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« Reply #1650 on: November 08, 2022, 11:23:48 AM »

Prince Christian of Hanover (Christian Heinrich Clemens Paul Frank Peter Welf Wilhelm-Ernst Friedrich Franz)(1 June 1985) is a German noble, the younger son of Ernst August, Prince of Hanover, and his first wife, Chantal Hochuli.On 24 November 2017, Christian married Peruvian lawyer Alessandra de Osma in a civil service at the Chelsea and Westminster register office in London. The couple celebrated their religious wedding on 16 March 2018 at Basilica of San Pedro, in Lima, with the Rev. Hans-Jürgen Hoeppke (IELP-Evangelical Lutheran Church of Peru; Christuskirche in Lima) and Bishop Norbert Klemens Strotmann of the diocese of Chosica officiating After moving permanently to Madrid, the couple announced in March 2020 they were expecting a set of twins, and Alessandra gave birth on 7 July 2020 at Quirón Clinic in Pozuelo de Alarcón.


Christian August II, Duke of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Augustenburg (19 July 1798 – 11 March 1869)( Christian Carl Frederik August), commonly known as Christian, Duke of Augustenborg, was a German prince and statesman. During the 1850s and 1860s, he was a claimant to first duke of the whole provinces of Schleswig and Holstein, and a candidate to become king of Denmark following the death of King Frederick VII. He was the father-in-law of Princess Helena (daughter of Queen Victoria) and the paternal grandfather of Augusta Victoria, Empress of Germany and wife of Kaiser Wilhelm II. He was closely related to Kings Christian VII, Frederick VI and Christian VIII of Denmark through his mother and was a claimant for the Danish throne in the 1860s.Born a prince of the House of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Augustenburg and scion of a cadet-line descendant of the Danish royal House of Oldenburg, Christian August was the fiefholder of Augustenborg and Sønderborg. He was also a claimant to the rulership of the provinces of Slesvig and Holstein, and he was also a candidate to become king of Denmark during the succession crisis caused by the childlessness of King Frederick VII of Denmark. He lost the chance to ascend the throne to his distant kinsman, Prince Christian of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Beck.Christian August was the eldest son and heir of Frederik Christian II, Duke of Augustenborg and his wife Princess Louise Auguste of Denmark.Christian married in 1820 his second cousin, Countess Lovisa-Sophie af Danneskjold-Samsøe (1797–1867), a Danish noblewoman who belonged to the House of Danneskiold-Samsøe, which in turn was an illegitimate branch of the Danish royal House of Oldenburg. They had seven children


Christian August, Prince of Anhalt-Zerbst (29 November 1690 – 16 March 1747) was a German prince of the House of Ascania, and the father of Catherine the Great of Russia.He was a ruler of the Principality of Anhalt-Dornburg. From 1742, he was a ruler of the entire Principality of Anhalt-Zerbst. He was also a Prussian Generalfeldmarschall. Christian August was the third son of John Louis I, Prince of Anhalt-Dornburg and Christine Eleonore of Zeutsch (1666–1699). After the death of his father in 1704, Christian August inherited Anhalt-Dornburg jointly with his brothers John Louis II, John Augustus (died 1709), Christian Louis (died 1710) and John Frederick (died 1742). On 8 November 1727 in Vechelde, Christian August married Johanna Elisabeth of Holstein-Gottorp (24 October 1712 – 30 May 1760), daughter of Prince Christian August of Schleswig-Holstein-Gottorp, Prince of Eutin and sister of King Adolf Frederick of Sweden. They had five children


Prince Christian of Schaumburg-Lippe (German: Christian zu Schaumburg-Lippe)( 20 February 1898 – 13 July 1974) was a German prince and head of the Náchod branch of the princely house of Schaumburg-Lippe.He was born on 20 February 1898 in Sopron, Hungary as the only son and second child of Frederick of Schaumburg-Lippe (1868–1945) and his first wife Princess Louise of Denmark, younger sister of King Christian X of Denmark. In 1927, his engagement to Princess Irene of Greece and Denmark, a daughter of Constantine I of Greece was announced. Nothing ever came of these plans, however. She later married Prince Aimone of Savoy-Aosta. He was also briefly considered as a marriage candidate for Princess Juliana, the heiress to the Dutch throne. They had met each other in 1932 in Mecklenburg, the home of Juliana’s paternal relations. His reputation as a womanizer, his previous called off engagement and his German heritage did not make him a popular choice, but he was reconsidered after other candidates were rejected by the Queen or Juliana herself. These plans, however, did not prove fruitful either.On 9 September 1937, he married his cousin, Princess Feodora, daughter of Prince Harald of Denmark, a younger brother of King Christian X and Princess Louise, at Fredensborg Palace, Zealand, Denmark they had four children.


Prince Christian of Schaumburg-Lippe (September 4, 1971) is the son of Wilhelm of Schaumburg-Lippe and Ilona, Baroness Hentschel von Gilgenheimb. He is also the great-great-grandson of Frederick VIII of Denmark. He married Lena Giese in Glücksburg on July 25, 2009, a marriage that remained without posterity Although related to the Royal Family of Denmark, under Danish law he is not heir to the throne, as he is not a descendant of Christian X. He is however in the line of succession to the British throne, being a descendant of George II of the United Kingdom, through his daughter, Queen Louise of Denmark and Norway.


Christian, Duke of Oldenburg (German: Christian Nikolaus Udo Peter Herzog von Oldenburg)( 1 February 1955) is the head of the Grand Ducal Family of Oldenburg. Christian was born in Rastede, Lower Saxony, the only son of Duke Anton-Günther of Oldenburg and his wife Princess Ameli of Löwenstein-Wertheim-Freudenberg (b. 1923). Christian has an elder sister, Duchess Helene (b. 1953) who is unmarried. Christian is a great-grandson of the last Grand Duke of Oldenburg to reign, Frederick Augustus II and through his mother he is related to the Princes of Löwenstein-Wertheim-Freudenberg, who belong to a morganatic branch of the House of Wittelsbach descending from Frederick I, Elector Palatine.Christian became heir to the headship of the Grand Ducal family on 3 April 1970 when his grandfather Hereditary Grand Duke Nikolaus died. Under the monarchy the Grand Duke and the Hereditary Grand Duke and their wives were entitled to the style Royal Highness. First as heir to the headship of the House and now head of the House Christian bears this style Christian married on 26 September 1987 at Pronstorf Countess Caroline zu Rantzau (b. 1962), daughter of Count Christian Karl zu Rantzau (1924-2002) and his wife Héloise von Lettow-Vorbeck (b. 1923). They have four children


Duke Christian Louis of Mecklenburg (German: Christian-Ludwig Herzog zu Mecklenburg)(29 September 1912 – 18 July 1996) was the second son of the last reigning Grand Duke of Mecklenburg-Schwerin, Frederick Francis IV. He was born in Ludwigslust as the second child of the reigning Grand Duke of Mecklenburg-Schwerin, Frederick Francis IV, and his wife Princess Alexandra of Hanover, a daughter of Ernest Augustus, Crown Prince of Hanover and Princess Thyra of Denmark. Following the defeat of the German Empire in World War I, his father abdicated on 14 November 1918. On 5 July 1954 in Glücksburg, Christian Louis married in a civil wedding Princess Barbara of Prussia, daughter of Prince Sigismund of Prussia and Princess Charlotte of Saxe-Altenburg. They married in a religious ceremony on 11 July 1954. They had two daughters



Christian the Elder, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg, (1566–1633) was Prince of Lüneburg and Administrator of the Prince-Bishopric of Minden. Christian was born on 9 November 1566, the second son of Duke William of Brunswick-Lüneburg and Dorothea of Denmark, was elected in 1597 as Coadjutor of the Prince-Bishopric of Minden and took office as the bishop himself in 1599. After the death of his elder brother, Ernest II (1611), he took over the rule of the Principality of Lüneburg and acquired the Principality of Grubenhagen in 1617, which was merged.When the Thirty Years' War broke out he joined, with Duke Frederick of Holstein, the side of the Emperor, became colonel of the Lower Saxon Circle troops (Kreistruppen) and sought with great skill to keep the scene of the war as far from the bishopric territory as possible; despite that in 1623 the imperial forces under General Tilly occupied the land. When Lower Saxon noblemen then prepared to defend themselves, Christian resigned his post of circle colonel. Not until 1629, when the Edict of Restitution was passed, did he join the Protestant faith.He died on 8 November 1633.


Christian of Brieg-Legnica (German: Christian von Liegnitz-Brieg, Polish: Chrystian Brzeski-Legnicki, Czech: Kristián Břežsko-Lehnický)( 19 April 1618– 28 February 1672) was a Duke of Legnica (during 1653–1654 and 1663–1664 with his brothers), Brzeg (during 1639–1654 with his brothers), Wołów (during 1653–1654 with his brothers, then alone) and Oława (during 1639–1654 with his brothers, then alone). Since 1664, he was the sole ruler as Duke of Legnica-Brzeg-Wołów-Oława. He is descended from the Legnica branch of the Silesian Piasts dynasty.He was the seventh but third surviving son of John Christian, Duke of Brzeg-Legnica-Wołów-Oława, by his first wife Dorothea Sybille, daughter of John George, Elector of Brandenburg.In Dessau on 24 November 1648, Christian married with Louise (b. Dessau, 10 February 1631 – d. Oława, 25 April 1680), daughter of John Casimir, Prince of Anhalt-Dessau. They had four children


Christian Louis (b. 15 January 1664 – d. 27 February 1664). Son of Christian of Brieg-Legnica and Louise of Anhalt Dessau


Christian the Younger of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel (20 September 1599 – 16 June 1626), a member of the House of Welf, titular Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg and administrator of the Prince-Bishopric of Halberstadt, was a German Protestant military leader during the early years of the Thirty Years' War, fighting against the forces of the Imperial House of Habsburg, Habsburg Spain, and the Catholic League. Christian was born in 1599 at the Gröningen Priory near Halberstadt (in today's Saxony-Anhalt), the third son of Duke Henry Julius of Brunswick-Lüneburg (1564–1613) with his second wife Elizabeth (1573–1626), daughter of the late King Frederick II of Denmark. After his father's death, he was educated by his maternal uncle, King Christian IV of Denmark Christian's defeat signalled the close of the "Palatine Phase" of the Thirty Years' War, and the end of the Protestant rebellion as a whole. Three days after Stadtlohn, Frederick V signed an armistice with Ferdinand II, ending the former's resistance to what seemed as impending Catholic domination of the Holy Roman Empire. Mansfeld shortly thereafter disbanded his army on the Rhine with the entrance of Denmark-Norway, the United Provinces, and England into the war in 1625. Under a plan that involved Christian, Mansfeld, and Christian IV, King of Denmark-Norway, pushing from the United Provinces and from Denmark-Norway, Christian found himself with ample financial backing. Ordered to advance on the Rhineland, he undertook this mission but quickly found himself checked by Tilly in Hesse, and opted this time to retreat rather than fight. Ill from the outset of the campaign, he died at Wolfenbüttel on 16 June 1626 at the age of 26.


Count Christian Louis of Waldeck (29 July 1635 – 12 December 1706) was from 1645 Count of Waldeck-Wildungen and from 1692 Count of Waldeck and Pyrmont. He was born in Waldeck, the eldest son of the Count Philip VII of Waldeck-Wildungen (1613–1645) and his wife Anna Catherine of Sayn-Wittgenstein (1610–1690) and is the ancestor of all living Princes and Counts of Waldeck. The Arolsen princely house stems from his first marriage, while the Waldeck-Bergheim line, which resides in Bergheim near Bad Wildungen and died out in the male line in 1966, stems from his second marriage via his son Josias I. Christian Louis married on 2 July 1658 with Anna Elizabeth of Rappoltstein (born: 7 March 1644; died: 6 December 1676). With her, he had 14 children. On 6 June 1680 in Nice, he married Johannette of Nassau-Idstein (1657–1733), daughter of John, Count of Nassau-Idstein (1603–1677). With her, he had 11 children


Prince Christian of Waldeck and Pyrmont (13 October 1701 – 17 May 1728), son of  Countess Palatine Louise of Zweibrücken-Birkenfeld and Friedrich Anton Ulrich, Prince of Waldeck and Pyrmont (27 November 1676 – 1 January 1728)


Christian August, Prince of Waldeck and Pyrmont (German: Christian August Prinz zu Waldeck)( 6 December 1744 – 24 September 1798) was a general in the Austrian service, and last commander and Field Marshal of the Portuguese land army.Christian August was the son of Prince Karl August of Waldeck and Pyrmont and his wife Countess Palatine Christiane Henriette of Zweibrücken-Birkenfeld.


Prince Karl Christian of Waldeck and Pyrmont (12 April 1803 – 19 Jul 1846), son of George I, Prince of Waldeck and Pyrmont ( 6 May 1747 – 9 September 1813) and Princess Augusta of Schwarzburg-Sondershausen (1768-1849). He married Countess Amalie of Lippe-Biesterfeld, had issue.


Baron Christian Louis de Massy (born 17 January 1949) is the son of Princess Antoinette of Monaco, Baroness de Massy, and her husband, international tennis champion Alexandre-Athenase Noghès. His grandfather, Antony Noghès, created the world-famous Monaco Grand Prix. He was one of the two page boys at the wedding of his uncle Rainier III with Grace Kelly Christian Louis has been married and divorced four times: 1) He married María Marta Quintana y del Carril (b. London, 17 June 1951), daughter of Enrique Quintana y Achával, an Argentine ambassador, and his wife Marta Juana del Carril y Aldao (remarried to the 7th Duke of Tamames), in Buenos Aires on 14 November 1970. This marriage ended in 1978 - one daughter; 2) He married Anne Michelle Lütken (b. 28 November 1959 - 25 November 2001) in Ramatuelle on 11 September 1982. She was the first child of Carl Fredrik Lütken and his first wife Bjørg, née Christiansen. This marriage ended in 1987 - without issue; 3)He married Julia Lakschin (b. 6 November 1968), daughter of Roman Lakschin and his wife Ludmila, in Geneva in April 1992. This marriage ended in 1995 - without issue. Roman Lakschin is the Dominican ambassador to the United Nations and to the World Trade Organization. She is remarried to Ivan Mikhailovich Musatov and has issue; 4) He married Cécile Irène Gelabale, (1968), daughter of Denis Gelabale and his wife Lucie Darius Denon, in 1996. This marriage ended in 2015 after separation since 2009. Cecile has since reverted to her maiden name and no longer uses the title of Baroness. They have two sons


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« Reply #1651 on: November 08, 2022, 11:42:36 AM »

Christian Ludwig (24 May 1677 – 3 September 1734), a member of the House of Hohenzollern, was a Margrave of Brandenburg-Schwedt and a military officer of the Prussian Army. The margravial title was given to princes of the Prussian Royal House and did not express a territorial status. He is best known as the recipient of Johann Sebastian Bach's Brandenburg concertos Born in Berlin, Christian Ludwig was the youngest son of the "Great Elector" Frederick William (1620–1688), ruler of Brandenburg-Prussia, and his second wife Princess Sophia Dorothea of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg (1636–1689). Margrave Christian Ludwig died without heirs in Malchow. He is buried in the Hohenzollern crypt of Berlin Cathedral.


Christian Louis I, Duke of Mecklenburg-Schwerin (1 December 1623 – 21 June 1692) was a reigning Duke of Mecklenburg-Schwerin.Christian Louis I was born as Christian I, the son of the Duke Adolf Frederick I and his wife, Anna Maria (1601–1634), the daughter of Count Enno III of East Frisia.He married twice. His first wife was Christine Margarethe of Mecklenburg-Güstrow (31 March 1615 – 16 August 1666), the second daughter of Duke John Albert II. She was the widow of Duke Francis Albert of Saxe-Lauenburg, whom she had married on 21 February [O.S. 11 February]  1640. Francis Albert had died on 10 June 1642 from wounds he had received in the battle of Świdnica. She married Christian on 6 July 1650 in Hamburg. However, on 16 October 1660, a divorce was pronounced by an ecclesiastical court composed specifically for this case by Christian. She never recognized the divorce. It was, however, declared valid by a committee of ten professors of canon law of the University of Paris the Sorbonne. The divorce was confirmed by the Pope on 3 October 1663.His second wife was Elisabeth Angelique de Montmorency, Duchesse de Coligny, (b. 1626). She was the widow Gaspard IV de Coligny, the son of Gaspard III de Coligny. Her first husband had died at Charenton-le-Pont on 9 February 1649 during the Fronde. The exact date of Elisabeth Angelique's wedding to Christian Louis is not known with certainty, but it was probably on 3 March 1664. She died on 23 or 24 January [O.S. 13 or 14 January] 1695 in Paris.Both marriages were childless. When Christian Louis I died, he was succeeded by his nephew Frederick William, the eldest son of Duke Frederick of Mecklenburg-Grabow.


Christian Ludwig II of Mecklenburg (15 May 1683 – 30 May 1756) was the Duke of Mecklenburg-Schwerin from 1747 to 1756. He was the son of Frederick, Duke of Mecklenburg-Grabow, and Landravine Christine Wilhelmine of Hesse-Homburg. In 1714, he married Duchess Gustave Caroline of Mecklenburg-Strelitz and had five children


Duke Christian Ulrich I of Württemberg-Oels (9 April 1652 – 5 April 1704) was a German nobleman. He was the ruling Duke of Württemberg-Bernstadt from 1669 to 1697 and then the ruling Duke of Oels-Württemberg from 1697 until his death. Christian Ulrich I was the third son of Duke Silvius I Nimrod of Württemberg-Oels from his marriage with Duchess Elisabeth Marie, a daughter of Duke Charles Frederick I Poděbrady, Duke of Oels and Anne Sophie of Saxe-Weimar. He completed his first marriage, on 13 March 1672 in Bernburg with Anna Elisabeth of Anhalt-Bernburg, daughter of Prince Christian II of Anhalt-Bernburg and Eleonora Sophia of Schleswig-Holstein Sonderburg. With her he had seven children He completed his second marriage, on 27 October 1683 in Doberlug with Sibylle Maria (born: 28 October 1667; died: 9 October 1693), daughter of Duke Christian I of Saxe-Merseburg and Christiana of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg. With her he had seven more children  He concluded his third marriage, on 4 February 1695 in Hamburg with Sophie Wilhelmine of East Frisia (born: 17 October 1659; died: 4 February 1698), daughter of Prince Enno Louis Cirksena of East Frisia and Juliana Sophia Justina of Barby-Mühlingen. With her he had one daughterHe concluded his fourth marriage, on 6 December 1700 in Güstrow with Sophia (born: 21 June 1662; died: 1 June 1738), a daughter of Duke Gustav Adolph of Mecklenburg-Güstrow and Magdalene Sibylle of Schleswig-Holstein-Gottorp. This marriage remained childless.


Christian Ulrich (born: 21 February 1674 -2 July 1674), Hereditary Prince of Württemberg-Oels. Son of Duke Christian Ulrich I of Württemberg-Oels and his 1st wife Anna Elisabeth of Anhalt-Bernburg


Christian Erdmann (born July 24, 1686- 8 July 1689), Hereditary Prince of Württemberg-Oels.Son of Duke Christian Ulrich I of Württemberg-Oels and his 2nd  wife Sibylle Maria of Saxe-Merseburg.


Duke Christian Ulrich II of Württemberg-Wilhelminenort (27 January 1691 – 7 February 1734) was Duke of Württemberg-Wilhelminenort. Christian Ulrich II was the youngest son of the Duke Christian Ulrich I of Württemberg-Oels (1652-1704) from his second marriage to Princess Sibylle Marie (1667-1693), the daughter of Duke Christian I of Saxe-Merseburg.Christian Ulrich II married on 13 July 1711 Philippine Charlotte (18 February 1691 -17 June 1758), a daughter of Count Erdmann of Redern-Krappitz, with whom he had six children


Karl Christian Erdmann of Württemberg-Oels (26 October 1716 – 14 December 1792) was ruling duke of Württemberg-Oels and Bernstadt.He was the only son of Christian Ulrich II, Duke of Württemberg-Wilhelminenort and his wife, Countess Philippine Charlotte of Redern-Krappitz He married, in 1741, Countess Marie Sophie of Solms-Laubach (1721–1793). They had two children


Christian Ernst II, Duke of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld (18 August 1683 –  4 September 1745), was a duke of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld.He was the oldest surviving son of Johann Ernst, Duke of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld and his first wife, Sophie Hedwig of Saxe-Merseburg.In Naitschau on 18 August 1724, Christian Ernst married unequally with Christiane Fredericka of Koss; for this, his younger half-brother Franz Josias reclaimed the full succession of the duchy. His father, the duke Johann Ernst, determined the common government of the brothers with indivisibility of the duchy upon his death, in 1729. Christian Ernst make his residence in Saalfeld and Franz Josias moved into the Veste Coburg.The double government make soon impossible and this force the settlement of the "Coburg Eisenberg Roemhilder of Hereditary Controversy", whereby Christian Ernst received Coburg, Rodach, Mönchröden and half Neuhaus. Christian Ernst died childless and all his inheritance was taken by his half-brother, Franz Josias.


Christian Franz (25 January 1730 – 18 September 1797), son of  Princess Anna Sophie of Schwarzburg-Rudolstadt and Francis Josias, Duke of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld


Christian, Duke of Saxe-Weissenfels (23 February 1682– 28 June 1736), was a duke of Saxe-Weissenfels-Querfurt and member of the House of Wettin.He was the sixth (but second surviving) son of Johann Adolf I, Duke of Saxe-Weissenfels, and Johanna Magdalena of Saxe-Altenburg.In Stolberg on 12 May 1712, Christian married Louise Christine of Stolberg-Stolberg-Ortenberg, Dowager Countess of Mansfeld-Eisleben.For this occasion, the Elector Frederick August I of Saxony, had the Weissenfelser Hunt Cup (der Weißenfelser Jagdpokal) made as a gift for the couple. It was a costly and complex masterpiece of gold forging executed by the brothers Johann Melchior and George Christoph Dinglinger; it took as its artistic inspiration the duke's preference for the hunt. The cup stayed in the possession of the ducal house of Saxe-Weissenfels until it became extinct; after this, it again came into the possession of the Electorate of Saxony and can be admired today in the Green Vault (de: Grünes Gewölbe).Christian's marriage was childless. Without heirs, he was succeeded on his death by his younger brother, Johann Adolf II.


Christian of Saxe-Eisenberg (6 January 1653 – 28 April 1707) was a duke of Saxe-Eisenberg.He was born in Gotha, the eighth, but fifth surviving, son of Ernst I, Duke of Saxe-Coburg-Altenburg and Elisabeth Sophie of Saxe-Altenburg. In Merseburg on 13 February 1677, Christian married firstly with Christiane of Saxe-Merseburg. They had only one daughter


Christian I (3 November 1598 – 6 September 1654) was the Duke of Birkenfeld-Bischweiler from 1600 until 1654.Christian was born in Birkenfeld in 1598 as the youngest son of Charles I, Count Palatine of Zweibrücken-Birkenfeld. His father's lands were partitioned after his death and Christian received the territory around Bischwiller (German: Bischweiler) in Alsace. Christian died in Neuenstein in 1654 and was buried in Bischwiller.Christian married Magdalena Catherine of Palatinate-Zweibrücken (26 April 1607 – 20 January 1648), daughter of Duke John II, on 14 November 1630 and had 9 children


Christian Louis of Nassau-Ottweiler (1650-1650), son of Countess Palatine Dorothea Catherine of Birkenfeld-Bischweiler (3 July 1634 – 7 December 1715) and Count John Louis of Nassau-Ottweiler (1625–1690)


Christian II (22 June 1637 – 26 April 1717) was the Duke of Birkenfeld-Bischweiler from 1654, the Duke of Zweibrücken-Birkenfeld from 1671, and the Count of Rappoltstein from 1673 until 1699. Christian was born in Bischwiller in 1637 as the eldest surviving son of Christian I, Count Palatine of Birkenfeld-Bischweiler. After his father's death in 1654 he succeeded him to his territories around Bischweiler. In 1671 he inherited Palatinate-Zweibrücken-Birkenfeld from his cousin Charles II Otto. Through the inheritance of his wife, he was also the Count of Rappolstein from 1673 until he granted that title to his son Christian III. Christian married Countess Catherine Agatha of Rappoltstein (15 June 1648 – 16 July 1683) on 5 September 1667 and had 7 children.




Christian III, Count Palatine of Zweibrücken-Birkenfeld (7 November 1674 – 3 February 1735) was a German nobleman. He was a member of the House of Palatinate-Zweibrücken-Birkenfeld, a cadet branch of the House of Wittelsbach. He was the son of Christian II of Zweibrücken-Birkenfeld and Katharina Agathe, Countess of Rappoltstein. He was Count Palatine of Zweibrücken-Birkenfeld from 1717 to 1731. In 1731, he inherited the sovereign duchy of Palatine Zweibrücken and thus became Count Palatine and Duke of Zweibrücken. He was also Count of Rappoltstein from 1699 until his death.Christian was born in Strasbourg in 1674. He was the only son of Christian II, Count Palatine of Zweibrücken-Birkenfeld to survive into adulthood. In 1719, at the castle in Lorentzen, he married Caroline of Nassau-Saarbrücken (1704–1774) and had four children


Christian of Hessen-Darmstadt (25 November 1763 - 17 April 1830) was landgraf of the house of Hesse-Darmstadt and a Dutch general. He was also a keen Freemason, rising to grandmaster.The youngest son of landgraf Louis IX and his wife Caroline  Palatine of Zweibrücken-Birkenfeld


Christian IV, Count Palatine of Zweibrücken-Birkenfeld (6 September 1722 – 5 November 1775) was Duke of Zweibrücken from 1735 to 1775.Christian IV was born in Bischweiler on 6 September 1722, the son of Christian III, Count Palatine of Zweibrücken and Caroline of Nassau-Saarbrücken.In 1751 he married, morganatically, Maria Johanna Camasse (1734–1807, created Countess Forbach in 1757). They had six children, who were unable to succeed to their father's Duchy due to the morganatic nature of their parents' marriage at first, but in 1792 were allowed to carry the name Freiherr von Zweibrücken


Christian Graf von Forbach, then Christian Marquis de Deux-Ponts and later Christian Freiherr von Zweibrücken (20 November 1752 – 25 October 1817) was an officer of the French Army and later a general of the Royal Prussian and then of the Bavarian Army, at last in the rank of General der Infanterie. He may not be confused with his nephew Christian Freiherr von Zweibrücken (aka Christian Graf von Forbach, 1782–1859), who was a Bavarian General of Cavalry (General der Kavallerie) Christian von Zweibrücken, was the first of six children of Christian IV Herzog von Pfalz-Zweibrücken and Maria Johanna Camasse Gräfin von Forbach. He was born in Zweibrücken. The children, were unable to succeed to their father's Duchy due to the morganatic nature of their parents' marriage at first, but were allowed to wear the name Freiherr von Zweibrücken in 1792.


Christian Marianne Wilhelm August Franz Freiherr von Zweibrücken, before 1792 Graf von Forbach, (30 August 1782 – 25 April 1859) was a Bavarian General der Kavallerie, and later Generalkapitän of the Leibgarde der Hartschiere. He may not be confused with his uncle Christian Freiherr von Zweibrücken (aka Christian Graf von Forbach, 1752–1817), who was a Bavarian General der Infanterie. Christian von Zweibrücken, grandson of Christian IV Herzog von Pfalz-Zweibrücken, was born as son of the officer Philippe Guillaume (later renamed to Wilhelm) Freiherr von Zweibrücken (born Graf von Forbach, 1754–1807) and Adelheid (Adélaïde) Gräfin von Polastron (1760–1795) in Forbach.[5][better source needed] He had three siblings. When he was born, he had the last name of his grandmother Maria Johanna Camasse Gräfin von Forbach like his father, uncles and aunts. They were allowed to wear the name Freiherr von Zweibrücken in 1792 He was married two times. At first he was married to Christiane Freiin von Guttenberg-Steinenhausen (1798–1817) on 24 July 1798, and after her death to Karoline Friederike Walpurga Marie von Rechberg und Rothenlöwen (1798–1878) on 4 August 1818. He had a baby with his first wife, named Karoline Therese, who was born in February 1817 and died in October 1818. Christian von Zweibrücken died in Munich


Christian August I, Duke of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Augustenburg (4 August 1696 – 20 January 1754) was a son of Frederick William of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Augustenburg, who was himself a son of Ernest Günther.He served as provost of the cathedral chapter in Hamburg. Later, he became governor of the Danish island Als, then General of the Infantry and Colonel of the royal guards in Denmark. In 1731, Christian August I succeeded his childless uncle Ernest August. He married Frederikke Louise (1699–1744), the daughter of Count Christian Gyldenløve of Danneskiold-Samsøe. They had 9 children

Christian Ulrich (1723), Son of Christian August I, Duke of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Augustenburg and Frederikke Louise Gyldenløve of Danneskiold-Samsøe

Frederick Christian I (German: Friedrich Christian I., Danish: Frederik Christian 1)(6 April 1721 – 13 November 1794) was Duke of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Augustenburg from 1754 to 1794.He was the eldest son of Christian August, Duke of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Augustenburg (1696–1754) and his wife Duchess Louise Frederikke née Countess af Danneskiold-Samsøe (1699–1744). In 1754, his father died and Frederick Christian inherited Augustenborg Castle and Gråsten. However, these estates were deeply in debt. He waived his claims on the duchies of Schleswig and Holstein and in return the King of Denmark (who was also Duke of Schleswig and Holstein) granted him a favourable settlement. This allowed him to purchase Als and Sundeved, making him the largest landowner in Schleswig. He was also able to expand Augustenborg Castle, the family residence.Frederick Christian served as a general in the Danish army. He was a Knight of the Order of the Elephant.On 26 May 1762, Frederick Christian married Princess Charlotte Amalie Wilhelmine (1744–1770), a daughter of Frederick Charles, Duke of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Plön. The couple had seven children


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« Reply #1652 on: November 08, 2022, 12:00:08 PM »

Prince Christian of Hesse (Christian Ludwig Friedrich Adolf Alexis Wilhelm Ferdinand)( 16 June 1887 – 19 October 1971) was a member of the House of Hesse-Philippsthal-Barchfeld and a German naval officer until he resigned his commission during the First World War in protest at Germany's policy of unrestricted submarine warfare.As a member of the House of Hesse, he was styled His Highness Prince Christian of Hesse. To distinguish between the various branches of the house, the designation -Philippsthal-Barchfeld was sometimes added to the end of the princely title Prince Christian, the youngest of Prince Wilhelm of Hesse's ten children, was born at Louisenlund Castle in Güby, Schleswig-Holstein. He was the only child from his father's fourth marriage with Princess Auguste of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg, the eldest daughter of Duke Friedrich Prince Christian was closely related to the British, Danish, Greek and Russian royal families through his mother, who was a first cousin of Queen Alexandra, King Frederik VIII, King George I and Empress Maria Feodorovna. His half-sister Princess Bertha was married to Leopold IV, Prince of Lippe. Prince Christian was a relative of Emperor Nicholas II of Russia, their mothers being first cousins, and before the outbreak of the war, a marriage between the prince and the Emperor's oldest daughter Grand Duchess Olga Nikolaevna had been speculated on, the match being seen as a way to increase German influence in Russia. However, nothing would ever come of that, and in December 1914, Prince Christian's engagement with Elizabeth Reid Rogers, the daughter of Richard Reid Rogers, was announced. The couple had first met about a year earlier at a ball in Cairo after which her family travelled to Berlin for an extended stay and enabled the prince to renew his courtship. Unlike other American society girls who had married European royalty and nobility in the 19th and 20th centuries, Prince Christian's fiancée was not particularly wealthy but was born of an influential father.Prince Christian and Elizabeth were married on 14 January 1915 at the Holy Trinity Church in Berlin. As Elizabeth was not of equal birth, the marriage was morganatic and so she and any future children would be unable to share Prince Christian's title and rank. To compensate, on the day of the wedding Prince Christian's kinsman the reigning Grand Duke of Hesse bestowed the title Baroness von Barchfeld on Elizabeth.Prince Christian and Elizabeth went on to have four children: Elisabeth Auguste (1915–2003), Richard Christian (1917–1985), Waldemar (1919–2002) and Marie Louise Olga (1921–1999). With the permission of his brother Landgrave Chlodwig, on 14 November 1921 it was declared that Prince Christian's wife and children were permitted to title themselves Prinz/Prinzessin von Hessen (Prince/Princess of Hesse) On 2 February 1957, Prince Christian's wife, Elizabeth, died at Cannes. He was married for a second time in Cannes on 25 June 1958 to a fellow widow, Ann Pearl Field, née Everett (1906-1972), the civil wedding having taken place 15 days earlier in Geneva.His second marriage was childless.


Christian Erland Harald von Koenigsegg (born July 2, 1972)know professionally as Christian von Koenigsegg is an automotive engineer and entrepreneur, and is the founder and CEO of the Swedish high-performance automobile manufacturer Koenigsegg Automotive. Christian von Koenigsegg is the son of Jesko von Koenigsegg, CEO of JK Energiteknik, and fashionista Brita Aasa. The von Koenigsegg lineage is attested from CE 1171 and originates in Swabia Germanic-Roman Empire where his ancestors were knights (see Königsegg for details) Christian von Koenigsegg married Halldora von Koenigsegg in 2000. They presently have 2 sons, Sebastian and Samuel


Christian V, Count of Oldenburg (sometimes called Christian VI; c. 1342 – after 6 April 1399) was the ruling count of Oldenburg from 1368 until 1398. He was born sometime before 1347 to Count Conrad I of Oldenburg and Ingeborg of Brunswick. After his father died in 1347, he ruled Oldenburg jointly with his elder brother Conrad II, and after Conrad II's deaths in 1386, with the latter's son, Maurice II.He married Agnes of Honstein, and the Danish Royal houses of Oldenburg and Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg descend from him via his son and successor Dietrich, Count of Oldenburg. Through the dynastic marriages of his descendants, he is an ancestor of many European Royal houses.


Christian I, known as "the Quarrelsome" (died 1167), was Count of Oldenburg from 1143 to 1167. He was son of Elimar II, Count of Oldenburg and wife Eilika von Werl-Rietberg,[2] daughter of Count Heinrich von Rietberg.He married Kunigunde and had 1 son


Count Christian of Waldeck-Wildungen (24/25 December 1585 – 31 December 1637), German: Christian Graf von Waldeck-Wildungen, official titles: Graf zu Waldeck und Pyrmont, was since 1588 Count of Waldeck-Eisenberg and after the division with his brother in 1607 Count of Waldeck-Wildungen . He founded the new cadet branch of Waldeck-Wildungen and is the progenitor of the princes of Waldeck and Pyrmont. Never before was the independence of the county of Waldeck more threatened by Hesse than during the reign of Count Christian. Together with his younger brother Wolrad IV, however, he later successfully continued the sovereignty-oriented territorial policy of their father Josias I. They made use of the legal possibilities and chose during the for Waldeck disastrous Thirty Years’ War the for them favourable side of Sweden. However, neither count lived to see the end of the war and with it the conflict with Hesse. The eldest son of Count Josias I of Waldeck-Eisenberg and Countess Mary of Barby and Mühlingen.Christian married in Wildungen in November 1604 to Countess Elisabeth of Nassau-Siegen (8 November 1584 – 26 July 1661), the eldest daughter of Count John VII ‘the Middle’ of Nassau-Siegen and his first wife Countess Magdalene of Waldeck-Wildungen. From this marriage he had 15 children.

Count Christian Louis of Waldeck (29 July 1635 – 12 December 1706) was from 1645 Count of Waldeck-Wildungen and from 1692 Count of Waldeck and Pyrmont. He was born in Waldeck, the eldest son of the Count Philip VII of Waldeck-Wildungen (1613–1645) and his wife Anna Catherine of Sayn-Wittgenstein (1610–1690) and is the ancestor of all living Princes and Counts of Waldeck. Christian Louis married on 2 July 1658 with Anna Elizabeth of Rappoltstein (born: 7 March 1644; died: 6 December 1676). With her, he had 15 children


Prince Christian of Waldeck and Pyrmont (13 October 1701 – 17 May 1728) Son of Friedrich Anton Ulrich, Prince of Waldeck and Pyrmont and  Countess Palatine Louise of Zweibrücken-Birkenfeld


Count Christian Karl Reinhard of Leiningen-Dagsburg-Falkenburg (17 July 1695 – 17 November 1766) was a German nobleman. Christian Karl Reinhard was the son of John, Count of Leiningen-Dagsburg-Falkenburg (17 March 1662 - 3 November 1698), and his wife, Countess Johanna Magdalene of Hanau-Lichtenberg (18 December 1660 - 21 August 1715) Christian Karl Reinhard married on 27 November 1726 in Mettenheim, to Countess Katharina Polyxena of Solms-Rödelheim (January 30, 1702 - March 29, 1765), and had 6 children


Count Christian Edward Valdemar Jean Frederik Peter of Rosenborg (16 July 1932 – 24 March 1997);son of Prince Erik, Count of Rosenborg ( 8 November 1890 – 10 September 1950) and Canadian Lois Frances Booth ( 2 August 1897 –  26 February 1941)He married at Stouby on 10 August 1962 Karin Lüttichau (12 August 1938), daughter of Folmer Lüttichau by his wife, Ingeborg Carl They had 2 children


Christian Emil Krag-Juel-Vind-Frijs (8 December 1817 – 12 October 1896) was a Danish nobleman and politician. He was Council President of Denmark from 1865 to 1870 as the leader of the Frijs Cabinet.

Christian Adolph Frederick (Count of Castell-Remlingen) (1743–62)

Christian Frederick Charles (Count of Castell-Rüdenhausen (1736–1773)

Christian Frederick (later Count of Castell-Rüdenhausen) (1773–1803)


Archduke Carl Christian of Austria (born 1954), son of Archduke Carl Ludwig of Austria (1918–2007) and Princess Yolande of Ligne (born 6 May 1923). He married  Princess Marie Astrid of Luxembourg Carl Christian and Marie Astrid have five children


Archduke Carl Christian of Austria (b. 1977), son of Archduke Rudolf of Austria (1950) and Baroness Hélène de Villenfagne de Vogelsanck (b. 1954)
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« Reply #1653 on: November 08, 2022, 01:09:50 PM »

Prince Friedrich Christian of Schaumburg-Lippe (5 June 1906 – 20 September 1983) was a German prince, the youngest son of Georg, Prince of Schaumburg-Lippe and his consort Princess Marie Anne of Saxe-AltenburgUnhappy and disillusioned with the state of Germany after World War I, Friedrich Christian turned to the Nazi Party as a solution for the country's ills. As an ardent Party supporter, he worked vigorously to gain noble and royal support for it, and eventually became an upper privy councillor and adjutant to Propaganda Minister Joseph Goebbels. In 1939, Friedrich Christian was asked to become king of Iceland by Icelanders sympathetic to the Nazi party, but refused due to the opposition of Foreign Minister Joachim von Ribbentrop.After World War II, the prince devoted his writings to defending the record of the Third Reich, producing such works as Was Hitler Really a Dictator? (a personal account of the German leader) and "Als die goldne Abendsonne..." Aus meinen Tagebüchern der Jahre 1933–1937 (the prince's personal diaries).Prince Friedrich Christian of Schaumburg-Lippe was the eighth and youngest son of Georg, the reigning Prince of Schaumburg-Lippe, and his consort Princess Marie Anne of Saxe-Altenburg. Three Icelandic Nazi sympathizers visited Friedrich Christian in 1939 and asked him to become king of Iceland when Germany took control of their country, as they hoped would happen in order to win Iceland's independence from Denmark. Friedrich Christian treated this as a realistic prospect and brought it to the attention of Joseph Goebbels. In his 1952 autobiography, Zwischen Krone und Kerker, the prince recalled that Goebbels had reacted favorably to the idea, but Foreign Minister Joachim von Ribbentrop did not. In 1947, four German princes (Friedrich Christian, Prince August Wilhelm of Prussia, Prince Philipp of Hesse, and Hereditary Prince Ernst of Lippe) were brought under arrest to the war crimes jail at Nuremberg in order to appear as witnesses in a portion of the 16 trials of high-ranking Nazi criminals Viewed as an "old-line party member" who made propaganda excursions to many foreign countries on Goebbels' behalf, Friedrich Christian was the last of the four to testify Friedrich Christian had an unwavering adherence to Nazi ideology (both the nationalist and racist aspects), something that was unchanged even after the German regime fell in 1945Consequently, like his distant cousin and fellow Nazi party member Princess Marie Adelheid of Lippe, Friedrich Christian was outspoken in his defense of the Third Reich. He wrote numerous books and articles on the subject, including Zwischen Krone und Kerker (Wiesbaden, 1952) and Souveräne Menschen. Kleine Lebensregeln, grossgeschrieben (Druffel, Leonie am Starnberger See 1955, 1962).Both in his works and direct overtures to the press, Friedrich Christian gave detailed accounts of his time in the Nazi party. In 1963 for instance, he claimed that Hitler refused to shave his famous mustache because people would think he was "sick"He said his wife Alexandra commented to Hitler that "his haircut and little mustache were always openings for cartoonists", but that Hitler replied "one shouldn't change a company's trademark, even if one doesn't like it any longer. The public has become so used to it over the years that it would rebel if he suddenly looked completely different."In Seeläsgen, Friedrich Christian married Countess Alexandra Hedwig Johanna Bertha Marie zu Castell-Rüdenhausen on 25 September 1927. They had 3 children. Alexandra died on 9 September 1961. A year later (on 15 October 1962), Friedrich Christian married a second time to Princess Marie Louise, eldest child of Prince Albrecht of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg; it was the second marriage for both of them They had no children, and the princess died on 29 December 1969.Friedrich married a third and final time to Helene Mayr on 6 March 1971.





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« Reply #1654 on: November 08, 2022, 01:24:38 PM »

Christina or Cristina is a feminine given name. It is a simplified form of the Latin Christiana, and a feminine form of Christianus or a Latinized form of the Middle English Christin 'Christian' (Old English christen, from Latin).


Christina of the Isles (fl. 1290–1318) was a fourteenth-century Scottish noblewoman. She was daughter of Ailéan mac Ruaidhrí, and a leading member of Clann Ruaidhrí. Although Ailéan had two sons, Lachlann and Ruaidhrí, both appear to have been illegitimate, whereas Christina was legitimate, and possibly a daughter of Ailéan's wife, Isabella.A fourteenth-century source states that Christina assisted Robert I, King of Scotland during the First War of Scottish Independence, when he was a fugitive and hunted by the forces of Edward I, King of England. Another fourteenth-century source declares that, when Robert mounted a counter offensive following Edward II's demise, the Scottish king received critical assistance from an unnamed kinswoman, a woman who could be identical to Christina herself. Christina's support of the Bruce cause may have stemmed from her marriage to Donnchadh, a member of the comital kindred of Mar, a family closely related to the Bruces. It is also possible that Christina was influenced by her maternal ancestry, since there is reason to suspect that her mother was a sister of Robert's mother. Christina was a daughter of Ailéan mac Ruaidhrí. The latter was a son of Ruaidhrí mac Raghnaill, Lord of Kintyre, eponym of Clann Ruaidhrí. Ailéan had two sons: Lachlann and Ruaidhrí. Whilst Christina was legitimate, her brothers were evidently illegitimate


Christina Abrahamsdotter (Swedish: Kristina Abrahamsdotter) (Finnish: Kristiina Abrahamintytär) (1432–1492) was a Finnish woman, royal mistress and briefly queen of Sweden as the third wife of King Charles VIII.The parentage of Christina Abrahamsdotter is not known, but she is believed to have been the daughter of Abraham Pedersson, governor of Raseborg. The ex-King Charles of Sweden got to know her during his exile in Finland 1457–1464. When Charles returned to Sweden in 1464 and reclaimed the Swedish throne, she followed him there as royal mistress. In 1465, they had a son together.In 1470, during the last year of his life, Charles married Christina. She thereby became queen, and her son became legitimate. The exact date of the marriage is unknown. Traditionally, the wedding was to have taken place on his deathbed. The marriage took place on an unknown date during the spring of 1470, a few weeks before the death of Charles in May. The wedding is said to have taken place in Stockholm with 50 wedding witnesses.By the marriage, Christina became queen, and her son was legitimized. They were both included in the new will, which excluded his sons-in-law, which had been his previous heirs, specially Ivar Axelsson, whom he had previously appointed his successor. The king therefore appointed his nephew Sten Sture the Elder as regent until his son was old enough to be elected King, and also gave him the task to protect their right to inherit him in his new will. The marriage caused controversy because of the difference in rank. Bishop Henrik Tidemansson of Linköping wrote a poem to illustrate the contemporary controversy over the marriage, where he stated that the marriage took place against the royal council and caused a great hatred toward King Charles because he was considered to have made a bad example. Christina was the only royal mistress in Sweden to have become queen alongside Karin Månsdotter (1568).On 15 May 1470, Christina became a widow and Queen dowager. After the death of Charles, Sten Sture had the king's will revoked, took all of the power himself as regent and gave the majority of the late king's estates to his sons-in-law rather than to his appointed heir. Christina lived a secluded life after the death of Charles. In 1488, her son successfully claimed a part of his inheritance.


Christina of Denmark (Danish: Christine af Danmark)( November 1521 – 10 December 1590) was a Danish princess, the younger surviving daughter of King Christian II of Denmark and Norway and Isabella of Austria. By her two marriages, she became Duchess of Milan, then Duchess of Lorraine. She served as the regent of Lorraine from 1545 to 1552 during the minority of her son. She was also a claimant to the thrones of Denmark, Norway and Sweden in 1561–1590. Finally, she was sovereign Lady of Tortona in 1578–1584.Christina was born in Nyborg in central Denmark in 1521 to King Christian II of Denmark, Sweden, and Norway and his wife Isabella of Austria, the third child of Duke Philip of Burgundy and Queen Joanna of Castile. In January 1523, nobles rebelled against her father and offered the throne to his uncle, Duke Frederick of Holstein. Christina and her sister and brother followed their parents into exile in April of the same year, to Veere in Zeeland, the Netherlands, and were raised by the Dutch regents, their grandaunt and aunt, Margaret of Austria and Mary of Hungary. Her mother died on 19 January 1526. In 1532, her father Christian II of Denmark was imprisoned in Denmark after an attempt to retake his throne. The same year, her brother died, and she became second in line to her father's claim to the Danish throne after her elder sister Dorothea. As a ward of her uncle the Emperor, Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor, and a member of the Imperial house, she was a valuable pawn on the political marriage market. In 1527, Thomas Wolsey, Primate of England, suggested that Henry FitzRoy, Duke of Richmond and Somerset, the illegitimate son of Henry VIII be married to Christina or Dorothea, but the Habsburgs did not wish for them to marry someone born out of wedlock. In 1531, Francesco II Sforza, Duke of Milan, proposed to marry either of the sisters, as he wished to make an alliance to the Imperial house. Charles V denied him a match with Dorothea, but agreed to a marriage with Christina.On 23 September 1533 in Brussels, Christina was married by proxy to Francesco II Sforza, Duke of Milan, through his representative Count Massimiliano Stampa. On 3 May 1534, Christina made her official entry in Milan among great festivities, and on 4 May, the second wedding ceremony was celebrated in the hall of the Rocchetta Francesco II Sforza died in October 1535, leaving her widowed when she was thirteen. On 10 July 1541, Christina married Francis, Duke of Bar in Brussels. Francis had been betrothed to Anne of Cleves, who became the fourth wife of Henry VIII. In August, Christina and Francis reached Pont-à-Mousson, in Lorraine, where they visited the dowager duchess Philippa, and continued to the capital in Nancy escorted by the Guise family. In November 1541, Christina, her spouse, and father-in-law visited the French court in Fontainebleau, where they were forced to cede the fort of Stenay to France. Christina prevented this from creating a rift between Lorraine and the Emperor. During the war between France and the Emperor in 1542, she lived in the French court at several occasions visiting her aunt, Queen Eleanor. In February 1544, Christina and her sister Dorothea visited the Emperor at Speyer, reportedly to implore him to make peace with France, though without success. On 19 June 1544, Francis succeeded his father as Duke of Lorraine. Francis died on 12 June 1545, leaving Christina as Regent of Lorraine and the guardian of her minor son. His will was contested by a party headed by Count Jean I de Salm (d. 1560), who regarded Christina as a puppet of the emperor, and so wished to place her brother-in-law as her co-regent. Christina, being pregnant at the time, postponed the funeral, withdrew to her dower estate, and sent word to Charles V. On 6 August, after mediation from the emperor, Christina and her brother-in-law were declared co-regents during the minority, with both of their seals necessary to issue orders, but with Christina as the main regent with sole custody of the minor monarch. In October 1546, she hosted the French king at Bar, who tried to convince her to marry the Count of Aumale. However, she refused to marry again. Christina was present at the Diet of Augsburg in 1547 with her aunt Mary of Hungary and dowager princess Anne of Orange. A marriage was discussed between Christina and king Sigismund of Poland during the diet. She was also courted by Albert Alcibiades, Margrave of Brandenburg-Kulmbach and Burgrave of Nuremberg, whose infatuation with her attracted attention. She opposed the marriage of her brother-in-law Nicolas of Vaudemont and Margaret of Egmont, because she feared it would displease France. In March 1549, she made an official visit to Brussels to be present at the welcome of Prince Philip of Spain to the Netherlands. On this occasion, Philip gave her so much attention that it caused discontent, and she left for Lorraine to avoid any complications. In Lorraine, Christina was careful to maintain good relations to the Guise family, who were closely affiliated with the French court, and she had Stenay, Nancy and several other strongholds fortified against an expected French attack. In September 1550, she had Charles the Bold reburied in Lorraine. The same year, she attended the Diet of Augsburg for the second time, and was much celebrated as a hostess for the attending princes. In May 1551, she hosted her sister and brother-in-law in Lorraine. Christina received marriage proposals from King Henry of Navarre, Adolf of Holstein, the prince of Piedmont, and Albert of Brandenburg. The latter promised to recover the kingdom of her father for her. However, she refused to marry, and focused on negotiations with France to recover the custody of her son. She was present at the abdication of Emperor Charles V in Brussels in October 1555, followed by the ceremony when her aunt Mary of Hungary stepped down from the regency of the Netherlands. She took leave of them on their departure to Spain in October 1556. The emperor suggested that Emmanuel Philibert, Duke of Savoy should marry her, and in parallel be made governor of the Netherlands, but though he replaced Mary as governor that year, the match never took place. Christina was finally, through the negotiation of her former brother-in-law Nicolas de Vaudemont, given permission to meet her son. The meeting took place in the border village Marcoing in May 1558. She was invited to his wedding in Paris in 1559, but declined as she was by then in mourning for her foster-mother, Mary of Hungary, and because she had by then accepted the task of presiding at the peace conference between France and Spain. In Lorraine, Christina served as adviser to her son, especially in repairing the finances of Lorraine after the war and winning the loyalty of the local nobility, and assisted her daughter-in-law as hostess.


Christina of Lorraine or Christine de Lorraine (16 August 1565 – 19 December 1637) was a member of the House of Lorraine and was the Grand Duchess of Tuscany by marriage. She served as Regent of Tuscany jointly with her daughter-in-law during the minority of her grandson from 1621 to 1628. Born Christine de Lorraine in Nancy, she was the daughter of Charles III of Lorraine and his wife Claude of Valois, and granddaughter of Catherine de' Medici. She was named after her paternal grandmother, Christina of Denmark.In 1587 Francesco I de' Medici, Grand Duke of Tuscany died without a legitimate male heir; his brother Ferdinando immediately declared himself the third Grand Duke of Tuscany. Seeking a marriage that would preserve his political independence, Ferdinando chose his distant cousin, Christine of Lorraine, the favourite granddaughter of Catherine de' Medici, Queen of France. Catherine had influenced her towards this marriage, to re-align the Medici with France, not Spain. They had 9 children Christina's husband died in early 1609, shortly after her son had wed. Grand Duke Cosimo II was only 19 when he assumed power, and Christina remained a dominant force at the court. In 1610 the Venetian ambassador Giacomo Vendramin wrote home: "the grand duchess wants thus to govern everything absolutely, without any thought to the reputation and the benefit of her son". Christina was keen to bolster the dynastic claim of the Medici, and commissioned a biography of the first grand duke and her father-in-law Cosimo I. She also commissioned engravings by Jacques Callot to showcase the life of her late husband Ferdinando I.


Maria Cristina de 'Medici (24 August 1609 – 9 August 1632) was a Tuscan princess and the first born child of Cosimo II de' Medici, Grand Duke of Tuscany. Maria Cristina de 'Medici was born on 24 August 1609 in Florence as the first child of Cosimo II de' Medici, Grand Duke of Tuscany and Archduchess Maria Maddalena of Austria. She was born with a deformity and was possibly mentally disabled.


Countess Christina of Salm (1575–1627), was a Duchess consort of Lorraine; married in 1597 to Francis II, Duke of Lorraine Christine Katharina was the only daughter and heiress of Paul, Count zu Salm-Badenweiler (1548-1595), head of his branch of the House of Salm (1535–1595) by his wife, Marie Le Veneur de Tillières (1553-1600) Although the Salms had been semi-sovereign Imperial counts since 1475, neither they nor the Le Veneurs were reckoned among the major magnates of either the Holy Roman Empire or of France in the 16th century. However, when Francis married Christina, he was only the third son of Duke Charles III, destined for the countship of Vaudémont as appanage rather than for the sovereignty of Lorraine. Indeed, to prevent the duchy from leaving the patriline (and to legitimate its usurpation), Francis and Christina's sons would eventually be wed to the two daughters of his elder brother, Duke Henry II of Lorraine. They had 6 children.


Christine de Lorraine (1621–1622) died in infancy. Daughter of Countess Christina of Salm and Francis II, Duke of Lorraine


Christine (23 September 1571 – 27 April 1580), daughter of Renata of Lorraine or Renée de Lorraine (20 April 1544 – 22 May 1602) and William V, Duke of Bavaria
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« Reply #1655 on: November 08, 2022, 01:32:30 PM »

Christina (Swedish: Kristina)( 18 December 1626 – 19 April 1689), a member of the House of Vasa, was Queen of Sweden in her own right from 1632 until her abdication in 1654.[a] She succeeded her father Gustavus Adolphus upon his death at the Battle of Lützen in 1632, but began ruling the Swedish Empire when she reached the age of eighteen in 1644. Christina was born in the royal castle Tre Kronor on 18 December [O.S. 8 December] 1626. Her parents were the Swedish king Gustavus Adolphus and his German wife, Maria Eleonora. They had already had three children: two daughters (a stillborn princess in 1621, then the first Princess Christina, who was born in 1623 and died the following year) and a stilborn son in May 1625 Excited expectations surrounded Maria Eleonora's fourth pregnancy in 1626. When the baby was born, it was first thought to be a boy as it was "hairy" and screamed "with a strong, hoarse voice."She later wrote in her autobiography that, "Deep embarrassment spread among the women when they discovered their mistake." The king, though, was very happy, stating, "She'll be clever, she has made fools of us all!"From most accounts, Gustav Adolf appears to have been closely attached to his daughter, and she appears to have admired him greatly. In 1644, Christina was declared an adult, although the coronation was postponed because of the war with Denmark-Norway. lready at the age of nine Christina was impressed by the Catholic religion and the merits of celibacy.[48] She read a biography on the virgin queen Elizabeth I of England with interest. Christina understood that it was expected of her to provide an heir to the Swedish throne. Her first cousin Charles was infatuated with her, and they became secretly engaged before he left in 1642 to serve in the Swedish army in Germany for three years. Christina revealed in her autobiography that she felt "an insurmountable distaste for marriage" and "for all the things that females talked about and did." She once stated, "It takes more courage to marry than to go to war." As she was chiefly occupied with her studies, she slept three to four hours a night, forgot to comb her hair, donned her clothes in a hurry and wore men's shoes for the sake of convenience. Her unruly hair became her trademark. When Christina left Sweden, she continued to write passionate letters to her intimate friend Ebba Sparre, in which she told her that she would always love her. However, such emotional letters were relatively common at that time, and Christina would use the same style when writing to women she had never met, but whose writings she admired.On 26 February 1649, Christina announced that she had decided not to marry and instead wanted her first cousin Charles Gustav to be heir to the throne. While the nobility objected to this, the three other estates – clergy, burghers, and peasants – accepted it. Christina's coronation took place on 22 October 1650.When Christina decided she wanted her first cousin Charles to be heir to the throne, she agreed to stay on the condition the councils never again asked her to marry. In 1651, Christina lost much of her popularity after the beheading of Arnold Johan Messenius, together with his 17-year-old son, who had accused her of serious misbehavior and of being a "Jezebel"According to them "Christina was bringing everything to ruin, and that she cared for nothing but sport and pleasure." In the summer of 1654, Christina left Sweden in men's clothing with the help of Bernardino de Rebolledo, and rode as Count Dohna, through Denmark. Relations between the two countries were still so tense that a former Swedish queen could not have traveled safely in Denmark. Christina had already packed and shipped abroad valuable books, paintings, statues, and tapestries from her Stockholm castle, leaving its treasures severely depleted. Christina had settled down in the Palazzo Farnese, which belonged to the Duke of Parma.


Maria Christina Henriette Desideria Felicitas Raineria of Austria (Spanish: María Cristina de Habsburgo-Lorena)( 21 July 1858 – 6 February 1929) was the second queen consort of Alfonso XII of Spain. She was queen regent during the vacancy of the throne between her husband's death in November 1885 and the birth of their son Alfonso XIII in May 1886, and subsequently also until the coming of age of the latter in May 1902. Known to her family as Christa, she was born at Židlochovice Castle (Groß Seelowitz), near Brünn (now Brno), in Moravia, a daughter of Archduke Karl Ferdinand of Austria and his wife, Archduchess Elisabeth Franziska of Austria Her paternal grandparents were Archduke Charles of Austria and Princess Henriette Alexandrine of Nassau-Weilburg. After the death of Queen María de las Mercedes in June 1878, King Alfonso XII was determined to remarried to produce an heir. The Queen had died just a few months after her marriage with no descendants and negotiations started with the court of Vienna. In August, Alfonso XIII traveled to Arcachon, Gironde, with the specific purpose of meeting Archduchess Maria Christina and her mother Archduchess Elisabeth. In this first meeting, the King proposed to her and she accepted.In early September 1878, the Spanish Government approved the engagement and Emperor Franz Joseph asked her niece to officially relinquish her title of Abbess of the Theresian Convent of Prague as it was necessary for the future Queen to abandon all her Austrian appointments. The proposal was gazetted in the Wiener Zeitung on 7 September: "His Majesty the King of Spain, during his visit to Archacon, has requested the hand of the Most Serene Lady Archduchess Maria Christina... with previous consent of His Imperial and Royal Apostolic Majesty, as Chief of the Imperial Family, the Most Serene Lady Archduchess has accepted the said proposal". The wedding took place on 29 November 1879 at the Basilica of Atocha in Madrid The arranged marriage (the second of Alfonso XII after the death of his first wife María de las Mercedes of Orléans), was concerted on the basis of the conservative profile espoused by the Austro-Hungarian Empire as well as by the prestige attained by the Habsburgs in their previous involvement in the history of Spain, and blocked the possibility of a prospective Austrian endorsement to the Carlist cause.After giving birth to two female children—María de las Mercedes (born 1880) and María Teresa (born 1882)—she ensured dynastic continuity, yet, with the threatening landmark for the ruling dynasty set by the previous Carlist Wars, she was still pressured to undergo a new pregnancy and give birth to a male child in order to consolidate the political system, as it was considered at the time. She became pregnant again before the death of her husband in November 1885 (the king suffered from tuberculosis yet he led an active life). An attributed dying wish by Alfonso XII pleading to her is "Ya verás cómo todo se arregla providencialmente. Pero, si muero, guarda el coño y ándate siempre de Cánovas a Sagasta y de Sagasta a Cánovas" ("You will see how everything is going to be providentially fixed, yet if I die, keep your pussy at bay and always go from Cánovas to Sagasta and from Sagasta to Cánovas"). While possibly apocryphal, it is representative of the Restoration era. Months later, in May 1886, she would give birth to a male child, Alfonso, who reigned as Alfonso XIII upon his birth.


Maria Christina, Duchess of Teschen (Maria Christina Johanna Josepha Antonia)( 13 May 1742 – 24 June 1798), was the fifth child of Maria Theresa of Austria and Francis I, Holy Roman Emperor. Married in 1766 to Prince Albert of Saxony, the couple received the Duchy of Teschen, and she was appointed Governor of the Austrian Netherlands jointly with her husband during 1781–1789 and 1791–1792. After two expulsions from the Netherlands (in 1789 and 1792), she lived with her husband in Vienna until her death.The fifth child and fourth (but second surviving) daughter, Maria Christina was born on the 25th birthday of her mother, on 13 May 1742 at Vienna, Austria. The next day she was baptized in the Hofburg with the names Maria Christina Johanna Josepha Antonia; Christina was named after her grandmother Elisabeth Christine, Holy Roman Empress, however, she was always called Marie or Mimi at the Viennese court and by her family. She was Maria Theresa's favourite child, as can be seen in the letters that the Empress wrote to her. Little is known about her early childhood. In a letter dated 22 March 1747 the Prussian ambassador in Vienna, Count Otto Christoph von Podewils, described the then five-year-old Maria Christina as pretty and witty.The 17-year-old Maria Christina had a romance with Duke Louis Eugene of Württemberg, but a marriage between them displeased the Empress, who believed that the third son of the Duke of Württemberg was not of enough rank for an Archduchess. In early January 1760 Prince Albert and Clemens of Saxony arrived at the Imperial Court and both were warmly received by the Emperor and Empress. Prince Albert met the lovely Archduchess on the occasion of a concert, in which she participated, and soon he developed a great affection for her, as he recalled in his memoirs. At the end of January 1760, Albert and Clemens returned from Vienna.In the following years, Maria Christina developed an intense love affair with Princess Isabella of Parma, who married the future Emperor Joseph II on 6 October 1760. Among other things, the two young women often played together. The beautiful, educated, and very sensitive Isabella, who detested the court ceremonial and her position as wife of the Habsburg heir, wanted a more sensual destiny; however, despite these inner feelings, she appeared to be cheerful and satisfied with her fate. While her husband loved her very deeply, she was cold towards him. In contrast, for Maria Christina, she had a heartfelt affection, expressed in about 200 letters between them, usually written in French. They spent so much time together that they were compared to Orpheus and Eurydice. Isabel and Mimi were united not only by a shared interest in music and art but also by a deep mutual love.In December 1763, Prince Albert of Saxony returned to Vienna to express his condolences to the Imperial family for Isabella of Parma's death. He had become a good friend of the late Isabella after her marriage with the future Joseph II and, as he noted in his diary, also developed a close relationship with Maria Christina. In 1764 the Saxon prince met the Archduchess, firstly in Vienna in the spring and later more often in Pressburg (Bratislava), at that time capital of Hungary. After these visits, Maria Christina fell deeply in love with Albert, who, despite his affection for the Archduchess, did not believe that he could win her hand in marriage because of his relatively weak and politically unstable position for the imperial standards. But then he was invited to Vienna to study a new service regulation for the cavalry, to participate in hunts and amusements of the Imperial court, and received the invitation of Maria Christina to give free rein to his feelings for her but not yet publicly.Maria Christina had a strong influence over her mother, who approved of her relationship with Albert, but the lovers were forced to keep their relationship secret because the Emperor wanted her to marry her first cousin, Prince Benedetto of Savoy, Duke of Chablais (son of Elisabeth Therese of Lorraine, younger sister of Francis I). The Empress advised her impatient daughter to appear calm and cautious with regard to her liaison with Albert, and to rely on her; Maria Theresa promised to arrange the match with Albert In July 1765, the Imperial family travelled to Innsbruck for the wedding of Archduke Leopold, Grand Prince of Tuscany, with Infanta Maria Luisa of Spain; Albert also participated in the celebrations. Since the Duke of Chablais was also present, Maria Christina and her beloved had to proceed more carefully. One month after Leopold's marriage, the Emperor suddenly died (18 August) from either a stroke or heart attack. The Imperial family was badly affected by this death, including Maria Christina, whose marriage plans were now no longer a hindrance since her mother had long been on her side. In consequence, she was the only daughter of Maria Theresa who didn't marry for political reasons; however, out of respect for the Emperor's death, a period of mourning had to be observed first before her wedding could take place. Maria Christina's luck in being permitted to marry the man she loved embittered Maria Theresa's other daughters, who already resented their mother's favouritism. One of her sisters, the Archduchess Maria Amalia, was also in love with a minor prince, Charles of Zweibrücken, but was forcibly married off to Ferdinand of Parma. She remained estranged from her mother for the rest of the Dowager Empress' life.Maria Christina gave birth to a daughter named Maria Christina Theresa on 16 May 1767, but the child lived only one day. Maria Christina developed puerperal fever, while in mid-June Albert fell ill with smallpox; however, they were both able to recover. Since Maria Christina was unable to have any more children due to her difficult childbirth, in 1790 she persuaded her brother Leopold, Grand Duke of Tuscany, to let her and her husband adopt one of his youngest sons, Archduke Charles, in order to have an heir.


Princess Maria Christina Theresa of Saxony (16 May 1767-17 May 1767), daughter of Maria Christina, Duchess of Teschen and Prince Albert Casimir of Saxony


Maria Christina of Austria (10 November 1574 – 6 April 1621), was a Princess of Transylvania by marriage to Sigismund Báthory, and for a period in 1598 elected sovereign Princess regnant of Transylvania. She was the daughter of Archduke Charles II of Austria, the son of Emperor Ferdinand I, and Maria Anna of Bavaria. Her elder brother Archduke Ferdinand, succeeded as Holy Roman Emperor in 1619. On 7 February 1595 was received in Graz the formal petition of marriage between Maria Christina and Sigismund Báthory, ruling Prince of Transylvania, by the nobleman Stephen Bocskay. The marriage contract was negotiated almost a month, and finally the bride on 15 June accompanied by her mother, the Prince-Bishop George of Lavant and 6000 German horsemen. In Kaschau Maria Christina fell ill with fever, which delayed the re-ride. The formal marriage took place in Weissenburg on 6 August 1595, and soon after Maria Christina moved to Transylvania.However, this union proved to be completely unhappy: Sigismund, after a disastrous wedding night, refused to consummate the marriage and sent his wife to a fortress in Kővárgara, where Maria Christina was kept as prisoner. In 18 April 1598, at the request of the local nobility, she was elected to occupy the Transylvanian throne after her husband abdicated. However, her rule was only nominal because Emperor Rudolf II sent representatives to rule. On 20 August 1598, Sigismund Báthory regained the throne and reconciled with his wife, but sent her again to Kővár. When Sigismund abdicated for a second time in March 1599, Maria Christina finally left him and return to Austria in April. On 17 August 1599 Pope Clement VIII dissolved her marriage, and in 1607 she joined to her younger sister Eleanor in the Haller Convent (Haller Damenstift) in Hall in Tirol, where she died in 1621, aged forty-six.


Princess Maria Christina of Saxony (Maria Christina Anna Theresa Salomea Eulalia Francisca Xaveria)( 12 February 1735 – 19 November 1782) was a Princess of Saxony and later Abbess of Remiremont. She was the daughter of Augustus III of Poland, Elector of Saxony (as Frederick Augustus II), King of Poland and Grand Duke of Lithuania (as Augustus II), and Maria Josepha of Austria, first cousin of Empress Maria Theresa. In 1764, Maria Christina was sent to France to become a Coadjutorice at the Abbey of Remiremont in Remiremont, northern France. Her position was thanks to the personal intervention of Louis XV himself In France, she was known as Marie Christine de Saxe. In 1773, at the death of Anne Charlotte, Maria Christina was named Abbess, a position she would keep until her death.


Maria Christina of Saxony (Maria Christina Albertina Carolina)( 7 December 1770 – 24 November 1851) was a Princess of Saxony. She was the Princess of Carignano and later Princess of Montléart by marriage. Maria Christina was the only surviving child of Prince Charles of Saxony, Duke of Courland, himself son of King Augustus III of Poland, and his wife, Countess Franciszka Krasińska. Her parents married secretly in Warsaw in 1760. The marriage was considered morganatic in Saxony. Her mother was created a princess (Princess Franziska Krasińska Wettin) in her own right due to her marriage, only after the intervention of Emperor Joseph II In Turin on 24 October 1797, she married Charles Emmanuel of Savoy Prince of Carignano (d.1800). They had two children


Princess Maria Cristina of Savoy (1826–1827) died in infancy. Daughter of Maria Theresa of Austria and Charles Albert of Savoy.


Maria Cristina of Naples and Sicily (Maria Cristina Amelia Teresa)(17 January 1779 – 11 March 1849) was a Princess of Naples and Sicily and later Queen of Sardinia as wife of King Charles Felix. She was a daughter of King Ferdinand I of the Two Sicilies and his wife Maria Carolina of Austria, a daughter of Empress Maria Theresa of Austria. Her twin sister Maria Cristina Amelia, died of smallpox on 26 February 1783.She was married on 6 April 1807 in Palermo with Prince Charles Felix of Savoy, who became king when his elder brother Victor Emmanuel I abdicated in 1821. Until her husband became king, she was styled as the Duchess of Genoa.Charles Felix died in 1831 after a reign of ten years. Maria Cristina lived the rest of her life in Turin, Naples, Agliè and Frascati, and died in Savona, Liguria. She was buried beside her husband in the Hautecombe Abbey, Saint-Pierre-de-Curtille. The couple had no children.


Maria Christina of the Two Sicilies (Italian: Maria Cristina Ferdinanda di Borbone, Principessa delle Due Sicilie, Spanish: María Cristina de Borbón, Princesa de las Dos Sicilias)( 27 April 1806 – 22 August 1878) was Queen of Spain from 1829 to 1833 and regent of the Kingdom from 1833 to 1840. By virtue of her marriage to King Ferdinand VII of Spain, she became a central character in Spanish history for nearly 50 years. Born in Palermo, Sicily on 27 April 1806, she was the daughter of King Francis I of the Two Sicilies by his second wife, Maria Isabella of Spain.On 27 May 1829, Maria Josepha Amalia of Saxony, the third wife of King Ferdinand VII of Spain, died. Ferdinand VII, old and ill, had not sired a male heir, sparking a succession duel between the Infanta Maria Francisca and the Infante Carlos, and the Infanta Luisa Carlotta and the Infante Francisco de Paula. Ferdinand VII declared his intention to marry and assembled the Council of Castile, who tasked the King with remarriage. Following Luisa Carlotta's suggestion, Ferdinand VII sent for Maria Christina, his niece, who had already given birth to a child and pleased the King's eyes. The two were wed on 12 December 1829 at the Church of the Atocha With her betrothal and then marriage to Ferdinand VII, Maria Christina became embroiled in the conflict between the Spanish Liberals and the Carlists. On 28 December 1833, shortly after the death of Ferdinand VII, Maria Christina secretly married an ex-sergeant from the royal guard, Agustín Fernando Muñoz (1808–1873). Maria Christina and Muñoz had several children together while trying to keep their marriage a secret
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« Reply #1656 on: November 08, 2022, 01:43:18 PM »

María Cristina Muñoz y Borbón de Quirós (1862), daughter of Eladia Bernaldo de Quirós González de Cienfuegos and Fernando María Muñoz y Borbón (April 27, 1838 – December 7, 1910) Paternal granddaughter of  Maria Christina, Regent of Spain, and her morganatic husband Agustín Fernando Muñoz, Duke of Riánsares.


María Cristina Muñoz y Borbón (19 April 1840 - 20 December 1921) was a Spanish aristocrat, 1st Marquise of la Isabela. Born on 19 April 1840 in the Royal Palace of Madrid, she was the uterine sister of Queen Isabella II, one the children conceived in the marriage between Queen Regent Maria Christina and her morganatic husband Agustín Fernando Muñoz y Sánchez, 1st Duke of Riánsares. She was granted the titles of Viscountess of La Dehesilla and the title of Marchioness of La Isabela in 1847. She married in the Malmaison on 20 October 1860 José María Bernaldo de Quirós y González de Cienfuegos, 8th Marquis of Campo Sagrado, whom with she had 3 surviving children: Jesús María, Ana Germana and María de los Desamparados.


Maria Cristina, Infanta of Spain and Portugal (5 June 1833 – 19 January 1902) was a daughter of Infante Francisco de Paula of Spain and his wife Princess Luisa Carlotta of the Two Sicilies. She became an Infanta of Portugal by her marriage to Infante Sebastian of Portugal and Spain.Maria Cristina was one of eleven children born to Infante Francisco de Paula of Spain and Princess Luisa Carlotta of the Two Sicilies in Madrid. Her father was in turn a younger son of Charles IV of Spain. Her mother was a daughter of Francis I of the Two Sicilies.Maria Cristina was a sister of Francisco de Asís, the king-consort of Isabella II of Spain, and of Amalia, Princess Adalbert of Bavaria.On 19 November 1860, Maria Cristina became the second wife of the much older Infante Sebastian of Portugal and Spain, who was a paternal great grandson of Charles III of Spain and a maternal grandson of John VI of Portugal. Sebastian and his immediate family had been in conflict with the Queen Regent Maria Christina, losing all of his titles and claims to the Spanish throne in 1837. He was restored to his Spanish titles upon his second marriage to Maria Cristina, who was both a cousin and a sister-in-law of Queen Isabella II.The nuptials took place in the Royal Palace of Madrid. In the spirit of reconciliation, the celebration was attended by Isabella II of Spain and her husband, among other members of the Spanish royal family. They had five children


María Cristina de Borbón y Muguiro, 2nd Duchess of Marchena (1889–1981), daughter of Francisco María de Borbón y Borbón, 1st Duke of Marchena (1861–1923) Paternal granddaughter of Infante Sebastian of Portugal and Spain (1811–1875) and Infanta María Cristina of Spain (1833–1902)

María Cristina de Borbón y Madán (1886–1985), daughter of Pedro de Alcántara de Borbón y Borbón, 1st Duke of Dúrcal (1862–1892) Paternal granddaughter of Infante Sebastian of Portugal and Spain (1811–1875) and Infanta María Cristina of Spain (1833–1902)

María Cristina de Borbón y Bosch-Labrús, 3rd Duchess of Dúrcal (1913–2002), daughter of Fernando Sebastián de Borbón y Madán, 2nd Duke of Dúrcal (1891–1944). Paternal granddaughter of Pedro de Alcántara de Borbón y Borbón, 1st Duke of Dúrcal (1862–1892). Therefore paternal great granddaughter of Infante Sebastian of Portugal and Spain (1811–1875) and Infanta María Cristina of Spain (1833–1902)


Infanta Maria Cristina of Spain, Countess Marone (María Cristina Teresa Alejandra María de Guadalupe María de la Concepción Ildefonsa Victoria Eugenia de Borbón y Battenberg)( 12 December 1911 – 23 December 1996) was the fifth child and younger daughter of Alfonso XIII of Spain and Victoria Eugenie of Battenberg and paternal aunt of King Juan Carlos I. Infanta Maria Cristina was born at the Palacio Real in Madrid, Spain. The Spanish Royal Family left the country in 1931, in the face of Republican demonstrations, settling in Paris, before moving to Fontainebleau.By 1933 King Alfonso and his daughters, the Infantas Beatriz and Maria Cristina, had moved to Rome. Their father warned would-be suitors of the inherent dangers of hemophilia, from which two of the king's sons, Alfonso and Gonzalo, suffered She renounced her succession rights to the throne of the defunct Spanish crown and, on 10 June 1940, morganatically married Conte Enrico Eugenio Marone-Cinzano (15 March 1895  – 23 October 1968) in Rome He had been created 1st Count Marone-Cinzano on 13 May 1940 by Victor Emmanuel III of Italy. He was the son of Alberto Marone and his wife, Paola Cinzano, and was the widower of Noemí Rosa de Alcorta y García-Mansilla, by whom he had issue.The marriage produced four daughters


María Cristina del Carmen Margarita Ruiz de Arana y Marone-Cinzano (25 March 1968), 18th Duchess of Baena, 18th Duchess of Sanlúcar la Mayor, 14th Marquise de Castromonte, 12th Comtesse de Sevilla la Nueva and 6th Vicomtesse de Mamblas.  Daughter of Doña María Theresa Beatrice Marone-Cinzano (January 4, 1945)and  José María Ruiz de Arana y Montalvo (April 27, 1933 - April 30, 2004), 17th Duke of Baena, 17th Duke of Sanlúcar La Mayor, 15th Marquess of Villamanrique, 13th Marquess of Castromonte, 5th Marquess of Brenes, 11th Count of Seville La Nueva and 5th Viscount of Mamblas. A maternal granddaughter of Infanta Maria Cristina of Spain, Countess Marone


Cristina Izuzquiza y Ruiz de Arana (August 30, 2002), daughter of Isabel Alfonsa Ruiz de Arana y Marone-Cinzano (May 17, 1970), 16th Marchioness of Villamanrique,and Ignacio Izuzquiza y Fernández (May 6, 1970). She is the granddaughter of Doña María Theresa Beatrice Marone-Cinzano (January 4, 1945)and  José María Ruiz de Arana y Montalvo (April 27, 1933 - April 30, 2004), 17th Duke of Baena, 17th Duke of Sanlúcar La Mayor, 15th Marquess of Villamanrique, 13th Marquess of Castromonte, 5th Marquess of Brenes, 11th Count of Seville La Nueva and 5th Viscount of Mamblas.
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« Reply #1657 on: November 08, 2022, 02:19:01 PM »

Princess Christina of the Netherlands (Maria Christina)( 18 February 1947 – 16 August 2019) was the youngest of four daughters of Queen Juliana of the Netherlands and Prince Bernhard of Lippe-Biesterfeld. Princess Christina, who was known as Princess Marijke in her youth, was born on 18 February 1947, at Soestdijk Palace, Baarn, the Netherlands. Her parents were Crown Princess Juliana, the only child of Queen Wilhelmina of the Netherlands, and Prince Bernhard of Lippe-Biesterfeld. At the time of her birth, she was fifth in the line to the throne after her mother and three older sisters: Princess Beatrix, Princess Irene and Princess Margriet She was baptised on 9 October 1947 and her godparents included Queen Wilhelmina (her maternal grandmother), her eldest sister Princess Beatrix, Sir Winston Churchill (for whom her father stood proxy), her paternal grandmother Armgard von Cramm, Prince Felix of Luxembourg and his niece Princess Anne of Bourbon-Parma On 4 September 1948, after a reign of nearly 58 years, Christina's grandmother Queen Wilhelmina (68) abdicated the throne and her mother was inaugurated as Queen of the Kingdom of the Netherlands on 6 September 1948. While her mother was pregnant with Christina, she contracted the German Measles or rubella and as a result, Christina was born nearly blind. With medical treatment and custom eye-glasses, her vision improved to a point that she could attend school and live a relatively normal life In 1963, she stopped using her first name Maria, from then on referring to herself merely as Christina. While living in New York as Christina van Oranje, the Princess started a relationship with Cuban exile Jorge Guillermo The couple were married on 28 June 1975, civilly in Baarn and then religiously in an ecumenical ceremony in the Cathedral of Saint Martin, Utrecht They had three children By her request, the couple divorced on 25 April 1996 In June 2018, it was announced that Princess Christina had been diagnosed with bone cancer. She died on 16 August 2019, aged 72. Her body was taken to Fagel's Garden Pavilion nearby Noordeinde Palace for a private service held on 22 August, and her remains were cremated


Princess Christina, Mrs. Magnuson, LoK av KMO (Christina Louise Helena)( 3 August 1943) is the youngest of four older sisters of King Carl XVI Gustaf of Sweden. She generally uses the name Christina Magnuson. Christina was born at Haga Palace outside Stockholm as the fourth child and youngest daughter of Prince Gustaf Adolf, Duke of Västerbotten, and Princess Sibylla of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. She is the granddaughter of King Gustaf VI Adolf of Sweden. She met her future husband, Tord Magnuson, at a lunch in Stockholm in 1961. Her engagement to Magnuson was announced on 1 February 1974. The couple married on 15 June 1974 in the Palace Church of the Royal Palace of Stockholm.The couple have three sons: Carl Gustaf Victor (b. 1975), Tord Oscar Frederik (born 1977) and Victor Edmund Lennart (born 1980).In October 2016, it was announced that Magnuson has been diagnosed with chronic leukemia. It was later made known that she had been cured following stem cell treatment.


Infanta Cristina of Spain (Cristina Federica Victoria Antonia de la Santísima Trinidad de Borbón y de Grecia)(13 June 1965) is the younger daughter of the former King and Queen of Spain Juan Carlos I and Sofía. As of 2015 she is sixth in the line of succession to the Spanish throne, after her brother King Felipe VI's children, her sister Elena, and Elena's children.Cristina de Borbón was born on 13 June 1965 at Our Lady of Loreto Hospital, now known as ORPEA Madrid Loreto in Madrid and was baptized into the Church at the Palacio de La Zarzuela by the Archbishop of Madrid. Her godparents were Alfonso, Duke of Anjou and Cádiz (her first cousin once removed), and Infanta Maria Cristina of Spain (great-aunt). Cristina married team handball player Iñaki Urdangarin at Barcelona Cathedral on 4 October 1997. On this occasion, she was endowed as Duchess of Palma de Mallorca for life They have 4 children. Her husband was investigated from early 2012 on suspicion of fraudulently obtaining millions in public funds in the Nóos case. In April 2013, Infanta Cristina was formally named as a suspect in the case by the judge in charge.Spanish judge Jose Castro formalised charges against Infanta Cristina on 25 June 2014  In November 2014 the High Court of Palma de Mallorca upheld tax fraud charges against the princess, paving the way for her to face trial; however, it decided to drop money-laundering charges. Her lawyers maintained that they remained completely convinced of her innocence.On 22 December 2014 the High Court of the Balearic Islands announced that Infanta Cristina, her husband, and 15 others would stand trial on tax fraud charges "as soon as next year" On 12 June 2015, King Felipe VI officially deprived his sister of her dukedom, privately announcing his intention beforehand. Pursuant to their meeting in person on 12 June Infanta Cristina wrote to the king (her brother) requesting the forfeiture of her noble title, immediately following which a royal decree to that effect was issued.Cristina's trial began on 11 January 2016, presided over by three judges in Palma, with a maximum potential sentence of eight years if found guilty On 17 February 2017, she was acquitted of the charges, while her husband received a sentence of imprisonment for a term of six years and three months. On 12 June 2018 the Supreme Court in appeal reduced this sentence to a term of five years and ten months.


Christina Oxenberg (born December 27, 1962) is a Serbian-American writer, humorist, and fashion designer.Christina Oxenberg was born in New York City. She is a daughter of Princess Elizabeth of Yugoslavia (born 1936) and her first husband Howard Oxenberg (1919–2010), a Jewish dress manufacturer and close friend of the Kennedy family. Princess Elizabeth is the only daughter of Prince Paul of Yugoslavia (who served as regent for his cousin's eldest son King Peter II of Yugoslavia) and Princess Olga of Greece and Denmark. She has a full sister, Catherine Oxenberg, and a half-brother on her mother’s side, Neil Balfour (born 1970) Christina Oxenberg's maternal grandmother, Princess Olga, was the daughter of Grand Duchess Elena Vladimirovna of Russia and Prince Nicholas of Greece and Denmark, himself the son of another Romanov grand duchess, Queen Olga Konstantinovna of the Hellenes and her Danish-born husband King George of Greece, brother of Queen Alexandra of the United Kingdom and the Empress Maria Fyodorovna. Princess Olga was the sister of Princess Marina, who married Prince George, Duke of Kent (an uncle of Queen Elizabeth II); and Olga/Marina were also paternal first cousins of the Duke of Edinburgh (husband of Queen Elizabeth II) through their respective fathers Prince Nicholas of Greece and Denmark and Prince Andrew of Greece and Denmark, who were brothers


Baroness Marie-Christine Anna Agnes Hedwig Ida von Reibnitz (15 January 1945) She is the younger daughter of Baron Günther Hubertus von Reibnitz (1894–1983) by his second wife, Countess Maria Anna Carolina Franziska Walburga Bernadette Szapáry von Muraszombath, Széchysziget und Szapár (1911–1988), who was the daughter of Count Friedrich Szapáry von Muraszombath, Széchysziget und Szapár, the Austro-Hungarian Ambassador to Saint Petersburg at the outbreak of World War I. Her first husband was the English banker Thomas Troubridge (1939–2015), younger brother of Sir Peter Troubridge, 6th Baronet. They met at a boar hunt in Germany and were married on 14 September 1971 at Chelsea Old Church, London. The couple separated in 1973 and were civilly divorced in 1977. The marriage was ecclesiastically annulled by Pope Paul VI in May 1978. One month after the annulment, on 30 June 1978, at a civil ceremony in Vienna, Austria, she married Prince Michael of Kent, the son of Prince George, Duke of Kent, and Princess Marina of Greece and Denmark. Prince Michael is a first cousin of Queen Elizabeth II.Prince and Princess Michael of Kent have two children


Christine of France (10 February 1606 – 27 December 1663) was the sister of Louis XIII and Duchess of Savoy by marriage. Upon the death of her husband Victor Amadeus I in 1637, she acted as regent of Savoy between 1637 and 1648.Born in the Palais du Louvre in Paris, Christine was the third child and second daughter of King Henry IV of France and his second wife Marie de' Medici. Christine married Victor Amadeus I, Duke of Savoy, on 10 February 1619 at the Louvre in Paris.  From 1619 till her husband's accession, she was known as the Princess of Piedmont. He was a son of Charles Emmanuel I, Duke of Savoy, and the Infanta Catherine Michelle of Spain. The couple had 8 children


Christine of Mecklenburg-Güstrow (14 August 1663 – 3 August 1749) was a German noblewoman of the House of Mecklenburg and by marriage Countess of Stolberg-Gedern.Born in Güstrow, she was the sixth of eleven children born from the marriage of Gustav Adolph, Duke of Mecklenburg-Güstrow and Magdalene Sibylle of Holstein-Gottorp. From her ten older and younger siblings, eight survived to adulthood: Marie (by marriage Duchess of Mecklenburg-Strelitz), Magdalene, Sophie (by marriage Duchess of Württemberg-Oels), Charles, Hereditary Prince of Mecklenburg-Güstrow, Hedwig (by marriage Duchess of Saxe-Merseburg-Zörbig), Louise (by marriage Queen of Denmark and Norway), Elisabeth (by marriage Duchess of Saxe-Merseburg-Spremberg) and Augusta.In Güstrow on 14 May 1683, Christine married Louis Christian, Count of Stolberg-Gedern (1652–1710) as his second wife. Between 1684 and 1705 she had 23 children in 19 pregnancies (including 4 sets of twins). From them, only 11 survive to adulthood


Christiana Louise ( 6 April 1688 - 11 August 1691), daughter of Christine of Mecklenburg-Güstrow and Louis Christian, Count of Stolberg-Gedern (1652–1710)


Christine Eleonore of Stolberg-Gedern (12 September 1692, 3 August 1745). was a German noblewoman of The House of Stolberg and by marriage Countess of Isenburg-Büdingen. Christine Eleonore was born on 12 September 1692, the eleventh child of Christine of Mecklenburg-Güstrow and Louis Christian, Count of Stolberg-Gedern.Christine married Ernst Casimir of on 8 August 1708, in Büdingen. Together the couple had five children


Countess Christine Wilhelmine of Isenburg and Büdingen, daughter of Count Gustav Friedrich of Isenburg and Princess Dorothea Benedicta von Reventlow


Countess Christine of Erbach-Schönberg (5 May 1721 –  26 November 1769), daughter of Countess Ferdinande Henriette of Stolberg-Gedern ( 2 October 1699- 31 January 1750) and  Georg August, Count of Erbach-Schönberg  She married in Schönberg on 2 October 1742 to Heinrich XII, Count of Reuss-Schleiz (15 May 1716- 25 Jun 1784).


Christine Louise of Oettingen-Oettingen (20 March 1671 – 3 September 1747) was Duchess of Brunswick-Lüneburg. She was the maternal grandmother of Holy Roman Empress Maria Theresa, Emperor Peter II of Russia and also Charles I, Duke of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel. Christine Louise was the third daughter of Albert Ernest I, Prince of Öttingen-Öttingen and Duchess Christine Friederike of Württemberg, daughter of Eberhard III, Duke of Württemberg and his first wife Anna Katharina, Wild- and Rheingräfin of Salm-Kyrburg. She married Louis Rudolph, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg at Aurich in 1690. They had four daughters, but only three reached adulthood


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« Reply #1658 on: November 08, 2022, 02:19:09 PM »

Christine of Hesse-Rheinfels-Rotenburg (Christine Henriette)(21 November 1717 – 1 September 1778) was a princess of the German dynasty of Hesse-Rheinfels-Rotenburg. She was the Princess of Carignano by marriage and mother of the princesse de Lamballe and of Victor Amadeus II, Prince of Carignan.Christine Henriette was born in Rotenburg the youngest of the ten children of the Landgrave Ernst Leopold I of Hesse-Rheinfels-Rotenburg and his wife, Princess Eleonore of Löwenstein-Wertheim-Rochefort. Her older sister Polyxena was married in 1730 to the future Charles Emmanuel III of Sardinia and had issue. Another sister, Caroline was the wife of the French Prime Minister, Louis Henri, Duke of Bourbon until her death in 1741.After Polyxena's marriage, Christine became engaged to Louis Victor, Prince of Carignan, the eldest surviving child of Victor Amadeus, Prince of Carignan and his wife Maria Vittoria Francesca of Savoy The Carignans were a cadet branch of the House of Savoy, would inherit from them the kingship of Sardinia, and would be declared kings of Italy from 1861.Christine married Louis Victor on 4 May 1740 at the age of 22. The next year her husband succeeded to the title Prince de Carignan, the seigneury of Carignan having belonged to the Savoys since 1418. The fact that it was part of Piedmont, only twenty kilometers south of Turin, meant that it could be a "princedom" for the cadet line in name only, being endowed neither with independence nor revenues of substance.Christine's second child, born at the Palazzo Carignano, was named Victor Amadeus and was the great-grandfather of the future Victor Emmanuel II of Italy. Her fifth daughter was her most famous; Louise, princesse de Lamballe, the tragic best friend of Marie Antoinette.Christine died at the Palazzo Carignano in Turin on the night of 31 August – 1 September 1778, and was followed less than three months later by her husband.


Princess Christine de Ligne (born 11 August 1955), daughter of Princess Alix of Luxembourg (24 August 1929 – 11 February 2019) and Antoine, 13th Prince de Ligne (8 March 1925 – 21 August 2005) She married Prince Antonio of Orléans-Braganza on 25 September 1981. They have four children


Princess Marie-Christine of Belgium (6 February 1951), oldest daughter and second child of King Leopold III of Belgium and his 2nd wife Lilian Baels Previously Mrs. Drucker and later Mrs. Gourgues Her first marriage, to Paul Drucker in 1981, lasted 40 days (and formally divorced in 1985). She subsequently married Jean-Paul Gourges in 1989.


Christine von Hessen (30 October 1648 - 18 March 1702) was a German noblewoman, belonging to the Hessen-Eschwege branch of the Hessen-Rotenburg line of the House of Hesse. Through her marriage on 25 November 1667 in Eschwege to Ferdinand Albert I, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg (1636-1687), she became Duchess-Consort of Braunschweig-Wolfenbüttel-Bevern.She was born in Kassel as the second of six children of Frederick, Landgrave of Hesse-Eschwege and his wife Eleonore Katharina von Pfalz-Zweibrücken-Kleeburg, sister of the future Charles X Gustav of Sweden. The couple had 9 children


Princess Christine Charlotte of Hesse-Kassel (11 February 1725 – 4 June 1782) was a Hessian princess who lived as a secular canoness before becoming a coadjutor princess-abbess of Herford Abbey. Princess Christina Charlotte of Hesse-Kassel was born in Kassel on 11 February 1725 to Prince Maximilian of Hesse-Kassel and Princess Friederike Charlotte of Hesse-Darmstadt. She was a sister of Caroline, Princess of Anhalt-Zerbst; Princess Henry of Prussia; and Princess Ulrike, Duchess of Oldenburg. Christina Charlotte was a granddaughter of Charles I, Landgrave of Hesse-Kassel on her father's side and Ernest Louis, Landgrave of Hesse-Darmstadt on her mother's side. A staunch Calvinist, Christina Charlotte chose a religious life. On 17 April 1765 she became a secular canoness at Herford Abbey, a Lutheran imperial abbey in Saxony. On 12 July 1766 she was appointed coadjutor abbess of Herford, where she ruled alongside Friederike Charlotte of Brandenburg-Schwedt She resigned from her position in 1779


 Christine-Alix de Massy, daughter of Princess Antoinette of Monaco, Baroness of Massy (28 December 1920 – 18 March 2011) and her 1st husband Alexandre-Athenase Noghès


Princess Christine Elisabeth of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg (23 June 1638 – 7 June 1679), was a German noblewoman member of the House of Oldenburg and by marriage Duchess of Saxe-Weimar.Born in Sonderburg, she was the second of the four children born from the marriage of John Christian, Duke of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg, and Countess Anna of Oldenburg-Delmenhorst. From her three older and younger siblings, two survive adulthood: Dorothea Auguste (by marriage Landgravine of Hesse-Darmstadt) and Christian Adolph, Duke of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg In Weimar on 14 August 1656, Christine Elisabeth married John Ernest, Hereditary Prince of Saxe-Weimar. They had five children


Christiana Ernestina (16 September 1685 –20 June 1689), daughter of Eleonore Sophie of Saxe-Weimar (22 March 1660 – 4 February 1687) and  Prince Philipp of Saxe-Merseburg


Archduchess Marie-Christine Anne Astrid Zita Charlotte of Austria (b. 31 July 1983), oldest child and daughter of Archduke Carl Christian of Austria and Princess Marie Astrid of Luxembourg.  Her engagement was announced on 16 May 2008 to Count Rodolphe Christian Léopold Carl Ludwig Philippe de Limburg-Stirum (b. 20 March 1979), son of Count Christian and Countess Colienne de Limburg-Stirum On 6 December 2008 married in a civil ceremony in Mechelen town hall, Mechelen, Belgium and then a religious ceremony at St. Rumbold's Cathedral in Mechelen, Belgium.They have three sons


Marie Christine de Pardaillan de Gondrin (17 November 1663 – 1675) was the eldest legitimate child of Françoise de Rochechouart de Mortemart and her husband, the Marquis of Montespan. She died in her teens and never married.Marie Christine was born in Paris to Louis Henri de Pardaillan de Gondrin, marquis de Montespan and his wife of nine months Françoise de Rochechouart de Mortemart. She was the older of two children born to the couple and had numerous half brothers and sisters as a result of her mother's affair with Louis XIV of France.


Maria Cristina of Savoy (Maria Cristina Carlotta Giuseppa Gaetana Efisia)( 14 November 1812 – 21 January 1836) was the first Queen consort of Ferdinand II of the Two Sicilies. She died as a result of childbirth. She is venerated in the Catholic Church, having been beatified by Pope Francis.Maria Cristina was the youngest daughter of King Victor Emmanuel I of Sardinia and Archduchess Maria Teresa of Austria-Este. On 21 November 1832, Maria Cristina married Ferdinand II of the Two Sicilies. The bride was twenty years old and the groom twenty-two. She died at the age of 23, after having given birth five days before to her only child, Francis II of the Two Sicilies.


Princess Maria Cristina Pia, daughter of Maria Sophie of Bavaria and Francis II of the Two Sicilies


Marie-Christine de Lalaing, or Philippe-Christine de Lalaing, was the daughter of Count Charles II of Lalaing and Marie de Montmorency-Nivelle. She was married to Pierre de Melun, the governor of Tournai. In the absence of her husband, she defended the city of Tournai against Alexander Farnese, Duke of Parma, in 1581


Marie Christine Felizitas of Leiningen-Dagsburg-Falkenburg-Heidesheim (29 December 1692 – 3 June 1734), was a German noblewoman member of the House of Leiningen and by her two marriages Princess of Baden-Durlach and Duchess of Saxe-Eisenach.Born in Broich Castle, Mülheim an der Ruhr, she was the fourth from seven children of Johann Karl August, Count of Leiningen-Dagsburg-Falkenburg-Heidesheim and Lord of Broich and Bürgel by his wife Countess Johanna Magdalene of Hanau-Lichtenberg. From Marie Christine's six older and younger siblings, only three survive adulthood: one sister, Sophie Magdalene (by marriage Countess of Salm-Grumbach) and two brothers, Christian Karl Reinhard and Johann Wilhelm Ludwig In Heidesheim on 1 December 1711, Marie Christine married firstly Prince Christopher, younger brother of Charles III William, Margrave of Baden-Durlach. They had three sons After eleven years of marriage, Prince Christopher of Baden died on 2 May 1723 and was buried in the Stiftskirche St.Michael, Pforzheim In Philippsruhe Castle, Hanau on 29 May 1727 Marie Christine married secondly John William, Duke of Saxe-Eisenach as his fourth wife. The union lasted only twenty months until his death on 14 January 1729. They had no children.
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« Reply #1659 on: November 08, 2022, 04:49:56 PM »

Countess Palatine Christina Magdalena of Kleeburg[1] (27 May 1616– 14 August 1662) of the House of Wittelsbach, Margravine of Baden-Durlach. She was the daughter of John Casimir, Count Palatine of Kleeburg and Princess Catherine of Sweden (a granddaughter of Gustav I of Sweden, making Christina a link between the house of Vasa and the later houses of Holstein-Gottorp and Bernadotte). Christina Magdalena was a sister of Charles X of Sweden, and grew up in Sweden. Christina Magdalena was born in Nyköping, Sweden, as her parents did not move to Germany until 1618, three years after their wedding Negotiations for her marriage began in 1637, and included "a young and rich Marquess of Huntly" in 1641. The same year, Frederick VI, Margrave of Baden-Durlach visited Sweden. After having befriended her brother, he was accepted as her suitor. The wedding, held in Stockholm, was postponed until 30 November 1642 after a fire broke out at the ball before their designated wedding date on 26 November. They had 8 children


Christine of Baden-Durlach (22 April 1645 – 21 December 1705) was a German noblewoman.She was a daughter of Frederick VI, Margrave of Baden-Durlach and his wife Christina Magdalena of the Palatinate-Zweibrücken. Her first marriage was to Albert II, Margrave of Brandenburg-Ansbach. He died in 1667, and in 1681 she married for the second time to Frederick I, Duke of Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg, widowed earlier that year. She had no children by either marriage.


Christina Sophia (17 December 1674 – 22 January 1676), daughter of Friedrich VII Magnus of Zähringen, Margrave of Baden-Durlach (23 September 1647 – 25 June 1709) and  Augusta Marie of Holstein-Gottorp


Countess Christina Theresa von Löwenstein-Wertheim-Rochefort (12 October 1665 – 14 April 1730), wife of Prince Philipp Erasmus of Liechtenstein (11 September 1664 – 13 January 1704) and mother of among others Joseph Wenzel I, Prince of Liechtenstein


Countess Christina Elisabeth Knuth (6 May 1977), married in 2005 to Jacob Conrad Kamman (b. 1979). She is the daughter of Marie-Lovise Frances Elisabeth Vind ( 7 February 1952) and Christian Count Knuth (23 November 1942). In maternal line a granddaughter of Countess Alexandra Dagmar Frances Marie Margrethe of Rosenborg (5 February 1927 –  5 October 1992), the oldest child and daughter of Prince Erik, Count of Rosenborg (née Prince of Denmark) (8 November 1890 – 10 September 1950) and Canadian Lois Frances Booth (2 August 1897 – 26 February 1941)


Christina Stewart Douglas, Countess of Buchan (c. 1548 – 20 September 1580), also known as Christian, was a Scottish noblewoman, the suo jure Countess of Buchan. She succeeded her grandfather John Stewart, 3rd Earl of Buchan in 1551. In that year she was, the heir to her father, enfeoffed in the lands, jurisdictions, and offices enumerated in her grandfather's charter of 1547. She was only three years of age at her mother's death, and was placed under the guardianship of Margaret Erskine, wife of Robert Douglas of Lochleven.In January 1549–50, though Christina was only a young child, a contract of marriage was arranged between her and James Stewart, afterwards Earl of Moray and Regent, which would give him possession of her lands. He was the son of Margaret Erskine by King James V. Notwithstanding this contract he married another lady, Agnes Keith. Christina was married instead to Moray's half-brother, Robert Douglas, second son of Margaret Erskine and Robert Douglas of Lochleven. In his wife's right, Robert Douglas became Earl of Buchan and Sheriff of Banff When Mary, Queen of Scots was imprisoned in Lochleven Castle in July 1567, Robert Douglas, Earl of Buchan, was one of the few people allowed to visit her They had one son and three daughters


Christian, daughter of Christina Stewart Douglas, Countess of Buchan and  Robert Douglas She married to Richard Douglas, brother of William Douglas of Whittinghame.


countess Christina Piper (1673–1752)

countess Christina Hilda Wachtmeister af Johannishus (died 1871)

 countess Christina Oxenstierna af Croneborg

Countess Maria Christina von Wrangel (1638-1691), daughter of Count Hermann von Wrangel and his wife Amalia Magdalena, Countess of Nassau-Siegen (1613-1669). Wife of  Count Kurt Christoph von Königsmarck (1634-1673) They had 4 children


Baroness Christina-Louise Silfverschiöld (1966), daughter of Princess Désirée of Sweden (2 June 1938) and Baron Nils-August Otto Carl Niclas Silfverschiöld, (31 May 1934 – 11 April 2017)
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« Reply #1660 on: November 08, 2022, 04:54:32 PM »

Christina Piper, née Törne (1673 – 1752), was a Swedish countess, landowner and entrepreneur, married to the statesman and military count Carl Piper. During the tenure of her spouse in office, she played a considerable political role. Christina Piper became known in history as a landowner and builder. She is known as one of the most successful female entrepreneurs in contemporary Scandinavia, and as one of the greatest builders in the history of Scania.Christina Piper was born to the very wealthy merchant and city official Olof Hansson Törne and Margareta Andersen. Her father was ennobled by the name Törnflycht in 1698, but as she married eight years before this, she never wore that name herself. On 13 February 1690, she married the royal official Carl Piper, who was 26 years her senior and the stepbrother of her father. The marriage was arranged for economic reasons: her husband was in need of funds, and as a relative with a good career (he had been ennobled during his career in royal service) he was seen as a good asset to keep in the family. The couple had eight children.


Cristina, daughter of Edward the Exile and Agatha, was the sister of Edgar Ætheling and Saint Margaret of Scotland, born in the 1040s. Cristina's nieces Edith and Mary were sent to Romsey Abbey, near Southampton, in 1086 when she was abbess. Cristina came to the Kingdom of England with her family in 1057, from Hungary. Along with her siblings, she went into exile in the Kingdom of Scotland, at the court of Malcolm III, her future brother-in-lawAt some time before 1086, Cristina returned to England, and entered the nunnery at Romsey Abbey, where she tutored her nieces Edith and Mary


Archduchess Maria Christina Isabelle Natalie of Austria, full German name: Maria Christina Isabelle Natalie, Erzherzogin von Österreich[1] (17 November 1879 – 6 August 1962) was a member of the Teschen branch of the House of Habsburg-Lorraine and an Archduchess of Austria and Princess of Bohemia, Hungary, and Tuscany by birth. Through her marriage to Emanuel Alfred, Hereditary Prince of Salm-Salm, Maria Christina was also Hereditary Princess of Salm-Salm. Maria Christina was the eldest child and daughter of Archduke Friedrich, Duke of Teschen and his wife Princess Isabella of Croÿ Maria Christina married Emanuel, Hereditary Prince of Salm-Salm, son of Alfred, 7th Prince of Salm-Salm and his wife Countess Rosa of Lützow, on 10 May 1902 in Vienna They had 5 children


Christine, Baroness von Loë (born 31 Jul 1927) married Prince Johannes of Löwenstein-Wertheim-Rosenberg Daughter of Princess Isabelle of Salm-Salm and Felix, Baron von Loë (1896–1944)
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« Reply #1661 on: November 09, 2022, 04:53:50 PM »

Victor is both a given name and a surname. It is Latin in origin meaning winner or conqueror.

Victor Amadeus I (Italian: Vittorio Amedeo I di Savoia)( 8 May 1587 – 7 October 1637) was the Duke of Savoy from 1630 to 1637. He was also known as the Lion of Susa He was born in Turin, Piedmont to Charles Emmanuel I, Duke of Savoy and Catherine Micaela of Spain, daughter of King Philip II of Spain. In 1619, he married Christine Marie of France (1606–1663), a daughter of Henry IV of France and Marie de' Medici. Following his death, she served as regent of the Duchy from 1637 to 1663.  They had 8 children. On 25 September 1637, Victor Amadeus fell ill after a dinner offered by the Duke of Créqui. He was carried to Vercelli, where he died on 7 October, aged 50


Victor Amadeus II (Vittorio Amedeo Francesco)( 14 May 1666 – 31 October 1732) was Duke of Savoy from 1675 to 1730. He also held the titles of Prince of Piedmont, Duke of Montferrat, Marquis of Saluzzo and Count of Aosta, Moriana and Nice. Victor Amadeus was born in Turin to Charles Emmanuel II, Duke of Savoy and his second wife Marie Jeanne Baptiste of Nemours. Named after his paternal grandfather Victor Amadeus I he was their only child As an infant he was styled as the Prince of Piedmont, traditional title of the heir apparent to the duchy of Savoy. A weak child, his health was greatly monitored. As an infant he had a passion for soldiers and was noted as being very intelligent Louis XIV organised his marriage in order to maintain French influence in the Duchy, but Victor Amadeus soon broke away from the influence of France. At his father's death in 1675, his mother, Marie Jeanne Baptiste of Nemours, was regent in the name of her nine-year-old son and would remain in de facto power until 1684 when Victor Amadeus banished her further involvement in the state His distant relationship with his mother was always strained and has been blamed on her ambition to keep power to herself.[31] Marie Jeanne spent most of her time relegated to state business which she enjoyed and had little time for her only child whom she kept under close supervision in order to make sure he would not try to assume power. Anne Marie gave her husband six children but also had two stillbirths of each gender, one in 1691 and again in 1697. Three of these children would go on to have further progeny, including the eldest Maria Adelaide, who was the mother of Louis XV of France. His second daughter Maria Luisa, known in the family as Louison, would marry Philip V of Spain in 1701 and was also regent of Spain for various periods. These two marriages were tactics used by Louis XIV to keep Victor Amadeus close to France prior to the War of the Spanish Succession.Anne Marie would remain a devoted wife. She quietly accepted his extramarital affairs; the longest one being with the famed beauty Jeanne Baptiste d'Albert de Luynes by whom he had two children. Jeanne Baptiste was his mistress for eleven years and eventually fled Savoy due to Victor Amadeus' obsession with her. Victor Amadeus subsequently had his daughter with Jeanne Baptiste, Maria Vittoria, marry the Prince of Carignano from which the present Vittorio Emanuele, Prince of Naples is a direct descendant. His favourite child was Victor Amadeus born in 1699 and given the title Prince of Piedmont as heir apparent. The Prince of Piedmont later died in 1715 from smallpox. Anne Marie died in 1728 after a series of heart attacks.His relationship with his younger son and eventual successor Charles Emmanuel was a cold one and the two were never close. Victor Amadeus organised the first two marriages of Charles Emmanuel, the first one being to Anne Christine of Sulzbach, daughter of the Count Palatine of Sulzbach, which produced a son who died in infancy The second marriage was to Polyxena of Hesse-Rotenburg, a first cousin of Anne Christine and mother of six children, including the future Victor Amadeus III of Sardinia. He had 6 legitimate issue and several illegitimate issue


Vittorio Francesco of Savoy (Vittorio Francesco Filippo)( 10 December 1694 – 20 March 1762) was the illegitimate son of Victor Amadeus II of Sardinia and Jeanne Baptiste d'Albert de Luynes. He was styled as the Marquis of Susa.His mother, Madame de Verrue, was the French wife of prominent Piedmontese diplomat working for the Duke of Savoy. At the Savoyard capital of Turin, the Duke of Savoy became infatuated with the young countess and in 1689, Jeanne Baptiste gave into the duke's overture, encouraged by the Duchess of Savoy Anne Marie d'Orléans and her uncle, the French king Louis XIV.When Victor Amadeus II became so obsessed with Jeanne Baptiste that he had her shut up from view of the court for some time, Jeanne Baptiste fled Savoy and sought refuge in France, ruled by Louis XIV. When Vittorio's mother fled Savoy in 1700, he and his sister Maria Vittoria Francesca of Savoy were left in Savoy and were cared for by a loving father.Victor Amadeus II had them both legitimised and created them Marquis and Marchesa of Susa.He married in 1760 with Maria Lucrezia Franchi (died 1777), daughter of Gaspare Orazio Franchi, Count of Ponte Chianale. They had no children.


Victor Amadeus of Savoy (Vittorio Amedeo Filippo Giuseppe;)( 6 May 1699 – 22 March 1715) was the eldest son of Victor Amadeus II, Duke of Savoy and his French wife Anne Marie d'Orléans. He was the heir apparent of Savoy from his birth and as such was styled as the Prince of Piedmont. He acted as Regent of Savoy from September 1713 till September 1714 in the absences of his father. He died of smallpox at the age of 15.


Vittorio Amedeo Theodore of Savoy (Prince Vittorio Amedeo Theodore)(7 March 1723 – 11 August 1725) was a prince of Savoy and Duke of Aosta. He was born in the reign of his grandfather Victor Amadeus II, King of Sardinia. Prince Vittorio Amedeo was born at the Royal Palace of Turin, he was a son of Charles Emmanuel III of Sardinia and his first wife Anne Christine of Sulzbach. He was styled as the Duke of Aosta from birth till his death He was the first-born son of his parents and was second in line to the throne (after his father) from his birth, which was greeted with much celebration. He died on 11 August 1725, at the age of 2.His father had another son with his second wife also named Victor Amadeus, Duke of Savoy, in his honour.


Victor Amadeus III (Vittorio Amadeo Maria)( 26 June 1726 – 16 October 1796) was King of Sardinia from 1773 to his death. Although he was politically conservative, he carried out numerous administrative reforms until he declared war on Revolutionary France in 1792. He was the father of the last three mainline Kings of Sardinia.Born at the Royal Palace of Turin, he was a son of Charles Emmanuel III of Sardinia and his second wife Polyxena of Hesse-Rotenburg. He was styled the Duke of Savoy from birth until he succeeded to his father's throne He was the eldest son of his parents and was the heir apparent from birth which was greeted with much celebration. His father had had a son with his first wife, Countess Palatine Anne Christine of Sulzbach who was also named Victor Amadeus, Duke of Aosta, but died in 1725.He married Infanta Maria Antonia of Spain (1729–1785), youngest daughter of Philip V of Spain and Elisabeth Farnese. They were married on 31 May 1750 at Oulx and later had twelve children. He had a loving relationship with his wife who exerted little influence over her husband The marriage had been arranged by Maria Antonietta's half brother, the ruling Ferdinand VI of Spain. The Spanish Infanta had been previously rejected by Louis, Dauphin of France. The union was used to strengthen relations between Madrid and Turin having fought on opposing sides in the War of the Austrian Succession.


Victor Emmanuel I (Vittorio Emanuele)( 24 July 1759 – 10 January 1824) was the Duke of Savoy and King of Sardinia (1802–1821). Victor Emmanuel was the second son of King Victor Amadeus III of Sardinia and Maria Antonia Ferdinanda of Spain, daughter of King Philip V of Spain and Elisabeth Farnese. Victor Emmanuel was known from birth as the Duke of Aosta.On 21 April 1789, he married Archduchess Maria Teresa of Austria-Este, daughter of Ferdinand, Duke of Modena (who was the son of Francis I, Holy Roman Emperor).They had six daughters and one son who died very young


Victor Emmanuel II (Italian: Vittorio Emanuele II; full name: Vittorio Emanuele Maria Alberto Eugenio Ferdinando Tommaso di Savoia)(14 March 1820 – 9 January 1878) was King of Sardinia from 1849 until 17 March 1861, when he assumed the title of King of Italy and became the first king of an independent, united Italy since the 6th century, a title he held until his death in 1878. Borrowing from the old Latin title Pater Patriae of the Roman emperors, the Italians gave him the epithet of Father of the Fatherland (Italian: Padre della Patria). Born in Turin as the eldest son of Charles Albert, Prince of Carignano, and Maria Theresa of Austria In 1842 he married his first cousin once removed Adelaide of Austria (1822–1855). With her, he had eight children


Victor, Prince Napoléon, titular 3rd Prince of Montfort (Napoléon Victor Jérôme Frédéric Bonaparte)(18 July 1862 – 3 May 1926), was the Bonapartist pretender to the French throne from 1879 until his death in 1926. He was known as Napoléon V by those who supported his claim. He was born in the Palais Royal of Paris during the Second French Empire the son of Napoleon's nephew Prince Napoleon and his wife, Princess Marie Clothilde of Savoy, daughter of Victor Emmanuel II of Italy. On 10 November/14 November 1910, at Moncalieri, Prince Victor was married to Princess Clémentine of Belgium (1872–1955), daughter of Leopold II of Belgium and Marie Henriette of Austria. They had two children


Victor Emmanuel III (Vittorio Emanuele Ferdinando Maria Gennaro di Savoia)( 11 November 1869 – 28 December 1947) was King of Italy from 29 July 1900 until his abdication on 9 May 1946. He also reigned as Emperor of Ethiopia (1936–1941) and King of the Albanians (1939–1943). During his reign of nearly 46 years, which began after the assassination of his father Umberto I, the Kingdom of Italy became involved in two world wars. His reign also encompassed the birth, rise, and fall of Italian Fascism and its regime. Victor Emmanuel III was born in Naples in the Kingdom of Italy to King Umberto I of Italy and Margherita of Savoy, the Queen consort. He was named after his grandfather, Victor Emmanuel II, King of Sardinia and later King of Italy. Unlike his paternal first cousin's son, the 1.98 m (6-foot 6") tall Amedeo, 3rd Duke of Aosta, Victor Emmanuel was short of stature even by 19th-century standards, to the point that today he would appear diminutive. He was just 1.53 m tall (just over 5 feet) From birth until his accession, Victor Emmanuel was known as The Prince of Naples. On 24 October 1896, Prince Victor Emmanuel married Princess Elena of Montenegro. They had 5 children


Prince Vittorio Emanuele of Savoy, Prince of Naples (Vittorio Emanuele Alberto Carlo Teodoro Umberto Bonifacio Amedeo Damiano Bernardino Gennaro Maria di Savoia;)(12 February 1937) is the only son of Umberto II, the last King of Italy, and his wife Marie-José of Belgium. Vittorio Emanuele also uses the title Duke of Savoy and claims the headship of the House of Savoy. These claims were disputed by supporters of his third cousin, Prince Aimone, 6th Duke of Aosta. Vittorio Emanuele was born 12 February 1937 in Naples to Umberto, Prince of Piedmont, who would later become the last King of Italy as Umberto II, and Princess Marie-José of Belgium After an 11-year relationship, Vittorio Emanuele married Swiss biscuit heiress and world-ranked water skier Marina Doria in Tehran, Iran on 7 October 1971, at the occasion of the 2,500-year celebration of the Persian Empire. Coincidentally, Vittorio Emanuele and his wife Marina share a birthday (12 February) but Vittorio Emanuele is two years younger than Marina (she was born in 1935). Vittorio Emanuele has one son, Prince Emanuele Filiberto of Savoy, Prince of Venice, born on 22 June 1972.


Prince Vittorio Emanuele of Savoy-Aosta, Infante of Spain, Count of Turin (24 November 1870 – 10 October 1946) was a grandchild of King Victor Emmanuel II and a member of the House of Savoy. He was a cousin of Victor Emmanuel III. Vittorio Emanuele was born in Turin just before his father Prince Amadeo of Savoy, Duke of Aosta was about to leave for Spain where he had been elected king. His mother was Maria Vittoria del Pozzo della Cisterna. With his father's accession to the Spanish throne he gained the additional title Infante of Spain In 1897 Vittorio Emanuele challenged Prince Henri of Orléans to a duel, after Henri described, in several articles in the newspaper Le Figaro, the Italian soldiers being held captive in Ethiopia during the First Italo–Ethiopian War as cowards. The dispute was widely echoed in Italy and Europe. It was agreed on the use of the sword as weapon of choice, as the Italians thought duels with pistols, favored by the French, were worthy of betrayed husbands, not of princes of royal blood. The duel with swords, directed by the Count Leontieff and the Count Avogadro, lasting 26 minutes, took place at 5:00 am on 15 August 1897 in the Bois de Marechaux at Vaucresson, France. Vittorio Emanuele defeated Henri after five reprises. Henri received a serious wound to his right abdomen, and the doctors of both parties considered the injury serious enough to put him in a state of obvious inferiority, causing the end of the duel and making Vittorio Emanuele famous in Europe.In April 1898 Vittorio Emanuele set out on a tour of world.Vittorio Emanuele died in Brussels four months after the proclamation of the Italian Republic. He was the last surviving son of Amedeo I.



Vittorio Emanuele (6 July 1852 – 6 July 1852). Son of Victor Emmanuel II and Adelaide of Austria


Vittorio Emanuele (18 January 1855 – 17 May 1855), Count of Geneva. Son of Victor Emmanuel II and Adelaide of Austria



Vittorio di Rho (1861 – Turin, 10 October 1913). He became a notable photographer. Illegitimate son of Victor Emmanuel II and Virginia Rho


Victor Amadeus of Savoy, 3rd Prince of Carignano (1 March 1690 – 4 April 1741) was an Italian nobleman who was Prince of Carignano from 1709 to 1741. He was the son of Emmanuel Philibert of Savoy, Prince of Carignano and his wife, the Maria Angela Caterina d'Este Born in Turin, he was the third child of four and the eldest son.Made a Knight of the Annunciation in 1696, he married, at Moncalieri on 7 November 1714, Marie Victoire Françoise of Savoy (1690–1766), legitimised daughter of Victor Amadeus II of Piedmont-Sardinia, King of Piedmont-Sardinia and of Jeanne Baptiste d'Albert de Luynes, Countess of Verrue.They had 5 children.


Louis Victor of Savoy, 4th Prince of Carignano (25 September 1721 – 16 December 1778) headed a cadet branch of the Italian dynasty which reigned over the Kingdom of Piedmont-Sardinia, being known as the Prince of Carignano from 1741 till his death. Upon extinction of the senior line of the family, his great-grandson succeeded to the royal throne as King Charles Albert of Piedmont-Sardinia, while his great-great-grandson, Victor Emmanuel II, became King of Italy. Louis Victor was born at the Hôtel de Soissons, the Parisian home of his ancestor Marie de Bourbon, Countess of Soissons, to Victor Amadeus I, Prince of Carignano and his wife Maria Vittoria di Savoia. His father was a grandson of Thomas Francis, Prince of Carignano and thus a descendant of Charles Emmanuel I, Duke of Savoy and Infanta Catherine Michelle of Spain. He was doubly descended from the latter pair, as his mother was a legitimated daughter of Victor Amadeus II of Sardinia and his mistress Jeanne Baptiste d'Albert de Luynes.One of five children, he was the second son of his parents; his older brother Joseph Victor died an infant in 1716. Louis Victor was thus heir to the cadet branch of the House of Savoy-Carignano from birth. On 4 May 1740 Louis Victor married Princess Christine of Hesse-Rotenburg-Rheinfels, a sister of the Sardinian king's deceased wife Queen Polyxena (1706–1736). The couple had nine children.


Victor Amadeus of Savoy, 5th Prince of Carignano (31 October 1743 – 10 September 1780) was a member of the House of Savoy and Prince of Carignano. He was the brother of the murdered princesse de Lamballe and grandfather of King Charles Albert of Sardinia. Born in Turin to Louis Victor, Prince of Carignano and his wife Landgravine Christine of Hesse-Rotenburg, he was the couple's second child and eldest son. As a male line descendant of the Duke of Savoy, he was a Prince of Savoy by birth. He was named after his cousin King Victor Amadeus III of Sardinia On 18 October 1768 at Oulx Victor Amadeus married Princess Joséphine of Lorraine, daughter of Louis de Lorraine, Prince of Brionne and Princess Louise de Rohan (1734--1815). The couple had one child who succeeded Victor Amadeus as Prince of Carignano in 1780. In 1786 he was moved to the Royal Basilica of Superga outside Turin. The current Prince of Naples is a direct male line descendant.


Louis Victor Meriadec de Rohan, Duke of Rohan and Bouillon (20 July 1766 - 10 December 1846); married in 1800 his niece, Berthe de Rohan (1782 - 1841) and had no issue. Son of Victoire Armande Josèphe de Rohan, Princess of Guéméné (28 December 1743 – 20 September 1807) and Henri Louis de Rohan, Duke of Montbazon


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« Reply #1662 on: November 09, 2022, 05:05:11 PM »

Victor François de Broglie, 2nd duc de Broglie (19 October 1718 – 30 March 1804) was a French aristocrat and soldier and a marshal of France. He served with his father, François-Marie, 1st duc de Broglie, at Parma and Guastalla, and in 1734 obtained a colonelcy. In the War of the Austrian Succession, he took part in the storming of Prague in 1742, and was made a brigadier. In 1744 and 1745 he saw further service on the Rhine, and he succeeded his father as 2nd duc de Broglie on the old duke's death in 1745. He was made a Maréchal de Camp, and he subsequently served with Marshal de Saxe in the Low Countries, and was present at Roucoux, Val and Maastricht. At the end of the war, he was made a lieutenant-generalSince the duke's eldest son, Charles-Louis-Victor, prince de Broglie, died in the Terror, the succession fell to his grandson, who became the third duc de Broglie. He died at Münster in 1804.


Charles-Louis-Victor, prince de Broglie, called Victor de Broglie (22 September 1756 – 27 June 1794) was a French soldier and politician.Victor de Broglie was born in Paris, the eldest son of Victor-François, 2nd duc de Broglie, who had attained the rank of maréchal de camp in the army. Victor adopted radical opinions and served with the Marquis de La Fayette and the Comte de Rochambeau in the American War of Independence The Prince's wife shared her husband's imprisonment, but managed to escape to Switzerland, where she remained till the fall of Robespierre. She then returned to Paris with her children and lived there quietly until 1796, when she married Marc-René de Voyer de Paulmy d'Argenson, grandson of the Comte d'Argenson (minister of war during the reign of Louis XV). Under the care of his step-father Victor de Broglie received a careful and liberal education and made his entrée into the aristocratic and literary society of Paris under the First French Empire


Achille Léonce Victor Charles, 3rd Duke of Broglie (28 November 1785 – 25 January 1870), briefly Victor de Broglie, was a French peer, statesman, and diplomat. He was the third duke of Broglie and served as president of the Council during the July Monarchy, from August 1830 to November 1830 and from March 1835 to February 1836. Victor de Broglie was close to the liberal Doctrinaires who opposed the ultra-royalists and were absorbed, under Louis-Philippe's rule, by the Orléanists.Victor de Broglie was born in Paris on 28 November 1785, the youngest child and only son of Charles-Louis-Victor, prince de Broglie, and grandson of Victor-François, 2nd duc de Broglie. While his grandfather emigrated, his parents were imprisoned during the Terror. His father was guillotined in 1794, but his mother, the former Countess Sophie de Rosen (Paris 10 Mar 1764 – Paris 31 Oct 1828) managed to escape to Switzerland, where she remained until the fall of Robespierre In 1816 he married Albertine de Staël-Holstein. They had issue


Louis-Alphonse-Victor, 5th duc de Broglie, called Victor de Broglie (30 October 1846 – 26 August 1906), was a French aristocrat. Victor de Broglie was born in Rome, Italy where his father, monarchist politician Albert, 4th duc de Broglie, held a diplomatic post.On 26 September 1871, he married Pauline de La Forest d'Armaillé (1851–1928) in Paris. With her, he had four children who survived to adulthood, including two sons, Maurice and Louis, both of whom were physicists, and both of whom would hold the ducal title. Louis would win the Nobel Prize for Physics and go on to win other national and international honors over his long life.De Broglie acceded to the title of duc de Broglie on his father's death in 1901 but died only a few years later, passing the title to his eldest son, Maurice.Maurice died in 1960 and was succeeded by his brother Louis, who died in 1987. Maurice had no surviving children, while Louis died unmarried, and the title passed collaterally to Victor-François, a descendant of the 5th Duke's third younger brother.


Victor-François Marie Léon, 8th duc de Broglie (25 March 1949, in Paris – 12 February 2012, in Broglie) was a French aristocrat and holder of the title of duc de Broglie.The duke was born in Paris, the eldest son of Prince Jean de Broglie (1921–1976). He acceded to the ducal title in 1987, after the death of his distant cousin, physicist and Nobel laureate Louis, 7th duc de Broglie, without heirs. His father Jean's great-grandfather, Albert, 4th duc de Broglie, was Louis de Broglie's grandfather, and there was no more senior surviving male.The duke was active in local politics in the Eure, and has served as mayor of the ducal seat of Broglie. He died suddenly in castle of Broglie on 12 February 2012 (Le Figaro, 14 February 2012, p. 15). The duke was unmarried, and his titles were inherited by his younger brother, also unmarried. However, there is another younger brother and several junior cousins, some with young sons.


Prince Albert Victor, Duke of Clarence and Avondale (Albert Victor Christian Edward)( 8 January 1864 – 14 January 1892) was the eldest child of the Prince and Princess of Wales (later King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra) and grandson of the reigning British monarch, Queen Victoria. From the time of his birth, he was second in the line of succession to the British throne, but did not become king or Prince of Wales because he died before both his grandmother and his father. Albert Victor was born two months prematurely on 8 January 1864 at Frogmore House, Windsor, Berkshire. He was the first child of Albert Edward, Prince of Wales, and his wife Alexandra of Denmark. Following his grandmother Queen Victoria's wishes, he was named Albert Victor, after herself and her late husband, Albert As a grandchild of the reigning British monarch in the male line and a son of the Prince of Wales, he was formally styled His Royal Highness Prince Albert Victor of Wales from birth.He was christened Albert Victor Christian Edward in the private chapel of Buckingham Palace on 10 March 1864 by the Archbishop of Canterbury, Charles Longley, but was known informally as "Eddy". His godparents were Queen Victoria (his paternal grandmother), King Christian IX of Denmark (his maternal grandfather, represented by his brother Prince John of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg), King Leopold I of Belgium (his great great-uncle), the Dowager Duchess of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg (his maternal great-grandmother, for whom the Duchess of Cambridge stood proxy), the Duchess of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (his great-aunt by marriage, for whom the Grand Duchess of Mecklenburg-Strelitz stood proxy), the Landgrave of Hesse (his maternal great-grandfather, for whom Prince George, Duke of Cambridge, stood proxy), the Crown Princess of Prussia (his paternal aunt, for whom Princess Helena, her sister, stood proxy) and Prince Alfred (his paternal uncle). In 1889, Albert Victor's grandmother Queen Victoria expressed her wish that he marry his paternal cousin Princess Alix of Hesse and by Rhine, who was one of her favorite granddaughters. In Balmoral Castle, he proposed to Alix, but she did not return his affections and refused his offer of engagement. He persisted in trying to convince Alix to marry him, but he finally gave up in 1890 when she sent him a letter in which she told him "how it grieves her to pain him, but that she cannot marry him, much as she likes him as a Cousin." In 1894, she married Tsar Nicholas II of Russia, another of Albert Victor's cousins.After her proposed match with Alix fell through, Victoria suggested to Albert Victor that he marry another first cousin, Princess Margaret of Prussia. On 19 May 1890, she sent him a formal letter in which she expressed her opinions about Margaret's suitability to become Queen: "Of the few possible Princess (for of course any Lady in Society would never do) I think no one more likely to suit you and the position better than your Cousin Mossy  ... She is not regularly pretty but she has a very pretty figure, is very amiable and half English with great love for England which you will find in very few if any others."  Although Albert Victor's father approved, Queen Victoria's secretary Henry Ponsonby informed her that Albert Victor's mother "would object most strongly and indeed has already done so." Nothing came of Queen Victoria's suggestion.By this time however, Albert Victor was falling in love with Princess Hélène of Orléans, a daughter of Prince Philippe, Count of Paris, a pretender to the French throne who was living in England after being banished from France in 1886. At first, Queen Victoria opposed any engagement because Hélène was Roman Catholic. Once Albert Victor and Hélène confided their love to her, the Queen relented and supported the proposed marriage. Hélène offered to convert to the Church of England, and Albert Victor offered to renounce his succession rights to marry her. To the couple's disappointment, her father refused to countenance the marriage and was adamant she could not convert. Hélène travelled personally to intercede with Pope Leo XIII, but he confirmed her father's verdict, and the courtship ended.] When Albert Victor died, his sisters Maud and Louise sympathized with Hélène and treated her, not his fiancée Princess Victoria Mary of Teck, as his true love. Maud told her that "he is buried with your little coin around his neck" and Louise said that he is "yours in death". Hélène later became Duchess of Aosta.By 1891, another potential bride, Princess Victoria Mary of Teck, was under consideration. Mary was the daughter of Queen Victoria's first cousin Princess Mary Adelaide, Duchess of Teck. Queen Victoria was very supportive, considering Mary ideal—charming, sensible and pretty. On 3 December 1891 Albert Victor, to Mary's "great surprise", proposed to her at Luton Hoo, the country residence of the Danish ambassador to Britain. The wedding was set for 27 February 1892 Just as plans for both his marriage to Mary and his appointment as Viceroy of Ireland were under discussion, Albert Victor fell ill with influenza in the pandemic of 1889–1892. He developed pneumonia and died at Sandringham House in Norfolk on 14 January 1892, less than a week after his 28th birthday. His younger brother Prince George  later married Mary himself in 1893.


Prince Victor Albert Jay Duleep Singh (10 July 1866 – 7 June 1918) was the eldest son of Maharani Bamba Müller and Maharaja Sir Duleep Singh, the last Maharaja of Lahore, and of the Sikh Empire, and the grandson of Maharaja Ranjit Singh Victor Duleep Singh was educated at Eton and Trinity College, Cambridge, where he met Lady Anne Blanche Alice Coventry whom he would later marry.In 1889 Singh was stationed at Halifax, Nova Scotia, as a member of the staff of General Sir John Ross, commander of British forces in British North America. In December, he was rumoured to be engaged to marry Jeanne Turnure, daughter of Lawrence Turnure, a New York City banker, after staying at the Turnure house in Newport, Rhode Island, the previous summer; the rumour was however denied by the banker On the death of his father, Maharaja Sir Duleep Singh, on 23 October 1893, Victor succeeded him as Head of the Royal House of the Punjab On 4 January 1898, Prince Victor Albert Jay Duleep Singh married Lady Anne Coventry, a daughter of the 9th Earl of Coventry, who was eight years younger than himself. The marriage created a sensation: it was the first time an Indian prince had married an English noblewoman, and the marriage was made possible primarily due to the intervention of the Prince of Wales (subsequently King Edward VII). The wedding took place at St Peter's Church, Eaton Square, London, where Queen Victoria was also represented Although Queen Victoria gave the couple her blessing, she allegedly told Lady Anne to never have children with the Prince. The marriage remained childless Singh was declared bankrupt on 4 September 1902, with debts totaling £117,900 (approximately £12.8 million in today's value), despite his £8,250 annual allowance and his wife's income of £2,500. The bankruptcy was attributed to bad investments and to gambling, something that plagued him for the rest of his life.He died, without legitimate issue, aged 51, on 7 June 1918, and was buried at the Anglican Cemetery above Monte Carlo. Beside him is the grave of his wife who died aged 82, on 2 July 1956.


Günther Victor, Prince of Schwarzburg (21 August 1852 – 16 April 1925) was the final sovereign prince of Schwarzburg-Rudolstadt and Schwarzburg-Sondershausen.He was born in Rudolstadt the son of Prince Adolf of Schwarzburg-Rudolstadt (1801–1875) and his wife Princess Mathilde of Schönburg-Waldenburg (1826–1914). His mother Princess Mathilde was the daughter of Otto Victor, Prince of Schönburg-Waldenburg (1785–1861) and Princess Thekla of Schwarzburg-Rudolstadt (1795–1861) a cousin of Prince Günther's father. Following the death of his father on 1 July 1875 Prince Günther became the heir presumptive to the principality of Schwarzburg-Rudolstadt. Following the death of his first cousin once removed Prince Georg on 19 January 1890 Prince Günther succeeded him as sovereign prince of Schwarzburg-Rudolstadt.Prince Günther was married to Princess Anna Louise of Schönburg-Waldenburg (1871–1951) at Rudolstadt on 9 December 1891. She was daughter of Prince Georg of Schönburg-Waldenburg (1828–1900) and Princess Luise of Bentheim-Tecklenburg (1844–1922). The marriage was childless In 1942 Princess Anna Luise adopted her nephew Prince Wilhelm of Schönburg-Waldenburg (1913–44) and his son Prince Ulrich (b. 1940).
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« Reply #1663 on: November 09, 2022, 05:18:36 PM »

Prince Christian Victor of Schleswig-Holstein (Christian Victor Albert Louis Ernst Anton) (14 April 1867 – 29 October 1900) was a member of the British royal family. He was the eldest son of Princess Helena, third daughter of Queen Victoria.Prince Christian was born on 14 April 1867, at Windsor Castle. His father was Prince Christian of Schleswig-Holstein, the third son of Christian, Duke of Augustenborg, and Countess Louise Sophie of Danneskiold-Samsøe. His mother was Princess Helena, the fifth child and third daughter of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom and Prince Albert. His parents resided in the United Kingdom, at Cumberland Lodge, and the Prince was considered a member of the British royal family. Under letters patent of 1866, he was styled His Highness Prince Christian Victor of Schleswig-Holstein In October 1900, while in Pretoria, he came down with malaria, and died of enteric fever, on 29 October, aged 33, after receiving Holy Communion in the presence of Lord Roberts and Prince Francis of Teck. He was interred in the Pretoria cemetery on 1 November 1900. His grave is marked with a granite cross and a cast-iron railing.


Admiral Prince Victor Ferdinand Franz Eugen Gustaf Adolf Constantin Friedrich of Hohenlohe-Langenburg, GCB (11 December 1833 – 31 December 1891), also known as Count von Gleichen, was an officer in the Royal Navy, and a sculptor. He was born at Langenburg in Württemberg, the third son of Ernst I, Prince of Hohenlohe-Langenburg (1794–1860) and Princess Feodora of Leiningen (1807–1872). His mother was Queen Victoria's half-sister, and his family was therefore closely related to the British Royal Family. He married Laura Williamina Seymour, the younger daughter of Admiral Sir George Francis Seymour (under whom he served on HMS Cumberland in the 1850s) on 24 January 1861 in London  Shortly before his morganatic marriage, his wife was created Countess von Gleichen, after Gleichen which was at one stage owned by a branch of the Hohenlohe family. They had four children


George Victor (14 January 1831 – 12 May 1893) was the 3rd sovereign Prince of the German state of Waldeck and Pyrmont.He was born in Bad Arolsen the son of George II, Prince of Waldeck and Pyrmont and his wife Princess Emma of Anhalt-Bernburg-Schaumburg-Hoym. He succeeded as prince originally under the guardianship of his mother on 15 May 1845 following the death of his father.He died of pneumonia in Marienbad, Bohemia and was succeeded by his eldest son Friedrich. George Victor was first married on 26 September 1853 in Wiesbaden to Princess Helena of Nassau, daughter of William, Duke of Nassau They had seven children His second marriage took place in Luisenlund on 29 April 1891 to Princess Louise of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg From this marriage he had one son who was killed in action shortly after outbreak of the First World War


Viktor Adolf, Prince of Bentheim and Steinfurt (18 July 1883 – 4 June 1961) Son of Princess Pauline of Waldeck-Pyrmont and Alexis, Prince of Bentheim and Steinfurt.


Carol Victor, Hereditary Prince of Albania (Karl Viktor Wilhelm Friedrich Ernst Günther von Wied)(19 May 1913 – 8 December 1973) was the only son of William, Prince of Albania and briefly heir to the Principality of Albania. He held the title of Hereditary Prince of Albania. He was also styled Skënder, in homage to Skanderbeg, the national hero.Carol Victor was born on 19 May 1913 in Potsdam, Kingdom of Prussia as Prince Charles Victor of Wied (German: Karl Viktor Prinz zu Wied). He was the second child and only son of Prince William Frederick of Wied (1876–1945), son of William, Prince of Wied and Princess Marie of the Netherlands, and his wife, Princess Sophie of Schönburg-Waldenburg (1885–1936), daughter of Victor, Hereditary Prince of Schönburg-Waldenburg and his wife, Princess Lucia of Sayn-Wittgenstein-Berleburg. Through his paternal grandmother he was related with the Dutch Royal Family.On 7 March 1914, appointed by the Great Powers of Europe, his father William was created Prince of Albania. After his father became Prince, he held the title of Hereditary Prince of Albania. On 8 September 1966, whilst living in New York City, Carol Victor married the English-born widow Eileen de Coppet (née Johnston), whose first husband had been Captain André de Coppet (1892 - 1953). They had no children; de Coppet was in her forties when the marriage occurred They had no issue


Victor I, Prince of Anhalt-Bernburg-Schaumburg-Hoym (7 September 1693 –15 April 1772), was a German prince of the House of Ascania who belonged to a cadet branch of the princely house of Anhalt-Bernburg.Through his mother, he inherited the County of Holzappel and Lordship of Schaumburg and founded the cadet branch of Anhalt-Bernburg-Schaumburg-Hoym.Victor was born at Schaumburg Castle on 7 September 1693 as the eldest son of Lebrecht, Prince of Anhalt-Zeitz-Hoym by his first wife Princess Charlotte of Nassau-Dillenburg-Schaumburg, heiress of the County of Holzappel and Lordship of Schaumburg as a daughter of Elisabeth Charlotte, Countess of Holzappel in her marriage with Adolph, Prince of Nassau-Schaumburg. In Birstein on 22 November 1714 Victor Amadeus Adolph married firstly with Charlotte Louise (b. Büdingen, 31 July 1680 - d. Schaumburg, 2 January 1739), daughter of Wilhelm Moritz, Count of Isenburg-Büdingen-Birstein and his first wife, Countess Anna Amalie of Isenburg-Büdingen-Wächtersbach. She was fourteen years older than he was; nevertheless, the union produced six children In Pölzig on 14 February 1740 Victor Amadeus Adolph married for a second time to Hedwig Sophie (b. Oderberg, 7 May 1717 - d. Diez, 21 February 1795), daughter of Count Wenzel Louis Henckel of Donnersmarck and Countess Hedwig Charlotte of Solms-Baruth. The Henckel von Donnersmarck family were an old family in Silesia only raised in 1651 to the rank of counts;in consequence, this marriage was on the verge of being considered morganatic. In the end, the union was nonetheless considered equal by the rest of the House of Anhalt. They had six children


Victor II Karl Frederick of Anhalt-Bernburg-Schaumburg-Hoym (2 November 1767 –  22 April 1812), was a German prince of the House of Ascania from the Anhalt-Bernburg branch and a ruler of the principality of Anhalt-Bernburg-Schaumburg-Hoym.He was the eldest son of Karl Louis, Prince of Anhalt-Bernburg-Schaumburg-Hoym, by his second wife Amalie Eleonore, daughter of Frederick William, Prince of Solms-Braunfels.In Weilburg on 29 October 1793 Victor Karl Frederick married Princess Amelia of Nassau-Weilburg, then of Nassau (b. Kirchheimbolanden, 7 August 1776 - d. Schaumburg, 19 February 1841), daughter of Charles Christian, Prince of Nassau-Weilburg, and through her mother, Princess Carolina,a great-granddaughter of King George II of Great Britain.They had four daughters


Victor Amadeus of Anhalt-Bernburg-Schaumburg-Hoym (21 May 1744 – 2 May 1790), was a German prince of the House of Ascania from the Anhalt-Bernburg branch through the sub-branch of Anhalt-Bernburg-Schaumburg-Hoym and a Russian General under the service of Empress Catherine II the Great.He was the sixth (but fifth surviving) son of Victor I Amadeus Adolph, Prince of Anhalt-Bernburg-Schaumburg-Hoym, and the third-born by his second wife, Countess Hedwig Sophie Henckel of Donnersmarck. As the youngest of the sons of Prince Victor I, Victor Amadeus had little chances to inherit any of the family lands. He thus chose to follow a military career and entered in the Russian army in 1772. In Schaumburg on 21 April 1778 Victor Amadeus married Magdalena Sophie (b. Braunfels, 4 June 1742 - d. Homburg vor der Höhe, 21 January 1819), daughter of Frederick William, Prince of Solms-Braunfels. They had one son


Victor Amadeus (b. Homburg vor der Höhe, 19 June 1779 - d. Homburg vor der Höhe, 4 March 1783). Son of Victor Amadeus of Anhalt-Bernburg-Schaumburg-Hoym and Magdalena Sophie of Solms-Braunfels



Prince Victor of Thurn and Taxis (German: Viktor Theodor Maximilian Egon Maria Lamoral Prinz von Thurn und Taxis)(18 January 1876 – 28 January 1928) was a member of the Princely House of Thurn and Taxis and a Prince of Thurn and Taxis Prince Victor, who was born in 1876, was the youngest child of the late Prince Egon Maximilian of Thurn und Taxis and his wife, Viktoria Edelspacher de Gyoryok  On 1 November 1911, Prince Victor married Mrs. Gerald Fitzgerald, Born Lida Eleanor Nicolls in 1875 in Uniontown, Pennsylvania  she was the daughter of grocer John Albert Nicolls and his wife Lenora Markle Nicolls, nee Thompson Mrs. Fitzgerald's first husband was Gerald Fitzgerald of Ireland. She returned to the United States from England last Friday. She was born Lida Eleonor Nicholls in 1875 in Uniontown. Lida married her first husband, Irish-born General Gerald Purcell Fitzgerald in Los Angeles in late 1899. Prior to the marriage, Lida was reportedly said to possess $1 million in her own right. Following her marriage to Prince Victor, Lida announced that she and her husband would reside in Europe and she would never again return to the United States. Prince Victor of Thurn and Taxis was a son of the late Prince and Princess Egon, and a Hungarian citizen by virtue of his father having become naturalized in Hungary at the time of his marriage.


Victor, Duke of Münsterberg also: Victor, Duke of Münsterberg and Opava; Czech: Viktorin z Minsterberka; (29 May 1443 – 30 August 1500) was an Imperial Count from 1459 and Count of Kladsko. From 1462 until his death, he was Duke of Münsterberg, and from 1465 to 1485 Duke of Opava. Victor was the second son of the Bohemian king George of Poděbrady and his wife Kunigunde of Sternberg. In 1463 he married Margaret Ptáčková, the only daughter of Hynek Ptáček of Pirkstein, who died in 1472. Two years later he married Sophie, daughter of Duke Boleslaw II of Cieszyn. After her death in 1479, he married in 1480 Helena-Margarete Palaiologa, daughter of John IV, Marquess of Montferrat (d. 1496). From these marriages, he had several daughters and two sons


Victor Christian William Cavendish, 9th Duke of Devonshire KG, GCMG, GCVO, TD, PC, JP, FRS (31 May 1868 – 6 May 1938), known as Victor Cavendish until 1908, was a British peer and politician who served as Governor General of Canada. Cavendish was born in the Marylebone area of London, England, the eldest son of Lord Edward Cavendish, himself the third son of the 7th Duke of Devonshire, and Emma Lascelles, both the daughter of William Lascelles and Lord Edward's cousin. Cavendish's younger brother was Lord Richard Cavendish and his uncles were Spencer Cavendish, Marquess of Hartington (later the eighth Duke of Devonshire) and Lord Frederick Cavendish.On 30 July 1892, Cavendish married Lady Evelyn Petty-FitzMaurice, the elder daughter of Henry Petty-Fitzmaurice, 5th Marquess of Lansdowne, Viceroy of India and quondam Governor General of Canada They had 7 children


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« Reply #1664 on: November 10, 2022, 09:12:38 AM »

Claude-Victor Perrin, 1st Duke of Belluno (7 December 1764 – 1 March 1841) was a French soldier and military commander who served during both the French Revolutionary Wars and the Napoleonic Wars. He was made a Marshal of the Empire in 1807 by Emperor Napoleon I.He was born at Lamarche in the Vosges in 1764, son of Charles Perrin and wife Marie Anne Floriot, paternal grandson of Charles Perrin and wife Gabrielle Guerin, born in 1696, and great-grandson of Pierre Perrin and wife Anne Louvière. When the second restoration followed the Battle of Waterloo he was made a peer of France. He became president of a commission which inquired into the conduct of the officers during the Hundred Days, and dismissed Napoleon's sympathizers. In 1821 he was appointed war minister and held this office for two years. In 1830 he was major-general of the royal guard, and after the July Revolution of that year he retired altogether into private life. He died in Paris on 1 March 1841. His papers for the period 1793–1800 have been published (Paris, 1846) Victor first married Jeanne-Josephine Muguet in May 1791 and had four children His second marriage was to Julie Vosch van Avesaet in June 1803 (1781–1831), with whom he had a daughter



Napoleon-Victor (1796–1853), son of Claude-Victor Perrin, 1st Duke of Belluno and Jeanne-Josephine Muguet



Victor Frederick William Cavendish-Bentinck, 9th Duke of Portland, CMG (18 June 1897 – 30 July 1990), known as Victor Cavendish-Bentinck until 1977 and Lord Victor Cavendish-Bentinck from 1977 to 1980, and informally as Bill Bentinck, was a British diplomat, businessman, and peer. He served as Chairman of the Joint Intelligence Committee during the Second World War and was British Ambassador to Poland between 1945 and 1947. Cavendish-Bentinck was born in Marylebone, London on 18 June 1897 He was the second son of Frederick Cavendish-Bentinck, whose father, George Cavendish-Bentinck, was a grandson of William Cavendish-Bentinck, 3rd Duke of Portland. Although formally Victor Cavendish-Bentinck he was known informally as Bill. Like other members of his family he dispensed with the name "Cavendish", being known simply as Bill Bentinck Bentinck married Clothilde Bruce Quigley (died 1984), an American heiress, on 16 February 1924. She was the daughter of James Bruce Quigley,a Dallas, Texas wealthy businessman. They had two children together Soon after World War II began Bentinck received a telephone call at his office from his Hungarian maid to tell him that his wife Clothilde had left him and taken their children with her. They were finally divorced in 1948. Portland married secondly, Kathleen Elsie Barry (died 2004) on 27 July 1948. She was the daughter of Arthur Barry. They had one daughter



Victor-Marie d'Estrées, Duke of Estrées count then duke (1723) of Estrées (30 November 1660, Paris – 27 December 1737, Paris) was a Marshal of France and subsequently known as the "Maréchal d'Estrées". Son of Marshal Jean d'Estrées, Count of Estrées (1624–1707), Victor Marie began his military career in the infantry in 1676, but joined the Navy one year later. In the Franco-Dutch War (1672–1678), he commanded a ship in the Battle of Tabago (3 March 1677) and fought afterwards in the Mediterranean.



Victor I, Duke of Ratibor, Prince of Corvey, Prince of Hohenlohe-Schillingsfürst (German: Viktor Moritz Carl 1.Herzog von Ratibor, 1.Fürst von Corvey, Prinz zu Hohenlohe-Schillingsfürst)( 10 February 1818 – 30 January 1893) was a member of House of Hohenlohe-Schillingsfürst and later Duke of the Silesian duchy of Ratibor (Czech: Ratiboř, Polish: Racibórz) and Prince of Corvey. Victor was born at Langenburg, Kingdom of Württemberg, eldest son of Franz Joseph, 5th Prince of Hohenlohe-Schillingsfürst (1787–1841), (son of Karl Albrecht II, Prince of Hohenlohe-Schillingsfürs and Baroness Judith Reviczky of Revisnye) and his wife, Princess Constanze of Hohenlohe-Langenburg (1792–1847), (daughter of Karl Ludwig, Prince of Hohenlohe-Langenburg and Countess Amalie of Solms-Baruth). Victor married 19 April 1845 at Donaueschingen to Princess Amélie of Fürstenberg (1821–1899), third child of Karl Egon II, Prince of Fürstenberg, and his wife, Princess Amalie of Baden. They had 10 children


Victor II, Duke of Ratibor, Prince of Corvey, Prince of Hohenlohe-Schillingsfürst (German: Viktor Amadeus 2.Herzog von Ratibor, 2.Fürst von Corvey, Prinz zu Hohenlohe-Schillingsfürst)( 6 September 1847 – 9 August 1923) was a member of House of Hohenlohe-Schillingsfürst and Duke of the Silesian duchy of Ratibor (Polish: Racibórz). Victor was born at Schloss Rauden, Kingdom of Prussia, eldest son of Victor I, Duke of Ratibor (1818–1893), (son of Franz Joseph, Prince of Hohenlohe-Schillingsfürst and Princess Constanze of Hohenlohe-Langenburg) and his wife, Princess Amélie of Fürstenberg (1821–1899), (daughter of Karl Egon II, Prince of Fürstenberg and Princess Amalie of Baden).Victor married 19 June 1877 at Vienna to Countess Maria Breunner-Enkevoirth (1856–1929), daughter of Count August Breunner-Enkevoirth, and his wife, Countess Agatha Széchényi de Sárvár-Felsövidék. They had 4 children


Victor III, Duke of Ratibor (2 February 1879 – 11 November 1945), son of Victor II, Duke of Ratibor, Prince of Corvey, Prince of Hohenlohe-Schillingsfürst and Countess Maria Breunner-Enkevoirth   He married in 1910 to Princess Elisabeth of Oettingen-Oettingen and Oettingen-Spielberg, had issue.


Victor Alexander Grosvenor, Earl Grosvenor (28 April 1853 – 22 January 1884), son of Hugh Lupus Grosvenor, 1st Duke of Westminster, KG, PC, JP (13 October 1825 – 22 December 1899) and his 1st wife Lady Constance Sutherland-Leveson-Gower. He married Lady Sibell Mary Lumley, the daughter of Richard Lumley, 9th Earl of Scarbrough and Frederica Mary Adeliza Drummond. He was the father of Hugh Grosvenor, 2nd Duke of Westminster


Louis Victor de Rochechouart de Mortemart, Duke of Mortemart (25 August 1636 – 15 September 1688) was a French nobleman and member of the ancient House of Rochechouart. His father Gabriel de Rochechouart de Mortemart was a childhood friend of Louis XIII. His older sister was Gabrielle de Rochechouart de Mortemart, the celebrated beauty of the era; another sister was Madame de Montespan herself the mistress of Louis XIV. He was Général des galères and Marshal of France, Maréchal de Vivonne. The only son of Gabriel de Rochechouart de Mortemart, he was a member of the ancient House of Rochechouart which were the most ancient noble family in France after the royal family.Louis Victor married Antoinette Louise de Mesmes (1640–10 March 1709) at the Château de Beyne in September, 1655. The couple had six children, three of which would have progeny


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