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Author Topic: 2018 Yrma - NEWS & EVENTS  (Read 275748 times)
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pixiecat
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« Reply #1365 on: December 04, 2018, 09:01:01 PM »

December 4
Yrma hosts a Christmas reception for the Mary Fund's collaborators







she looks so out of place, like a well-dressed waitress  Thinking



Of course. They're intelligent people speaking Danish. She's got that "Just smile and pretend to be interested" facial expression in this picture.  It reminds me of that scene in Bridget Jones' Diary where she's listening to Salman Rushdie speaking and he asks her what she thinks and she responds by asking him where the toilets are.
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« Reply #1366 on: December 04, 2018, 09:40:10 PM »

Does she not speak Danish? I could have sworn I saw her give a speech in it.
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pixiecat
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« Reply #1367 on: December 04, 2018, 10:48:51 PM »

Does she not speak Danish? I could have sworn I saw her give a speech in it.

She does, but rather poorly.  That's what the Danes on this board have said.

They don't speak it at home, and the Danes on this board have said that it is very obvious that she doesn't spend any time practicing it.
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Harley
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« Reply #1368 on: December 04, 2018, 10:52:30 PM »

Does she not speak Danish? I could have sworn I saw her give a speech in it.

She does but it’s with a very heavy accent. For someone who’s lived here for that many years, she also doesn’t come across as someone who “gets” Danish and our culture. She’s absolutely still an Australian who lives in Denmark. She’s not Danish.
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« Reply #1369 on: December 06, 2018, 06:14:46 PM »

Is Danish a very hard language to learn? I can't imagine being married to the heir apparent (especially for as long as they've been together) and not trying to perfect my Danish.
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Harley
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« Reply #1370 on: December 06, 2018, 08:35:47 PM »

Is Danish a very hard language to learn? I can't imagine being married to the heir apparent (especially for as long as they've been together) and not trying to perfect my Danish.

Yeah, it’s a difficult language but it’s not impossible. Alexandra speaks flawlessly and Marie, while there’s still an accent, is leagues better than Mary as well.

Mary’s accent is so bad that she once, on national tv, pronounced underernærede (malnourished) so that it sounded like onanerede (masturbated) instead. I think she’s already lived here for a decade by that point.
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« Reply #1371 on: December 06, 2018, 08:38:06 PM »

These colours suit her but it doesn't matter what she wears she looks old.
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« Reply #1372 on: December 06, 2018, 10:21:16 PM »

I come from a Norwegian-speaking family and even those of us who have studied Danish in school would agree that it is a difficult language to pronounce correctly.

Do you know the old story about that red stuff known as ``Danish dessert''? The original  -- not the awful packaged crap --  is really delicious, a puree of red berries (although I make it often with blackberries) served with some heavy cream and toasted almonds.  The name is ``rødgrød med fløde'' and I have heard that during WWII, when Denmark was occupied, the way that the Danes could identify undercover German spies was to ask them to say the name of this dish. It's practically impossible to say correctly, unless you're born a Dane.

So I have a little sympathy for any non Denmark native trying to speak the language with a correct accent.
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« Reply #1373 on: December 06, 2018, 10:41:26 PM »

I come from a Norwegian-speaking family and even those of us who have studied Danish in school would agree that it is a difficult language to pronounce correctly.

Do you know the old story about that red stuff known as ``Danish dessert''? The original  -- not the awful packaged crap --  is really delicious, a puree of red berries (although I make it often with blackberries) served with some heavy cream and toasted almonds.  The name is ``rødgrød med fløde'' and I have heard that during WWII, when Denmark was occupied, the way that the Danes could identify undercover German spies was to ask them to say the name of this dish. It's practically impossible to say correctly, unless you're born a Dane.

So I have a little sympathy for any non Denmark native trying to speak the language with a correct accent.

I worked with an engineer who grew up and went to college in Denmark, he often commented how hard it was to teach people Danish. Still, if Mary had more Danish spoken around her she would start to notice patterns and inflections that would make her Danish more fluid if not fluent. But just like another married-in, she doesn't acclimate to her surroundings because she doesn't think she has to.
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« Reply #1374 on: December 06, 2018, 11:53:54 PM »

I come from a Norwegian-speaking family and even those of us who have studied Danish in school would agree that it is a difficult language to pronounce correctly.

Do you know the old story about that red stuff known as ``Danish dessert''? The original  -- not the awful packaged crap --  is really delicious, a puree of red berries (although I make it often with blackberries) served with some heavy cream and toasted almonds.  The name is ``rødgrød med fløde'' and I have heard that during WWII, when Denmark was occupied, the way that the Danes could identify undercover German spies was to ask them to say the name of this dish. It's practically impossible to say correctly, unless you're born a Dane.

So I have a little sympathy for any non Denmark native trying to speak the language with a correct accent.


I do for normal people, but not for her.

Yrma had lessons with a private paid for tutor! It's her not wanting to be Danish, and immerse her into Danish culture that is a big problem. My Grandfather spoke 7 languages fluently, and always said the more languages you speak the more person you are (badly translated) meaning that the language opens your mind and sould to the respecitve country, culture and life style.

Yrma doesn't want that. She likes the perks that come with her position in this country, but doesn't want to do her part.

How come that Alex learned Danish perfectly in record time? How come that Marie speaks it extremely well? Granted, Marie is a polyglot, so it might come to her easier. Nevertheless, there are 2 people from different countries managing learning the Danish language well. It might just be that they identify with Denmark, Mary is not!
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« Reply #1375 on: December 07, 2018, 12:11:35 AM »

I come from a Norwegian-speaking family and even those of us who have studied Danish in school would agree that it is a difficult language to pronounce correctly.

Do you know the old story about that red stuff known as ``Danish dessert''? The original  -- not the awful packaged crap --  is really delicious, a puree of red berries (although I make it often with blackberries) served with some heavy cream and toasted almonds.  The name is ``rødgrød med fløde'' and I have heard that during WWII, when Denmark was occupied, the way that the Danes could identify undercover German spies was to ask them to say the name of this dish. It's practically impossible to say correctly, unless you're born a Dane.

So I have a little sympathy for any non Denmark native trying to speak the language with a correct accent.


I do for normal people, but not for her.

Yrma had lessons with a private paid for tutor! It's her not wanting to be Danish, and immerse her into Danish culture that is a big problem. My Grandfather spoke 7 languages fluently, and always said the more languages you speak the more person you are (badly translated) meaning that the language opens your mind and sould to the respecitve country, culture and life style.

Yrma doesn't want that. She likes the perks that come with her position in this country, but doesn't want to do her part.

How come that Alex learned Danish perfectly in record time? How come that Marie speaks it extremely well? Granted, Marie is a polyglot, so it might come to her easier. Nevertheless, there are 2 people from different countries managing learning the Danish language well. It might just be that they identify with Denmark, Mary is not!


All the kids are polyglots. Even Freddles is a polyglot. Mosh is just a Glot.
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pixiecat
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« Reply #1376 on: December 07, 2018, 02:04:38 AM »

I come from a Norwegian-speaking family and even those of us who have studied Danish in school would agree that it is a difficult language to pronounce correctly.

Do you know the old story about that red stuff known as ``Danish dessert''? The original  -- not the awful packaged crap --  is really delicious, a puree of red berries (although I make it often with blackberries) served with some heavy cream and toasted almonds.  The name is ``rødgrød med fløde'' and I have heard that during WWII, when Denmark was occupied, the way that the Danes could identify undercover German spies was to ask them to say the name of this dish. It's practically impossible to say correctly, unless you're born a Dane.

So I have a little sympathy for any non Denmark native trying to speak the language with a correct accent.


I do for normal people, but not for her.

Yrma had lessons with a private paid for tutor! It's her not wanting to be Danish, and immerse her into Danish culture that is a big problem. My Grandfather spoke 7 languages fluently, and always said the more languages you speak the more person you are (badly translated) meaning that the language opens your mind and sould to the respecitve country, culture and life style.

Yrma doesn't want that. She likes the perks that come with her position in this country, but doesn't want to do her part.

How come that Alex learned Danish perfectly in record time? How come that Marie speaks it extremely well? Granted, Marie is a polyglot, so it might come to her easier. Nevertheless, there are 2 people from different countries managing learning the Danish language well. It might just be that they identify with Denmark, Mary is not!


THIS!  Star  Her one job is to be the future queen consort of this country and to be the face of DK abroad. It's her one job.  It's not like she has to put in overtime at the factory and then come home and raise kids by herself.  She lives a life of immense privilege that none of us can even begin to imagine.  She has all the time in the world. She's a lazy, vain, fool for not making the mastering of Danish her priority. 

I have ZERO sympathy for Mary.  Not one shred.  She's got more language-learning resources at her disposal and more free time than any other human being who is trying to learn Danish.  The results of the effort she's put is are pathetic. She's not a person with a learning disability or brain injury.  There is literally no excuse whatsoever for this.
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« Reply #1377 on: December 07, 2018, 09:58:25 AM »

A little peddle back, it is not easy for everyone to learn another / new language.
One picks it up by his or herself, just by listening and so, while others need to spend enormous amounts of time and effort in to it to grasp the basics.

But still I would think that after being in Denmark for about 15 years and all the possibilities etc. available to her, Mary would have a better understanding, feeling and such for the Danish language and culture.

Reminds me of a nice conversation with a British couple I recently had. They told that to their experiences Europeans, especially the ones from the Benelux, were at ease with and mastering several languages. And they asked me how many I spoke, which is about 4 (Dutch, English, German and a dialect (of the so called Lower Saxon language(s))). But that was nothing in comparison to an old study friend of mine, who mastered about 7. For me it is quite normal to be able to speak several languages (or at least know the basics), but according to the Brits for them this was quite unusual. Their kids would learn English and perhaps French and or Spanish. And I have noticed that for most people, who have English as 1st language, it isn't always easy to pick up another language. As most of the other people also master English to a certain level and will easily switch to English (instead of helping learn the language by continuing in their language). Off course you also have people who can't be bothered by learning another language………….
« Last Edit: December 07, 2018, 10:18:34 AM by Principessa » Logged
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« Reply #1378 on: December 07, 2018, 10:16:44 AM »

I'll say learning a different language can be quite tricky for those who have English as their native language. Its a universally spoken language and a lack of need/necessity can also be an another driving factor.
I tried learning Spanish but despite my best efforts I still can't speak the language fluently  although if you speak very slowly I can understand what the speaker is saying.

PS- not speaking for Mary in particular but making a general point.  
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Harley
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« Reply #1379 on: December 07, 2018, 10:18:08 AM »

The thing is, I wouldn’t be judging Mary for having a hard time learning Danish (as a Dane, I KNOW it’s a difficult language to learn) if it weren’t for the fact that it’s just part of many things where she’s decidedly not Danish. She lives here, heck, her job is to represent us abroad. She’ll likely be our queen one day. But she’s not Danish. You can tell that she doesn’t feel at home here, even after all those years.

Henrik had a very heavy accent as well and to the average Dane, it was more noticable since we’re more used to the sound of English than the sound of French. But his grasp of the language (the nuances and the “between the lines stuff) and his vocabulary were very good. It was really mainly the sentence melody that he struggled with and he was mocked for it for decades. Mary has far greater problems with the language but she’s hailed as the second coming and people, weirdly, buy into the hype. Henrik was pretty much always blamed for the things that people ought to blame Mosh for instead.
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