Please read here on how to use images on RoyalDish. - Please read the RoyalDish message on board purpose and rules.
Images containing full nudity or sexual activities are strongly forbidden on RoyalDish.


Pages: 1 ... 3 4 [5] 6 7 8   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Winter Olympics  (Read 125783 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Kittens

New Member
*

Reputation: 3

Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 1





Ignore
« Reply #60 on: February 10, 2018, 02:01:23 AM »

woohooo Winter Olympics

The trade in dog meat South Korea doesn't want Olympics tourists to see is exposed at market where they are slaughtered, chopped up and served in bubbling red broth for just $8 a bowl
Dogs and even puppies are sold openly for food in Moran market, Seongnam, outside of Seoul, South Korea.

Acutely aware of the worldwide reaction to eating dog meat, Korean authorities have urged citizens not to consume the animals during the Winter Olympics, which begins Friday, - but pictures show their request is futile.

The images show around two dozen caged dogs in a freezing, darkened dungeon, twitching at the slightest noise, their nostrils full of the stench of slaughter.

Outside their cages, whole, halved and quartered carcasses fill the tables of meat stalls, their fur burnt off but their paws still attached. Cauldrons of boiling dog meat steam away in a shop front.

Next door restaurants serve up bosintang, the dog flesh-rich soup, that many Koreans believe boosts the diner's sex drive, for 8,000 South Korean won, less than $7.50 or 5.20.

Authorities had claimed to have closed the dog trade aspect of the market - but it continues and instead there is an attempt to ban photography.

The brutality is a far cry from the friendly image South Korea wants to project.





We've had SOI dogs at the rescue, they are the most gentle and grateful souls you will ever meet. Unfortunately, it's a pervasive problem throughout Asia, not just South Korea. The Soi dogs we have had came from Thailand for example. Thank you for raising awareness of this tragic and ignorant practice PeDe! Star If you want more information on Soi Dog Foundation, please follow the link (warning, graphic images): https://www.soidog.org/

As someone of Korean descent and a longtime lurker, I wanted to say that dog meat is not a common thing in Korea. Many people there are animal lovers and those who eat dog meat are looked at with distain by the general population. It's incredibly disheartening that there are people saying that Korea didn't deserve the Olympic bid because of a strange, minuscule group of people who willingly partake in what we (meaning many East Asians) see as an abomination. Please don't judge a whole country based on a few bad apples.
Logged
GoodGollyMissMolly

Small Member
****

Reputation: 241

Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 575





Ignore
« Reply #61 on: February 10, 2018, 02:16:43 AM »

woohooo Winter Olympics

The trade in dog meat South Korea doesn't want Olympics tourists to see is exposed at market where they are slaughtered, chopped up and served in bubbling red broth for just $8 a bowl
Dogs and even puppies are sold openly for food in Moran market, Seongnam, outside of Seoul, South Korea.

Acutely aware of the worldwide reaction to eating dog meat, Korean authorities have urged citizens not to consume the animals during the Winter Olympics, which begins Friday, - but pictures show their request is futile.

The images show around two dozen caged dogs in a freezing, darkened dungeon, twitching at the slightest noise, their nostrils full of the stench of slaughter.

Outside their cages, whole, halved and quartered carcasses fill the tables of meat stalls, their fur burnt off but their paws still attached. Cauldrons of boiling dog meat steam away in a shop front.

Next door restaurants serve up bosintang, the dog flesh-rich soup, that many Koreans believe boosts the diner's sex drive, for 8,000 South Korean won, less than $7.50 or 5.20.

Authorities had claimed to have closed the dog trade aspect of the market - but it continues and instead there is an attempt to ban photography.

The brutality is a far cry from the friendly image South Korea wants to project.





We've had SOI dogs at the rescue, they are the most gentle and grateful souls you will ever meet. Unfortunately, it's a pervasive problem throughout Asia, not just South Korea. The Soi dogs we have had came from Thailand for example. Thank you for raising awareness of this tragic and ignorant practice PeDe! Star If you want more information on Soi Dog Foundation, please follow the link (warning, graphic images): https://www.soidog.org/

As someone of Korean descent and a longtime lurker, I wanted to say that dog meat is not a common thing in Korea. Many people there are animal lovers and those who eat dog meat are looked at with distain by the general population. It's incredibly disheartening that there are people saying that Korea didn't deserve the Olympic bid because of a strange, minuscule group of people who willingly partake in what we (meaning many East Asians) see as an abomination. Please don't judge a whole country based on a few bad apples.
Star
Logged
pixiecat
Board Helper
Most Exalted Member
************

Reputation: 5458

Offline Offline

Cuba Cuba

Posts: 33095


Pixiecat loves to Dish!




Ignore
« Reply #62 on: February 10, 2018, 03:00:37 AM »

Welcome, Kittens!  Star  Hug

I know what it feels like to be from a country where a small number of people who do awful things overshadow everything else.
Logged
AddiesGirl
Banned
Banned
Big Member
*******

Reputation: 576

Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 2113


"I am aware that you believe me insane" - Sisi




Ignore
« Reply #63 on: February 10, 2018, 03:17:54 AM »




We've had SOI dogs at the rescue, they are the most gentle and grateful souls you will ever meet. Unfortunately, it's a pervasive problem throughout Asia, not just South Korea. The Soi dogs we have had came from Thailand for example. Thank you for raising awareness of this tragic and ignorant practice PeDe! Star If you want more information on Soi Dog Foundation, please follow the link (warning, graphic images): https://www.soidog.org/

As someone of Korean descent and a longtime lurker, I wanted to say that dog meat is not a common thing in Korea. Many people there are animal lovers and those who eat dog meat are looked at with distain by the general population. It's incredibly disheartening that there are people saying that Korea didn't deserve the Olympic bid because of a strange, minuscule group of people who willingly partake in what we (meaning many East Asians) see as an abomination. Please don't judge a whole country based on a few bad apples.
[/quote]

Sorry, in no way was I judging a whole culture or country by what I said (and nowhere did I say anything about Korea not deserving the Olympics). It's the ignorant few, not the general populace at all that is the problem. That's why it's important to bring it to light, maybe it will be easy to stop? JMO and again sorry that you thought I was judging you or Korea (or any nation for that matter), not at all my intention.

By the way, welcome to the forum, hope you enjoy the games. I love the winter Olympics even more than the summer ones I think.
« Last Edit: February 10, 2018, 03:41:42 AM by AddiesGirl » Logged
PeDe
Board Helper
Most Exalted Member
************

Reputation: 5939

Offline Offline

Germany Germany

Posts: 33824





Ignore
« Reply #64 on: February 10, 2018, 04:04:59 AM »

woohooo Winter Olympics

The trade in dog meat South Korea doesn't want Olympics tourists to see is exposed at market where they are slaughtered, chopped up and served in bubbling red broth for just $8 a bowl
Dogs and even puppies are sold openly for food in Moran market, Seongnam, outside of Seoul, South Korea.

Acutely aware of the worldwide reaction to eating dog meat, Korean authorities have urged citizens not to consume the animals during the Winter Olympics, which begins Friday, - but pictures show their request is futile.

The images show around two dozen caged dogs in a freezing, darkened dungeon, twitching at the slightest noise, their nostrils full of the stench of slaughter.

Outside their cages, whole, halved and quartered carcasses fill the tables of meat stalls, their fur burnt off but their paws still attached. Cauldrons of boiling dog meat steam away in a shop front.

Next door restaurants serve up bosintang, the dog flesh-rich soup, that many Koreans believe boosts the diner's sex drive, for 8,000 South Korean won, less than $7.50 or 5.20.

Authorities had claimed to have closed the dog trade aspect of the market - but it continues and instead there is an attempt to ban photography.

The brutality is a far cry from the friendly image South Korea wants to project.





We've had SOI dogs at the rescue, they are the most gentle and grateful souls you will ever meet. Unfortunately, it's a pervasive problem throughout Asia, not just South Korea. The Soi dogs we have had came from Thailand for example. Thank you for raising awareness of this tragic and ignorant practice PeDe! Star If you want more information on Soi Dog Foundation, please follow the link (warning, graphic images): https://www.soidog.org/

As someone of Korean descent and a longtime lurker, I wanted to say that dog meat is not a common thing in Korea. Many people there are animal lovers and those who eat dog meat are looked at with distain by the general population. It's incredibly disheartening that there are people saying that Korea didn't deserve the Olympic bid because of a strange, minuscule group of people who willingly partake in what we (meaning many East Asians) see as an abomination. Please don't judge a whole country based on a few bad apples.


I don't judge a whole country, I judge the people doing these atrocious things. Especially if they are done out of an imaginary benefit, or vain. Same thing with Elefant tusks, or rino horns.

I have several Korean colleagues at work and we had a lively discussion about this subject. And as they explained to me dog meat eating and dog meat trade is a certain part of Korean culture, as it is of the Japanese, Thai and Indian. The one colleage working in my department explained further that in her grandparents generation it was a very normal thing, her parents didn't see anyting wrong with it either, her generation is absolutely abhorred by it.

That said, Western culture is as cruel and as nasty when it comes to raising life stock, transporting and slaughtering it. No difference in treatment, but a difference in the cultural aspect of a companion.

What's dishartening to me is that politicians, and in our board's case royals are traveling on trade missions and this subject is not on their agenda. What does it say about trade then. What does it say about humanity.

I have the same opinion on this like I have on the Russian Olympics when 1000's of stray dogs were culled and thrown half dead, dead in a ditch, kilometers outside the Olympic village. It was athletes and reporters who made globally aware of this practice. And the Russian government has announced this practice to continue for the 2018 World Soccer Championships in June/July.

If a government condones this horrendous practice and tells a certain part of the population to halt this unimaginable cruelty only for as long as foreign guests are in the country, then the government does not do its job to put a final stop to it. And it seems that the disgust and distain of fellow countrymen does not bring about enough action to end this cruelty. And if there wouldn't be any demand for dog meat, there wouldn't be any supply. It's not only people doing it, but people asking for it and consuming it.

I'm really sorry that some comments are disheartning to you.

My heart does not break for athletes, politicians or normal people. My heart breaks for those dogs (and other animals) that are kept in horrific conditions, butchered and cooked up for something that is unreal, and evil.


Logged

cowgrrl

Large Member
******

Reputation: 267

Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 1283





Ignore
« Reply #65 on: February 10, 2018, 04:35:24 AM »

This American is very annoyed that our Vice President didn't stand when the united Korean delegation walked into the arena.  How embarrassing. 
Logged
Hester
Board Helper
Warned
Most Exalted Member
************

Reputation: 2518

Offline Offline

Samoa Samoa

Posts: 13611





Ignore
« Reply #66 on: February 10, 2018, 04:59:53 AM »

Australia news sites are reporting that Fred has rushed home to visit Henrik.
Logged
Pomme

Gigantic Member
*********

Reputation: 1327

Offline Offline

Netherlands Netherlands

Posts: 3253


Mary who?




Ignore
« Reply #67 on: February 10, 2018, 04:24:07 PM »

This American is very annoyed that our Vice President didn't stand when the united Korean delegation walked into the arena.  How embarrassing.  


I believe the Korean PsTB couldn't care less about him - they can handle their own business quite well thank you very much.
They politely ignored him, had lunch, an invitation for talks followed.

I've been to S. Korea only 3 times, but remaining polite, not losing one's temper, and act in a quiet, forgiving and friendly manner in the face of all kinds of ignorance, rudeness and stupidity are things that struck me as of utmost importance to Koreans.







« Last Edit: February 10, 2018, 04:46:59 PM by Pomme » Logged

Talk to the hair, you slitherin' Skank
http://i.imgur.com/2mUIe.jpg
lellobeetle

Big Member
*******

Reputation: 455

Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 2154



WWW

Ignore
« Reply #68 on: February 11, 2018, 11:24:12 AM »

This American is very annoyed that our Vice President didn't stand when the united Korean delegation walked into the arena.  How embarrassing. 

I'm ignorant to the protocol. Is standing the common thing to do for the home delegation? I don't have any TVs in the house (by choice).  Smiley
Logged

getafix

Most Exalted Member
*

Reputation: 3633

Offline Offline

Virgin Islands, British Virgin Islands, British

Posts: 19643


Bye-Bye MEDiana Who!!!!




Ignore
« Reply #69 on: February 11, 2018, 11:43:15 AM »

This American is very annoyed that our Vice President didn't stand when the united Korean delegation walked into the arena.  How embarrassing. 


I believe the Korean PsTB couldn't care less about him - they can handle their own business quite well thank you very much.
They politely ignored him, had lunch, an invitation for talks followed.

I've been to S. Korea only 3 times, but remaining polite, not losing one's temper, and act in a quiet, forgiving and friendly manner in the face of all kinds of ignorance, rudeness and stupidity are things that struck me as of utmost importance to Koreans.

Pomme I lived in SK for 2 years.

while they may 'appear' serene...they are anything but serene!

No. they can be quite vitriolic and volcanic if the mood and situation suitaed them.

Protocol says, foreign dignitaries ought to stand p just like flags ought to be taken down each night.

G Smiley
Logged

ANDREW DENTON: Yes. What did... When you first met, what did you see in each other? CROWN PRINCE FREDERIK: What did we see in each other? We saw... Well, it's a bit hard. It's a bit blurry, in a way, because it was just after the Olympics had started and it was one of those evenings where...
lynda

Ginormous Member
***********

Reputation: 729

Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 8365





Ignore
« Reply #70 on: February 11, 2018, 04:25:00 PM »

This American is very annoyed that our Vice President didn't stand when the united Korean delegation walked into the arena.  How embarrassing. 

I agree
Logged
Pomme

Gigantic Member
*********

Reputation: 1327

Offline Offline

Netherlands Netherlands

Posts: 3253


Mary who?




Ignore
« Reply #71 on: February 11, 2018, 04:40:55 PM »

This American is very annoyed that our Vice President didn't stand when the united Korean delegation walked into the arena.  How embarrassing. 


I believe the Korean PsTB couldn't care less about him - they can handle their own business quite well thank you very much.
They politely ignored him, had lunch, an invitation for talks followed.

I've been to S. Korea only 3 times, but remaining polite, not losing one's temper, and act in a quiet, forgiving and friendly manner in the face of all kinds of ignorance, rudeness and stupidity are things that struck me as of utmost importance to Koreans.

Pomme I lived in SK for 2 years.

while they may 'appear' serene...they are anything but serene!

No. they can be quite vitriolic and volcanic if the mood and situation suitaed them.

Protocol says, foreign dignitaries ought to stand p just like flags ought to be taken down each night.

G Smiley

Heheh I was referring only to formal or semi-formal interactions with foreigners (because that's the context in which I visited, never really immersed in Korean life proper, let alone liv there). The 'bella figura' so to speak.
I believe you immediately!
Though you'd have to agree that their threshold until they 'lose it' is generally speaking rather high?

As long as a flag is well-lit, it can stay up? That's one of the few rules we have here.




Logged

Talk to the hair, you slitherin' Skank
http://i.imgur.com/2mUIe.jpg
pixiecat
Board Helper
Most Exalted Member
************

Reputation: 5458

Offline Offline

Cuba Cuba

Posts: 33095


Pixiecat loves to Dish!




Ignore
« Reply #72 on: February 11, 2018, 05:51:21 PM »

This American is very annoyed that our Vice President didn't stand when the united Korean delegation walked into the arena.  How embarrassing. 

Me too.  He's a creepy, vile, fundamentalist tool.  He and his "mother".  Nerves
Logged
pixiecat
Board Helper
Most Exalted Member
************

Reputation: 5458

Offline Offline

Cuba Cuba

Posts: 33095


Pixiecat loves to Dish!




Ignore
« Reply #73 on: February 11, 2018, 05:53:14 PM »

This American is very annoyed that our Vice President didn't stand when the united Korean delegation walked into the arena.  How embarrassing. 

I'm ignorant to the protocol. Is standing the common thing to do for the home delegation? I don't have any TVs in the house (by choice).  Smiley

Yes.  If the tables had been turned and we were hosting the Olympics, our leaders would be outraged and offended if, for example, the president of Colombia didn't stand for our athletes. 

It was even more glaringly rude since they were sitting while literally every other person behind, next to, in front of, etc was standing.
Logged
Duchess of Verona

Gigantic Member
*********

Reputation: 1035

Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 3389





Ignore
« Reply #74 on: February 12, 2018, 02:18:11 PM »

How great that Marai Nagasu landed her triple axel! Only the 3rd woman (and first American one) to do so at the Olympics! It must be especially sweet after the selection committee took the Olympic berth away from her last time (which she had rightfully earned) and gave it to Ashley Wagner who had under performed at Nationals in the last cycle.
Logged
Pages: 1 ... 3 4 [5] 6 7 8   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to: