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« Reply #1200 on: June 16, 2022, 05:06:57 PM »

Irmgard is a feminine German given name.


Irmgard of Berg, heiress of Berg (died 1248–1249), was the child of Adolf VI count of Berg (1185–1218) and Berta von Sayn.She married in 1217 Henry IV, Duke of Limburg (since 1226), who became count of Berg in 1225. Henry IV of Limburg-Berg died on 25 Feb 1246; their descendants were counts of Berg, the county of Berg leaving the descendance of the Ezzonen.


Irmgard of Chiemsee (German: Selige Irmgard, also Irmengard; c. 831/833 – 16 July 866), a member of the Carolingian dynasty, was the second daughter of King Louis the German and his wife Hemma. She was the first abbess of Frauenwörth abbey from 857 until her death.


Irmgard of Cleves (also known as Irmengard von Kleve) was the wife of John IV, Lord of Arkel. Born in 1307, she was the only daughter of Otto, Count of Cleves and his wife, Mechteld von Virneburg. Her father, Count Otto died shortly after her birth.In 1327, Irmgard married John IV, Lord of Arkel, the son of John III, Lord of Arkel and his wife, Mabelia of Voorne. The marriage of Irmgard and John brought a lot of prestige for the van Arkel family.John and Irmgard had four children.


Saint Irmgardis, Saint Irmgard of Süchteln (1000 - † 1065 or 1082/1089, Cologne, Germany) was a medieval saint and sovereign Countess Irmgardis of Aspel (Germany) in 1013–1085. Her relics are preserved in sarcophagus in the altar of Cologne Cathedral.Also known as Saint Irmgardis of Köln, the sources show her as Reigning Countess, and after her parents died, she distributed her wealth among hospitals, churches and social institutions. She lived a simple life in solitude and went on three pilgrimages to Rome. She spent her last years in Köln, where she supported Chapters and Convents. Her feast day is 4 September.


Princess Irmingard Maria Therese José Cäcilia Adelheid Michaela Antonia Adelgunde of Bavaria (21 September 1902 – 21 April 1903); died of diphtheria. Daughter of Rupprecht, Crown Prince of Bavaria and his first wife Duchess Marie Gabriele in Bavaria (9 October 1878 – 24 October 1912)

Princess Irmingard of Bavaria (29 May 1923 – 23 October 2010) was the daughter of Rupprecht, Crown Prince of Bavaria and his second wife, Princess Antonia of Luxembourg. She was a half-sister of Albrecht, Duke of Bavaria. On 20 July 1950, Irmingard married her first cousin Prince Ludwig of Bavaria (22 June 1913 in Munich — 17 October 2008 in Leutstetten), son of Prince Franz of Bavaria and Princess Isabella Antonie of Cro˙. The civil wedding took place at Leutstetten, and the religious ceremony followed a day later at Schloss Nymphenburg in Munich. The couple had three children


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« Reply #1201 on: June 16, 2022, 05:22:01 PM »

Hilda is one of several female given names derived from the name Hild, formed from Old Norse hildr, meaning 'battle'. Hild, a Nordic-German Bellona, was a Valkyrie who conveyed fallen warriors to Valhalla. Warfare was often called Hild's Game.The name became rare in England during the later Middle Ages, but was revived in the 19th century. In Sweden it has been in use since the late 18th century, being a popular name throughout the 19th century. Hilde is a variant of Hilda. Another variation on Hild is Hildur. Ildikó is a Hungarian feminine given name of Germanic origin; its original Germanic version is Ilda or Hilda. Its meaning is "battle" or "warrior" in ancient Germanic languages. Its medieval Latin version was Ildico, which the Hungarians adopted as Ildikó.


Princess Hilda Charlotte Wilhelmine of Nassau (5 November 1864 – 8 February 1952) was the last Grand Duchess of Baden.She was the daughter of Adolphe, Grand Duke of Luxembourg, who was Duke of Nassau until he was deposed in 1866 and his second wife Princess Adelheid-Marie of Anhalt-Dessau.Hilda married Frederick II, Grand Duke of Baden on 20 September 1885 at Schloss Hohenburg. The marriage did not produce surviving children. The couple became Grand Duke and Grand Duchess in 1907. Hilda was described as intelligent and interested in art, and was often present at art-exhibitions and museums. Several schools and streets, such as the schools Hilda-Gymnasium in Pforzheim, Hilda-Gymnasium in Koblenz, and the streets north- and south Hilda Promenade in Karlsruhe are named after her.Frederick and Hilda were deposed as Grand Duke and Grand Duchess of Baden, in 1918 when all German monarchies were overthrown. At the time of the revolution, her sister-in-law, Queen Victoria of Sweden, was visiting the family. After the abdication of the German emperor, riots spread in Karlsruhe on 11 November. The son of a courtier led a group of soldiers up to the front of the palace, followed by a great crowd of people, where a few shots were fired.  Hilda, as well as the rest of the family, left the palace the back way and left for the Zwingenberg palace in the Neckar valley. By permission of the new government, they were allowed to stay at the Langenstein Palace, which belonged to a Swedish count, Douglas.  The government gave the order that the former grand ducal family was to be protected, and that Langenstein be excepted from housing the returning soldiers, because the Queen of Sweden was in their company, and Baden should not do anything to offend Sweden. In 1919, the family requested permission from the government to reside in Mainau, and was told that they were now private citizens and could do as they wished. Hilda is described as a jolly and cheerful character with the ability to ease things up with her good sense of humor, an ability she used during the revolution and the years after, taking care of her husband whose health was weak.As Frederick and Hilda were without own direct heirs, they bequeathed their castle of Mainau to Frederick's only sister's grandson, Count Lennart Bernadotte, who was also a great-grandson of Hilda's aunt.


Princess Hilda of Luxembourg (French: Hilda Sophie Marie Adélaďde Wilhelmine de Nassau-Weilburg, Princesse de Luxembourg)(15 February 1897– 8 September 1979) was a Princess of Luxembourg by birth and the Princess of Schwarzenberg by marriage.Hilda was the third daughter of William IV, Grand Duke of Luxembourg, and his wife, Infanta Marie Anne of Portugal.[citation needed] Her two eldest sisters reigned as sovereign Grand Duchess of Luxembourg and titular Duchess of Nassau: Marie-Adélaďde and Charlotte.Princess Hilda married with Adolf, 10th Prince of Schwarzenberg (18 August 1890 – 27 February 1950) in Berg Castle on 29 October 1930.They did not have children.


Princess Hilda Hildegard Marie Gabriele of Bavaria (24 March 1926 – 5 May 2002), daughter of Rupprecht, Crown Prince of Bavaria and his second wife Princess Antonia of Luxembourg. She married Juan Bradstock Edgart Lockett de Loayza on 12 February 1949. They had four children.


Ildikó Mária Walburga of Austria (Hilda Maria Walburga)(6 June 2002), daughter of Archduke Georg von Habsburg (16 December 1964) and Duchess Eilika of Oldenburg (22 August 1972).


Hilda Madeline Gordon-Lennox, Duchess of Richmond DBE FRHS JP (née Brassey)( 16 June 1872 – 29 December 1971) was the daughter of Henry Brassey and Anna Harriet Stevenson (died 15 July 1898), and granddaughter of the railway pioneer Thomas Brassey. She was known as Lady Settrington from 1893 to 1903, and as Countess of March from 1903 to 1928, when her husband inherited the dukedom.On 8 June 1893 Hilda Madeline Brassey married Charles Henry Gordon-Lennox, the 8th Duke of Richmond (born 30 December 1870 – died 7 May 1935). They had 5 children.

Lady Hilda Madeline Britten-Jones (née Fisher) (1892-1965) was born in South Australia. She was the South Australian amateur Champion between 1921 and 1929.

Hilda Runciman, Viscountess Runciman of Doxford (28 September 1869 – 28 October 1956) was a British Liberal Party politician. A daughter of James Cochran Stevenson, a Liberal Member of Parliament for South Shields, Hilda Stevenson was educated at Notting Hill High School and Girton College, Cambridge, where she took first class honours in the History Tripos. In 1898 she married Walter Runciman, a rising politician. They had two sons and three daughters, including Leslie Runciman, 2nd Viscount Runciman of Doxford, Margaret Fairweather, one of the first eight women pilots in the Air Transport Auxiliary, and historian Steven Runciman.In 1937 her husband became Viscount Runciman of Doxford, and she was styled as Viscountess Runciman of Doxford.


Ildico (fl. AD 453) was the last wife of the Hunnic ruler Attila. Her name is probably Germanic, a diminutive form of the noun *hildaz ("battle"), a common element in Germanic female names (e.g. Svanhildr, Brynhildr and Gunnhildr), and Hildr ("battle") was the name of a Valkyrie. Her name is thus reconstructed as *Hildiko ("little Hildr"), and it is probably preserved in *Grímhild or *Krēmhild, the name of Ildiko's later legendary version.According to Priscus, Attila died after the feast celebrating their marriage in 453 AD, in which he suffered a severe nosebleed and choked to death in a stupor.


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« Reply #1202 on: June 16, 2022, 06:00:03 PM »

Nicholas is a male given name and a surname. The Eastern Orthodox Church, the Roman Catholic Church, and the Anglican Churches celebrate Saint Nicholas every year on December 6, which is the name day for "Nicholas". In Greece, the name and its derivatives are especially popular in maritime regions, as St. Nicholas is considered the protector saint of seafarers. The name is derived from the Greek name Νικόλαος (Nikolaos), understood to mean 'victory of the people', being a compound of νίκη nikē 'victory' and λαός laos 'people'. An ancient paretymology of the latter is that originates from λᾶς las (contracted form of λᾶας laas) meaning 'stone' or 'rock',as in Greek mythology, Deucalion and Pyrrha recreated the people after they had vanished in a catastrophic deluge, by throwing stones behind their shoulders while they kept marching on.The name became popular through Saint Nicholas, Bishop of Myra in Lycia, the inspiration for Santa Claus, but it predates said Bishop by several centuries: the Athenian historian Thucydides for example, mentions that in the second year of the Peloponnesian War (431–404 BC) between Sparta and Athens, the Spartans sent a delegation to the Persian king to ask for his help to fight the Athenians; a certain Nikolaos was one of the delegates.


Nicholas I (Russian: Никола́й I Па́влович, tr. Nikoláy I Pávlovich, IPA: [nʲɪkɐˈlaj ˈpʲervɨj ˈpavləvʲɪtɕ]; 6 July [O.S. 25 June] 1796 – 2 March [O.S. 18 February] 1855) reigned as Emperor of Russia, King of Poland and Grand Duke of Finland from 1825 until his death in 1855. He was the third son of Paul I and younger brother of his predecessor, Alexander I. Nicholas inherited his brother's throne despite the failed Decembrist revolt against him. He is mainly remembered in history as a reactionary whose controversial reign was marked by geographical expansion, economic growth, and massive industrialisation on the one hand, and centralisation of administrative policies and repression of dissent on the other. Nicholas had a happy marriage that produced a large family; all of their seven children survived childhood.Nicholas was born at Gatchina Palace in Gatchina to Grand Duke Paul, and Grand Duchess Maria Feodorovna of Russia (née Sophie Dorothea of Württemberg). Five months after his birth, his grandmother, Catherine the Great, died and his parents became emperor and empress of Russia. He was a younger brother of Emperor Alexander I of Russia, who succeeded to the throne in 1801, and of Grand Duke Constantine Pavlovich of Russia. On 13 July 1817, Nicholas married Princess Charlotte of Prussia (1798–1860), who thereafter went by the name Alexandra Feodorovna when she converted to Orthodoxy. Charlotte's parents were Frederick William III of Prussia and Louise of Mecklenburg-Strelitz. Nicholas and Charlotte were third cousins, as they were both great-great-grandchildren of Frederick William I of Prussia.With two older brothers, it initially seemed unlikely Nicholas would ever become tsar. However, as Alexander and Constantine both failed to produce legitimate sons, Nicholas remained likely to rule one day. In 1825, when Alexander I died suddenly of typhus, Nicholas was caught between swearing allegiance to Constantine and accepting the throne for himself. The interregnum lasted until Constantine, who was in Warsaw at that time, confirmed his refusal. Additionally, on 25 (13 Old Style) December, Nicholas issued the manifesto proclaiming his accession to the throne. That manifesto retroactively named 1 December (19 November Old Style), the date of Alexander I's death, as the beginning of his reign. During this confusion, a plot was hatched by some members of the military to overthrow Nicholas and seize power. This led to the Decembrist Revolt on 26 (14 Old Style) December 1825, an uprising Nicholas was successful in quickly suppressing.


Grand Duke Nicholas Nikolaevich of Russia (Russian: Великий князь Николай Николаевич)(8 August 1831 – 25 April 1891) was the third son and sixth child of Tsar Nicholas I of Russia and Alexandra Feodorovna. He may also be referred to as Nicholas Nikolaevich the Elder to tell him apart from his son, Grand Duke Nicholas Nikolaevich of Russia (1856–1929). Trained for the military, as a Field Marshal he commanded the Russian army of the Danube in the Russo-Turkish War, 1877–1878.Nicholas Nicolaievich unwillingly married his second cousin Grand Duchess Alexandra Petrovna, formerly Princess Alexandra of Oldenburg (1838–1900), whose paternal grandmother was a daughter of Emperor Paul I. The wedding took place in St Petersburg on 6 February 1856. Alexandra was plain and unsophisticated and the couple soon found out that they had little in common. They had two children The marriage was in trouble from the start and four years later, Nicholas developed a permanent relationship with Catherine Chislova, a dancer from the Krasnoye Selo Theater. Their affair was quite open and they had five children. Nicholas Nicolaievich was in Cannes with his two sons when his brother Alexander II was assassinated, returning immediately to Russia in March 1881. The ascension to the Russian throne of his nephew, Alexander III, marked the beginning of the Grand Duke's steady decline. Alexander III did not have any special sympathy for his uncle and Nicholas Nicholaievich was resolutely deprived of all his influence. His authority suffered even further when he was involved in fraudulent military requisitions. When the Grand Duke tried to explain his actions to the Nouvelle Revue of Paris 1880, he indiscreetly attacked government officials and military commanders and eventually was removed from his post. Alexander III also criticized his uncle's extramarital affairs.By then, Nicholas Nicholaievich was living openly with his mistress. His wife left him for good in 1881 and moved to Kiev, but the Grand Duchess refused to grant the divorce he wanted. The couple's adult sons took their mother’s side in the family breakup, but continued to live at the palace and confronted Catherine once she was waiting for their father in the Palace he shared with his wife. Catherine Chislova nagged Nicholas to provide for her and their children, he soon became financially embarrassed and had to mortgage Nicholas Palace in St. Petersburg. In 1882, Nicholas Nicolaievich was put under supervision due to the squandering of his fortune; he lived as a private gentleman in a modest house.Grand Duke Nicholas Nicolaievich, unable to get a divorce, hoped to survive his wife and then marry his mistress, but it was Catherine Chislova who died unexpectedly in Crimea while Grand Duchess Alexandra Petrovna would survive him by nine years. Shortly after his mistress' death, Nicholas went mad; he had oral cancer that spread to his brain. Suffering from delusion, he was convinced that all women were in love with him. During one ballet performance, the Grand Duke even attacked a young male dancer that he took to be a woman. In 1890, Nicholas Nicolaievich was declared insane and kept locked indoors in Crimea. He died in Alupka, Crimea on 25 April 1891. The Grand Duke's reputation at the imperial court was low and his death was not deeply felt. He had squandered all his tremendous wealth and his palace was immediately sold to cancel his massive debts


Grand Duke Nicholas Nikolaevich of Russia (Russian: Николай Николаевич Романов (младший – the younger))(18 November 1856 – 5 January 1929) was a Russian general in World War I (1914–1918). The son of Grand Duke Nicholas Nikolaevich of Russia (1831–1891), and a grandson of Emperor Nicholas I of Russia, he was commander in chief of the Imperial Russian Army units on the main front in the first year of the war, during the reign of his first cousin once removed, Nicholas II. A very tall man (1.98m / 6' 6"), Nicholas, named after his paternal grandfather, the emperor, was born as the eldest son to Grand Duke Nicholas Nicolaevich of Russia (1831–1891) and Alexandra Petrovna of Oldenburg (1838–1900) on 18 November 1856.His father was the sixth child and third son born to Nicholas I of Russia and his Empress consort Alexandra Fedorovna of Prussia (1798–1860). Alexandra Fedorovna was a daughter of Frederick William III of Prussia and Louise of Mecklenburg-Strelitz On 29 April 1907, Nicholas married Princess Anastasia of Montenegro (1869–1935), the daughter of King Nicholas I, and sister of Princess Milica, who had married Nicholas's brother, Grand Duke Peter. They had no children. She had previously been married to George Maximilianovich, 6th Duke of Leuchtenberg, by whom she had two children, until their divorce in 1906. Since the Montenegrins were a fiercely Slavic, anti-Turkish people from the Balkans, Anastasia reinforced the Pan-Slavic tendencies of Nicholas.


Nicholas Romanovich Romanov (Russian: Николай Романович Романов; 26 September 1922 – 15 September 2014) was a claimant to the headship of the House of Romanov and president of the Romanov Family Association. Although undoubtedly a descendant of Tsar Nicholas I of Russia, his claimed titles and official membership in the former Imperial House were disputed by those who maintained that his parents' marriage violated the laws of Imperial Russia. Prince Nicholas was born in Cap d'Antibes near Antibes, France, the eldest son of Prince Roman Petrovich and his wife Princess Praskovia Dmitrievna (née Countess Sheremeteva). Prince Nicholas had a younger brother, Prince Dimitri Romanovich. Their father Prince Roman Petrovich was the only son of Grand Duke Peter Nicolaievich and Grand Duchess Militsa Nikolaievna (née Princess of Montenegro). His grandfather was the younger son of Grand Duke Nicholas Nikolaevich and Grand Duchess Alexandra Petrovna (née Duchess of Oldenburg). His great grandfather Nicholas Nikolaevich was a younger son of Emperor Nicholas I of Russia and Empress Alexandra Fyodorovna (née Princess Charlotte of Prussia) and founded the Nikolaevichi branch of the Russian Imperial Family.In 1950, Prince Nicholas and the Countess Sveva della Gherardesca (b. 15 July 1930), daughter of Count Walfred della Gherardesca and Nicoletta de Piccolellis, met at a party in Rome. Sveva is a member of the Italian della Gherardesca noble family from Tuscany and a direct descendant of Count Ugolino della Gherardesca. They were married in Florence in a civil ceremony on 31 December 1951 followed by a religious ceremony on 21 January 1952 in the Russian Cathedral at Cannes. They had 3 daughters.


Nicholas Nikolaevich Nikolaev (1875–1902), son of Catherine Gavrilovna Chislova (Russian: Екатерина Гавриловна Числова) (21 September 1846 – 13 December 1889) and Grand Duke Nicholas Nikolaevich of Russia (Russian: Великий князь Николай Николаевич)( 8 August 1831 – 25 April 1891)


Nicholas, 4th Duke of Leuchtenberg (4 August 1843 - 6 January 1891) son of Grand Duchess Maria Nikolaevna of Russia (1819–1876) and Maximilian de Beauharnais, 3rd Duke of Leuchtenberg. married Nadeshda Sergeevna Annenkova (1840–1891) they had two sons, Nicholas (1868–1928) and George (1872–1929)


Nicholas of Leuchtenberg (1868 - 1928) son of Nicholas, 4th Duke of Leuchtenberg and Nadeshda Sergeevna Annenkova


Grand Duke Nicholas Constantinovich of Russia (14 February 1850 – 26 January 1918) was the first-born son of Grand Duke Konstantin Nikolayevich and Grand Duchess Alexandra Iosifovna of Russia and a grandson of Nicholas I of Russia. He had an affair with a notorious American woman Fanny Lear. In a scandal related to this affair, he stole three valuable diamonds from the revetment of one of the most valuable family icons. He was declared insane and he was banished to Tashkent He lived for many years under constant supervision in the area around Tashkent in the southeastern Russian Empire (now Uzbekistan) and made a great contribution to the city by using his personal fortune to help improve the local area. In 1890 he ordered the building of his own palace in Tashkent to house and show his large and very valuable collection of works of art and the collection is now the center of the state Museum of Arts of Uzbekistan. He was also famous in Tashkent as a competent engineer and irrigator, constructing two large canals, the Bukhar-aryk (which was poorly aligned and soon silted up) and the much more successful Khiva-Aryk, later extended to form the Emperor Nicholas I Canal, irrigating 12,000 desyatinas, 33,000 acres (134 km˛) of land in the Hungry Steppe between Djizak and Tashkent. Most of this was then settled with Slavic peasant colonisers Nikolai had a number of children by different women. One of his grandchildren, Natalia Androsova, died in Moscow in 1999.


Nicholas Nikolayevich Wolinsky (11 December 1875 – 30 December 1913) son of Grand Duke Nicholas Constantinovich of Russia and Alexandra Abasa (1855–4 Nov 1894)


Nicholas (d. 1922) son of Grand Duke Nicholas Constantinovich of Russia and unknown mistress.


Nicholas George Brandram (23 April 1982);he married Katrina Davis on 10 September 2011 and they divorced in 2014. In 2022, he married Sophie Amelia Ferguson (b. 1992). He is the son of Paul Brandram (1 April 1948 – 9 May 2020) and Jennifer Diane Steele. A paternal grandson of Princess Katherine of Greece and Denmark


Prince Nicholas of Greece and Denmark (Greek: Νικόλαος)(22 January 1872 – 8 February 1938), of the Glücksburg branch of the House of Oldenburg, was the fourth child and third son of George I of Greece, and of Queen Olga. He was known as "Greek Nicky" within the family to distinguish him from his cousin Emperor Nicholas II of Russia (first cousin on the paternal side and second cousin on the maternal side). Prince Nicholas was a talented painter, often signing his works as "Nicolas Leprince." He married Grand Duchess Elena Vladimirovna of Russia (1882–1957), daughter of Grand Duke Vladimir Alexandrovich of Russia and Marie of Mecklenburg-Schwerin, the only sister of the future Russian imperial pretender, Grand Duke Cyril Vladimirovich, and his second cousin through his mother Olga Constantinovna of Russia and her father Vladimir Alexandrovich of Russia, on 29 August 1902 in Tsarskoye Selo, Russia. They had three daughters


Prince Nikola of Yugoslavia (29 June 1928 – 12 April 1954), also known in Britain as Prince Nicholas and in Serbia as Nikola Karađorđević (Serbian Cyrillic: Никола Карађорђевић), was the younger son of Prince Paul of Yugoslavia by his wife Princess Olga of Greece and Denmark.Known as "Nicky". He died of a road accident in the UK.


Nicholas Augustus Roxburgh Balfour (b. 6 June 1970), son of Princess Elisabeth of Yugoslavia and her 2nd husband  Neil Balfour of Dawyck (born 1944) He married Jonkvrouw Stéphanie de Brouwer (b. 1971) in 2000. They have four daughters


Lord Nicholas Charles Edward Jonathan Windsor (born 25 July 1970) is a relative of the British royal family, youngest child of Prince Edward, Duke of Kent. As a Catholic convert, he has forfeited his right of succession to the throne.Lord Nicholas Windsor was born on 25 July 1970 at King's College Hospital in Denmark Hill, London, to Prince Edward, Duke of Kent and Katharine, Duchess of Kent.Windsor's mother, Katharine, Duchess of Kent, had been received into the Catholic Church in 1994, and in 2001, in a private ceremony, Nicholas himself was also received into the Catholic Church. This meant that he forfeited his right of succession to the British throne under the terms of the Act of Settlement 1701.Windsor met his future wife, Paola Doimi de Lupis Frankopan Šubić Zrinski,[4] at a party in New York City in 1999 to mark the Millennium. He became engaged to her in July 2006. Following a civil ceremony on 19 October 2006 in a London register office,[4] the couple had a religious marriage on 4 November 2006 in the Church of St Stephen of the Abyssinians in the Vatican and by the marriage the bride became Lady Nicholas Windsor. As required by the Royal Marriages Act 1772, the Queen of the United Kingdom consented to the marriage. A House of Commons Early Day Motion welcomed "the first overt marriage within the rites of the Catholic Church of a member of the Royal Family since the reign of Queen Mary I, and the first marriage of a member of the Royal Family to take place within the Vatican City State".Lord and Lady Nicholas Windsor had their first child, a son, Albert Louis Philip Edward Windsor, on 22 September 2007 at the Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, London. Albert is the eighth grandchild for the Duke and Duchess of Kent. The child is the first Windsor to carry the name Albert since King George VI. An Early Day Motion in the House of Commons welcomed the baptism of Albert as the first royal child to be baptised a Catholic since 1688. Albert was baptised on 20 February 2008 in a Catholic ceremony held in the Queen's Chapel adjoining St James's Palace in London.Lady Nicholas gave birth to the couple's second child, Leopold Ernest Augustus Guelph Windsor, on 8 September 2009 at the Chelsea and Westminster Hospital. Leopold was baptised by Cardinal Angelo Comastri in St. Peter's Basilica in the Vatican on 29 May 2010. A third son, Louis Arthur Nicholas Felix Windsor, was born on 27 May 2014 at the Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, London


Prince Nikola of Yugoslavia (born 15 March 1958), son of Princess Margarita of Baden (14 July 1932 – 15 January 2013) and Prince Tomislav of Yugoslavia (19 January 1928 – 12 July 2000)


Grand Duke Nicholas Mikhailovich of Russia (Russian: Великий князь Никола́й Миха́йлович; 26 April [O.S. 14 April] 1859 – 28 January 1919) was the eldest son of Grand Duke Michael Nikolaevich of Russia and a first cousin of Alexander III.


Nicholas Harold Phillips (23 August 1947 – 1 March 1991), son of Georgina, Lady Kennard (née Wernher; formerly Phillips; 17 October 1919 – 28 April 2011)  and her first husband  Lt.-Col. Harold Phillips (1909–1980). He is in maternal line a grandson of Countess Anastasia Mikhailovna de Torby


Lord Nicholas Edward Hamilton (born 5 July 1979); son of Alexandra Phillips and James Hamilton, 5th Duke of Abercorn He married Tatiana Kronberg on 30 August 2009, had issue  His mother is a granddaughter of Countess Anastasia Mikhailovna de Torby


Prince Nicholas Rostislavovich (9 September 1945 – 9 November 2000), son of Prince Rostislav Alexandrovich of Russia (24 November [O.S. 11 November] 1902 – 31 July 1978) and his 2nd wife Alice Eilken (30 May 1923 – 21 October 1996)


Nicholas II or Nikolai II Alexandrovich Romanov (18 May [O.S. 6 May] 1868 – 17 July 1918), known in the Russian Orthodox Church as Saint Nicholas the Passion-Bearer,[e] was the last Emperor of Russia, King of Congress Poland and Grand Duke of Finland, ruling from 1 November 1894 until his abdication on 15 March 1917. During his reign, Nicholas gave support to the economic and political reforms promoted by his prime ministers, Sergei Witte and Pyotr Stolypin. He advocated modernization based on foreign loans and close ties with France, but resisted giving the new parliament (the Duma) major roles. Ultimately, progress was undermined by Nicholas's commitment to autocratic rule, strong aristocratic opposition and defeats sustained by the Russian military in the Russo-Japanese War and World War I. By March 1917, public support for Nicholas had collapsed and he was forced to abdicate the throne, thereby ending the Romanov dynasty's 304-year rule of Russia (1613–1917). He was married to Princess Alix of Hesse, who took the name Alexandra Feodorovna upon conversion to the Russian Orthodox Faith. The couple had 4 daughters and 1 son.
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« Reply #1203 on: June 16, 2022, 06:36:21 PM »

Nikola I Petrović-Njegoš (Serbian Cyrillic: Никола I Петровић-Његош; 7 October [O.S. 25 September] 1841 – 1 March 1921) was the ruler of Montenegro from 1860 to 1918, reigning as prince from 1860 to 1910 and as the country's first and only king from 1910 to 1918. Nikola was born in the village of Njeguši, the home of the reigning House of Petrović. He was the son of Mirko Petrović-Njegoš, a celebrated Montenegrin warrior (an elder brother to Danilo I of Montenegro) and his wife, Anastasija Martinovich (1824-1895). After 1696, when the dignity of vladika, or prince-bishop, became hereditary in the Petrović family, the sovereign power had descended from uncle to nephew, the vladikas belonging to the order of the black clergy (i.e., monastic clergy) who are forbidden to marry. A change was introduced by Danilo I, who declined the episcopal office, married and declared the principality hereditary in the direct male line. Mirko Petrović-Njegoš having renounced his claim to the throne, his son was nominated heir-presumptive, and the old system of succession was thus incidentally continued. In Cetinje, on 8 November 1860,  Prince Nicholas I of Montenegro, then aged 19 married Milena Vukotić then aged 13. They had 12 children.Five of his daughters were married, each to princes and kings, giving Nikola the nickname "the father-in-law of Europe", a sobriquet he shared with the contemporary King of Denmark.


Crown Prince Nicholas of Montenegro (Serbian Cyrillic: Никола Петровић-Његош)(7 July 1944) is a French-born architect and the Head of the House of Petrović-Njegoš, which reigned over Montenegro from 1696 to 1766 and again from 1782 to 1918.Prince Nicholas was born in Saint-Nicolas-du-Pélem at the house of a maternal great aunt in France as the only son and heir of Michael, Prince of Montenegro and his wife Genevičve, Princess of Montenegro, née Prigent (1919–1990), a member of the French resistance Prince Michael was internationally recognised as Montenegro's king-in-exile under a regency headed by his grandmother Queen Milena from 7 March 1921 until 13 July 1922 when international recognition was given for the 1918 annexation of Montenegro by the new Serbian headed kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes. Prince Nicholas' parents were married on 27 January 1941 in Paris.His parents divorced in Paris, France, on 11 August 1949, exactly 5 weeks after his 5th birthday. Genevieve received custody of the young Nicholas and raised him largely as a single mother. Growing up in France, Prince Nicholas barely saw his father and knew very little about Montenegro or his family's history being raised and educated as a Frenchman.In 1967 while a student he visited Montenegro for the first time, upon showing his university ID card the staff bowed upon recognising the Petrovic-Njegos name. News of his visit had spread and by the time he left the museum a crowd of 300 Montenegrins had gathered to greet him.Prince Nicholas succeeded as head of the House of Petrović-Njegoš on the death of his father in 1986 and grew closer to his Montenegrin heritage. In 1989 he received an official invitation to come to Montenegro for the reburial and state funeral of his great grandparents King Nicholas I of Montenegro and Queen Milena and their two daughters, Princess Vera and Princess Xenia On 27 November 1976 in Trébeurden, Côtes-du-Nord, he married Francine Navarro (Casablanca, 27 January 1950 - Paris, 6 August 2008), fashion designer, daughter of Antoine Navarro (Melilla, 29 January 1922 - Marseille, 12 August 1989), who fought in the French Foreign Legion, and wife Rachel Wazana (Casablanca, 19 July 1929), of Moroccan Jewish descent, paternal granddaughter of Francisco Navarro and wife Carmela Padia and maternal granddaughter of Charles Wazana and wife Fanny ... (? - Casablanca, 15 October 1938). They have 2 children.


Nikolai Martynov (born 30 September 2009), son of Princess Altinaď Petrović-Njegoš (Montenegro) (born 27 October 1977) and Anton Martynov.


Prince Nicholas of Romania (Romanian: Principele Nicolae al României; 5 August 1903 – 9 June 1978), later known as Prince Nicholas of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen, was the fourth child and second son of King Ferdinand I of Romania and his wife Queen Marie.In 1927 after the death of his father, Nicholas was appointed as one of the three regents for his minor nephew King Michael I. His position as regent ended in 1930 with the return of his older brother Prince Carol to Romania to take over as King of Romania.In later 1930 he was stripped of his titles and privileges and exiled from the Royal Court, due to King Carol II's disapproval of his marriage. In 1942 after the removal of King Carol II from the throne and King Michael's second reign, Nicholas had also been stripped of his Romanian honours and therefore started using the title of Prince of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen of the house to which he belonged.He died in exile on 9 July 1978 in Madrid, Spain.


Jobst Nikolaus I, Count of Hohenzollern (1433–1488), German nobleman


Baron, later Count Nikolaus Esterházy de Galántha (English: Nicholas Esterházy of Galántha) (8 April 1583 – 11 September 1645) was the founder of the West-Hungarian noble House of Esterházy which became one of the grandest and most influential aristocratic families of the Kingdom of Hungary.Nikolaus's parents were Protestants, and he himself followed them at first, but he subsequently became a Catholic and, along with Cardinal Pázmány, his most serious rival at court, became a pillar of Catholicism, both religiously and politically. At court, he opposed the two great Protestant champions of the period, Gabriel Bethlen and George I Rákóczi. Matthias II made him a baron (1613), count of Bereg (1617), and lord-lieutenant (Hungarian: főispán) of the county of Zólyom and magister curiae regiae (1618).He married in 1612 Baroness Orsolya Dersffy de Szerdahely (1583–1619) and they had 2 children. After his first wife's death, he married in 1624 Baroness Krisztina Nyáry de Bedegh (1604–1641) and had 9 children.


Prince Miklós Antal Esterházy of Galántha (1655–1695), son of Paul I, Prince Esterházy of Galántha (8 September 1635 – 26 March 1713) and his 1st wife and niece Countess Orsolya Esterházy of Galántha.

Nikolaus I, Prince Esterházy (Hungarian: Esterházy I. Miklós, German: Nikolaus I. Joseph Fürst Esterhazy)( 18 December 1714 – 28 September 1790) was a Hungarian prince, a member of the famous Esterházy family. His building of palaces, extravagant clothing, and taste for opera and other grand musical productions led to his being given the title "the Magnificent". He is remembered as the principal employer of the composer Joseph Haydn. On 4 March 1737, he married Freiin Marie Elisabeth, daughter of Reichsgraf (Count of the Holy Roman Empire) Ferdinand von Weissenwolf. They had issue

Nicholas II, Prince Esterházy (Hungarian: Esterházy II. Miklós, German: Nikolaus II Esterházy)( 12 December 1765 – 24 November 1833) was a wealthy Hungarian prince. He served the Austrian Empire and was a member of the famous Esterházy family. He is especially remembered for his art collection and for his role as the last patron of Joseph Haydn.Nikolaus was born in Vienna on 12 December 1765, the son of Prince Anton Esterházy and his first wife, Maria Theresia, Countess Erdödy de Monyorokerek et Monoszlo (1745–1782). His father Anton was the son of Nikolaus I, whom he succeeded as reigning prince on the latter's death in 1790. In 1783, the younger Nikolaus, aged 17, married the 15-year-old Maria Josepha, Princess von und zu Liechtenstein (1768–1845).According to Mraz (2009b), the marriage was not a happy one (see below, "debauchery"). It produced three children: Paul (1786–1866), who succeeded Nikolaus as prince, Leopoldine (1788–1846), and Nikolaus (1799–1844)


Nikolaus Esterházy  (1799–1844) son of Nicholas II, Prince Esterházy and Maria Josepha, Princess von und zu Liechtenstein


Nikolaus III, Prince Esterházy (Hungarian: Esterházy III. Miklós, German: Nikolaus III Esterházy (Regensburg, June 25, 1817 - Vienna, January 28, 1894) was the ninth prince of the Hungarian House of Esterházy.Unlike his ancestors, Nikolaus did not spend his youth in the Schloss Esterháza in Hungary, but in England, where his father, Paul III Anton, Prince Esterházy, was Ambassador for the Austrian Emperor. Nikolaus married Lady Sarah Frederica Caroline Child Villiers (1822–1853), a daughter of George Child Villiers, 5th Earl of Jersey, and his wife the former Lady Sarah Sophia Fane. Lady Jersey was a close friend of his mother Princess Maria Theresia of Thurn and Taxis, who served with her for many years as a patroness of Almack's, the centre of London's social scene. They had three sons, Paul IV, Prince Esterházy (born 1843), Aloys (1844), and Anton (1851). His wife died in 1853.After his return from England, Nikolaus entered into the service of the new Emperor Franz Joseph I of Austria, and accompanied him on his travels through Hungary and Transylvania. Like most of his ancestors, in 1862 he received the Order of the Golden Fleece.In 1866, he succeeded his father, but under very difficult circumstances. In 1865 the Esterházy estates had been placed in the hands of curators until 1898, because of the enormous debts caused by his father's and grandfather's extravagance. Nikolaus was forced to sell the family's collection of paintings to the Kingdom of Hungary, and it still constitutes the core of the collection of the present-day Museum of Fine Arts in Budapest.When he died in 1894 he was succeeded by his eldest son, Paul.


Nikolaus VI Graf Pálffy von Erdőd (1657–1732), Hungarian nobleman known as Miklós Pálffy


Nikolaus, Hereditary Grand Duke of Oldenburg (German: Nikolaus Friedrich Wilhelm von Holstein-Gottorp, Erbgroßherzog von Oldenburg)(10 August 1897 – 3 April 1970) was the eldest son of Frederick Augustus II, Grand Duke of Oldenburg, who was the last ruling Grand Duke of Oldenburg.In 1931, Nikolaus succeeded to his father's titles and assumed the role of pretender to the Grand Duchy, until his death in 1970.Nikolaus was born at Oldenburg, Grand Duchy of Oldenburg, the third child and first son of Frederick Augustus II, Grand Duke of Oldenburg (1852–1931) (son of Peter II, Grand Duke of Oldenburg and Princess Elisabeth of Saxe-Altenburg) and his wife, Duchess Elisabeth Alexandrine of Mecklenburg-Schwerin (1869–1955) (daughter of Frederick Francis II, Grand Duke of Mecklenburg-Schwerin and Princess Marie of Schwarzburg-Rudolstadt).He was a first cousin of Queen Juliana of the Netherlands and with his wife and other family members was a guest at her 1937 wedding to Prince Bernhard of Lippe-Biesterfeld Nikolaus married on 26 October 1921 in Arolsen to Princess Helena of Waldeck and Pyrmont (1899–1948), only daughter of Friedrich, Prince of Waldeck and Pyrmont and his wife, Princess Bathildis of Schaumburg-Lippe. They had issue.


Prince Nikolaus of Liechtenstein (Nikolaus Ferdinand Maria Josef Raphael)(24 October 1947) is a member of the Liechtenstein princely family. He is a younger brother of the reigning Prince of Liechtenstein, Hans-Adam II. He is also the non-resident Ambassador of Liechtenstein to the Holy See Nikolaus was born in Zürich as the third son of Franz Joseph II, Prince of Liechtenstein and of his wife, Countess Georgina of Wilczek.Nikolaus married on 20 March 1982, at Notre Dame Cathedral in Luxembourg, Princess Margaretha of Luxembourg, youngest daughter of Jean, Grand Duke of Luxembourg. For the time being, this is the last dynastically equal marriage between two sovereign houses currently reigning in Europe.They had four children


Prince Nikolaus of Thurn and Taxis (later Nikolaus, Baron of Hochstadt) (German: Nikolaus Prinz von Thurn und Taxis; Nikolaus, Freiherr von Hochstadt) (21 January 1885 – 8 June 1919) was a member of the Princely House of Thurn and Taxis and a Prince of Thurn and Taxis.Nikolaus was born in Athens, Kingdom of Greece, the eldest child and son of Prince Franz of Thurn and Taxis and his wife Countess Theresia Grimaud of Orsay.Nikolaus renounced his princely rights and title of "Prince of Thurn and Taxis" and was subsequently created "Baron of Hochstadt" by Otto of Bavaria on 19 May 1913 His renunciation of his succession rights and title followed his engagement to the Munich actress Carola Reichenberger, the daughter of a foreman of a printing shop Because Reichenberger was "of humbler birth" than Nikolaus, his family objected to the union It was announced that their wedding was scheduled to take place in early August 1913 and the couple wed on 3 August.Following the wedding, Nikolaus and his wife relocated to Texas in the United States


Prince Nikolaus Wilhelm of Nassau (20 September 1832 – 17 September 1905), was the only son of William, Duke of Nassau by his second wife Princess Pauline of Württemberg.He married morganatically in London on 1 July 1868 with Natalia Alexandrovna Pushkina (Saint Petersburg, 4 June 1836 – Cannes, 23 March 1913). She was the youngest child of Alexander Sergeyevich Pushkin and his wife, Natalia Nikolayevna Goncharova, and a descendant of Abram Petrovich Gannibal and Petro Doroshenko, Hetman of Ukrainian Cossacks, in turn grandson of Mykhailo Doroshenko. She was divorced from Russian General Mikhail Leontievich von Dubelt, by whom she had a daughter. In 1868, Prince Nikolaus Wilhelm's sister Princess Helena of Nassau's husband George Victor, Prince of Waldeck and Pyrmont granted Natalia the title Countess von Merenberg.They had 3 children


Count Georg Nikolaus von Merenberg (13 February 1871 – 31 May 1948); son of Prince Nikolaus Wilhelm of Nassau and Natalia Alexandrovna Pushkina He married firstly on 12 May 1895 in Nice, Princess Olga Alexandrovna Yurievskaya (St. Petersburg, 8 November 1873 – Wiesbaden, 10 August 1925), daughter of Alexander II of Russia and his morganatic second wife, Princess Ekaterina Mikhailovna Dolgorukova, and had issue; married, secondly, on 2 January 1930 in Wiesbaden, Adelheid Moran-Brambeer (Wiesbaden, 18 October 1875 – Zürich, 12 May 1942), no issue


Georg Nikolaus von Rintelen (29 June 1970); son of Countess Elisabeth Clothilde von Merenberg (b. Wiesbaden, 14 May 1941) and  Enno von Rintelen (b. Berlin, 9 November 1921 - 16 October 2013). He married on 30 May 2007 Olivia Minninger (b. Köln, 27 August 1969), and had issue


Nicolai von Rintelen (17 November 2006) son of Georg Nikolaus von Rintelen and Olivia Minninger


Prince Nicolas of Belgium (13 December 2005), son of Prince Laurent of Belgium and Claire Coombs. Twin of prince  Aymeric.


Monsieur d'Orléans (16 April 1607 – 17 November 1611) was the second son and fourth child of Henry IV of France and his consort, Marie de' Medici. Commonly ascribed the names Nicolas or Nicolas Henri and the title Duke of Orléans, he was neither baptised nor invested as such during the course of his short life.


Prince Nikolaos of Greece and Denmark (Greek: Νικόλαος)(October 1, 1969) is the third child of Constantine II and Anne-Marie of Denmark, who were the last King and Queen of Greece, reigning from 1964 to 1973.Nikolaos's engagement to Tatiana Ellinka Blatnik, with whom he had been in a long term relationship, was announced on 28 December 2009, by the office of King Constantine in London. The couple married in the Orthodox Church of St. Nicholas, Spetses, Greece on August 25, 2010. No issue


Prince Nicolas Paul Gustaf, Duke of Ĺngermanland,(15 June 2015), 2nd child and only son of Princess Madeleine of Sweden and Chris O'Neil


Prince Nikolai of Denmark, Count of Monpezat (Nikolai William Alexander Frederik)(28 August 1999) is a member of the Danish royal family. He is the eldest son of Prince Joachim and his first wife, Alexandra, Countess of Frederiksborg. He is currently seventh in the line of succession to the Danish throne. At the time of his birth, he was third, after his uncle and father.


Prince Nikolai Dmitriyevich Golitsyn (Russian: Никола́й Дми́триевич Голи́цын)( 12 April 1850 – 2 July 1925) was a Russian Golitsyn was born in Porechye, a village in the Moscow Governorate near Mozhaisk into the noble Golitsyn family. His father was Dmitry Borisovich Golitsyn (1803-1864) who came from Bolshiye Vyazyomy, the family estate.Prince Nikolai Golitsyn married in Saint Petersburg on 7 April 1881 Evgenia Andrejevna von Grünberg (Saint-Petersburg, 18 April 1864 - Nice, 18 July 1934). The couple had six children


Prince Nikolai Nikolayevich (Archangelsk, 1883 - executed at Solovski, 1931), son of Prince Nikolai Dmitriyevich Golitsyn and Evgenia Andrejevna von Grünberg


Prince Nikolai Sergeyevich Trubetzkoy (Russian: Никола́й Серге́евич Трубецко́й)(16 April 1890 – 25 June 1938) was a Russian linguist and historian whose teachings formed a nucleus of the Prague School of structural linguistics. He is widely considered to be the founder of morphophonology. He was also associated with the Russian Eurasianists.Trubetzkoy was born into privilege. His father, Sergei Nikolaevich Trubetskoy, came from a Lithuanian Gediminid princely family.


Nicholas Alexandrovich (Russian: Николай Александрович)( 20 September [O.S. 8 September] 1843 – 24 April [O.S. 12 April] 1865) was tsesarevich—the heir apparent—of Imperial Russia from 2 March 1855 until his death in 1865.Grand Duke Nicholas was born on 20 September [O.S. 8 September] 1843, in the Alexander Palace in Tsarskoye Selo south of central Saint Petersburg, during the reign of his grandfather, Emperor Nicholas I. Nicknamed "Nixa", he was the eldest son of the Tsesarevich Alexander Nikolaevich, eldest son of Emperor Nicholas I, and the Tsesarevna Maria Alexandrovna of Russia. In 1855, his paternal grandfather died, and his father succeeded to the throne as Emperor Alexander II.Nicholas had a close relationship with his younger brother, Grand Duke Alexander. He called Alexander "Pug." On his deathbed, he told his father, “Papa, take care of Sasha, he is such an honest, good man." In the summer of 1864, Nicholas became engaged to Princess Dagmar of Denmark. She was the second daughter of King Christian IX of Denmark and Louise of Hesse-Kassel and was a younger sister of the Princess of Wales, later Queen Alexandra and wife of the heir-apparent to the British throne, Albert Edward, who reigned as Edward VII.Nicholas was besotted with Dagmar after he saw a photograph of her. Until 1865, Nicholas was thought to have a strong constitution. During a tour in southern Europe, he contracted an ailment that was initially incorrectly diagnosed as rheumatism. Nicholas's symptoms at that time included back pain and a stiff neck, as well as sensitivity to noise and light. He thought little of his ailments, however, and continued his tour in Italy. His health rapidly worsened, and he was sent to Southern France, but this move brought him no improvement. It was eventually determined that he was suffering from cerebro-spinal meningitis, and it was speculated that this illness of his was caused by a previous accident in a wrestling match, in which Nicholas participated and was thrown down. In the spring of 1865, Nicholas continued to decline, and he died on 24 April 1865, at the Villa Bermond in Nice, France. On his deathbed, Nicholas expressed the wish that his fiancée become the bride of his younger brother and future tsarevich, Alexander. He "raised his right hand and took Sasha's [Alexander's] hand... and seemed to be reaching for Princess Dagmar's with his left." In 1866, Alexander and Dagmar married.Nicholas's death at the early age of 21 thoroughly devastated his mother, who was said to have pored obsessively over all aspects of Nicholas's life. Empress Maria never recovered from his death.
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« Reply #1204 on: June 16, 2022, 06:49:02 PM »

Nicholas Francis (French: Nicolas François de Lorraine; 6 December 1609 – 25 January 1670), also known as Nicholas II, was briefly Duke of Lorraine and Duke of Bar for a few months in 1634, spanning the time between the abdication of his older brother and his own resignation. He was therefore Duke during the invasion of Lorraine by the French in the Thirty Years War.He is the direct male ancestor of all rulers of the Habsburg-Lorraine dynasty, including all Emperors of Austria.Nicholas Francis was the youngest son of Duke Francis II of Lorraine and his wife, Christina of Salm. Born on the feast of Saint Nicholas, he was named in his honour. His sister was Marguerite of Lorraine, the Duchess of Orléans and wife of Gaston, Duke of Orléans.He married his first cousin Claude Françoise de Lorraine who died in childbirth They had 5 children.

Nicholas II of Opava (also: Nicholas II of Troppau, Nicholas II of Ratibór; Czech: Mikuláš II. Opavský)( 1288 – 8 December 1365) was Duke of Opava (German: Troppau) from 1318 to 1365 and Duke of Ratibór from 1337 to 1365 and Burgrave of Kladsko (German: Glatz) from 1350 to 1365 and also chamberlain of the Kingdom of Bohemia.Nicholas II of Opava was a member of the Opava branch of the Bohemian noble Přemyslovci family. His parents were Duke Nicholas I of Opava, who had held Opava since 1269, and Adelheid of Habsburg, a niece of King Rudolf I.Nicholas was married three times. Around 1318 he married Anna of Racibórz (died around 1340), a daughter of Duke Przemysław of Racibórz. Several children resulted from this marriageNicholas was married three times. Around 1318 he married Anna of Racibórz (died around 1340), a daughter of Duke Przemysław of Racibórz. Several children resulted from this marriage After Anna's death, Nicholas married in May 1342 to Hedwig (died 1359), a daughter of Duke Konrad I of Oleśnica (died 1366). From this marriage, he had a son In 1360, Nicholas married his third wife, Jutta (died after 1378), a daughter of the Duke Boleslaw II of Opole-Falkenberg. This marriage produced three more children


Nicholas IV of Bruntál (also known as Nicholas IV of Ratibor and Bruntál, also Nicholas I of Opava-Ratibor; Czech: Mikuláš IV. z Bruntálu; German: Nikolaus IV. von Freudenthal; c. 1370 – c. 1406) was a member of the Opava branch of the Přemyslid dynasty. He was co-ruler of Ratibor and Bruntál with his brother John II "the Iron".His parents were Duke John I of Opava-Ratibor and his wife Anna, a daughter of Duke Henry V of Glogau-Sagan (d. 1369). His father had inherited the Duchy of Ratibor in 1365 as the sole heir and became the founder of the Opava-Ratibor line of the Opavian branch of the Přemyslid dynasty.Nicholas IV was still a minor when his father died in 1380/1382. His older brother John II inherited the duchies of Ratibor, Krnov and Bruntál. Around 1385, a part of Bruntál was split off for Nicholas IV.Nicholas died around 1406, unmarried and without issue. His share of Bruntál fell to his brother John II, who then held the whole Duchy of Bruntál.


Nicholas V, Duke of Krnov (also known as Nicholas II of Opava-Ratibor; Czech: Mikuláš V. Krnovský; 1409–1452) was a member of the Přemyslid dynasty. He was Duke of Racibórz, Krnov, Bruntál and Rybnik. All these duchies were situated in Silesia, then part of the Crown of Bohemia.Nicholas was older son of John "the Iron" and Helena of Lithuania (niece of King Wladyslaw II Jagiello of Poland). He was born in 1409 In 1435, Nicholas V married Margaret Clemm of Ellguth. They had three children. In 1451 in Kraków, Nicholas V married his second wife. She was Barbara Rockemberg (d. 1464) from a patrician family in Kraków. They had two children


Nicholas (died in infancy)., son of Nicholas V, Duke of Krnov and his 2nd wife Barbara Rockemberg


Nicholas I of Opole (Polish: Mikołaj I; c. 1424 – 3 July 1476) was a duke of Opole since 1437 (until 1439 with his brother as co-ruler), Duke of Brzeg from 1450, ruler over Kluczbork from 1451 and Duke of Strzelce, Niemodlin and Olesno from 1460.He was the fourth son of Duke Bolko IV of Opole by his wife Margareta, possibly member of the House of Gorizia.By February 1442, Nicholas I married with Magdalena (ca. 1430 – 10 September 1497), daughter of Duke Louis II of Brzeg. They had ten children


Nicholas II of Niemodlin (Polish: Mikołaj II Niemodliński; c. 1462 – 27 June 1497), was a Duke of Opole-Brzeg-Strzelce-Niemodlin in 1476 (as co-ruler of his father) and sole Duke of Niemodlin from 1476 until his death.
He was the third son of Duke Nicholas I of Opole by his wife Magdalena, daughter of Duke Louis II of Brzeg.Nicholas II never married nor did he have children.


Nicholas III of Opava (German: Nikolaus III. von Troppau; Czech: Mikuláš III. Opavský; c. 1339 – 9 July 1394) was Duke of Opava from 1367 to 1377 and Duke of Głubczyce from 1377 until his death.Nicholas II of Opava was a member of the Opava branch of the Přemyslid dynasty. His parents were Duke Nicholas II of Opava and his second wife, Hedwig (died 1359), a daughter of Duke Konrad I of OleśnicaNicholas III died unmarried and childless in 1394. His youngest brother Přemysl I continued to rule the Duchy of Głubczyce.


Duke Nicholas IV of Opava (Czech: Mikuláš IV. Opavský; German: Nikolaus IV. von Troppau; c. 1400 – 1437) was Duke of Opava and Lord of Zlaté Hory from 1433 until his death.His parents were Duke Przemko I of Opava (d. 1433) and his first wife Anna of Lutz (d. 1405).Nicholas IV died in 1437 unmarried and without issue. His eldest brother, Wenceslaus II, probably inherited Zlaté Hory.


Nicholas of Anjou (July 1448 – 27 July 1473) was the son of John II, Duke of Lorraine and Marie de Bourbon.Nicholas was born and died in Nancy. He succeeded his father in 1470 as Duke of Lorraine, and assumed the titles of Marquis of Pont-ŕ-Mousson, Duke of Calabria, and Prince of Girona, as heir apparent of Bar, Naples, and Aragon respectively.He was engaged to Anne of France, Viscountess of Thouars, and used her title, but he did not marry her and had only one illegitimate daughter, Marguerite, wife of John IV of Chabannes, Count of Dammartin (d. 1503).


Duke Nicholas of Württemberg (German: Herzog Nikolaus von Württemberg; 1 March 1833 – 22 February 1903) was an officer in the army of the Austrian Empire. Duke Nicholas was born at Carlsruhe, Kingdom of Prussia (now Pokój, Poland) was the third child of Duke Eugen of Württemberg (1788–1857, son of Duke Eugen of Württemberg and Princess Louise of Stolberg-Gedern) by his second marriage to Princess Helene of Hohenlohe-Langenburg (1807–1880, daughter of Charles Louis, Prince of Hohenlohe-Langenburg and Countess Amalie of Solms-Baruth). Nicholas had three half-siblings by his father's previous marriage with Princess Mathilde of Waldeck and Pyrmont.On 8 May 1868, in Carlsruhe, he married Duchess Wilhelmine of Württemberg (1844–1892), daughter of Duke Eugen of Württemberg and Princess Mathilde of Schaumburg-Lippe. Wilhelmine was the elder daughter of Nicholas' half-brother. They had no issue.
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« Reply #1205 on: June 16, 2022, 07:03:07 PM »

Count Nikolay Pavlovich Ignatyev (historical spelling: Nicolai Ignatieff; Russian: Граф Никола́й Па́влович Игна́тьев; 29 January [O.S. 17 January] 1832 – 3 July [O.S. 20 June] 1908), a Russian statesman and diplomat, became best known for his aggressive expansionism in support of Russian imperialism. In dealing with China, he secured a large slice of Chinese territory by the multi-lateral Treaty of Peking in 1860 Nikolay Ignatyev was born in St Petersburg, to Maria Ivanovna Maltsova and Captain Pavel Nikolayevich Ignatyev.Count Nikolay Ignatiev was married to Yekaterina Leonidovna Galitzina (1842-1917), daughter of Prince Leonid Mikhailovich Galitzine and Anna Matveyevna Tolstaďa.Their eight children included Ignatiev's son, Count Pavel Ignatiev, who served as the last Minister of Education under Tsar Nicholas II and later moved to Canada. His grandson, George Ignatieff, was born in Russia and became a Canadian diplomat, and his great-grandson, Michael Ignatieff, is an academic and was the leader of the Liberal Party of Canada from 2008 to 2011.Other sons of Count Ignatiev included: - General Nikolai Nikolaevich Ignatiev (1872-1962), commander of the Preobrazhensky Regiment of the Imperial Guard; - Alexey Nikolaevich Ignatiev (1874-1948), last governor of Kiev under Tsarist rule.


Nikolaus (Anton) Graf Szécsen von Temerin (Hungarian: gróf temerini Szécsen Miklós) (26 November 1857 – 18 May 1926), was an Austro-Hungarian diplomat of Hungarian origin serving as ambassador at Paris at the outbreak of World War I.Born in Temerin on 26 November 1857 into the Hungarian nobility as son of Anton Graf Szécsen von Temerin (1819–1896), an Austro-Hungarian government minister. In 1896, he married Johanna Gräfin Mikes von Zabola (1866–1930) in Vienna. They had 3 children.


Nicholas, Count of Salm (Vielsalm, Belgium 1459 – Salmhof, Marchegg, Lower Austria, 4 May 1530) was a German soldier and an Imperial senior military commander (German: Feldherr). His greatest achievement was the defense of Vienna during the first siege by the Turks in 1529.In 1502, he married Elisabeth von Rogendorff, with several children

Nicholas II, count of Salm-Neuburg, son of Nicholas, Count of Salm and  Elisabeth von Rogendorff


Nicholas, Count of Schauenburg and Holstein-Rendsburg (also known as Claus of Holstein; 1321 – 8 May 1397 in Itzehoe) was a titular Count of Schauenburg. Together first with his brother and then with his nephews, Nicholas was the co-ruling Count of Holstein-Rendsburg from 1340 until his death. In 1390 Nicholas and his nephews inherited Holstein-Kiel, which itself included former Holstein-Plön through reversion in 1350. So except of Holstein-Pinneberg Nicholas and his nephews had united all of Holstein. He was also co-ruler of Schleswig from 1375 to 1386. He was thus a leading member of the House of Schauenburg and an influential figure in the area orth of the Elbe. He was the second son of Count Gerhard III of Holstein-Rendsburg and his wife, Sophia of Werle.He ruled Schleswig jointly with his elder brother Henry II from 1375 to 1384, thereafter alone. In 1386, he abdicated as Duke of Schleswig in favour of Henry II's son Gerhard VI of Holstein-Rendsburg, who was confirmed as Gerhard II as Duke of Schleswig by King Olaf II of Denmark.In 1354, he married Elisabeth, the daughter of Duke William II of Brunswick and Lüneburg, Prince of Lunenburg. She was the widow of Otto of Saxe-Wittenberg, a son of Rudolph I. They had one daughter


Nicholas I, Count of Tecklenburg (died 1367), also known as Nicholas III of Schwerin, was a German noble in the Holy Roman Empire.Nicholas was the son of Gunzelin VI, Count of Schwerin and Richardis, the daughter of Count Otto IV of Tecklenburg. In 1328, he succeeded his uncle, Count Otto V of Tecklenburg, as count of Tecklenburg-Ibbendüren and count of Lingen and Cloppenburg. He was initially considered an outsider, however, he managed to prove himself capable of the job.Nicholas married Helena, the daughter of Count Otto of Oldenburg-Wildeshausen-Altbruchhausen. They had two children


Nicholas II of Tecklenburg († 1426) was the ruling Count of Tecklenburg from 1388 until his death.Nicholas II was the only son of Count Otto VI and his wife, Adelaide of Lippe, a daughter of Bernard V, Lord of Lippe.Nicholas II married Anna Elisabeth of Moers (d. 1430), a daughter of Frederick III, Count of Moers. They had 2 children.

Nicholas III of Tecklenburg (d. 1508) son of Otto VII, Count of Tecklenburg and his 1st wife Ermengarda of Hoya-Nienburg


Count Nikolay Alexandrovich Zubov (Russian: Николай Александрович Зубов; 24 April 1763 – 9 August 1805) was the eldest of the Zubov brothers who, together with Count Pahlen, masterminded the conspiracy to assassinate Tsar Paul of Russia. In 1782 Zubov joined the Horse Guards Regiment where he became known for his gigantic height, physical strength and fiery temper. When his younger brother Platon became Catherine II's lover, the "colossus" was made a count and general. He helped Alexander Suvorov fend off Prince Potemkin's intrigues, courted his only daughter, the Suvorochka (1775–1844), and eventually married her towards the end of 1794.Although Catherine II's death spelled the end of his career, Nicholas mustered courage and rushed to the Gatchina Palace, where her son Paul was residing. He hoped to become the first to congratulate Paul on his prospective accession to the throne. On hearing the news of his arrival, Paul refused to see the courtier. He had heard the rumor that the Zubovs persuaded the Empress to sign a testament transferring the throne to her grandson Alexander and was afraid that Zubov had come to arrest him.In short order, the Zubov brothers were exiled from court and little was heard about them until November 1800, when Nicholas was permitted to return to St. Petersburg. The connections of his sister Olga Zherebtsova and the funds provided by her lover Lord Whitworth allowed him and Count Pahlen to form a conspiracy. On the night of 11 March 1801 the plotters broke into Paul's bedroom in Saint Michael's Castle, and Zubov struck the emperor down with a heavy snuffbox, whereupon the emperor was strangled by his accomplices.Zubov died four years after the regicide. Among his descendants was Count Valentin Platonovich Zubov (1884–1969) who founded the Gatchina museum and authored several books about Tsar Paul and his reign.


 Count Nicholas Muravyov (governor of Grodno)


Nicholas Theotokis, son of George (Νικόλαος Γ. Θεοτόκης, died 1603), nephew of Alexander Theotokis (Αλέξανδρος Θεοτόκης, 1516–1600),, Venetian governor of Parga in 1591

Nicholas Theotokis, son of Mark (Νικόλαος Μ. Θεοτόκης, 1631–1686), grandson of the above, as reward for his service during the War of Candia, in 1699 his descendants received the title of count


Count Nicholas-Alvise Theotokis (Νικόλαος Αλοΐσιος Θεοτόκης, 1702–1762), son of Count George Theotokis (Γεώργιος Θεοτόκης, 1677–1734), ambassador to Venice from 1746


Nicolas-Alexandre, marquis de Ségur (1695–1755) was a Bordeaux wine maker who during his lifetime was known as the "Prince of Vines" due to his ownership of some of the most famous Bordeaux chateaus-including Château Lafite, Château Latour, Château Mouton and Château Calon-Ségur. A hundred years after his death, the Bordeaux Wine Official Classification of 1855 would designate Lafite and Latour as First Growths, Mouton as a second growth and Calon-Ségur as a third growth.Nicolas-Alexandre Ségur was the son of Alexandre de le Meon de Ségur de Francs et Portugaises and Marie-Thérčse de Clausel and paternal grandson of Jean-Isaac, marquis de Ségur (d. 1707), military commander and a descendant of François de Ségur, seigneur de Sainte-Aulaye (d. 1605)


Prince Nikita Alexandrovich of Russia (17 January [O.S. 4 January] 1900 – 12 September 1974) was the third son and fourth child of Grand Duke Alexander Mikhailovich of Russia and Grand Duchess Xenia Alexandrovna of Russia. He was a nephew of Tsar Nicholas II of Russia.Born in Imperial Russia during the reign of his uncle, Prince Nikita escaped the fate of many of his relatives who were killed by the Bolsheviks. He left Russia in April 1919, at age nineteen. In 1922, he married Countess Maria Vorontsova-Dashkova. The couple had two children.

Prince Nikita Nikitich Romanov (13 May 1923 – 3 May 2007) was a British born, American historian and writer, author of a book about Ivan the Terrible. He was a member of the Romanov family, a son of Prince Nikita Alexandrovich of Russia and a great nephew of Nicholas II of Russia, the last Tsar.Prince Nikita was married to Jane Anna Schoenwald (24 April 1933, Oklahoma City — 28 January 2017, Cairo) on 14 July 1961 in London, and they had one son


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« Reply #1206 on: June 17, 2022, 10:14:06 AM »

Felix is a male given name that stems from Latin felix  (genitive felicis) and means "happy" or "lucky". Its female form is Felicity


Prince Félix of Bourbon-Parma (later Prince Félix of Luxembourg)(28 September 1893 – 8 April 1970) was the husband of Charlotte, Grand Duchess of Luxembourg and the father of her six children, including her successor Jean, Grand Duke of Luxembourg. By birth to his father Robert I, Duke of Parma, he was a member of the House of Bourbon-Parma and one descendant of King Philip V of Spain. Prince Félix was the longest-serving consort of Luxembourg.Prince Félix was one of the 24 children of the deposed Robert I, Duke of Parma, being the duke's sixth child and third son by his second wife, Maria Antonia of Portugal. His maternal grandparents were Miguel of Portugal and Adelaide of Löwenstein-Wertheim-Rosenberg. He was born in Schwarzau am Steinfeld He was also the younger brother (by sixteen months) of Empress Zita of Austria. Of the twelve children of Duke Robert's first marriage to Maria-Pia of the Two Sicilies, three died as infants, six had learning difficulties, and only three married. Despite the loss of his throne, Duke Robert and his family enjoyed considerable wealth, traveling in a private train of more than a dozen cars among his castles Less than four months after Robert's death in 1907 the Grand Marshal of the Austrian Court declared six of the children of his first marriage legally incompetent, at the behest of Duchess Maria Antonia. Nonetheless, Robert's primary heir was Elias, Duke of Parma, (1880–1959), the youngest son of the first marriage and the only one to father children of his own. Duke Elias also became the legal guardian of his six elder siblings. Although Félix's elder brothers, Prince Sixte and Prince Xavier, eventually sued their half-brother Duke Elias to obtain a greater share of the ducal fortune, they lost in the French courts, leaving Prince Félix with modest prospects On 6 November 1919 in Luxembourg, the prince married his first cousin Grand Duchess Charlotte of Luxembourg, having been admitted to the nobility of Luxembourg and also made Prince of Luxembourg by Grand Ducal decree the day before.Unlike some European consorts, Félix neither adopted his wife's dynastic surname (of Nassau), nor relinquished his own title and name "Prince of Bourbon-Parma". His traditional style as a Bourbon prince of the Parmesan branch is the reason that cadet members of the Grand Ducal Family of Luxembourg enjoy the style of Royal Highness (but that style belongs to the Luxembourg monarch and heir apparent by right, as the historical prerogative of grand-ducal dynasties) Felix and Charlotte had 6 children.


Prince Félix of Luxembourg (Félix Léopold Marie Guillaume)(3 June 1984) is the second son of Henri, Grand Duke of Luxembourg, and Maria Teresa, Grand Duchess of Luxembourg. He is currently third in the line of succession. Prince Félix was born on 3 June 1984 at the Grand Duchess Charlotte Maternity Hospital in Luxembourg. He is the second of the five children of Grand Duke Henri and Grand Duchess Maria Teresa, the others being: Hereditary Grand Duke Guillaume, Prince Louis, Princess Alexandra and Prince Sébastien. His godparents are Prince Jean and Catalina Mestre. He was named after his great-grandfather, Prince Felix of Bourbon-Parma.On 13 December 2012, the Grand Ducal household confirmed Prince Félix's engagement to Claire Lademacher. The civil wedding took place on 17 September 2013 in Königstein im Taunus, followed by a religious ceremony on 21 September in the Basilica of Sainte Marie-Madeleine in Saint-Maximin-la-Sainte-Baume, France Prince Félix and Princess Claire's daughter, Princess Amalia Gabriela Maria Theresa, was born on 15 June 2014 at the Maternité Grande-Duchesse Charlotte Hospital in Luxembourg. A son, Prince Liam Henri Hartmut, was born at Private Clinic in Geneva on 28 November 2016


Prince Felix of Denmark (Felix Henrik Valdemar Christian)(22 July 2002) is a member of the Danish royal family. He is the younger son of Prince Joachim and his first wife, Alexandra, Countess of Frederiksborg. Prince Felix is currently eighth in the line of succession to the Danish throne.


Felix Ludwig Johann Friedrich, Prince of Schwarzenberg (German: Felix Ludwig Johann Friedrich Prinz zu Schwarzenberg; Czech: Felix Ludvík Jan Bedřich princ ze Schwarzenbergu) (2 October 1800 – 5 April 1852) was a Bohemian nobleman and an Austrian statesman who restored the Austrian Empire as a European great power following the Revolutions of 1848. He served as Minister-President of the Austrian Empire and Foreign Minister of the Austrian Empire from 1848 to 1852.Felix was born at Český Krumlov Castle (German: Böhmisch Krumau) in Bohemia, the second son of Prince Joseph of Schwarzenberg (1769–1833) and his wife Pauline of Arenberg. The House of Schwarzenberg was one of the most influential Bohemian noble families During his time as a London attaché in 1828 he had an affair with Jane Digby, whom he deserted after causing her then-husband – Edward Law, 1st Earl of Ellenborough – to divorce her, and making her pregnant. This episode led to the nickname of "Prince of Cadland" being applied to him in London. Digby had two children with Felix; Mathilde "Didi" (12 November 1829, raised by Felix's sister) and Felix (December 1830) who died just a few weeks after his birth. The affair with Felix ended shortly after the death of their son.Schwarzenberg died in office at Vienna, suffering a stroke in the early evening of Monday, April 5, 1852.


Count Felix Nikolayevich Sumarokov-Elston (Russian: Граф Феликс Николаевич Сумароков-Эльстон)( 24 January 1820 – 30 October 1877) was the Ataman of the Kuban Cossacks and the Governor of Kuban Oblast (region) in the late 1860s. Felix (a common name for illegitimate children) was brought up by Princess Elisabeth Khitrovo, a famous salon hostess who was a daughter of Prince Kutuzov and the mother of Dorothea de Ficquelmont. It has been widely rumored that Felix Elston was the natural son of Khitrovo's eldest daughter, Countess Ekaterina von Tiesenhausen (a lady-in-waiting to King Frederick William IV of Prussia's sister, Empress Alexandra of Russia) and Prince Augustus of Prussia.It appears more likely that Felix's parents were Karl Alexander Anselm Freiherr von Hügel ( April 25, 1795 – June 2, 1870) [himself the son of Johann Aloys Josef Hügel, later 1st Freiherr von Hügel (November 14, 1753 –  1826) and wife Anna von Holthof, married in 1787] by Jozefa Gräfin Andrássy de Csíkszentkirály et Krasznahorka (Košice (Kassa))(April 8, 1790 – 1868), a relative of Gyula Andrássy, married (in Košice (Kassa), February 7, 1808) to Miklós Graf Forgách de Ghymes et Gács (1784 – Nagyszalánc (Slanec), January 10, 1857), by whom she had three sons, all of whom died unmarried and without any issue. Recent investigations taken by one of his great-granddaughters and an English genealogist practically confirm this late ancestry, not explaining, however, the motives why he didn't use his father's name but Elston, his English nanny's surname.From his marriage with Countess Elena Sergeievna Sumarokova (September 5, 1829 – April 15, 1901) (daughter of Count Sergei Pavlovich Sumarokov (1791-1875) and wife Marchesa Aleksandra Pavlovna Maruzzi (ca 1808–1857)) he had seven children, including Count Felix Felixovich Sumarokov-Elston, later prince Yusupov, who was the father of Prince Felix Yusupov.


Count Felix Felixovich Sumarokov-Elston, son of Count Felix Nikolayevich Sumarokov-Elston and Marchesa Aleksandra Pavlovna Maruzzi. He would marry Zinaida Yusupova. For the Yusupov name not to die out, he (1856 – 1928) was granted the title and the surname of his wife, Princess Zinaida Yusupova, on 11 June 1885, a year after their marriage, but effective after the death of his father-in-law in 1891. Prince Felix Felixovich Yusupov was their son.


Prince Felix Felixovich Yusupov, Count Sumarokov-Elston (Russian: Князь Фе́ликс Фе́ликсович Юсу́пов, Граф Сумаро́ков-Эльстон, romanized: Knyaz' Féliks Féliksovich Yusúpov, Graf Sumarókov-El'ston)(23 March [O.S. 11 March] 1887 – 27 September 1967), was a Russian aristocrat from the Yusupov family. He is best known for participating in the assassination of Grigori Rasputin and marrying Princess Irina Alexandrovna, a niece of Tsar Nicholas II.He was born in the Moika Palace in Saint Petersburg, the capital of the Russian Empire. His father was Count Felix Felixovich Sumarokov-Elston, the son of Count Felix Nikolaievich Sumarokov-Elston. Zinaida Yusupova, his mother, was the last of the Yusupov line, of Tatar origin, and very wealthy. For the Yusupov name not to die out, his father (1856 – 1928) was granted the title and the surname of his wife, Princess Zinaida Yusupova, on 11 June 1885, a year after their marriage, but effective after the death of his father-in-law in 1891The Yusupov family, one of the richest families in Imperial Russia, had acquired their wealth generations earlier The engagement took place in the fall of 1913 in the Yusupov Palace in Koreiz. Back in Saint Petersburg, he married Princess Irina of Russia, the Tsar's only niece, in the Anichkov Palace on 22 February 1914 No one suspected that this was the last grand wedding in the Russian Empire. The Yusupovs' only daughter, Princess Irina Felixovna Yusupova, nicknamed Bébé, was born on 21 March 1915


Charles Felix of Sardinia (6 April 1765 – 27 April 1831) was the Duke of Savoy, Piedmont, Aosta and King of Sardinia from 1821 to 1831.Charles Felix was born in Turin as the eleventh child and fifth son born to Victor Amadeus III of Savoy and Maria Antonia Ferdinanda of Spain. His paternal grandparents were Charles Emmanuel III of Savoy and his German wife Polyxena of Hesse-Rotenburg. His maternal grandparents were French born King Philip V of Spain and his Italian wife, Elisabeth Farnese.He was a younger brother of two other rulers of Savoy Charles Emmanuel IV and Victor Emmanuel I. He spent his childhood with his sister Maria Carolina and his younger brother, Giuseppe Benedetto Placido, Count of Moriana, at the Castle of Moncalieri.From his youth, Carlo Felice was reported as having a very complex character: on the one hand consistent and inflexible, private, distrustful, and impulsive, if not touchy and vindictive; on the other hand honest, sincere, and capable of emotion and fondness. He had a clever mind, at times even ironic. He possessed a sacral conception of the monarchy and the right to reign.On 7 March 1807, in the Cappella Palatina of the Palazzo dei Normanni in Palermo, Charles Felix married by proxy Maria Cristina of Naples and Sicily (17 January 1779 - 11 March 1849), daughter of Ferdinand IV King of Naples and Sicily and Maria Carolina of Austria.The marriage, which had originally been opposed by Charles Felix, had been arranged for dynastic reasons. Neither Charles Emmanuel nor Victor Emmanuel had male children (the son of the latter had become sick and died in Sardinia), while the Duke of Montferrat and the Count of Morian were deceased, so Charles Felix had become the heir presumptive and therefore had to produce a male heir.Although the marriage to Maria Cristina proved harmonious, she was unable to have children, forcing Victor Emmanuel to consider the succession of Charles Albert, prince of Carignano, from a collateral line of the House of Savoy.


Felix Nikolaus Alexander Georg Graf von Luckner (9 June 1881 – 13 April 1966), sometimes called Count Luckner in English, was a German nobleman, naval officer, author, and sailor who earned the epithet Der Seeteufel (the Sea Devil), and his crew that of Die Piraten des Kaisers (the Emperor's Pirates), for his exploits in command of the sailing commerce raider SMS Seeadler (Sea Eagle) during the First World War. After the war, Luckner became a war hero in Germany and was renowned around the world for his seamanship and chivalrous conduct during the war, which resulted in a minimal loss of life on both sides. Luckner was born in Dresden, Germany, the great-grandson of Nicolas Luckner, Marshal of France and commander-in-chief of the French Army of the Rhine, who in the 18th century was elevated to the rank of Count (Graf) by the King of Denmark.Luckner was married twice. He married Petra Schultz from Hamburg, with whom he had a daughter, Inge-Maria, born in 1913. They were divorced in 1914. On 24 September 1924 he married Ingeborg Engeström in Malmö, Sweden.


Count Felix Mielżński (1871-1910)


Félix María Calleja del Rey y de la Gándara (Spanish: Félix María Calleja del Rey, primer conde de Calderón) (November 1, 1753 – July 24, 1828) was a Spanish military officer and viceroy of New Spain from March 4, 1813, to September 20, 1816, during Mexico's War of Independence. For his service in New Spain, Calleja was awarded with the title Count of Calderon.


Félix, Count Goblet d'Alviella (26 May 1884 – 7 February 1957) was a Belgian lawyer, director of the Revue de Belgique, alderman and Olympic fencer He was married to Eva Boël (1883–1956), and was the father of Jean Goblet d'Alviella. He was a son of Eugene Goblet d'Alviella


Felix of Werdenberg (c.1495- 12 July 1530) , son of George II. Ruled jointly with his brothers (1508-1530). Married to Elisabeth of Neuchâtel, no issue. Werdenberg was a county of the Holy Roman Empire, within the Duchy of Swabia, situated on either side of the Alpine Rhine, including parts of what is now St. Gallen (Switzerland), Liechtenstein, and Vorarlberg (Austria). It was partitioned from Montfort in 1230. In 1260, it was divided into Werdenberg and Sargans.


Count Felix Friedrich von Flemming (1661–1739)  a Prussian privy councillor


Philippe Félix Balthasar Otto Ghislain, Count de Merode (13 April 1791 – 7 February 1857), known as Félix de Merode, was a Belgian politician. Born in Maastricht, Merode's father was mayor of Brussels during the period in which modern Belgium formed part of France. Under the First French Empire, Merode lived in Paris. In 1809 he married Rosalie de Gramont, niece by marriage of the Marquis de Lafayette.Merode settled in the southern part of the United Kingdom of the Netherlands—modern Belgium—and was one of the leaders of the Belgian Revolution of 1830. He served in the Provisional Government of Belgium and in the Belgian National Congress which was elected in November 1830. Merode was proposed as a candidate for the throne of the newly created Belgium, but refused to be considered as he was not a prince, merely a count. Merode's brother Frédéric was killed during the fighting against the forces of King William I following the revolution.He formed part of the delegation to Paris which sought to have Louis, Duke of Nemours, second son of King Louis-Philippe, accept the throne, but this approach was rebuffed by the French king. Merode was a confidant of the eventual king, Leopold I, and was made a Minister of State in 1831.He served as Foreign affairs, War, and Finance minister in the 1830s. He resigned from office in 1839 as he was unwilling to sign the Treaty of London ceding Belgian territory to the Kingdom of the Netherlands.Charles Forbes René de Montalembert was his son in law, and Montalembert's political ideas were supported by Merode. His son Frédéric-François-Xavier Ghislain de Mérode served as a minister to Pope Pius IX.

Count Félix Rignon (1829–1914), husband of Luisa Perrone di San Martino (1 October 1838 – 14 November 1880). They had 2 children: Luisa and Félix Rignon had two children, Édouard Rignon (1861–1932), and Maria Rignon (15 March 1858 – 27 March 1950). Luisa belonged to the House of La Fayette.


Count Felix of Colloredo-Mannsfeld  (b.2013), son of Paul-Josef Count of Mannsfeld, Hereditary Prince of Colloredo-Mannsfeld (b.1981)

Count Felix Arbaud, married to Azalaďs d'Arbaud (née Marie-Azalaďs Valčre-Martin)( 1834-1917), a French writer in the Occitan language. They were the parents of the poet Joseph d'Arbaud and a daughter, Berthe

Count Felix Golovkin


Félix María Serafín Sánchez de Samaniego y Zabala (12 October 1745 – 11 August 1801) was a Spanish neoclassical fabulist. He was born and died in Laguardia, Álava, in the Basque Country, and was educated at Valladolid. A government appointment was secured for him by his uncle the Count de Peńaflorida.


Count Felix Friedrich Wenzel von Wimpffen (March 16, 1827 - December 30, 1882 ) was an Austrian, later Austro-Hungarian diplomat. Felix von Wimpffen came from the house of the Counts of Wimpffen. His father was the Württemberg General Franz Karl Eduard von Wimpffen, his mother his second wife Paulina Maria née Freiin von Marschall (1787-1869). One of his half-brothers was the Austrian General Franz Emil Lorenz Wimpffen.He studied law in Prague until 1848 and took part in the Italian campaign in the spring of 1849 before entering the diplomatic service in the same year. After professional positions in Rome and London, he was ambassador to Denmark from January 9, 1866, and to Prussia from October 13, 1866. In Berlin he met Margarethe Gräfin von Lynar (1837–1895), whom he married in August 1867.
From 1871 he was twice ambassador to Italy and France, but increasingly suffered from a fear of Alzheimer's disease and committed suicide in 1882 during his mission in Paris.He left his widow and two daughters:Maria Margarethe von Wimpffen (1868 - 1930-) & Pauline von Montgelas (1874- 1961).


Count Felix Albert zu Löwenstein-Wertheim-Rochefort (1684 - 1685)

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« Reply #1207 on: June 17, 2022, 11:45:09 AM »

The name Robert is an ancient Germanic given name, from Proto-Germanic *Hrōţi- "fame" and *berhta- "bright" (Hrōţiberhtaz).Compare Old Dutch Robrecht and Old High German Hrodebert (a compound of Hruod (Old Norse: Hróđr) "fame, glory, honour, praise, renown" and berht "bright, light, shining"). It is the second most frequently used given name of ancient Germanic origin. It is also in use as a surname. Another commonly used form of the name is Rupert.


Robert I of Scotland (1274–1329) ("Robert the Bruce"), king and national hero of Scotland, legendary for his victory at the Battle of Bannockburn, one of the most prominent and skilled warriors of his time who freed Scotland from the English rule during the Wars of Scottish Independence

Robert II of Scotland (Robert Stewart) (1316–1390), one of the principal commanders at the Battle of Halidon Hill

Robert III of Scotland (c. 1337/40–1406)

Robert I of France (c.866–923)

Robert II of France (972–1031)

Robert of Naples (1276–1343)

Robert of Germany (Rupertus, Rex Romanorum) (1352–1410)

Charles I Robert of Hungary and Croatia (1288–1342)

Robert I, Duke of Normandy (1000–1035), also known as Robert the Magnificent or Robert the Devil; father of William the Conqueror

Robert Curthose (c.1051–1134, son of William the Conqueror, claimant to throne of Kingdom of England, one of the principal commanders of the First Crusade and its battles Siege of Antioch, Battle of Ascalon, Battle of Dorylaeum (1097), Siege of Jerusalem (1099), Siege of Nicaea and Battle of Tinchebray

Prince Robert, Duke of Chartres (Robert Philippe Louis Eugčne Ferdinand)(November 9, 1840 – December 5, 1910), was the son of Prince Ferdinand Philippe, Duke of Orléans, and thus grandson of King Louis-Philippe of France. He fought for the Union in the American Civil War, and then for France in the 1870 Franco-Prussian War. In 1863 he married his cousin Princess Françoise of Orléans, the daughter of François, Prince of Joinville. In 1886, he was exiled from France.Robert and Françoise had 5 children


Prince Robert d'Orléans (11 January 1866 – 30 May 1885), son of Prince Robert, Duke of Chartres and Princess Francoise of Orléans.

Robert I (Italian: Roberto Carlo Luigi Maria)(9 July 1848 – 16 November 1907) was the last sovereign Duke of Parma and Piacenza from 1854 until 1859, when the duchy was annexed to Sardinia-Piedmont during the Risorgimento. He was a member of the House of Bourbon-Parma and descended from Philip, Duke of Parma, the third son of King Philip V of Spain and Queen Elisabeth Farnese. Born in Florence, Robert was the elder son of Charles III, Duke of Parma and Louise Marie Thérčse d'Artois, daughter of Charles Ferdinand, duc de Berry and granddaughter of King Charles X of France. He succeeded his father to the ducal throne in 1854 upon the latter's assassination, when he was only six, while his mother stood as regent.On 5 April 1869, while in exile in Rome, he married Princess Maria Pia of Bourbon-Two Sicilies (1849–1882), daughter of King Ferdinand II of the Two Sicilies. She was his half first cousin once removed, as her father (Ferdinand II) and Robert's maternal grandmother (Princess Caroline Ferdinande of Bourbon-Two Sicilies) were half-siblings, both being children of Francis I of the Two Sicilies.Maria Pia belonged to the deposed Royal Family of the Two Sicilies and was thus a Bourbon, like her husband. She bore him 12 children, before dying in childbirth After his first wife's death in childbirth, he remarried on 15 October 1884 to Infanta Maria Antonia of Portugal, daughter of the deposed King Miguel I of Portugal and his wife, Adelaide of Löwenstein-Wertheim-Rosenberg. Maria Antonia was his second cousin once removed, as her paternal grandmother (Charlotte of Spain) and Robert's paternal great-grandmother (Maria Luisa of Spain) were siblings, both being children of Charles IV of Spain and Maria Luisa of Parma. She bore him another 12 children


Robert Hugo, Duke of Parma and Piacenza (Italian: Roberto Ugo di Borbone-Parma)( 7 August 1909 – 15 November 1974) was the head of the House of Bourbon-Parma and the pretender to the defunct throne of the Duchy of Parma between 1959 and 1974.Robert Hugo was born at Schloss Weilburg in Baden bei Wien, the second but eldest surviving son of Elias, Duke of Parma and Archduchess Maria Anna of Austria (1882–1940). He succeeded his father Elias as head of the House of Bourbon-Parma upon his death in 1959, and maintained his style until his death in 1974 in Vienna. He died unmarried and without issue, and was succeeded by his agnatic half-uncle Xavier.


Robert, Archduke of Austria-Este (given names: Robert Karl Ludwig Maximilian Michael Maria Anton Franz Ferdinand Joseph Otto Hubert Georg Pius Johannes Marcus d'Aviano)(8 February 1915 – 7 February 1996), was the second son of Karl I, (beatified) last Emperor of Austria-Hungary, and Princess Zita of Bourbon-Parma. He was also known as Robert Karl Erzherzog von Österreich. On 16 April 1917, at the age of two, his father the Emperor ceded the title of Archduke of Austria-Este in Robert's favor. Archduke Robert was thereby chosen to preserve, in the form of a distinct secundogeniture, the Habsburg-Lorraine representation of the once-sovereign Duchy of Modena which had belonged to the House of Este. He was thus made heir to his assassinated relative Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria, (1863–1914), who had inherited in 1875 the Austria-Este designation and what had been salvaged of the Este fortune when the duchy was annexed to Italy in 1860.Upon his death in 1996, the day before his 81st birthday, he was succeeded as head of this line by his son, Lorenz of Austria-Este, Prince of Belgium (born 1955). Although the marriage of his eldest son to Princess Astrid of Belgium, relegated use of the Austria-Este archdukedom to a secondary title in that realm, the title continues in use elsewhere among his cadet descendants Archduke Robert married Princess Margherita of Savoy-Aosta (7 April 1930 – 10 January 2022), elder daughter of the late Amadeo, 3rd Duke of Aosta on 28 December 1953 in Bourg-en-Bresse, France (civilly) and 29 December 1953 (religiously), in Brou, France The couple had five children, all of whom use the designation of Austria-Este.


Robert I, Count of Flanders (c.1035–1093)

Robert II, Count of Flanders (c.1065–1111), one of the principal commanders of the First Crusade and its battles Siege of Antioch, Battle of Ascalon, Siege of Jerusalem (1099), Siege of Ma'arra and Siege of Nicaea

Robert I, crown prince of Bavaria (1869–1955), also known as Prince Rupprecht, last heir apparent to the Bavarian throne, one of the most prominent military commanders of World War I, claimant to the thrones of England, Scotland and Ireland, one of the principal commanders of Battle of the Somme Rupprecht was born in Munich, the eldest of the thirteen children of Ludwig III, the last King of Bavaria, and of Archduchess Maria Theresa of Austria-Este, a niece of Duke Francis V of Modena. He was a member of the lineage of both Louis XIV of France and William the Conqueror. As a direct descendant of Henrietta of England, daughter of Charles I of England, he was claimant to the thrones of England, Scotland and Ireland in the Jacobite succession Rupprecht married twice and had children with both of his wives. His first wife was Duchess Marie Gabriele in Bavaria (9 October 1878 – 24 October 1912), daughter of Duke Karl-Theodor in Bavaria, married on 10 July 1900 in Munich. They had five children His second wife was Princess Antonia of Luxembourg (7 October 1899 – 31 July 1954), daughter of William IV, Grand Duke of Luxembourg, married on 7 April 1921 in Lenggries. They had six children.


Robert I, Latin Emperor (d. 1228), Emperor of the Latin Empire and Constantinopole

Robert Guiscard (c. 1015–1085), Norman nobleman, adventurer and explorer, leader of the conquest of southern Italy and Sicily


Robert III of Artois (1287–1342), Lord of Conches-en-Ouche, of Domfront, and of Mehun-sur-Yčvre, Earl of Richmond, one of the principal commanders of Battle of Saint-Omer and Hundred Years' War (1337–1360)

Robert of Bellęme, 3rd Earl of Shrewsbury, Anglo-Norman nobleman, and one of the most prominent figures in the competition for the succession to England and Normandy, member of the House of Bellęme, one of the principal commanders of Battle of Tinchebray

Sir Robert Bemborough, medieval knight who led the Montfortist faction during the Combat of the Thirty
Robert de Craon (died 1147), the second Grand Master of the Knights Templar from June 1136 until his death, one of the principal commanders of the Second Crusade

Robert de Juilly (died 1377), Grand Master of the Knights Hospitaller from 1374 to his death

Robert IV of Sablé (1150–1193), eleventh Grand Master of the Knights Templar from 1191 to 1192 and Lord of Cyprus from 1191 to 1192, one of the principal commanders of the Third Crusade and Battle of Arsuf


Robert Benson, 1st Baron Bingley

Robert Bertie, 1st Earl of Lindsey

Robert Bruce, 1st Earl of Ailesbury

Robert Carey, 1st Earl of Monmouth

Robert Carr, 1st Earl of Somerset

Robert Cecil, 1st Viscount Cecil of Chelwood (Edgar Algernon Robert Gascoyne-Cecil, 1st Viscount Cecil of Chelwood) CH, PC, QC (14 September 1864 – 24 November 1958), known as Lord Robert Cecil from 1868 to 1923, was a British lawyer, politician and diplomat. He was one of the architects of the League of Nations and a defender of it, whose service to the organisation saw him awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1937.Cecil was born at Cavendish Square, London, the sixth child and third son of Robert Gascoyne-Cecil, 3rd Marquess of Salisbury, three times prime minister, and Georgina, daughter of Sir Edward Hall Alderson. He was the brother of James Gascoyne-Cecil, 4th Marquess of Salisbury, Lord William Cecil, Lord Edward Cecil and Lord Quickswood and the cousin of Arthur Balfour He was fond of saying that his marriage to Lady Eleanor Lambton, daughter of George Lambton, 2nd Earl of Durham on 22 January 1889, was the cleverest thing he had ever done.

Robert Cecil, 1st Earl of Salisbury

Sir Robert Dashwood, 1st Baronet, English politician

Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex, English nobleman and military commander, one of the principal commanders of English Armada, Capture of Cadiz, Islands Voyage, Essex Campaign in Ireland and Irish Nine Years' War

Robert Dudley, 1st Earl of Leicester, British statesman and military commander, governor-general of British Empire, one of the principal commanders of Dutch Revolt, Eighty Years' War, Anglo-Spanish War (1585–1604) and Battle of Zutphen

Robert Devereux, 3rd Earl of Essex, British nobleman and military leader, Roundhead and one of the principal commanders of English Civil War

Robert Bannatyne Finlay, 1st Viscount Finlay, GCMG, PC (11 July 1842 – 9 March 1929), known as Sir Robert Finlay from 1895 to 1916, initially formally qualified as a doctor, was a British barrister and politician, and Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain. The son of William Finlay, a physician, and Ann, daughter of Robert Bannatyne Lord Finlay married Mary, daughter of Cosmo Innes, in 1874. She died in June 1911. Lord Finlay died in March 1929, aged 86, at his home in Kensington, London, and was buried at Nairn. He was succeeded in his titles by his son, William, later a Lord Justice of Appeal.

Sir Robert Gordon, 1st Baronet, Scottish politician and courtier

Robert Greville, 2nd Baron Brooke, English Baron, military commander and Roundhead general

Robert Henley, 1st Earl of Northington, Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain

Robert Herbert, 12th Earl of Pembroke

Sir Robert Inglis, 2nd Baronet, English Conservative politician

Robert Kerr, 1st Earl of Ancram

Robert Kerr, 1st Marquess of Lothian

Sir Robert Kingsmill, 1st Baronet, Royal navy officer, one of the principal commanders of French expedition to Ireland (1796)


Robert I de la Marck


Robert II de la Marck (1468 – November 1536), Duke of Bouillon, Belgium, and Seigneur of Sedan, France. Son of Robert I de la Marck and Jeanne de Saulcy Robert married Catherine de Cro˙, daughter of Philip I of Cro˙-Chimay, Count of Chimay, in 1490. They had 8 children

Robert III de La Marck, Seigneur of Fleuranges, Marshal of France. Born in 1491, Robert was the son of Robert II de la Marck; Duke of Bouillon, Seigneur of Sedan and Fleuranges, and Catherine de Cro˙ Robert married Guillemette de Sarrebruck and had 1 son

Robert IV de La Marck (1512–1556), was Duke of Bouillon, Seigneur of Sedan and a Marshal of France. Robert was the only son of Robert III de La Marck and Guillemette de Sarrebruck Robert married in 1538 Françoise de Brézé, daughter of Louis de Brézé and Diane de Poitiers. They had 9 children


Robert Maxwell, 1st Earl of Nithsdale, Scottish nobleman and military commander, one of the principal commanders of Thirty Years' War

Robert Maxwell, 5th Lord Maxwell, Scottish soldier and nobleman, member of the Council of Regency of the Kingdom of Scotland, Regent of the Isle of Arran, patriarch of the House of Maxwell/Clan Maxwell, one of the principal commanders of Battle of Solway Moss and Battle of Melrose

Robert Paston, 1st Earl of Yarmouth

Sir Robert Peel, 1st Baronet, British politician and industrialist and one of early textile manufacturers of the Industrial Revolution, father of Sir Robert Peel, twice Prime Minister of the United Kingdom

Robert Pierrepont, 1st Earl of Kingston-upon-Hull

Robert Raymond, 1st Baron Raymond

Robert Reid, 1st Earl Loreburn

Robert Rich, 2nd Earl of Warwick

Robert Rolfe, 1st Baron Cranworth, Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain

Lord Robert Walpole, 2nd Earl of Orford, British peer and politician

Robert Windsor-Clive, 1st Earl of Plymouth, British nobleman and Conservative politician

Robert Stewart, 1st Marquess of Londonderry

Robert Stewart, Viscount Castlereagh, Irish/British statesman, British Foreign Secretary, central to the management of the War of the Sixth Coalition that defeated Napoleon, principal British diplomat at the Congress of Vienna, leader of the British House of Commons in the Liverpool, Chief Secretary for Ireland, Secretary of State for War and the Colonies, one of the principal leaders of Irish Rebellion of 1798


Prince Robert of Luxembourg (Robert Louis François Marie)(14 August 1968) is a member of the Grand Ducal Family of Luxembourg. He is a paternal first cousin of Henri, the reigning grand duke of Luxembourg. Prince Robert is currently the president of Domaine Clarence Dillon, the French wine company founded by his maternal great-grandfather, Clarence Dillon. As of May 2020, Prince Robert is 12th in the line of succession to the Luxembourger throne. Born on 14 August 1968 at Fischbach Castle, Fischbach, Luxembourg, he is the second child and only son of Prince Charles of Luxembourg, second son of Charlotte, Grand Duchess of Luxembourg and Prince Felix of Bourbon-Parma, and his American-born wife, Joan Douglas Dillon, second daughter of politician and diplomat C. Douglas Dillon. He has one older sister half-sister from his mother's previous marriage and one older full-sister, Princess Charlotte (born 15 September 1967). Prince Robert and his sister were raised at Fischbach Castle which was then the home of his paternal grandparents On 29 January 1994, Prince Robert married Julie Elizabeth Houston Ongaro (born 9 June 1966) in Boston, Massachusetts. They have three children As their marriage was non-dynastically approved, Julie was initially known only as "Julie de Nassau" and their children initially bore the titles "Count/Countess of Nassau". On 27 November 2004, Grand Duke Henri issued an Arręté grand-ducal upgrading Julie and their issue to the titles of "Prince/Princess of Nassau" with the style of Royal Highness

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« Reply #1208 on: June 17, 2022, 11:55:36 AM »

The given name Eric, Erich, Erikk, Erik, Erick, or Eirik is derived from the Old Norse name Eiríkr  (or Eríkr  in Old East Norse due to monophthongization).The first element, ei- may be derived from the older Proto-Norse *aina(z), meaning "one, alone, unique", as in the form Ćinrikr explicitly, but it could also be from *aiwa(z) "everlasting, eternity", as in the Gothic form Euric.The second element -ríkr stems either from Proto-Germanic *ríks "king, ruler" (cf. Gothic reiks) or the therefrom derived *ríkijaz "kingly, powerful, rich, prince"; from the common Proto-Indo-European root *h₃rḗǵs. The name is thus usually taken to mean "sole ruler, autocrat" or "eternal ruler, ever powerful". Eric used in the sense of a proper noun meaning "one ruler" may be the origin of Eriksgata, and if so it would have meant "one ruler's journey". The tour was the medieval Swedish king's journey, when newly elected, to seek the acceptance of peripheral provinces.

Euric, king of the Visigoths between 466 and 484

Eric I of Denmark, king of Denmark between 1095 and 1103

Eric II of Denmark, king of Denmark between 1134 and 1137

Eric III of Denmark, king of Denmark from 1137 until he abdicated in 1146

Eric IV of Denmark, king of Denmark from 1241 until his murder in 1250

Eric V of Denmark, son of Christopher I, reigned from 1259 to his murder in 1286

Eric VI of Denmark, firstborn son of Eric V, reigned from 1286 to 1319

Eric VII of Denmark, also Eric III of Norway and Eric XIII of Sweden, reigned from 1397 to his deposition in 1439

Eric I of Norway (Eric Bloodaxe), the second king of Norway

Eric II of Norway, the king of Norway from 1280 until 1299

Eric III of Norway, also Eric VII of Denmark and Eric XIII of Sweden

Eiríkr Hákonarson, earl of Lade, ruler of Norway and earl of Northumbria

Erik the Red, the son of Ţorvaldr Ásvaldsson

Alaric and Eric, two legendary kings of Sweden

Jorund and Eirik, two legendary kings of Sweden

Erik Björnsson, one of the sons of Björn Ironside

Erik Refilsson, Swedish legendary king

Eric Anundsson, Swedish legendary king who ruled during the 9th century, may be the same as Erik Weatherhat, a more or less mythical Swedish king

Eric the Victorious, king of the Swedes during the second half of the 10th century

Eric and Eric, two pretenders around 1066

Eric IX of Sweden, Swedish king between 1150 and 1160, called Saint Eric, Eric the Lawgiver, Eric the Saint, or Eric the Holy

Eric X of Sweden, the King of Sweden between 1208 and 1216

Eric XI of Sweden, the son of king Erik X of Sweden and Richeza of Denmark

Eric XII of Sweden, rival King of Sweden and to his father Magnus IV from 1356 to his death in 1359

Eric XIII of Sweden, Eric of Pomerania

Eric XIV of Sweden, King of Sweden from 1560 until he was deposed in 1568

Prince Erik, Duke of Västmanland (Erik Gustav Ludvig Albert)( 20 April 1889 – 20 September 1918) was a Swedish and Norwegian prince. He was the third and youngest son of King Gustav V of Sweden and Victoria of Baden. In 1904, Prince Erik was appointed a Knight of the Norwegian Lion by his paternal grandfather, King Oscar II. Prince Erik had epilepsy and mild intellectual disability. His exact condition has not been published, but he may have had an injury at birth or been affected by his mother's strong pre-natal medication for pneumonia. He had pangs of severe anxiety, and Victoria called him "my much loved child of grief" He was described as handsome and physically healthy. His mental disability was not noticeable in brief conversation, but would become apparent if he was engaged at length Because of his condition, he was seldom seen in public and led a quiet life away from the public eye, similar to the life of Prince John of the United Kingdom. Because he was a member of the royal family, he was present in official royal photographs, but he had no official tasks. During 1907 to 1909, a residence was built for him away from the public eye in Djursholm, a relatively new garden community north of Stockholm. In 1917, he complained about having to live in such isolation, and it was decided that he should have a new residence closer to Stockholm. However, he died the next year of the Spanish flu at Drottningholm Palace. His parents were not present when he died which, according to official memoirs, caused his father great sorrow in later years. His mother, who herself had poor health and spent parts of the year in Italy, was abroad at the time. Reportedly his brothers felt sorry for him


Prince Erik, Count of Rosenborg (Erik Frederik Christian Alexander)( 8 November 1890 – 10 September 1950) was a Danish prince. He was born in Copenhagen, a son of Prince Valdemar of Denmark and Princess Marie of Orléans. As was then customary in the Danish royal house, Erik renounced his rights to the throne when he chose to take a commoner as wife, marrying in Ottawa, Ontario, on 11 February 1924 Lois Frances Booth (Ottawa, Ontario, 2 August 1897 – Copenhagen, 26 February 1941). His wife was the daughter of John Frederick Booth, who lived in Canada, and the paternal granddaughter of John Rudolphus Booth by his wife, Rosalinda Cook. Prince Erik and his wife divorced in 1937. She later remarried Thorkild Juelsberg, without issue.The couple had two children


Erik Ove Carl Johan Emil Vind (5 May 1954), son of Countess Alexandra Dagmar Frances Marie Margrethe of Rosenborg (5 February 1927 – 5 October 1992) and  Ivar Emil Vind-Röj (5 January 1921 – 11 February 1977),  He married in Mahé, Seychelles on 15 February 1993 Countess Suzanne Ingrid Jessie Dorthe av Ahlefeldt-Laurvig-Bille (b. Svendborg, 4 March 1967), lady-in-waiting to the Princess Alexandra . They had 3 children


Prince Erik Marie Joseph René Michel Pierre of Bourbon-Parma (28 August 1953 – 21 January 2021), son of Prince Michel of Bourbon-Parma (4 March 1926 – 7 July 2018) and his 1st wife Princess Yolande de Broglie-Revel (1928–2014) and  He married in Ledreborg, Denmark, on 8 August 1980 Countess Lydia af Holstein-Ledreborg (born 22 February 1955), daughter of Princess Marie Gabriele of Luxembourg, divorced in 1999. They had five children


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« Reply #1209 on: June 20, 2022, 01:21:01 PM »

Julie is a popular Latin first name which originally comes from the Latin Julia which could mean youthful, soft-haired, beautiful or vivacious. It is the feminine form of Julius, and can be a pet form of Julia, Yulie, or Juliette.


Julia (wife of Sulla) (c. 129 BC–c. 104 BC), first wife of Sulla

Julia (wife of Marius) (c. 130 BC–69 BC)

Julia (mother of Mark Antony) (104 BC–after 39 BC)

Julia Major (sister of Julius Caesar) (before 101 BC–?)

Julia Minor (sister of Julius Caesar) (101 BC–51 BC), maternal grandmother of Emperor Augustus Caesar

Julia (daughter of Caesar) (c. 76 BC–54 BC)

Livia Drusilla (58 BC–29 AD), also known as Julia Augusta, wife of Emperor Augustus Caesar

Julia the Elder (39 BC–14 AD), daughter of Emperor Augustus

Julia the Younger (19 BC–c. AD 29), daughter of Julia the Elder

Julia Livia (before 14–43), granddaughter of Emperor Tiberius

Julia Agrippina or Agrippina the Younger (15–59), daughter of the general Germanicus and fourth wife of Emperor Claudius

Julia Drusilla (16–38), daughter of Germanicus, sister of Caligula

Julia Livilla (18-late AD 41 or early AD 42), daughter of Germanicus, youngest sister of Caligula

Julia Drusilla (39–41), daughter of Emperor Caligula

Julia Urania (fl. 1st century), wife of Roman client king Ptolemy of Mauretania

Julia Bodina (fl. 1st century), a slave, later freedwoman, of Julia Urania of Mauretania

Julia Iotapa (daughter of Antiochus III) (before 17–c. 52), Queen of Commagene

Julia Iotapa (daughter of Antiochus IV) (c. 45–after 96), Queen of Cetis

Julia Iotapa (Cilician princess) (c. 80–2nd century), Princess of Cilicia

Julia Mamaea (wife of Polemon II of Pontus) (fl. 1st century), second wife of Polemon II of Pontus

Julia (daughter of Tigranes VI of Armenia) (fl. 1st century-possibly 2nd century), Herodian Princess of Armenia

Julia Flavia (64–91), daughter of emperor Titus

Julia Serviana Paulina (died before 136?), niece of Emperor Hadrian

Julia Fadilla, younger half-sister to Emperor Antoninus Pius and paternal aunt to Empress Faustina the Younger

Julia Domna (160–217), empress and wife of Emperor Septimius Severus

Julia Maesa (c. 165–c. 224), Domna's sister

Julia Soaemias (180–222), daughter to Julia Maesa and mother of emperor Elagabalus

Julia Avita Mamaea (after 180–235), Soaemias' sister and mother of emperor Alexander Severus

Julia Severa or Severina (fl. 3rd century), daughter of Emperor Philip the Arab

Julia, Princess of Battenberg (previously Countess Julia Therese Salomea von Hauke, Russian: Ю́лия Маври́киевна Гауке)( 24 November [O.S. 12 November] 1825 – 19 September 1895) was the wife of Prince Alexander of Hesse and by Rhine, the third son of Louis II, Grand Duke of Hesse. The daughter of a Polish general of German descent, she was not of princely origin. She became a lady-in-waiting to Marie of Hesse, wife of the future Emperor Alexander II and a sister of Prince Alexander of Hesse and by Rhine, whom she married, having met him in the course of her duties. The marriage of social unequals was deemed morganatic, but the Duke of Hesse gave her her own title of nobility as Princess of Battenberg. She was the mother of Alexander, Prince of Bulgaria, and is an ancestor of Charles, Prince of Wales, heir to the British throne, and to the current generations of the Spanish royal family.Hauke was born in Warsaw, Congress Poland, then ruled in personal union by the Emperor of the Russian Empire. She was the daughter of Hans Moritz Hauke, a Polish general of German descent. Her mother, Sophie, was the daughter of Polish doctor Franz Leopold Lafontaine.Hauke served as lady-in-waiting to Empress Marie Alexandrovna, wife of the future Emperor Alexander II and a sister of Prince Alexander of Hesse and by Rhine. She met Prince Alexander while performing her duties at court in St. Petersburg. The Emperor did not approve of a courtship between her and his son's brother-in-law, so the two arranged to leave St. Petersburg. By the time Julia and Alexander were able to marry, she was six months pregnant with their first child, Marie. They were married on 28 October 1851 in Breslau in Prussian Silesia (now called Wrocław and in Poland).Since she was not considered equal for royal marriage purposes, her children did not qualify for succession to the throne of Hesse and by Rhine. Her marriage was declared to be morganatic after the birth of her first son.Her husband's brother, Grand Duke Louis III of Hesse-Darmstadt, made her Countess of Battenberg in 1851; with the style of Illustrious Highness (German: Erlaucht). In 1858, she was elevated to Princess of Battenberg with the style of Serene Highness, (German: Seine Erlaucht). Battenberg became the name of a morganatic branch of the Grand Ducal Family of Hesse.There were five children of the marriage, all princes and princesses of Battenberg


Julie d'Angennes, Duchess of Montausier (1607 - 15 November 1671) was a French courtier. She served as royal governess of Louis, Grand Dauphin in 1661-1664, and Premičre dame d'honneur to the queen of France, Queen Marie Thérčse, from 1664 until 1671. She was the duchesse de Montausier by marriage.Julie d'Angennes was the daughter of Charles d'Angennes, Marquis of Rambouillet and Catherine de Vivonne, "marquise de Rambouillet". She played an important role in the famous literary salon of her mother, where she was referred to as Princess Julie and was celebrated as a muse to writers and poets for her beauty and wit. She married Charles de Sainte-Maure, Duke of Montausier in 1645. In 1661-1664, she was governess to the dauphin. She was blamed by Louis Henri de Pardaillan, Marquis of Montespan for assisting in the affair between the king and his wife, Madame de Montespan. In 1668, when her spouse was appointed governor to the dauphin, which was by some seen as payment for the role his wife played in the king's love life, the husband of Madame de Montespan stormed in to Julie d'Angennes and publicly blamed her for her role in the adultery of his wife. This scene deeply affected Julie d'Angennes, who was already suffering from nervous problems, and in late 1669, she announced her retirement from court service and left for the country, though an appointment for her replacement was not made until two years later.


Countess Julie of Rosenborg, daughter of Count Axel and Countess Jutta of Rosenborg. Her father is son of Prince Axel of Denmark's younger son, Count Flemming Valdemar of Rosenborg, and his wife


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« Reply #1210 on: June 20, 2022, 01:23:05 PM »

Marie Juliette Louvet (9 May 1867 – 24 September 1930) was the lover of the unmarried Prince Louis II of Monaco and the mother of his only child, Princess Charlotte of Monaco.Known as Juliette, Louvet was the daughter of Jacques Henri Louvet (1830–1910) and his first wife, Joséphine Elmire Piedefer (1828–1871). She married the photographer Achille Delmaet, but they divorced in 1893. They had two children, Georges and Marguerite. Juliette Delmaet became an entertainer of sorts, reportedly a cabaret singer. In 1897, she was a hostess in a Montmartre nightclub when she met Prince Louis of Monaco. She gave birth to their daughter, Charlotte, in Constantine, French Algeria, in 1898, where Louis served in the French Army with a regiment of Chasseurs d'Afrique (African Light Horse), and where she justified her presence at the military barracks as a laundress. Through her daughter she is the maternal grandmother of Rainier III, Prince of Monaco and Princess Antoinette, Baroness of Massy.


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« Reply #1211 on: June 20, 2022, 03:17:34 PM »

Charlotte is a female given name, a female form of the male name Charlot, a diminutive of Charles. It is of French origin meaning "free man" or "petite". The name dates back to at least the 14th century. King Charles II of England had two illegitimate daughters with the name, the second wife of King Louis XI of France was Charlotte of Savoy, and Charlotte de Bourbon-La Marche (1388-1422) was Queen of Cyprus. Other names for Charlotte are Charlie, Lottie, Lotte, Carlota and Carlotta


Princess Charlotte of Cambridge (Charlotte Elizabeth Diana) (2 May 2015) is a member of the British royal family. She is the second child and only daughter of Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, and Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge. She is fourth in the line of succession to the British throne.

Charlotte Stuart, styled Duchess of Albany (29 October 1753 - 17 November 1789) was the illegitimate daughter of the Jacobite pretender Prince Charles Edward Stuart ("Bonnie Prince Charlie" or the "Young Pretender") and his only child to survive infancy.Her mother was Clementina Walkinshaw, who was mistress to the Prince from 1752 until 1760. After years of abuse, Clementina left him, taking Charlotte with her. Charlotte spent most of her life in French convents, estranged from a father who refused to make any provision for her. Unable to marry, she herself became a mistress with illegitimate children, taking Ferdinand de Rohan, Archbishop of Bordeaux, as her lover.She was finally reconciled with her father in 1784, when he legitimised her and created her Duchess of Albany in the Jacobite Peerage. She left her children with her mother, and became her father's carer and companion in the last years of his life, before dying less than two years after him. Her three children were raised in anonymity; however, as Prince Charles Stuart's only grandchildren, they have been the subject of Jacobite interest since their lineage was uncovered in the 20th century.


Charlotte de Rohan, daughter of  Ferdinand Maximilien Mériadec de Rohan, Archbishop of Bordeaux and Cambrai and his mistress Charlotte Stuart, styled Duchess of Albany


Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz (Sophia Charlotte)( 19 May 1744 – 17 November 1818) was Queen of Great Britain and of Ireland as the wife of King George III from their marriage on 8 September 1761 until the union of the two kingdoms on 1 January 1801, after which she was Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland until her death in 1818. As George's wife, she was also Electress of Hanover until becoming Queen of Hanover on 12 October 1814, when the electorate became a kingdom.Charlotte was born into the royal family of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, a duchy in northern Germany. In 1760 the young and unmarried George III inherited the British throne. As Charlotte was a minor German princess with no interest in politics, George considered her a suitable consort, and they married in 1761. The marriage lasted 57 years and produced 15 children, 13 of whom survived to adulthood. They included two future British monarchs, George IV and William IV; as well as Charlotte, Princess Royal, who became Queen of Württemberg; Prince Edward, the father of Queen Victoria; Prince Adolphus, grandfather of the British queen consort Mary of Teck; and Prince Ernest Augustus, who became King of Hanover. The couple had 15 children.

Charlotte, Princess Royal (Charlotte Augusta Matilda)(29 September 1766 – 5 October 1828), was Queen of Württemberg as the wife of King Frederick I. She was the eldest daughter and fourth child of King George III of the United Kingdom and his wife, Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz On 18 May 1797, the Princess Royal was married at the Chapel Royal, St James's Palace, London, to Frederick, Hereditary Prince of Württemberg, the eldest son and heir apparent of Frederick II Eugene, Duke of Württemberg and his wife, Margravine Sophia Dorothea of Brandenburg-Schwedt.The younger Frederick succeeded his father as the reigning Duke of Württemberg on 22 December 1797. Duke Frederick II had two sons and two daughters by his first marriage to the late Princess Augusta (3 December 1764 – 27 September 1788), the daughter of Duke Karl II of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel and Princess Augusta of Great Britain (the elder sister of George III) and thus Charlotte's first cousin; Princess Augusta was also the elder sister of Caroline of Brunswick, the estranged wife of the future George IV (then Prince of Wales). The marriage between Duke Frederick and the Princess Royal produced one child: a stillborn daughter on 27 April 1798


Princess Charlotte Augusta of Wales (7 January 1796 – 6 November 1817) was the only child of George, Prince of Wales (later George IV), and his wife, Caroline of Brunswick. Had she outlived both her grandfather George III and her father, she would have become Queen of the United Kingdom, but she died at the age of 21, predeceasing them both. Charlotte's parents disliked each other from before their arranged marriage and soon separated. The Prince of Wales left most of Charlotte's care to governesses and servants, only allowing her limited contact with Caroline, who eventually left the country. As Charlotte grew to adulthood, her father pressured her to marry Willem, Hereditary Prince of Orange (later King of the Netherlands). After initially accepting him, Charlotte soon broke off the intended match. This resulted in an extended contest of wills between her and her father, who finally permitted her to marry Leopold of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld (later King of the Belgians). After a year and a half of happy marriage, Charlotte died after delivering a stillborn son.


Charlotte of Belgium (Marie Charlotte Amélie Augustine Victoire Clémentine Léopoldine)(7 June 1840 – 19 January 1927), known by the Spanish version of her name, Carlota, was by birth a Princess of Belgium and member of the House of Wettin in the branch of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (as such she was also styled Princess of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha and Duchess in Saxony). The daughter of King Leopold I of Belgium and Louise of Orléans. Her first name pays homage to the late Princess Charlotte of Wales, her father's first wife.  As the wife of Archduke Maximilian of Austria, Viceroy of Lombardy–Venetia and later Emperor of Mexico, she became Archduchess of Austria (in 1857) and Empress consort of Mexico (in 1864). She was daughter, granddaughter, sister, sister in-law, cousin and wife of reigning or deposed sovereigns throughout Europe and Mexico. Since the beginning of her marriage, she feuded with Empress Elisabeth in Vienna, and was glad when her husband was posted to Italy as Viceroy of Lombardy–Venetia. At this time, he was selected by the Emperor Napoleon III as a figurehead for his proposed French Empire in Mexico, and Charlotte overcame her husband's doubts about the plan. Maximilian and Charlotte (known by the Spanish Carlota) duly arrived to Mexico City in 1864, but their reign lasted a little over two years. She assisted her husband, who let her rule as regent during his absences from Mexico. When Emperor Napoleon III ordered the withdrawal of French military aid intended to support Maximilian, the situation of the Mexican imperial couple became untenable.On her own initiative, Charlotte decided to go personally to Europe in order to attempt a final approach to Paris and the Vatican. She landed in France in August 1866, but suffered the successive refusals of both Emperor Napoleon III and Pope Pius IX. In Rome, the failure of her mission appeared to compromise her mental health to the point that an alienist doctor advocated the confinement of Charlotte in Miramare Castle. It was during her stay under house arrest that Emperor Maximilian was deposed and executed by Benito Juarez in June 1867. Unaware that she was now a widow, Charlotte was brought back to Belgium and confined successively in the Pavilion de Tervueren (in 1867 and again during 1869–1879), the Palace of Laeken (during 1867–1869) and finally at Bouchout Castle in Meise (from 1879), where she remained for the next 48 years in a deleterious mental state, giving rise to much speculation ever since, before dying in 1927 aged 86.


Charlotte of Bourbon (1388 – 15 January 1422) was the queen consort of Cyprus and titular queen consort of Armenia and Jerusalem through her marriage to King Janus. She was his second wife and the mother of his six legitimate children, which included King John II and Anne de Lusignan. It was Charlotte's influence which was instrumental in the revival of French culture at the royal court in Nicosia


Charlotte (28 June 1444 – 16 July 1487) was the Queen of Cyprus from 1458 until 1464. She was the eldest and only surviving daughter of King John II of Cyprus and Helena Palaiologina. At the age of 14, she succeeded to the Cypriot throne upon the death of her father. Her illegitimate half-brother, James, challenged her right to the crown. With the support of the Egyptians, he forced her to flee the island in 1463, and he was later crowned king. She made a military attempt to regain her throne, but was unsuccessful, and died childless in Rome.


Charlotte Jemima Henrietta Maria Paston, Countess of Yarmouth (née FitzRoy; c. 1650 – 28 July 1684) was one of the many acknowledged illegitimate children of Charles II of England Her mother, Elizabeth Killigrew Boyle, wife of Francis Boyle (afterwards Viscount Shannon in Ireland), had been a maid of honour to Charles II's mother, Queen Henrietta Maria.Charlotte married firstly James Howard, with whom she had a daughter, Stuarta. In 1672 she married William Paston, later the second Earl of Yarmouth, a member of the Paston family, and had issue. Both William and his father were in high favour with the Stuarts.Charlotte died on 28 July 1684 in London and was buried at Westminster Abbey on 4 August 1684.With her first husband, James Howard (d. 1669), Lady Charlotte had a daughter Charlotte FitzRoy had at least four more children by her second husband, William Paston, 2nd Earl of Yarmouth


Lady Charlotte Paston (1675–1736), daughter of Charlotte Fitzroy and her second husband William Paston. She married Thomas Herne of Haveringland Hall, Norfolk, and had a son, Paston Herne, whose illegitimate daughter Anne Herne married Sir Everard Buckworth (later Buckworth-Herne), 5th Baronet, and was the mother of Sir Buckworth Buckworth-Herne-Soame, 6th Baronet. Lady Charlotte was also married to a Major Weldron.


Princess Charlotte Augusta Louisa of Clarence (27 March 1819-27 March 1819), daughter of King William IV of the UK and Adelaide of Saxe-Meiningen.


Charlotte of Savoy (c. 1441/3 – 1 December 1483) was Queen of France as the second spouse of Louis XI. She served as regent during the king's absence in 1465, and was a member of the royal regency council during her son's minority in 1483.She was a daughter of Louis, Duke of Savoy and Anne of Cyprus. Her maternal grandparents were Janus of Cyprus and Charlotte de Bourbon-La Marche. Her maternal grandmother, for whom she was probably named, was a daughter of John I, Count of La Marche, and Catherine de Vendôme. She was one of 19 children, 14 of whom survived infancy. On 11 March 1443, when Charlotte was just over a year old, she was betrothed to Frederick of Saxony (28 August 1439- 23 December 1451), eldest son of Frederick II, Elector of Saxony. For reasons unknown, the betrothal was annulled. Less than eight years later on 14 February 1451, Charlotte married Louis, Dauphin of France (future Louis XI), eldest son of Charles VII of France and Marie of Anjou.The bride was nine years old and the groom twenty-seven. The marriage, which had taken place without the consent of the French king, was Louis' second; his first spouse, Margaret of Scotland, had died childless in 1445. Upon her marriage, Charlotte became Dauphine of France.On 22 July 1461, Charlotte became Queen of France. The following year, she became seriously ill and was close to death by August 1462. Although she recovered, her health was weakened.Charlotte became the mother of eight children, but only three survived infancy. These were Charles VIII, who became king of France, Anne, who acted as regent of France for Charles, and Joan, who became queen of France as the spouse of Louis XII.


Charlotte Aglaé d'Orléans (22 October 1700 – 19 January 1761) was Duchess of Modena and Reggio by marriage to Francesco III d'Este. She was the third daughter of Philippe II, Duke of Orléans and his wife, Françoise-Marie de Bourbon. She was born a princesse du sang, and had ten children, including Ercole III d'Este, Duke of Modena.


Charlotte Amalie of Hesse-Kassel (27 April 1650 – 27 March 1714) was Queen of Denmark and Norway by marriage to King Christian V. Although she did not have much political influence, she was a successful businesswoman in her many estates and protected foreign Protestant non-Lutherans from oppression. She gained popularity for defending Copenhagen from Swedish forces in 1700. Charlotte Amalie was born on 27 April 1650, in Kassel, Hesse, Germany. Her parents were William VI, Landgrave of Hesse-Kassel and Hedwig Sophia of Brandenburg. The marriage was on 15 June 1667 in Nykřbing Slot. Charlotte Amalie became Queen of Denmark and Norway upon the accession of Christian to the throne in 1670. The couple had 8 children


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« Reply #1212 on: June 20, 2022, 03:18:02 PM »

Princess Charlotte Amalie of Denmark and Norway (6 October 1706 – 28 October 1782) was a Danish princess, daughter of King Frederick IV of Denmark and Louise of Mecklenburg-Güstrow. Charlotte Amalie never married. In 1725, she was placed on the list of 99 princesses regarded as suitable for marriage with Louis XV of France (which would require that she convert to Catholicism), but she was removed from the list because Denmark was an arch enemy toward Sweden, the traditional ally of France, and that such a marriage could potentially disturb the French-Swedish alliance  In the early 1730s, her brother the king tried to arrange a marriage between her and Frederick, Prince of Wales, but the negotiations did not succeed and she remained unmarried.


Charlotte Christine Sophie also known as Sophie Charlotte or simply Charlotte (28 August 1694 – 2 November 1715), was the wife of Tsarevich Alexei Petrovich of Russia. She was the daughter of Louis Rudolph, Duke of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel and Princess Christine Louise of Oettingen-Oettingen. She was also the great aunt of Queen Marie Antoinette of France. Charlotte Christine was brought up at the court of the Polish King August II, whose consort Christiane Eberhardine of Brandenburg-Bayreuth was her distant kinswoman and also her godmother. She received a good education for that time period. In late 1709, Tsar Peter I of Russia sent his son Alexei to Dresden to finish his education. There, he met Charlotte for the first time. She seemed a good match to Tsar Peter for his son because her elder sister Elizabeth Christine was married to the Holy Roman Emperor Charles VI, and the support of Austria in the upcoming fight with the Turks was appreciated by Russian diplomats. On 25 October 1711 at Torgau, Charlotte Christine married Tsarevich Alexei, eldest son and heir of Peter I of Russia by his first wife Eudoxia Lopukhina. She was allowed to keep her Lutheran faith, but any children would be raised as Russian Orthodox. This marriage was the second to break the old tradition of the Russian imperial family only marrying members of the Russian nobility, the first being Anna Ivanovna's marriage to Frederick William, Duke of Courland the year before. She was the first female member of a foreign European dynasty to marry a man of the Russian imperial family since Zoe Palaiologina. In 1713 she arrived in Russia.Charlotte enjoyed the favour of Tsar Peter the Great, but lived an isolated life with her own court, which was composed almost entirely by foreigners and headed by her first cousin, Princess Juliana Luise von Ostfriesland. In the beginning her marriage to Alexei was happy, but his drunkenness soon began to strain their relationship. Peter the Great also often took his son on war campaigns with him, thus even further isolating Charlotte. In the early weeks of their marriage, Peter ordered her to return to Petersburg without him or his son, but she had run back to her father's palace. Peter was the one who retrieved her, but soothed her instead of showing anger, and told her that she was free to visit her family whenever, but would have to tell him in the future. The tsesarevich also had an open affair with Yefrosinya Fedorov which started during Charlotte's short lifetime and continued after her death. Charlotte found some consolation in the birth of a daughter, Natalia, and a son, later Peter II of Russia. She died a month after the birth of her son. Both her daughter and son died young without issue.


Princess Charlotte, Duchess of Valentinois (Charlotte Louise Juliette Grimaldi)( 30 September 1898 – 16 November 1977), was the daughter of Louis II, Prince of Monaco, and the mother of Prince Rainier III. From 1922 until 1944, she was the Hereditary Princess of Monaco, heiress presumptive to the throne. Born Charlotte Louise Juliette de Monaco in Constantine, French Algeria, she was the illegitimate daughter of Marie Juliette Louvet, a cabaret singer, and Louis, Hereditary Prince of Monaco and Duke of Valentinois, son and heir of Monaco's reigning monarch, Prince Albert I. Louis had no legitimate children or siblings, so even before he succeeded his father as Prince Louis II, the principality sought to forestall a succession crisis, anticipating that its neighbour, the French Republic, might take it amiss if the throne fell someday to Louis' legal next of kin. That heir was his cousin, Wilhelm, 2nd Duke of Urach, who, although born and raised in Monte Carlo as the son of Princess Florestine of Monaco, was a German subject, property owner and patrilineal relative of the kings of Württemberg. On 15 May 1911 a law was passed recognising Charlotte as Louis' daughter, and declaring her to be a dynastic member of the sovereign family. Though this act was later held to be invalid under the 1882 statutes, an Ordinance of 30 October 1918 was passed to allow her to be adopted into the dynasty instead. Louis adopted Charlotte in Paris on 16 May 1919, thereby entitling her to the surname Grimaldi, while her grandfather bestowed upon her the traditional title of the Principality's heir, Duchess of Valentinois, for life. Charlotte became heir presumptive to the throne as Hereditary Princess when her grandfather died and her father inherited the princely crown in 1922. A shadow of doubt existed over the legality of this adoption. The Monegasque Civil Code (Articles 240 and 243) required that the adopting party be at least of age 50 and the adoptee 21. The 1918 Ordinance changed the age limit to 18 (Charlotte was twenty at the time) but not the other age limit; Louis was then only 48 In Monaco civilly on 18 March and religiously on 19 March 1920, Louis arranged Charlotte's marriage to the then Count Pierre de Polignac of Hennebont, Morbihan, Brittany, France, who, by the Prince's ordinance, took the surname Grimaldi and became a prince of the Monegasque princely family. The couple had two children. Their marriage was not, however, a happy one; they separated on 20 March 1930 due to his homosexuality, and Charlotte left him to live with her doctor and Italian lover, Dalmazzo. The couple were divorced on 18 February 1933 by ordinance of Prince Louis II. On 30 May 1944, the day before her son's 21st birthday and in full agreement with her father, Charlotte renounced and ceded her rights to the throne to her son Rainier, subject to the stipulation that he not predecease her. From this date she was no longer Hereditary Princess of Monaco, though she retained the title Princess Charlotte of Monaco. She renounced her rights because she thought Monaco's population wouldn't accept a leader who was divorced, and whose parents weren't married when she was born.Late in life she went to college, obtaining a degree in social work. After her son assumed the throne (in 1949), Princess Charlotte moved to live at Château de Marchais, the Grimaldi estate outside Paris. Despite the objections of her children who feared for her safety, she turned the estate into a rehabilitation centre for ex-convicts. She lived at the estate with her lover, a noted French former jewel thief named René Girier and nicknamed "René la Canne" (René the Cane)


Charlotte Marie Pomeline Casiraghi (3 August 1986) is a Monégasque model, socialite, writer, editor, equestrian, journalist, film producer, and humanitarian. She is the second child and only daughter of Caroline, Princess of Hanover, and Stefano Casiraghi, an Italian industrialist. She is eleventh in line to the throne of Monaco. Her maternal grandparents were Rainier III, Prince of Monaco, and American actress Grace Kelly. She is named after her maternal great-grandmother, Princess Charlotte, Duchess of Valentinois. In December 2011, Casiraghi started dating stand-up comedian and actor Gad Elmaleh. Their son, Raphaël, was born on Tuesday, 17 December 2013. As Raphaël's parents were not married, he is not included in the line of succession to the Monegasque throne. The couple split in June 2015. In March 2018, several credible media sources reported her engagement to Dimitri Rassam, the son of French actress Carole Bouquet, and it was widely noted that she wore a diamond ring at Monaco's Rose Ball on 24 March. Casiraghi was visibly pregnant by the summer and the couple chose to postpone a wedding until after the birth of their child. On 23 October 2018, Casiraghi gave birth to a second child, a son named Balthazar. The couple married civilly at the Prince's Palace of Monaco on 1 June 2019.They celebrated in a reception at nearby hotel Villa La Vigie.On 29 June 2019, they married religiously at the Abbey of Sainte-Marie de Pierredon, outside Saint-Rémy-de-Provence.


Archduchess Charlotte of Austria (German: Erzherzogin Charlotte von Österreich)( 1 March 1921 – 23 July 1989) was a daughter of Emperor Charles I of Austria and his wife Princess Zita of Bourbon-Parma. She was also known by the name Charlotte de Bar while a welfare worker in the United States from 1943 to 1956.Charlotte Hedwig Franziska Josepha Maria Antonia Roberta Ottonia Pia Anna Ignatia Marcus d'Aviano of Habsburg-Lorraine was born in Prangins, Switzerland, where the Austrian imperial family was living in exile following the collapse of the Austro-Hungarian Empire after the First World War. Her family lived in various countries during their exile: after they left Switzerland they went to the Portuguese island of Madeira where her father died a month after her first birthday, having contracted pneumonia. Her sister, Elisabeth was born one month later. They later settled in Belgium before leaving Europe to flee to the United States to escape the Nazis. Having moved to Canada with her family, she obtained a degree in economics from Laval University in 1942 and pursued further education at Fordham University upon returning to the United States.In 1943 Archduchess Charlotte started work as a welfare worker in Manhattan's East Harlem neighbourhood using the name Charlotte de Bar.In May 1956, Charlotte became engaged to George, Duke of Mecklenburg and head of the House of Mecklenburg-Strelitz. They were married in a civil ceremony on 21 July 1956 in Pöcking, Germany, followed by a religious ceremony four days later. She left her position as a welfare worker after her marriage. Her husband Duke George died on 6 July 1963 and they had no children.Archduchess Charlotte died in Munich four months after the death of her mother.


Dońa Carlota Joaquina Teresa Cayetana of Spain (25 April 1775 – 7 January 1830) was Queen of Portugal and Brazil as the wife of King Dom John VI. She was the daughter of King Don Charles IV of Spain and Maria Luisa of Parma. Detested by the Portuguese court — where she was called "the Shrew of Queluz" (Portuguese: a Megera de Queluz) — Carlota Joaquina gradually won the antipathy of the people, who accused her of promiscuity and influencing her husband in favor of the interests of the Spanish crown. After the escape of the Portuguese court to Brazil, she began conspiring against her husband, claiming that he had no mental capacity to govern Portugal and its possessions, thus wanting to establish a regency. She also planned to usurp the Spanish crown that was in the hands of Napoleon's brother Joseph Bonaparte. After the marriage in 1817 of her son Pedro with the Archduchess Leopoldina of Austria and the later return of the royal family to Portugal in 1821, Carlota Joaquina was confined in the Royal Palace of Queluz, where she died alone and abandoned by her children on 7 January 1830.


Princess Charlotte of Schaumburg-Lippe (10 October 1864 – 16 July 1946) was Queen of Württemberg from 6 October 1891 to 30 November 1918 as the second wife and consort of King William II. She was the daughter of Prince William of Schaumburg-Lippe and Princess Bathildis of Anhalt-Dessau. Charlotte was not only the last queen of Württemberg, but the last surviving queen of any German state.Charlotte was born in Schloss Ratiborschitz, Bohemia (now Ratibořice, Česká Skalice, Czech Republic), and grew up on the princely estate at Náchod. Besides general cultural interests such as music and art she was also very keen on sporting pursuits such as swimming, tennis, cycling and - unusual for a woman of the time - skiing. She also had an extraordinary passion for hunting.On 8 April 1886 she married the heir to the throne of the Kingdom of Württemberg, Crown Prince Wilhelm, who succeeded in 1891 as King William II of Württemberg (Wilhelm II. von Württemberg) She was his second wife, and like her predecessor Princess Marie of Waldeck and Pyrmont was held to be of no political consequence. If the marriage had taken place for reasons of state - Wilhelm had no male heir - it was a miscalculation, as Charlotte produced no children.


Princess Joséphine-Charlotte of Belgium (11 October 1927 – 10 January 2005), was the Grand Duchess consort of Luxembourg as the wife of Grand Duke Jean. She was the first child of King Leopold III of Belgium and his first wife Princess Astrid of Sweden, and sister of the late King Baudouin and former King Albert II and aunt of King Philippe. She was also the first cousin of King Harald V of Norway. Joséphine-Charlotte met Jean, Grand Duke of Luxembourg for the first time during one of her short stays with her godmother and future mother-in-law, Grand Duchess Charlotte, in Fischbach in 1948. On 26 December 1952, the couple announced their engagement to the public even though they already engaged the previous month. Joséphine-Charlotte and Jean were joined in marriage on 9 April 1953 in Luxembourg.During their 52-year marriage, the couple had five children


Charlotte (Charlotte Adelgonde Elisabeth Marie Wilhelmine)( 23 January 1896 – 9 July 1985) reigned as Grand Duchess of Luxembourg from January 1919 until her abdication in November 1964. Born in Berg Castle, Charlotte of Nassau-Weilburg, Princess of Luxembourg, was the second daughter of Grand Duke William IV and his wife, Marie Anne of Portugal. She acceded to the throne on 14 January 1919 following the abdication of her sister, Marie-Adélaďde, due to political pressure over Marie-Adélaďde's role during the German occupation of Luxembourg during World War I. A referendum retained the monarchy with Charlotte as grand duchess.On 6 November 1919 in Luxembourg, she married Prince Felix of Bourbon-Parma, a first cousin on her mother's side. (Both Charlotte and Felix were grandchildren of King Miguel of Portugal, through his daughters Maria Anna and Maria Antonia, respectively). With the marriage, their lineal descent was raised in style from Grand Ducal Highness to Royal Highness. The couple had six children: Grand Duke Jean, Princess Elisabeth, Princess Marie Adelaide, Princess Marie Gabriele, Prince Charles, and Princess Alix.


Princess Charlotte Phyllis Marie of Luxembourg (15 September 1967), daughter of Prince Charles of Luxembourg and Joan Dillon She married civilly in Mouchy on 26 June 1993 and religiously in Saint-Rémy-de-Provence on 18 September 1993 Marc-Victor Cunningham (24 September 1965), son of Victor Cunningham and wife Karen Armitage, and has issue


Princess Charlotte Katherine Justine Marie of Nassau (20 March 1995), daughter of Prince Robert Louis François Marie of Luxembourg (14 August 1968) and Julie Elizabeth Houston Ongaro (9 June 1966)

Countess Charlotte Henckel von Donnersmarck (4 August 1965) , daughter of Princess Marie-Adélaďde of Luxembourg (21 May 1924 – 28 February 2007) and  Graf Karl Josef Henckel von Donnersmarck (7 November 1928 – 16 April 2008) On 27 November 1999, in Wolfsberg, Carinthia, Austria, she married Graf Christoph Johannes von Meran (26 August 1963) and they have three children.
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« Reply #1213 on: June 20, 2022, 03:18:26 PM »

Charlotte Lennox, Duchess of Richmond (née Lady Charlotte Gordon)( 20 September 1768 – 5 May 1842), was a British aristocrat and peeress best known as the hostess of the Duchess of Richmond's ball.  Lady Charlotte Gordon was the eldest child of Alexander Gordon, 4th Duke of Gordon, and his wife, Jane Maxwell. On 9 September 1789, she married Charles Lennox, 4th Duke of Richmond, 4th Duke of Lennox and 4th Duke of Aubigny The Duke and Duchess had seven sons and seven daughters


Lady Charlotte Lennox (c. 1804 – 20 August 1833), daughter of Lady Charlotte Gordon and Charles Lennox, 4th Duke of Richmond, 4th Duke of Lennox and 4th Duke of Aubigny   She married Maurice Berkeley, 1st Baron FitzHardinge of Bristol, and had issue.


Duchess Charlotte Frederica of Mecklenburg-Schwerin (4 December 1784 – 13 July 1840), was the first wife of Christian VIII from 1806 until 1810, before he became King of Norway and later King of Denmark. She was a daughter of Frederick Francis I, Grand Duke of Mecklenburg-Schwerin, and Princess Louise of Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg. Duchess Charlotte Frederica was born on 4 December 1784 in Ludwigslust in Mecklenburg as the seventh and youngest surviving child of the later Grand Duke Frederick Francis I of Mecklenburg-Schwerin and Princess Louise of Saxe-Gotha-AltenburgDuring a long voyage to Germany in 1804, her cousin, the Danish Prince Christian Frederick of Denmark (later King Christian VIII), stayed for a longer time at his uncle's court in Schwerin, where he fell in love with the two year older couisn, Duchess Charlotte Frederica. They married two years later, on 21 June 1806 in Ludwigslust in Mecklenburg In 1809, her alleged affair with her singing teacher, Swiss-born singer and composer Édouard Du Puy, led to her removal from the court. For this reason, her husband divorced her in 1810, banished her from court, sent her into internal exile, and prohibited her from ever seeing her son again. After her divorce, Charlotte Frederica spent the next years of her life in a palace in Horsens, in Jutland and partly in Aarhus, where she cultivated social circles among the local bourgeoisie and had affairs with officersIn 1829 she moved from Denmark to Karlsbad under the name "Mrs. von Gothen." In 1830 she traveled to Italy, finally settling in Rome and later converted to the Catholic faith.Charlotte Frederica died in Rome in 1840. Her death was described as a relief to the court in Copenhagen as she dreamed of someday returning as the King's mother. Frederik VII, who was only one year old when she had to leave him, showed great reverence towards the memory of his late mother: he collected portraits of her in his rooms at Jćgerspris Castle, and when he visited Horsens on Sept. 1857 he officially thanked the city "for the love and kindness that was shown to her."She was allegedly buried in the Teutonic Cemetery in Vatican City. Her tomb was opened on 11 July 2019 due to investigations related to the disappearance of Emanuela Orlandi case, but was found to be empty

Duchess Sophia Charlotte of Oldenburg (German: Sophie Charlotte)(2 February 1879 – 29 March 1964) was a member of the House of Holstein-Gottorp. She was the only surviving child of Frederick Augustus II, Grand Duke of Oldenburg by his first wife Princess Elisabeth Anna of Prussia.Sophia Charlotte ("Lotte") is best known for her unhappy and well-publicized marriage to Prince Eitel Friedrich, second son of Wilhelm II, German Emperor. The marriage later led to divorce; Sophia Charlotte would remarry a few years later to Harald van Hedemann, a former police officer. He was forty and she was forty-eight. Despite his low status, the wedding was held at the grand ducal palace at Rastede Castle, and was attended by her father the ex-Grand Duke as well as a small number of both their relations. Sophia Charlotte was considered one of the richest women in the country, and the couple took up residence at the same castle where they were married.Sophia Charlotte died on 29 March 1964 in Westerstede.


Duchess Louise Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Schwerin (19 November 1779 – 4 January 1801) was the maternal grandmother of Prince Albert, husband of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom.Louise Charlotte was born Duchess of Mecklenburg-Schwerin, her father being Friedrich Franz I, Grand Duke of Mecklenburg-Schwerin. Her mother was Princess Louise of Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg; her sister Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Schwerin (1784–1840) married King Christian VIII of Denmark. On 1 November 1795, Louise Charlotte was engaged to King Gustav IV Adolf of Sweden. The engagement was arranged by Gustaf Adolf Reuterholm, the de facto regent of Sweden, who wished to keep his influence after the monarch was declared of legal majority by having a queen indebted to him for her position. The king himself was initially positive; the engagement was celebrated in the courts of Sweden and Mecklenburg and Louise Charlotte was mentioned in the official church prayer in Sweden. Empress Catherine the Great, however, wished her granddaughter Grand Duchess Alexandra Pavlovna of Russia to be Queen of Sweden, and displayed dislike of the engagement. Upon this many people told the king that Louise Charlotte, whom he had not seen, was not beautiful. About the same period, the monarch also fell in love with Ebba Modée. When the king was declared of legal majority in 1796, he broke off the engagement. Her father demanded compensation. In 1803, the matter was settled when the Swedish city of Wismar in Germany was turned over to Mecklenburg-Schwerin by a treaty in Malmö.In Ludwigslust on 21 October 1797 she married Augustus, Hereditary Prince of Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg, a second cousin on her mother's side. Their common ancestor was Frederick II, Duke of Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg (1676–1732). The marriage was arranged against her will and was an unhappy one: her spouse abused her and she wished to leave him, but was forced by her family to stay Three years later, on 21 December 1800 in Friedenstein Castle around 12.45 pm the Hereditary Princess of Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg gave birth her only child, a daughter, named Louise after her; this daughter later became the wife of Ernst I, Duke of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, and mother to Prince Albert, Prince consort of Queen Victoria. However, she never recovered from childbirth effects and died eleven days later, on 1 January 1801 at the age of 21, before Augustus assumed the throne of Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg.


Princess Charlotte of Prussia (21 June 1831 – 30 March 1855) was by birth a Princess of Prussia and member of the House of Hohenzollern. By marriage she became Hereditary Princess of Saxe-Meiningen.Her parents' marriage was unhappy due to Prince Albert's several affairs, and finally was dissolved on 28 March 1849, after which Princess Marianne began to live with her former coachman Johannes van Rossum, with whom she had a son, Johannes William of Reinhartshausen.The custody of Charlotte and her two surviving siblings Albert and Alexandrine was given to their father; however, their childless aunt Queen Elisabeth Ludovika took care of them, moreover after Prince Albert's second and morganatic marriage in 1853 with Rosalie von Rauch, who bore him two sons, Count William and Count Frederick of Hohenau. As a young woman, Charlotte was highly eligible, due to her Dutch fortune and Hohenzollern connections. In Charlottenburg on 18 May 1850, the nineteen-year-old princess married Georg, Hereditary Prince of Saxe-Meiningen, who was twenty-four years old. The only son of Bernhard II, Duke of Saxe-Meiningen and Princess Marie of Hesse-Kassel, he had led a battalion from Meiningen in support of the Prussians in the First Schleswig War in 1849 The couple had 4 children. On 27 January 1855, their second son, Georg died. Charlotte followed him two months later, dying of childbirth complications on 30 March at the age of twenty-three. Georg was inconsolable, but would eventually remarry to Princess Feodora of Hohenlohe-Langenburg in order to provide a mother to his remaining children


Princess Charlotte of Prussia (Viktoria Elisabeth Auguste Charlotte of Prussia) (24 July 1860 – 1 October 1919)  Born at the Neues Palais in Potsdam, she was the second child and eldest daughter of Prince Frederick of Prussia, a member of the House of Hohenzollern who became Crown Prince of Prussia in 1861 and German Emperor in 1888. Through her mother Victoria, Princess Royal, Charlotte was the eldest granddaughter of the British monarch Queen Victoria and her consort Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha.Princess Charlotte was a difficult child and indifferent student, with a nervous disposition. Her relationship with her demanding mother was strained. As she grew older, Charlotte developed a penchant for spreading gossip and causing trouble. Eager to escape from parental control, at age seventeen, she married Prince Bernhard of Saxe-Meiningen in 1878. Her husband's weak-willed personality had little effect on her. Known for spreading gossip and her eccentric personality, Princess Charlotte enjoyed Berlin society while frequently leaving her only child, Princess Feodora, in the care of family members. Charlotte and Feodora, in turn, also had a difficult relationship.

Princess Charlotte of Saxe-Meiningen (German: Marie Charlotte Amalie Ernestine Wilhelmine Philippine, Prinzessin von Sachsen-Meiningen) (11 September 1751, Frankfurt am Main, Free Imperial City of Frankfurt, Holy Roman Empire – 25 April 1827, Genoa, Kingdom of Sardinia) was a member of the House of Saxe-Meiningen and a Princess of Saxe-Meiningen by birth and a member of the House of Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg and Duchess consort of Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg through her marriage to Ernest II, Duke of Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg.Princess Charlotte was born on 11 September 1751. She was the eldest child and daughter of Anton Ulrich, Duke of Saxe-Meiningen and his second wife, Landgravine Charlotte Amalie of Hesse-Philippsthal. Charlotte was an elder sister of Charles William, Duke of Saxe-Meiningen and George I, Duke of Saxe-Meiningen.Charlotte married Ernest, Hereditary Prince of Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg (later Duke of Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg), son of Frederick III, Duke of Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg and his wife Luise Dorothea of Saxe-Meiningen, on 21 March 1769 in Meiningen. Charlotte and Ernest had four children


Countess Charlotte of Hanau-Lichtenberg (full name: Countess Charlotte Christine Magdalene Johanna of Hanau-Lichtenberg) (2 May 1700– 1 July 1726) was the wife of landgrave Louis VIII of Hesse-Darmstadt. Charlotte was the only surviving child of the last Count of Hanau, Johann Reinhard III, and the Countess Dorothea Friederike of Brandenburg-Ansbach. Thus, she was the sole heir of the County of Hanau. The first man to ask her hand in marriage, was the crown prince and later Landgrave William VIII of Hesse-Kassel. Had this marriage taken place, the county of Hanau would have remained united. However, it failed because of religious differences between William, who was a Calvinist and Charlotte, who was Lutheran.The second candidate was the crown prince and later Landgrave Louis VIII of Hesse-Darmstadt, who was Lutheran. They were married on 5 April 1717. From this marriage she had 3 children.


Charlotte Wilhelmine Christiane Marie of Hesse-Darmstadt (5 November 1755 – 12 December 1785), was by marriage Duchess of Mecklenburg-Strelitz.Charlotte was a daughter of Prince George William of Hesse-Darmstadt (1722-1782) from his marriage to Countess Maria Louise Albertine of Leiningen-Falkenburg-Dagsburg (1729-1818), daughter of Count Christian Karl Reinhard of Leiningen-Dachsburg-Falkenburg-Heidesheim.The princess was first engaged with the hereditary prince Peter Frederick William of Oldenburg, but the engagement was dissolved again as a result of the onset of Peter's mental illness. Charlotte married Charles of Mecklenburg-Strelitz (who later became the Duke of Mecklenburg-Strelitz), on 28 September 1784 in Darmstadt. He was previously married to Charlotte's older sister Friederike, who had died in childbirth. She thus became stepmother for her sister's five surviving children - her nieces and nephews.The couple lived in Hanover, where Charles served as Governor-General for his brother-in-law, King George. Charlotte died after the birth of her only child, a year after their marriage. Charles resigned from his post in Hanover and moved to Charlotte's mother in Darmstadt, who then took care of his children (both Frederike's and Charlotte's).


Duchess Charlotte Georgine of Mecklenburg-Strelitz (Charlotte Georgine Luise Friederike)(17 November 1769 – 14 May 1818) was a member of the House of Mecklenburg-Strelitz and a Duchess of Mecklenburg-Strelitz by birth and a Duchess of Saxe-Hildburghausen through her marriage to Frederick, Duke of Saxe-Hildburghausen (later Duke of Saxe-Altenburg). Charlotte Georgine was born in Hanover, Electorate of Hanover. She was the eldest child and daughter of Charles II, Grand Duke of Mecklenburg and his first wife, Princess Friederike of Hesse-Darmstadt.On 3 September 1785, at the age of fifteen, Charlotte married Duke Frederick, Duke of Saxe-Altenburg, who stood until 1787 under regency of his great-great uncle Joseph Frederick. The marriage was not a happy one; Charlotte was mentally superior to Frederick, who began to ignore her. They also had financial problems; Saxe-Hildburghausen had been financially ruined by the disastrous policies of Frederick's predecessors and in 1806 it had been put into Imperial receivership. The receivers allowed the Duke and Duchess only a reduced Civil List. Charlotte married Frederick, Duke of Saxe-Hildburghausen (later Duke of Saxe-Altenburg), youngest child of Ernest Frederick III, Duke of Saxe-Hildburghausen and his third wife, Princess Ernestine of Saxe-Weimar, on 3 September 1785 in Hildburghausen. Charlotte and Frederick had twelve children
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Charlotte of Bourbon (1546/1547 – 5 May 1582) was a Princess consort of Orange as the third spouse of Willem the Silent, Prince of Orange, the main leader of the Dutch revolt against the Spanish. She was the fourth daughter of Louis III de Bourbon, Duke of Montpensier and Jacqueline de Longwy, Countess of Bar-sur-Seine. Her paternal grandparents were Louis de Bourbon, Prince of La Roche-sur-Yon and Louise de Bourbon, Duchess of Montpensier. Her maternal grandparents were John IV de Longwy, Baron of Pagny, and Jeanne of Angoulęme, a natural (but legitimated by Royal decree in 1501) half-sister of King Francis I of France.Her mother, Jacqueline, was a believer in the Reformed doctrines, and she secretly taught them to her children. By some accounts, Charlotte's father determined to thwart his wife's influence by sending three of his daughters to convents. Charlotte was then only thirteen years old and begged to be allowed to stay with her mother, who died during the time Charlotte was in the convent.The young Charlotte shocked both her family and the royal court by fleeing the convent in 1572, announcing her conversion to Calvinism and, on the advice of Jeanne d'Albret, fleeing to the Electorate of the Palatinate, well beyond her parents' reach On 24 June 1575 Charlotte married the Protestant Willem, Prince of Orange. They had six daughters, including Louise Juliana of Nassau, from whom descended the House of Hanover and most other (Protestant) royal houses. The marriage was very happy–it is said to have been the only one of Willem's four marriages which was for love–and the obvious happiness of the couple increased Willem's popularity. Charlotte allegedly died from exhaustion while trying to nurse her husband after an assassination attempt in 1582.Though Willem was outwardly stoical, it was feared that his grief might cause a fatal relapse. Charlotte's death was widely mourned. Following her death, Willem married on 24 April 1583, his fourth and last wife, Louise de Coligny, by whom he had a son Frederick Henry, Prince of Orange.

Countess Charlotte Brabantina of Nassau (17 September 1580 – August 1631) was the fifth daughter of William the Silent and his third spouse, Charlotte of Bourbon. She lived in her life at the French royal court and performed many successful assignments as a mediator.


Countess Charlotte Flandrina of Nassau (18 August 1579 – 16 April 1640) was a french abbess. She was the fourth daughter of Willem the Silent and his third spouse Charlotte of Bourbon


Charlotte Louise of Hanau-Münzenberg (1597–1649), not married. Daughter of Catharina Belgica of Nassau (31 July 1578 – 12 April 1648) and Philip Louis II, Count of Hanau-Münzenberg


Charlotte of Hesse-Kassel (20 November 1627 – 26 March 1686), was a German princess of the House of Hesse-Kassel and by marriage Electress Palatine during 1650–1657 as the first wife of Charles I Louis, although the validity of the divorce was disputed. Through her daughter Elisabeth Charlotte, Duchess of Orléans, she was the direct ancestress of House of Orléans and the Houses of Habsburg-Lorraine and Habsburg-Este.Born in Kassel, Charlotte was the seventh child and fourth (but second surviving) daughter of William V, Landgrave of Hesse-Kassel and Countess Amalie Elisabeth of Hanau-Münzenberg. She is said to have been a beautiful, but very vain and intellectually undemanding young woman At the urging of her widowed mother, she married on 22 February 1650 at Heidelberg Castle with Charles I Louis, Elector Palatine, the son of the late "Winter King" of Bohemia, who only a few months earlier by the Peace of Westphalia after decades of exile returned to a devastated Electoral Palatinate, the reconstruction of which he set out with great energy. However, Charlotte did not reciprocate the love and attentions of her bridegroom, but instead confessed that she “did not like to take him”. Despite the marital disputes and to the joy of the Electoral Palatinate, Charlotte gave birth three children in quick succession: Charles (born 31 March 1651 and later Elector Palatine), Elisabeth Charlotte (born 27 May 1652 and by marriage Duchess of Orléans) and Frederick (born 12 May 1653, died 13 May 1653 aged 1 day).After the birth of her third child, the Electress Palatine expelled her husband from the bedchamber and refused to resume their conjugal duties.Due to his princely position and church belief, Charles I Louis couldn't get a divorce without Charlotte's consent, although he tried again and again in vain despite her disobedient, stubborn, morose and unruly demeanor. Unlike her ancestor Christine of Saxony, who in 1540 accepted the morganatic second marriage of her husband Philip I, Landgrave of Hesse (who subsequently fathered children with both women), Charlotte strictly refused to this. Charles I Louis, as the owner of the highest executive and judicial power in the Electoral Palatinate, finally on 14 April 1657 decided to unilaterally and officially divorce his wife and proclaimed this publicly. Then he determined his court preacher to bless the wedding with his mistress Marie Luise von Degenfeld as a morganatic marriage; however, Marie Luise and her brother had insisted on a regular and equal marriage. Unlike the Electress Palatine, Marie Luise was gentle and submissive. Between 1658 and 1675, she bore the Elector 13 children; they received the title of Raugrave, but dynastically were considered illegitimate and excluded from the line of succession. Charlotte initially didn't return to Kassel after her "divorce" but lived in a wing of Heidelberg Castle, still hoping that her marital bond could be restored. Little is known about her relationship with her two surviving children, Charles and Elisabeth Charlotte. Her daughter was sent by her father to live with his sister Sophia at her court in Hanover in 1659, apparently to remove the child from her mother's sphere of influence According to another opinion, Charles I Louis send his daughter to Hanover to spare her from the marital disputes. Sophia, who had lived at the Heidelberg court for a few years prior to her marriage, had seen it enough: she hated and despised her sister-in-law and was happy to help her brother take her daughter away from Charlotte, presumably to persuade her to return to Kassel. The only one at the Heidelberg court who openly sided with Charlotte was her eldest sister-in-law, Elisabeth.After Marie Luise von Degenfeld died in 1677 following complication from her 14th pregnancy, Charles I Louis tried in vain to obtain the consent of his first wife to an official divorce so that he could marry again equally and ensure the succession of the Electoral Palatinate, since the marriage of his eldest and only legitimate son, the Electoral Prince Charles with Princess Wilhelmine Ernestine of Denmark had been childless for seven years. However, Charlotte firmly refused.Charles I Louis died on 28 August 1680 and was succeeded by his son Charles II. Once her son took the government, Charlotte immediately returned to Heidelberg and took her place as Dowager Electress Palatine, but remained ill-tempered and difficult.


Countess Friederike Charlotte Antoinette of Dohna-Schlodien in Leistenau (German: Friederike, Burggräfin und Gräfin zu Dohna-Schlodien) (3 July 1738 – 21 April 1785 or 21 April 1786) was a German noble woman.Charlotte, as she was known, was born in Königsberg, Prussia, on 3 July 1738.She was the daughter of Albrecht Christoph, Count (or Burgrave) of Dohna-Schlodien in Leistenau, by his third wife Princess Sophie Henriette of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Beck.[1] She was married, firstly, to her first cousin Karl Anton August, Prince of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Beck (1727–1759) in Königsberg on 30 May 1754.They had an only child: Friedrich Karl Ludwig, Duke of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Beck.

Charlotte Amalia of Nassau-Dillenburg (1680 – 1738) was a German regent; regent of Nassau-Usingen from 1718-1732. She was a daughter of Prince Henry of Nassau-Dillenburg and Dorothea Elisabeth, a daughter of George III of Brieg.In 1706 in Dillenburg, she married Prince William Henry of Nassau-Usingen. The couple had ten children; the first child was born on 3 April 1707 and the last one on 6 March 1718.Four children reached adulthood William Henry died in 1718, and Charlotte Amalia became regent for her underage son Charles.

Charlotte Stanley, Countess of Derby (December 1599 – 31 March 1664), born Charlotte de La Trémoille,is famous for her robust defence of Lathom House during the English Civil War.Charlotte, born at the chateau of Thouars, Poitou, in France, was the daughter of the French nobleman Claude de La Trémoille, 2nd Duke of Thouars, and his wife, Countess Charlotte Brabantina of Nassau. Her maternal grandparents were Willem I, Prince of Orange, and Charlotte de Bourbon.On 26 June 1626, Charlotte married the English nobleman James Stanley, 7th Earl of Derby, and was naturalised as an English citizen by Act of Parliament in February 1629. Her husband was a Royalist commander in the English Civil War, later taken prisoner at Nantwich in 1651 and beheaded at Bolton. Lady Derby was famous for her defence of Lathom House in the Siege of Lathom House by Parliamentary forces during the First English Civil War in 1644. Charlotte and Derby were parents of four daughters and six sons. Only five of their children appear to have survived to a marriageable age

Princess Philippine Charlotte of Prussia (13 March 1716 – 17 February 1801) was Duchess of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel by marriage to Duke Charles I. Philippine Charlotte was a known intellectual in contemporary Germany. She is listed as a female composer as she is thought to have written marches and other music.Philippine Charlotte was the fourth child and third daughter of Frederick William I of Prussia and his wife Sophia Dorothea of Hanover (those who reached adulthood; she was otherwise seventh child and fourth daughter).On 2 July 1733 in Berlin, Princess Philippine Charlotte married Duke Charles of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel, eldest son of Ferdinand Albert II, Duke of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel. Charles inherited the dukedom on his father's death in 1735, making her Duchess consort.The double marriage alliance between Prussia and Brunswick by her marriage to Charles I, and that of her brother Frederick to Charles' sister Elisabeth Christine, led to a permanent alliance of the most important North German Protestant houses Prussia and Brunswick. The family ties of the two dynasties resulted the alliance of Brunswick and Prussia in the Seven Years' War, and the career of Philippines sons in the Prussian service They had 13 children.
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