Please read here on how to use images on RoyalDish. - Please read the RoyalDish message on board purpose and rules.
Images containing full nudity or sexual activities are strongly forbidden on RoyalDish.


Pages: 1 ... 4 5 [6] 7 8   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Middleton/Matthews baby  (Read 32737 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
genegal43

Huge Member
********

Reputation: 634

Offline Offline

Posts: 2975


All I got was a Nancy Pearl Action Figure...


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #75 on: November 12, 2018, 05:57:18 PM »

Not a surprise that Michael is in there for Pippa's dad and for James's brother who died.

no mention of Pimpy's side at all  Blink

http://www.msn.com/en-au/...yal/ar-BBPBdmn?ocid=ientp

G Smiley

They had a typo in the article, it should read "perfect name for a fake royal."
Logged

Genealogy: shrinking the world one person at a time!
Maria
Administrator
Most Exalted Member
************

Reputation: 4166

Offline Offline

Posts: 21585




« Reply #76 on: November 12, 2018, 10:42:22 PM »

I am over dishing on the Middletons so if since Arthur is born and named, perhaps we can move on..
Logged
Principessa

Most Exalted Member
*

Reputation: 2005

Offline Offline

Netherlands Netherlands

Posts: 28539


I am the Queen




Ignore
« Reply #77 on: November 12, 2018, 11:02:02 PM »

Based among others the comments underneath the DM article, a lot of Americans seem to be surpised by more than 2 (first) names.
Arenīt they simply not used to that? Over here in Europe, including GB, I do hear it more often.  I have 3 (first) names myself and my siblings have the same.
Logged
kpzra

Small Member
****

Reputation: 159

Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 551





Ignore
« Reply #78 on: November 13, 2018, 01:20:12 AM »

Based among others the comments underneath the DM article, a lot of Americans seem to be surpised by more than 2 (first) names.
Arenīt they simply not used to that? Over here in Europe, including GB, I do hear it more often.  I have 3 (first) names myself and my siblings have the same.

Almost everyone I know in the US has a first, middle and last name and that's it.  More then that is unusual here.
Logged
PeDe
Board Helper
Most Exalted Member
************

Reputation: 5935

Offline Offline

Germany Germany

Posts: 33797





Ignore
« Reply #79 on: November 13, 2018, 06:13:01 AM »

Based among others the comments underneath the DM article, a lot of Americans seem to be surpised by more than 2 (first) names.
Arenīt they simply not used to that? Over here in Europe, including GB, I do hear it more often.  I have 3 (first) names myself and my siblings have the same.

Almost everyone I know in the US has a first, middle and last name and that's it.  More then that is unusual here.


interesting history of middle names:


There is actual history behind it, and it dates back to ancient Rome. Many Romans had three names, a praenomen, which was a personal name, a nomen, which was a family name, and a cognomen, which indicated what branch of family you were from. The more names you had the more respected you were by others. Women only had two names, and slaves typically had one. An example you may be familiar with, Gaius Julius Caesar.

This tradition of multiple names spread over to Western cultures in the 1700s. Aristocrats would give their children long names to show their high place in society. Spanish and Arabic cultures would give their children paternal or maternal names from previous generations to be able to keep track of the child’s family tree.

But the way we use middle names today originated in the Middle Ages when Europeans couldn’t decide between giving their child a family name or the name of a saint. They eventually settled on naming their children with the given name first, baptismal name second, and surname third. The tradition was spread to America as people started to immigrate overseas.

As time went on people started to stray away from religious middle names and get creative with the second name of their child. A common tradition was making the middle name the maiden name of the mother.

Today, some people don’t even have middle names, some prefer to be called by their middle name, and some never even use theirs.
Logged

Principessa

Most Exalted Member
*

Reputation: 2005

Offline Offline

Netherlands Netherlands

Posts: 28539


I am the Queen




Ignore
« Reply #80 on: November 13, 2018, 10:07:55 AM »

Interesting!!

In my family, well predominantly in the past, children were often named after grandparents, other family members and so on. Which was and is also seen in other families. Often you would see that their given name, the name they would go by, was an abbreviation of one of their official names (mostly the first).

In my generation and those of my siblings you see another kind of approach. The first official name being your given name, the name you would go buy. Well the other names, in our case 2, would refer to a family member or related.

For example my first name is not a reference to a familymember (it is purely a name my parents liked), but my 2nd and 3rd name refers to and originate from both my grandmothers.


Mmmm just remembered that my mother even has 4 names. In the past we sometimes joked that the initials of her 4 names sounded like the name of bank. The fun if she would ever be required to write out her full name, including her maiden name (which is a long one) & married name.  Jumping
« Last Edit: November 13, 2018, 10:18:41 AM by Principessa » Logged
Maria
Administrator
Most Exalted Member
************

Reputation: 4166

Offline Offline

Posts: 21585




« Reply #81 on: November 13, 2018, 06:33:38 PM »

Based among others the comments underneath the DM article, a lot of Americans seem to be surpised by more than 2 (first) names.
Arenīt they simply not used to that? Over here in Europe, including GB, I do hear it more often.  I have 3 (first) names myself and my siblings have the same.

In Denmark it's not very usual to have more than two first names. That is pretty common though. I think it's more normal in Sweden so I have no doubt it's a cultural thing.
Logged
BaileyB

Baby Member
*

Reputation: 36

Offline Offline

Posts: 64





Ignore
« Reply #82 on: November 13, 2018, 11:39:10 PM »

Based among others the comments underneath the DM article, a lot of Americans seem to be surpised by more than 2 (first) names.
Arenīt they simply not used to that? Over here in Europe, including GB, I do hear it more often.  I have 3 (first) names myself and my siblings have the same.

Am American and it is unusual enough that in 36 years I have only met one person with more than a first and middle name name. Come to think of it have met more people with no middle names at all than with multiple middle names. But I am aware that the multiple names are more common in GB and some parts of Europe.
Logged
Principessa

Most Exalted Member
*

Reputation: 2005

Offline Offline

Netherlands Netherlands

Posts: 28539


I am the Queen




Ignore
« Reply #83 on: November 14, 2018, 01:19:50 AM »

Could it possibly beside cultural things have to do with religion? For example Roman-Catholic?

I remember an interview of Canadian actress Cobie Smulders at Ellen. She pronounced her full set of name: Jacoba Francisca Maria Smulders. At which Cobie is short for Jacoba. As it is an relative old fashion name in the Netherlands you will predominantly hear Jacoba and Cobie in the older generations.

Cobie is born to a Dutch father (hence the for us Dutchies familiar last name of Smulders) and an English mother. Her names, and especially her 1st sound very Dutch to me. And if I understand it correct she was named after a Dutch (great) aunt.

Ellen was suprised when hearing Cobie had more then 1 a 2 names.


In the Netherlands I also notice a small change, even among my siblings. One of my brothers has given his children just two names (of which the  1st is the name they liked, and the 2nd referst to a specific familymember), while another brother decided to give his childeren just one name.  Difference can be that the first mentioned brother had his kids baptised in the Roman Catholic church, while the other one has broken with the religion.
Logged
Margaret

Gigantic Member
*********

Reputation: 1430

Offline Offline

Australia Australia

Posts: 4107





Ignore
« Reply #84 on: November 14, 2018, 01:46:14 AM »

For what it's worth, in my Australian Anglican family, I and my brother and cousins and also my parents (both of whom were born in the early part of the 20th Century) each had a first name and middle name.  In each case the first name was the name the parents liked and wanted the child to be known by, and the middle name was generally the name of a family member or friend - a first name, not a surname - and was used to honour that person.  I say generally, because for some peculiar reason my mother's middle name was Kitchener, and none of us can think of any reason why my grandparents would have wanted to honour Lord Kitchener!  The timeline was consistent but we are not related to Lord Kitchener.  Perhaps he was a hero to one of my grandparents.  My mother's mother and her several siblings, all of whom were born in the last quarter of the 19th Century, all had a first name and two middle names.  One of the middle names was often quite odd and seemed like a surname but none of those still alive by the time I became curious about it knew why those odd second middle names, which were not family names we recognised, had been used.  Both of my great-grandparents, born in the 1850s, had only one middle name, and none of their parents (born in England, Scotland and Ireland during the first quarter of the 19th Century) had any middle name at all.  There was a similar pattern in my mother's father's family, and also on my father's side of the family, with the exception in each case of the odd pattern of two middle names in the late 19th Century.
« Last Edit: November 14, 2018, 01:53:35 AM by Margaret » Logged
PeDe
Board Helper
Most Exalted Member
************

Reputation: 5935

Offline Offline

Germany Germany

Posts: 33797





Ignore
« Reply #85 on: November 14, 2018, 02:47:59 AM »

Could it possibly beside cultural things have to do with religion? For example Roman-Catholic?

I remember an interview of Canadian actress Cobie Smulders at Ellen. She pronounced her full set of name: Jacoba Francisca Maria Smulders. At which Cobie is short for Jacoba. As it is an relative old fashion name in the Netherlands you will predominantly hear Jacoba and Cobie in the older generations.

Cobie is born to a Dutch father (hence the for us Dutchies familiar last name of Smulders) and an English mother. Her names, and especially her 1st sound very Dutch to me. And if I understand it correct she was named after a Dutch (great) aunt.

Ellen was suprised when hearing Cobie had more then 1 a 2 names.


In the Netherlands I also notice a small change, even among my siblings. One of my brothers has given his children just two names (of which the  1st is the name they liked, and the 2nd referst to a specific familymember), while another brother decided to give his childeren just one name.  Difference can be that the first mentioned brother had his kids baptised in the Roman Catholic church, while the other one has broken with the religion.


I think so re religion.

In my father's case the Fn was a form of Nikolas. All male family members had as First name a form of Nikolas and 1 Middle name after a male family relative, normally a god parent. My mother had her Fn and a form of Maria, as that was traditionally a Fn or Mn in my mother's side of the family.

My sister has her Fname, and her middlename is her godmothers Fn, our maternal aunt. Both her boys have religious Latin Fn, and old fashioned Saint Mn....and she is OUT of the Roman-Catholic church, broken with it after her second son was born......LOL

I have my Fn and 1 Mn name after my godmother/grandmother. And my son has 2 middle names: the male form of my sisters Fn as godmother, and per tradition my father's Fn. He wishes that I would have kept with my father's tradition and have one of his Mn be his Fn, and I agree with him I wish I had done it as well, but it is what it is.

« Last Edit: November 14, 2018, 04:13:16 AM by PeDe » Logged

Princess MS

Warned
Huge Member
********

Reputation: 604

Offline Offline

Australia Australia

Posts: 2909





Ignore
« Reply #86 on: November 14, 2018, 03:33:06 AM »

Could it possibly beside cultural things have to do with religion? For example Roman-Catholic?

I remember an interview of Canadian actress Cobie Smulders at Ellen. She pronounced her full set of name: Jacoba Francisca Maria Smulders. At which Cobie is short for Jacoba. As it is an relative old fashion name in the Netherlands you will predominantly hear Jacoba and Cobie in the older generations.

Cobie is born to a Dutch father (hence the for us Dutchies familiar last name of Smulders) and an English mother. Her names, and especially her 1st sound very Dutch to me. And if I understand it correct she was named after a Dutch (great) aunt.

Ellen was suprised when hearing Cobie had more then 1 a 2 names.


In the Netherlands I also notice a small change, even among my siblings. One of my brothers has given his children just two names (of which the  1st is the name they liked, and the 2nd referst to a specific familymember), while another brother decided to give his childeren just one name.  Difference can be that the first mentioned brother had his kids baptised in the Roman Catholic church, while the other one has broken with the religion.


I think so re religion.

In my father's case the Fn was a from of Nikolas. All male family members had as First name a form of Nikolas and 1 Middle name after a male family relative, normally a god parent. My mother had her Fn and a form of Maria, as that was traditionally a Fn or Mn in my mother's side of the family.

My sister has her Fname, and her middlename is her godmothers Fn, our maternal aunt. Both her boys have religious Latin Fn, and old fashioned Saint Mn....and she is OUT of the Roman-Catholic church, broken with it after her second son was born......LOL

I have my Fn and 1 Mn name after my godmother/grandmother. And my son has 2 middle names: the male form of my sisters Fn as godmother, and per tradition my father's Fn. He wishes that I would have kept with my father's tradition and have one of his Mn be his Fn, and I agree with him I wish I had done it as well, but it is what it is.



+1 re Religion - If your parents were Catholic - as mine were - then you had a first name that they liked, and a 2nd name which was given at your Baptism, and a third at your Confirmation - which you chose yourself and was after a Saint. Back then the Baptismal name tended to be the name of a Saint as well or perhaps after your Godmother.
Logged
bumbershoot

Warned
Gigantic Member
*********

Reputation: 1009

Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 3491





Ignore
« Reply #87 on: November 14, 2018, 07:26:52 PM »

When you give your child a regular litany of names, you need to be careful about what their initials might spell. One of my godchildren's initials are SAP. I doubt you will ever see her using her initials as a monogram.   I know a Jesuit whose initials spelled out FAT.  When he was confirmed, he had a certain amount of revenge on his family by choosing Robert as a confirmation name.  He thought it was funny his whole life long. I doubt his parents did. 
Logged
Kaiserin

Gigantic Member
*********

Reputation: 1840

Offline Offline

Germany Germany

Posts: 4291





Ignore
« Reply #88 on: November 14, 2018, 09:29:30 PM »

Good point, bumbershoot, LOL.
Logged
Principessa

Most Exalted Member
*

Reputation: 2005

Offline Offline

Netherlands Netherlands

Posts: 28539


I am the Queen




Ignore
« Reply #89 on: November 14, 2018, 09:58:27 PM »

When you give your child a regular litany of names, you need to be careful about what their initials might spell. One of my godchildren's initials are SAP. I doubt you will ever see her using her initials as a monogram.   I know a Jesuit whose initials spelled out FAT.  When he was confirmed, he had a certain amount of revenge on his family by choosing Robert as a confirmation name.  He thought it was funny his whole life long. I doubt his parents did. 


 Jumping Laugh bounce
Logged
Pages: 1 ... 4 5 [6] 7 8   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to: