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Author Topic: Meghan is pregnant, due Spring 2019  (Read 48922 times)
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lisadug

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« Reply #390 on: February 06, 2019, 02:34:11 PM »

Why you would want a birth without painkillers is beyond me. Seriously women have fought hard to get some relieve and it is still believed in too many areas to count that birthing pains are the punishments for Eva's sins.
NO MAN would even contemplate getting a vaginal pap-smear without full anaesthesia, let alone push a baseball from his body.
I did both (with painkillers and without) and let me assure you: not fun...

If and when my day comes I want to go as long as I can without drugs.  As I rule I don't take any narcotics since there is a multigenerational family history of addiction and needles scare the crap out of me...the thought of one going into my spine makes we want to have a panic attack.  But I don't think that makes me a better woman than someone who gets an epidural as soon as she can (or even a scheduled c section)...it just makes me me.  

I hate how women try to one up each other...I have a good friends that wanted a drug free birth and ended up with an emergency c section after she spiked a fever (concern about infection) other women told her horrible things not accepting the the most important part of birth is a healthy mom and healthy baby (or babies).  

 Thumb up that is indeed the most important.

My midwife gave me some lovely advice, she said make a plan and have an idea how you would like the birth to go but be prepared for flexibility because all we want is a healthy mom and baby at the end and it might be totally different to how you hope it will be.
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« Reply #391 on: February 06, 2019, 02:55:18 PM »


My midwife gave me some lovely advice, she said make a plan and have an idea how you would like the birth to go but be prepared for flexibility because all we want is a healthy mom and baby at the end and it might will be totally different to how you hope it will be.

Fixed it for you  Hug   

The only thing that went according to my plan was 'a live baby'  Grin  (His Apgar score was tops, but he developed an infection so had to stay in hospital. Me, that's another story).
So I took no chances with the second one, deciding on no plan at all.

A plan is an important tool to visualise the birth, and fortunately most mothers-to-be are aware of the fact that this flexibility is an essential part of the plan, too.

My mother friends have experienced every possible way: from 10-minute practically painfree home deliveries, to 10 hours pain-aceptable home births and from to perfectly normal hospital births ending with a deceased newborn strangled by her umbilical cord, to HELLP syndrome causing an early birth (at not even 26 weeks, he pulled through thank god), plus every conceivable birth in between.

You just can not predict it, no matter how relaxed or well-prepared you are - and a 'good' first time around doesn't predict a similar outcome a second time. Though some women are just blessed.

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« Reply #392 on: February 06, 2019, 02:57:20 PM »

Well my sister in law wanted to give birth to her 1st one in the (local) hospital. But it went so fast it was decided to do the delivery at home.

Some funny ones of the tv series Bones:



And there is a funny one of "pushing out a Jack-o-lantern" description by Brennan, who is corrected by Booth to use "watermelon". But I wasn't able to find a usable meme or such of that online (yet)

"...Assuming that psychologists have ethics. - I don't know. - Uh, okay. Uh, Dr. Brennan, perhaps the the emotions that you're experiencing during pregnancy are affecting what what should be a carefully reasoned decision. I mean, for your sake and the baby's, the safest place to give birth is a hospital. No, that's not true. Are you the one who has to undergo wave after wave of mind-searing pain that only ends after a writhing, screaming object the size of a a a jack-o-lantern pushes its way through your vagina? No. I thought you'd use the word "watermelon." I couldn't think of the word. When you give birth to a baby, you can make the decisionsÖ."

« Last Edit: February 06, 2019, 03:11:14 PM by Principessa » Logged
Eliza B

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« Reply #393 on: February 06, 2019, 03:03:56 PM »


My midwife gave me some lovely advice, she said make a plan and have an idea how you would like the birth to go but be prepared for flexibility because all we want is a healthy mom and baby at the end and it might will be totally different to how you hope it will be.

Fixed it for you  Hug  

The only thing that went according to my plan was 'a live baby'  Grin  (His Apgar score was tops, but he developed an infection so had to stay in hospital. Me, that's another story).
So I took no chances with the second one, deciding on no plan at all.

A plan is an important tool to visualise the birth, and fortunately most mothers-to-be are aware of the fact that this flexibility is an essential part of the plan, too.

My mother friends have experienced every possible way: from 10-minute practically painfree home deliveries, to 10 hours pain-aceptable home births and from to perfectly normal hospital births ending with a deceased newborn strangled by her umbilical cord, to HELLP syndrome causing an early birth (at not even 26 weeks, he pulled through thank god), plus every conceivable birth in between.

You just can not predict it, no matter how relaxed or well-prepared you are - and a 'good' first time around doesn't predict a similar outcome a second time. Though some women are just blessed.



Mine went mostly to plan.  But the things I was going to do for pain relief well yeah none worked.  The nurse was great.  She talked me into breathing differently than anything i was taught when pushing and delivery was very quick. Bring flexible with your ideas of what's going to happen is totally needed. And not feeling guilty by not following "the plan".
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« Reply #394 on: February 06, 2019, 03:06:33 PM »

Happy to hear you had such a good nurse helping you Eliza! - it makes a world of difference, having capable people around.
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« Reply #395 on: February 06, 2019, 03:10:24 PM »

Happy to hear you had such a good nurse helping you Eliza! - it makes a world of difference, having capable people around.

Very true.  It was a full delivery wing that night.  I'm very thankful she took so much time and care with me. Not everyone is so lucky.
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« Reply #396 on: February 06, 2019, 04:36:16 PM »

My doctor asked me what my plan was and what I wanted out of the birth experience. I said a live baby and not to die myself. I signed all papers (including permission for emergency surgery) before the inducement started and she talked through everything. I've delivered one baby and seen 6-8 others during my Paramedic rotations so I knew hoe sideways things can go or how smoothly, no way to tell.  I unfortunately had the former due to a nurse being an idiot (nothing like a narc OD) to the point I caused her to loose her license.  In the end the only thing that mattered was holding my daughter.
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« Reply #397 on: February 06, 2019, 05:11:13 PM »

I agree with Eliza, you have to be prepared for anything to happen and if it does, to trust the healthcare professionals that are with you because some interventions are going to have to happen fast.
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« Reply #398 on: February 06, 2019, 05:37:02 PM »

I am reading comments (on other forums) about how mean people are about Meghan cupping her belly. Comments like "I cupped my belly all the time, because I wanted to feel my baby, the bump was itchy or uncomfortable" etc etc.

1. The people who are writing the comments are not royals and are not representing the Queen of a country, so there is no comparison. Do what you want on your own free time.
2. In professional settings, it is seen as extremely unprofessional to constantly touch your body somewhere or fidget with your  hair or clothes. If you have to, you go to the rest room to do it or in your private office. Meghan's official meetings are 30 minutes to one hour long. She probably could keep her hands off her belly for an hour twice a week.

I don't understand why someone is defending her, her behaviour is just bad manners.
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« Reply #399 on: February 06, 2019, 06:16:42 PM »

Maybe Meghan has a plan. Start out every so bravely with no pain killers or medication of any kind, then have to give up her brave plan for the sake of the baby's health and move to a hospital. (I don't think it's far to move since doesn't one or all of the palaces have a hospital in it. )  I'm for sure not saying that she does think that way but wouldn't it be just the ticket to screaming headlines about how courageous she is. Just a thought. If I were her age and had all the resources imaginable for a healthy birth of a baby you can bet I would be taking full advantage of them. Especially the epidural. Who needs that kind of pain. I still can't buy into this natural birth she seems to be planning since this is a 'royal' baby and not just hers. This is Harry's baby too and no way can I see him putting that tiny life at any risk however minimal it may be.


ETA: I had plans for a  'natural' drug free birth in a hospital with my first child. About 3 labor pains in I had changed my mind about the drugs. Give them to me. And then after about an hour I was screaming that I had changed my mind about having a baby and to call the whole thing off, after which I was screaming 'I'm going to adopt my next one.' I was asleep when my baby was born and we didn't get introduced until I woke up in the recovery room.
« Last Edit: February 06, 2019, 06:23:16 PM by royalsareajoke » Logged

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« Reply #400 on: February 06, 2019, 06:27:04 PM »

My doctor asked me what my plan was and what I wanted out of the birth experience. I said a live baby and not to die myself. I signed all papers (including permission for emergency surgery) before the inducement started and she talked through everything. I've delivered one baby and seen 6-8 others during my Paramedic rotations so I knew hoe sideways things can go or how smoothly, no way to tell.  I unfortunately had the former due to a nurse being an idiot (nothing like a narc OD) to the point I caused her to loose her license.  In the end the only thing that mattered was holding my daughter.

 Hug  Glad there was a happy ending.
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« Reply #401 on: February 06, 2019, 06:49:23 PM »

Why you would want a birth without painkillers is beyond me. Seriously women have fought hard to get some relieve and it is still believed in too many areas to count that birthing pains are the punishments for Eva's sins.
NO MAN would even contemplate getting a vaginal pap-smear without full anaesthesia, let alone push a baseball from his body.
I did both (with painkillers and without) and let me assure you: not fun...

If and when my day comes I want to go as long as I can without drugs.  As I rule I don't take any narcotics since there is a multigenerational family history of addiction and needles scare the crap out of me...the thought of one going into my spine makes we want to have a panic attack.  But I don't think that makes me a better woman than someone who gets an epidural as soon as she can (or even a scheduled c section)...it just makes me me.  

I hate how women try to one up each other...I have a good friends that wanted a drug free birth and ended up with an emergency c section after she spiked a fever (concern about infection) other women told her horrible things not accepting the the most important part of birth is a healthy mom and healthy baby (or babies).  

 Thumb up that is indeed the most important.

My midwife gave me some lovely advice, she said make a plan and have an idea how you would like the birth to go but be prepared for flexibility because all we want is a healthy mom and baby at the end and it might be totally different to how you hope it will be.

I think this advice is good. However I think itís not the plan per se thatís important but rather that the mum to be has made herself aware of all options and understands what is happening to her and to oppose or offer alternatives if she wishes. In an emergency when thereís not enough time to explain it may be reassuring for the mum to already know whatís happening. It can be quite shocking how unaware women are and what choices they have ( whatís done for doctors concenience vs whatís best for mum) and this is something that mums can dwell on for a long time post birth. So awareness is very important and that can be achieved in part by taking the time to make a plan.
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« Reply #402 on: February 06, 2019, 08:11:55 PM »

Why you would want a birth without painkillers is beyond me. Seriously women have fought hard to get some relieve and it is still believed in too many areas to count that birthing pains are the punishments for Eva's sins.
NO MAN would even contemplate getting a vaginal pap-smear without full anaesthesia, let alone push a baseball from his body.
I did both (with painkillers and without) and let me assure you: not fun...

I have never given birth or been pregnant. But at my teenage years someone remarked the  heavy cramps I felt during my menstruation were light contractions. Well my reaction at the time was: "If this are light contractions, I really don't want to know how normal and or strong ones feel!!!
THIS!

I once made the mistake to let the Gyn extract my contraceptive coil without local anaethesis (because I am no hero with injections either, and he usually made 3 injections before exchanging the coil, so I thought "let's try it without"). Well, it WAS pain. For a split second, then I fainted (was away for a full 3 minutes). To imagine to endure such pain over hours is beyond me.
Each an every mother has my full respect, no matter how she delivers.
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« Reply #403 on: February 06, 2019, 08:45:23 PM »

I agree with Eliza, you have to be prepared for anything to happen and if it does, to trust the healthcare professionals that are with you because some interventions are going to have to happen fast.
And now take that advice and make it your daily Mantra for the next 20 years, because, let's face it, this being prepared for everything and an Alien invasion yet flexible enough to change Course midway thru anything, is going to be your life with a child.
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« Reply #404 on: February 07, 2019, 03:28:04 AM »

I am reading comments (on other forums) about how mean people are about Meghan cupping her belly. Comments like "I cupped my belly all the time, because I wanted to feel my baby, the bump was itchy or uncomfortable" etc etc.

1. The people who are writing the comments are not royals and are not representing the Queen of a country, so there is no comparison. Do what you want on your own free time.
2. In professional settings, it is seen as extremely unprofessional to constantly touch your body somewhere or fidget with your  hair or clothes. If you have to, you go to the rest room to do it or in your private office. Meghan's official meetings are 30 minutes to one hour long. She probably could keep her hands off her belly for an hour twice a week.

I don't understand why someone is defending her,
her behaviour is just bad manners.

maybe they;'re being paid to do so??

G Smiley
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