich Belevsky-Zhukovsky (1871–1931), He received the title Count Belevsky on 21 March 1884 from his uncle, Emperor Alexander III. In 1901 he added his name of his grandfather on his mother's side. The Grand Duke tried to get a title for her and her son. However, the Emperor, his father refused. He was however able to secure her a title by the Republic of San Marino. She was made on 24 March 1875 Baroness Seggiano.The same year, on 14 December 1875 she married Baron Christian-Henrich von Wohrmann in Munich/Bavaria. This marriage seem to prove that she did not marry the Grand Duke before. No proof of a divorce exists.



Countess Alexandra Alexeevna Belevskya-Zhukovskya (b. 4 March 1899 – 1995), daughter of Count Alexei Alexeevich Belevsky-Zhukovsky (Russian: Алексей Алексеевич Белёвский-Жуковский)( 26 November 1871 – c. 1931 Caucasus) and  Princess Maria Petrovna Troubetskaya (18 June 1872  – 20 March 1954) Count Alexei was the son of Grand Duke Alexei Alexandrovich of Russia and Alexandra Vasilievna, Baroness Seggiano. He was also, being the son of Grand Duke Alexei, a grandson of Alexander II of Russia. It is still rumoured that Alexei's parents married, however that has never been proven. But even if they were married, the marriage was morganatic, because Alexandra was born a "commoner," and not of a royal or formerly sovereign family. When Alexei was born in Salzburg, he was known by his mother's family name. While his father tried to get a Russian title for his son, the Emperor Alexander II refused. However he managed to get a title for mother and son from the Republic of San Marino: on 24. March 1875 they were granted the title Baron Seggiano. Alexandra married the same year the Baron Christian-Henrich von Wohrmann. This might be taken as an indication that there was no marriage to the Grand Duke as she could have done so only after a divorce. No records exist of such a divorce. Only after Alexander II had been murdered and Alexander III had become Emperor, the Grand Duke succeed to have his son created a Count. The title granted was on 21. March 1884 was Count Belevsky. The name was chosen from the village of Belyov in the province of Toula where his grandfather poet was born. In 1913 he was granted the right to add his grandfather's family name to his title just becoming Count Belevsky-Zhukovsky. Countess Alexandra married twice and had no children.


Countess Alexandra Olga Eugénia (1884–1963), daughter of Lady Mary Victoria Douglas-Hamilton, also known as Mary Victoria Hamilton (11 December 1850 – 14 May 1922) and her 2nd husband Prince Tasziló Festetics de Tolna (5 May 1850 – 4 May 1933). Her mother Mary had previously been married to  Prince Albert, only child and heir apparent of Charles III, Prince of Monaco.


Countess Alexandra Nikolaevna Ignatieff, Princess of San Stefano (Russian: Александра Николаевна Игнатьева, Aleksandra Nikolayevna Ignatyeva)(8 February 1939) is the daughter of Count Nikolay Leonidovich Ignatyev and Countess Yolande Durieu de Souzy. She was born in Paris and lived in the Château de Nançay. As the eldest of the elder branch descending from Count Nikolay Pavlovich Ignatyev, she is the current matriarch of the Ignatyev family


Countess Alexandra Branitskaya née von Engelhardt (Russian: Александра Васильевна Браницкая, Polish: Aleksandra Branicka [Braɲit͡ska])( 1754 – 15 September 1838), also known as Sanecka and Countess Branicka, was a leading Russian courtier. She was the niece, confidante, and possibly lover, of Grigory Potemkin, and Catherine the Great's favourite lady-in-waiting. She was one of the most notable socialites at the Russian Imperial court during Catherine's reign, and was conspicuously treated as a virtual member of the Imperial family. Through her marriage to Branicki she became administrator of the immense estate of Biała Cerkiew in the Kiev Oblast of Ukraine. Officially, she was the daughter of Vasily von Engelhardt and his wife Yelena Marfa, née Potemkin, a sister of Grigory Potemkin, and thus the latter's niece. However, at least one historian has taken a close interest in the gossip swirling around the imperial court at the time of her birth. One theory was that she was the first-born illegitimate child of Catherine with Grigory Potemkin.According to an alternative account, she was Catherine's daughter by Count Sergey Saltykov and that on learning of her arrival, tsarina Elizabeth had her swiftly substituted for a handy male neonate of Estonian parentage, who eventually grew up to be Tsar Paul, Catherine's son and heir. Other historians are more dismissive of the gossip. Even as Alexandra was rumoured to be Catherine's own daughter, they nevertheless repeat that it was merely a claim that Alexandra was the first-born who had been switched with the son of a Kalmyk woman on account of her sex, since a male heir was preferred. Alexandra was introduced to the Russian court with her five sisters and her brother in 1775. They arrived as uneducated and ignorant, but Alexandra was soon given a sophisticated polish and made to be the most favoured woman at the Russian court.They were appointed maid of honour, and Alexandra was in 1777 promoted to the honorary rank of chief maid of honour. She in particular along with her sisters were treated almost as a part of the Imperial family. They were regarded almost as "Grand Duchesses" and "jewels" of the Russian court. Potemkin gave them large dowries and had Catherine appoint them ladies-in-waiting. They were alleged to be the courtesans of their "uncle", which was one of the most riveting and scandalous subjects of gossip of the age. His first mistress from their midst was Varvara. However, after her marriage in 1779, her sister, Alexandra was selected to be her successor. Alexandra was the eldest of the sisters introduced at court. She was described as ignorant and uneducated, but also as intelligent and willful, and with a magnificent and confident manner and a haughty personality which effectively hid her lack of education. In 1781 she married the Polish noble, Franciszek Ksawery Branicki. The marriage had been strategically arranged to create a Russian bridgehead into Poland. After marriage, she could no longer keep her position as maid of honour, which was reserved for unmarried women, but was promoted to the rank of lady-in-waiting, and thus was able to continue to attend court. Her marriage was described as harmonious. While her spouse lacked any sense of financial restraint and frequently amassed huge and ruinous debts, these were never a problem, since Alexandra was by contrast a shrewd businesswoman. She made millions by trading in wheat and timber from her estates, and so was able to meet her husband's endless debts. She had five children, including, Władysław Grzegorz Branicki, Zofia Branicka and Elżbieta Branicka – Pushkin's secret love. She was considered the most intimate confidante and friend of Potemkin after Catherine, and his favourite among his nieces. Their alleged sexual relationship ended in 1779 when she was replaced by her sister, Yekaterina, with whom he went on to have an on-and-off relationship for the rest of his life; but the intimate friendship between Aleksandra and Potemkin continued. In 1791, she expressed the wish that Potemkin should be the next king of Poland. Likewise, for many years, there were rumours in Poland that Potemkin had plans to make her children heirs to the Polish throne. She nursed Potemkin during his final illness. Then Potemkin died in her arms. She is said to have "inherited" the actual marriage certificate of Potemkin and Catherine.


Countess Alexandra Dagmar Frances Marie Margrethe of Rosenborg (5 February 1927 – 5 October 1992), daughter of Prince Erik, Count of Rosenborg (Erik Frederik Christian Alexander)( 8 November 1890 – 10 September 1950) and Canadian Lois Frances Booth (2 August 1897 –26 February 1941). She married in Copenhagen on 2 May 1951 to Ivar Emil Vind-Röj (5 January 1921 – 11 February 1977), Master of the Royal Hunt, son of Ove Holger Christian Vind, Royal Danish Chamberlain, by his wife, Elsa Mimi Adelaide Marie Oxholm (of Danish nobility)

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« Reply #760 on: June 18, 2021, 02:14:40 PM »

Princess Alexandra of Hanover (1959), daughter of Ernst August, Hereditary Prince of Brunswick, Prince of Hanover (18 March 1914 – 9 December 1987) and his 1st wife Princess Ortrud of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg (1925–1980) She married Andreas, 8th Prince of Leiningen and had issue.


Princess Christian of Hanover, née Alessandra Lisette de Osma Foy (21 March 1988) is a Peruvian attorney, handbag designer, and former model. She is a member of the Hanoverian royal family through her marriage to Prince Christian of Hanover. Alessandra de Osma was born in San Borja, Lima, Peru. She is daughter of Felipe Juan Luis de Osma Berckemeyer (b. San Isidro, Lima, 25 August 1956), Executive and Central Commercial Manager of Hermes Transportes Blindados, a Peruvian cash management firm, and wife Elizabeth (Liz) María Foy Vásquez, a former model. De Osma met Prince Christian of Hanover in 2005 when she served as his tour guide when he was vacationing in Peru. They started dating in 2011. The couple became engaged in April 2017. They married in a civil ceremony on 25 November 2017 in London. They married religiously in a Catholic ceremony at the Basilica of San Pedro in Lima, Peru, on 16 March 2018. The groom's younger half-sister, Princess Alexandra, served as her bridesmaid. De Osma gave birth to twins on 7 July 2020 (Nicolás and Sofía).



Alexandra Isles (née Moltke)(February 11, 1946) is a former actress and a documentary filmmaker. She is best known for her role as the original Victoria Winters from 1966–68 on the gothic TV serial Dark Shadows. Moltke was born in Uppsala, Sweden in 1946, of Danish and American parentage, the elder of two daughters, to Count Carl Adam Moltke, son of Count Carl Moltke, and Countess Mab Moltke (née Wilson; formerly Wright). In 1967, she married Philip Henry Isles II of the Lehman banking family In 1969, she gave birth to a son, Adam.


Countess Alexandra Constantinovna von Zarnekau (Russian: графиня Александра Константиновна Зарнекау, 10 May 1883 - 28 May 1957) was the eldest daughter of Duke Constantine Petrovich of Oldenburg and his morganatic wife, Princess Agrippina Japaridze, Countess von Zarnekau, previously divorced from Prince Dadiani. At age 16, on 16 February 1900, Countess Alexandra married Prince George Alexandrovich Yuryevsky, the son of Tsar Alexander II by his mistress (and later wife), Ekaterina Mikhailovna Dolgorukova, the Princess Yourievskya. They were married at Nice, France and had one child, Prince Alexander Georgievich Yourievsky, who was born 21 December 1900. Alexandra and George divorced in 1908 Countess Alexandra married secondly to Leo Vassilievich Narishkin on 17 October 1908 at Paris, France.


Countess Alexandra von Merenberg (1869-1950), daughter of  Prince Nikolaus Wilhelm of Nassau (1832-1905) and Natalia Alexandrovna Pushkina (1836-1913).  She married Máximo de Elía y Ramos Mexía (d. 1929). Nikolaus was a son of William, Duke of Nassau and his second wife, Princess Pauline of Württemberg. He was also a younger half-brother of Adolphe, who was deposed by Prussia as last reigning Duke of Nassau in 1866, but succeeded as Grand Duke of Luxembourg in 1890. Natalia was a daughter of Alexander Pushkin, the most renowned Russian writer who ranked, however, only as a dvoryanin; an untitled member of the lower nobility. Therefore, Natalia was created Countess von Merenberg, a title without territory, as she was not legally permitted to share her husband's princely title or rank, even though his family had ceased to be hereditary rulers when the kingdom of Prussia annexed Nassau.

Alexandra Alix Nada Victoria Mountbatten (8 May 1998) daughter of Lord Ivar Alexander Michael Mountbatten, DL (9 March 1963) and Penelope Anne Vere Thompson (17 March 1966). Her parents separated in September 2010 and divorced amicably in November 2011. Although Lord Ivar is not a member of the British royal family proper, he is the first member of the British monarch's extended family openly in a same-sex relationship, and upon marrying his partner James Coyle in 2018 was the first to have a same-sex wedding. Through her father Alexandra is a  great granddaughter of Nadejda Mikhailovna Mountbatten, Marchioness of Milford Haven (née Countess Nadejda de Torby)(28 March 1896 – 22 January 1963), formerly Princess George of Battenberg.


Princess Alexandra Petrovna Golitsyna (Russian: Александра Петровна Голицына, née Протасова)(1774—1842) 1774-1842) was a maid of honour and historian of the Russian noble Protasov family. Sister to Moscow aristocrat and writer Catherine Rostopchin and maid of honour and dame of the Order of Saint Catherine Vera Vasilchikova, she was the mother of five, including Peter Gallitzin, and the grandmother of the Roman Catholic missionary, Demetrius Augustine Gallitzin who published her writing posthumously. Alexandra was the daughter of a senator, Lieutenant-General Pyotr Stepanovich Protasov (1730 - 1794), and his wife Anna Ivanovna (1750 - 1782). She and her four sisters were orphaned early in life and were raised by their aunt, Anna Protasov, a chambermaid of some note, and a personal friend of the Empress Catherine II, who was under the care of Madame de Pont. Protasov gave her nieces a great education by the standards of the time: the studies focused on foreign languages, including Latin, Greek, and Russian. They were also taught Russian history and religion. At the request of their aunt, the sisters, one still unmarried at the time of the Coronation of Alexander I of Russia, each received the title of Countess. Alexandra's station in life was elevated to the maid of honour, and in 1791 married the master of the horse, a confidential councilor to Prince Alexei Golitsyn, 1767-1800. Their union was relatively short but produced five children. Nine years into the marriage Alexandra was widowed. The countess officially converted to Catholicism from Russian Orthodoxy on 14 May 1818. Her conversion influenced her surviving daughter Yelizaveta, who became a nun, and two of her sons, who became missionaries. Alexandra also influenced a few others from the Russian nobility to convert to Catholicism. Golitsyna censured Madame Swetchine, who was known to be a mystic, only for the fact that she lived abroad, due to Golitsyna's belief that true religion was to serve at home in Russia.
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