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Eliza B

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« Reply #4560 on: January 24, 2021, 09:23:32 PM »

Puppies are so much fun, especially when there are children around. Then they grow into loving dogs ... mine was such a good boy on Thursday when he had to have his vaccinations and I hope he will be as good this coming Thursday when he has to have his teeth cleaned (and it will cost me more than having my own done but he is worth every cent).

I currently have a 3 month old puppy and two small girls, 3 & 5. Itís absolute CHAOS.

Please tell me more, or message me.  We want a dog and we are thinking of waiting until my girls were at least 3 and 5.  Would you recommend to wait until 4/6? Or chaos no matter how you slice it?
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« Reply #4561 on: January 24, 2021, 10:03:32 PM »

Puppies are so much fun, especially when there are children around. Then they grow into loving dogs ... mine was such a good boy on Thursday when he had to have his vaccinations and I hope he will be as good this coming Thursday when he has to have his teeth cleaned (and it will cost me more than having my own done but he is worth every cent).

I currently have a 3 month old puppy and two small girls, 3 & 5. Itís absolute CHAOS.

Please tell me more, or message me.  We want a dog and we are thinking of waiting until my girls were at least 3 and 5.  Would you recommend to wait until 4/6? Or chaos no matter how you slice it?
I'll tell you.
My boyfriend's sister got a puppy. She has 3 kids, twins, age 4,5, and their older sister age 9.
One of the twins tortures poor dog, he goes to hid everytime he sees her. We all try to keep the girl away from the puppy (now 4-5 months old).
The other twin just caresses him and wants hugs.
The older girl is relatively fine but she doesn't get the concept "do not tickle the dog" and "do not wake up the dog when he's sleeping".
Their grandmother doesn't want dogs (or cats, or any other animal, that's another story), so when they visit her, they keep the dog in a room inside - when we eat mostly because that's when we cannot keep an eye on him. The kids have the tendency to open the danm door and we all have to stop eating to prevent the dog peeing all over the place.

It needs descipline and it needs older kids - imo.
Their mother doesn't get that the dog is basically another child, the kids don't get it either.
Their father didn't want the dog, he's trying to keep the kids from hurting him though.
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« Reply #4562 on: January 25, 2021, 12:35:30 AM »

Puppies are so much fun, especially when there are children around. Then they grow into loving dogs ... mine was such a good boy on Thursday when he had to have his vaccinations and I hope he will be as good this coming Thursday when he has to have his teeth cleaned (and it will cost me more than having my own done but he is worth every cent).

I currently have a 3 month old puppy and two small girls, 3 & 5. Itís absolute CHAOS.

Please tell me more, or message me.  We want a dog and we are thinking of waiting until my girls were at least 3 and 5.  Would you recommend to wait until 4/6? Or chaos no matter how you slice it?
I'll tell you.
My boyfriend's sister got a puppy. She has 3 kids, twins, age 4,5, and their older sister age 9.
One of the twins tortures poor dog, he goes to hid everytime he sees her. We all try to keep the girl away from the puppy (now 4-5 months old).
The other twin just caresses him and wants hugs.
The older girl is relatively fine but she doesn't get the concept "do not tickle the dog" and "do not wake up the dog when he's sleeping".
Their grandmother doesn't want dogs (or cats, or any other animal, that's another story), so when they visit her, they keep the dog in a room inside - when we eat mostly because that's when we cannot keep an eye on him. The kids have the tendency to open the danm door and we all have to stop eating to prevent the dog peeing all over the place.

It needs descipline and it needs older kids - imo.
Their mother doesn't get that the dog is basically another child, the kids don't get it either.
Their father didn't want the dog, he's trying to keep the kids from hurting him though.

I've heard it said that if you have kids under about 5 or 6 then you should get an adult dog (age 2+) as they generally require less time and energy then a puppy or adolescent dog (and are generally far less crazy).  After age 6, most kids are capable of respecting the puppy and helping (without hindering) in puppy care...puppy is still mom and dad's responsibility.  Once kids hit around age 12 they can be expected to do most of the puppy care themselves and have it really be "their puppy" with mom and dad providing supervision (and paying the bills).

Before bringing home a puppy you want your kids to be old enough to appropriately respond to things like the puppy nipping them, puppy giving signals that they want to be alone or are done with play, enforce expected behaviors you've set for the puppy (like requiring the puppy to do a sit, stay, wait at meals), and obey expected behaviors that you've set for the child (no giving puppy table scraps and the like).  You also need to trust that they be able to do all those things day in a day out...rather than the first week puppy comes home and then afterwards only when they feel like it.

A vet I used to work for had a saying...if you don't trust that the kids and a puppy could behave while your busy making dinner then it's not the right time.
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Lady Liebe

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« Reply #4563 on: January 25, 2021, 12:53:05 AM »

Puppies are so much fun, especially when there are children around. Then they grow into loving dogs ... mine was such a good boy on Thursday when he had to have his vaccinations and I hope he will be as good this coming Thursday when he has to have his teeth cleaned (and it will cost me more than having my own done but he is worth every cent).

I currently have a 3 month old puppy and two small girls, 3 & 5. It’s absolute CHAOS.

Please tell me more, or message me.  We want a dog and we are thinking of waiting until my girls were at least 3 and 5.  Would you recommend to wait until 4/6? Or chaos no matter how you slice it?
I'll tell you.
My boyfriend's sister got a puppy. She has 3 kids, twins, age 4,5, and their older sister age 9.
One of the twins tortures poor dog, he goes to hid everytime he sees her. We all try to keep the girl away from the puppy (now 4-5 months old).
The other twin just caresses him and wants hugs.
The older girl is relatively fine but she doesn't get the concept "do not tickle the dog" and "do not wake up the dog when he's sleeping".
Their grandmother doesn't want dogs (or cats, or any other animal, that's another story), so when they visit her, they keep the dog in a room inside - when we eat mostly because that's when we cannot keep an eye on him. The kids have the tendency to open the danm door and we all have to stop eating to prevent the dog peeing all over the place.

It needs descipline and it needs older kids - imo.
Their mother doesn't get that the dog is basically another child, the kids don't get it either.
Their father didn't want the dog, he's trying to keep the kids from hurting him though.

I've heard it said that if you have kids under about 5 or 6 then you should get an adult dog (age 2+) as they generally require less time and energy then a puppy or adolescent dog (and are generally far less crazy).  After age 6, most kids are capable of respecting the puppy and helping (without hindering) in puppy care...puppy is still mom and dad's responsibility.  Once kids hit around age 12 they can be expected to do most of the puppy care themselves and have it really be "their puppy" with mom and dad providing supervision (and paying the bills).

Before bringing home a puppy you want your kids to be old enough to appropriately respond to things like the puppy nipping them, puppy giving signals that they want to be alone or are done with play, enforce expected behaviors you've set for the puppy (like requiring the puppy to do a sit, stay, wait at meals), and obey expected behaviors that you've set for the child (no giving puppy table scraps and the like).  You also need to trust that they be able to do all those things day in a day out...rather than the first week puppy comes home and then afterwards only when they feel like it.

A vet I used to work for had a saying...if you don't trust that the kids and a puppy could behave while your busy making dinner then it's not the right time.

I'm going to add a bit onto OC's advice. When looking for an older dog it's wise to look for one raised or fostered in a home with children, if at all possible with children near the age of your children.

If a puppy or dog is joining the family as a birthday or Christmas present, wait to bring the puppy (or kitten) home until the party/celebration is over. It's a scary time for an animal and the less fuss going on the easier it will be.

If you can - though probably not possible now, take the puppy or older dog to some obedience classes. The kids, if old enough, can help train the puppy at home but an adult needs to take him to the classes.

Crates are a good thing.
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Eliza B

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« Reply #4564 on: January 25, 2021, 02:15:05 AM »

Puppies are so much fun, especially when there are children around. Then they grow into loving dogs ... mine was such a good boy on Thursday when he had to have his vaccinations and I hope he will be as good this coming Thursday when he has to have his teeth cleaned (and it will cost me more than having my own done but he is worth every cent).

I currently have a 3 month old puppy and two small girls, 3 & 5. Itís absolute CHAOS.

Please tell me more, or message me.  We want a dog and we are thinking of waiting until my girls were at least 3 and 5.  Would you recommend to wait until 4/6? Or chaos no matter how you slice it?
I'll tell you.
My boyfriend's sister got a puppy. She has 3 kids, twins, age 4,5, and their older sister age 9.
One of the twins tortures poor dog, he goes to hid everytime he sees her. We all try to keep the girl away from the puppy (now 4-5 months old).
The other twin just caresses him and wants hugs.
The older girl is relatively fine but she doesn't get the concept "do not tickle the dog" and "do not wake up the dog when he's sleeping".
Their grandmother doesn't want dogs (or cats, or any other animal, that's another story), so when they visit her, they keep the dog in a room inside - when we eat mostly because that's when we cannot keep an eye on him. The kids have the tendency to open the danm door and we all have to stop eating to prevent the dog peeing all over the place.

It needs descipline and it needs older kids - imo.
Their mother doesn't get that the dog is basically another child, the kids don't get it either.
Their father didn't want the dog, he's trying to keep the kids from hurting him though.

I've heard it said that if you have kids under about 5 or 6 then you should get an adult dog (age 2+) as they generally require less time and energy then a puppy or adolescent dog (and are generally far less crazy).  After age 6, most kids are capable of respecting the puppy and helping (without hindering) in puppy care...puppy is still mom and dad's responsibility.  Once kids hit around age 12 they can be expected to do most of the puppy care themselves and have it really be "their puppy" with mom and dad providing supervision (and paying the bills).

Before bringing home a puppy you want your kids to be old enough to appropriately respond to things like the puppy nipping them, puppy giving signals that they want to be alone or are done with play, enforce expected behaviors you've set for the puppy (like requiring the puppy to do a sit, stay, wait at meals), and obey expected behaviors that you've set for the child (no giving puppy table scraps and the like).  You also need to trust that they be able to do all those things day in a day out...rather than the first week puppy comes home and then afterwards only when they feel like it.

A vet I used to work for had a saying...if you don't trust that the kids and a puppy could behave while your busy making dinner then it's not the right time.

I'm going to add a bit onto OC's advice. When looking for an older dog it's wise to look for one raised or fostered in a home with children, if at all possible with children near the age of your children.

If a puppy or dog is joining the family as a birthday or Christmas present, wait to bring the puppy (or kitten) home until the party/celebration is over. It's a scary time for an animal and the less fuss going on the easier it will be.

If you can - though probably not possible now, take the puppy or older dog to some obedience classes. The kids, if old enough, can help train the puppy at home but an adult needs to take him to the classes.

Crates are a good thing.


Thank you all!

I want an older dog,  husband a puppy.  So I'll def keep that in mind with their ages.  It is def a few years out, but we want everyone in prime shape to take on the responsibility.
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Duchess of Verona

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« Reply #4565 on: January 25, 2021, 03:07:52 AM »

A lot depends on the breed/temperament/tolerance of the individual dog. My black lab was 6 when my daughter was born. Juliet literally learned to stand pulling herself up on Lucy's ears/collar/tail. I would come around the corner and find Lucy laying flat on her side and Juliet sitting on her like a bench 'reading her' a picture book while the tail thumped as hard as possible against the rug.. Lu slept under her crib every single night. The next lab, 14 1/2 now, is an energetic 'wrecking ball' around humans, little or large. She loves to see anyone come to the house and exhibits her joy by rearing up on her hind legs and 'hugging' them aka known as accidentally knocking them down. But one thing I would definitely strongly recommend: the dog needs a place where it can have it's own space away from the children.  Always feed the dog there. The crate is your friend and the dog's!


Also, just between us, you should really expect that there will be little to no help from the kids or the husband....if your house is anything like mine. As to the age of the dog ,whether puppy or adult, each has it's own advantages and drawbacks. For example, it's easier to get a puppy with the personality and temperament that will be a good fit when you have a group to choose from in a private home...but you have the bother of housebreaking and teething. Also age 1 to 2  years is the most difficult moment in time (other than the rainbow bridge). When my first lab died, I adopted a senior rescue yellow lab who was also wonderful. But the thing about rescue, especially when you are adopting them without meeting them it's a total  roll of the dice. We originally rescued two bonded  senior yellow lab sisters. But one was a homicidal  maniac and had to go back to the rescue. The next day I took yellow Daisy to be shampooed as she smelled dreadful from the transport. The groomer remarked to me that she was covered in old bite wounds and fresh scabs from teeth marks. Daisy's temperament was such that she just sloughed it off and went on with a smile  on her face and a song in her heart. So my long and short advise is don't adopt or purchase any animal before you have a chance to meet it and have a lengthy interaction with it.
« Last Edit: January 25, 2021, 03:49:05 AM by Duchess of Verona » Logged
Lady Liebe

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« Reply #4566 on: January 25, 2021, 04:03:42 AM »

A lot depends on the breed/temperament/tolerance of the individual dog. My black lab was 6 when my daughter was born. Juliet literally learned to stand pulling herself up on Lucy's ears/collar/tail. I would come around the corner and find Lucy laying flat on her side and Juliet sitting on her like a bench 'reading her' a picture book while the tail thumped as hard as possible against the rug.. Lu slept under her crib every single night. The next lab, 14 1/2 now, is an energetic 'wrecking ball' around humans, little or large. She loves to see anyone come to the house and exhibits her joy by rearing up on her hind legs and 'hugging' them aka known as accidentally knocking them down. But one thing I would definitely strongly recommend: the dog needs a place where it can have it's own space away from the children.  Always feed the dog there. The crate is your friend and the dog's!

Also, just between us, you should really expect that there will be little to no help from the kids or the husband....if your house is anything like mine. As to the age of the dog ,whether puppy or adult, each has it's own advantages and drawbacks. For example, it's easier to get a puppy with the personality and temperament that will be a good fit when you have a group to choose from in a private home. When my first lab died, I adopted a senior rescue yellow lab who was also wonderful. But the thing about rescue, especially when you are adopting them without meeting them it's a total  roll of the dice. We originally rescued two bonded  senior yellow lab sisters. But one was a homicidal  maniac and had to go back to the rescue. The next day I took yellow Daisy to be shampooed as she smelled dreadful from the transport. The groomer remarked to me that she was covered in old bite wounds and fresh scabs from teeth marks. Daisy's temperament was such that she just sloughed it off and went on with a smile  on her face and a song in her heart. So my long and short advise is don't adopt or purchase any animal before you have a chance to meet it and have a lengthy interaction with it.

It definitely does depend on thei ndividual dog. We didn't have kids but our first Flattie wa very gentle with children. Second one had bull in a china shop tendencies and would have knocked over small children.

If you do get a purebred puppy, interview breeders before the litter is born, and check to see what kind of socialization they do with the pups. The breeder for out second Flattie was about an hour away so we went and played with the pups most every week until we brought ours home. Our breeder let the her neighbors and any older older children come by to play with the pups too. We did return a third pup to a breeder because he was bonded to his breeders, and he was one unhappy puppy. Our vet's succinct comment was - if that dog is not taking to you two there is something very wrong with that pup.
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« Reply #4567 on: January 25, 2021, 11:22:56 AM »

Tbf, the breed of the dog and its temperament is as important as the that of the children.
I have seen small children being very gentle and loving with dogs, and I have seen older children being horrid prats. Some people simply aren't cut to take care of animals. In any case, as with bringing in any new family member, as the parent, you need to set rules - for both of the new parties. And everybody will need to obey.
There is no rough play, there is no disturbing the dog while sleeping, eating or playing with his toy, dog will not be allowed to take ANY of the childrens toys, etc..
Learning such rules are a great way for children to learn responsibility and consideration as well.
However it will need parental supervision. (Heck children need to learn to brush their teeth and go to the toilet, don't expect these little monsters to suddenly have social skills)
I grew up with dogs and I had a one year old Brittany Spaniel when my first child arrived. Granted, by the time the babies were old enough to "play a bit rough", she was older and clever enough to handle the situation.
Bringing in an older dog with small children can be tricky, as you need to learn to read and know the dog. He also can be a lot more anxious to fit into the new family and he has made experiences with children, homes, possessions and being left. There can be things that trigger responses, you might not even be aware of. So I would recommend a puppy and strict rules.
A dog is IMO the best companion ever, esp. for growing children as they will always be there for them when the world (parents, school and pals) turn against them. Even the ruffian would cuddle endlessly when called to a lovesick young lady or when parental decrees caused tears and closed doors.
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« Reply #4568 on: January 25, 2021, 04:50:47 PM »

Puppies are so much fun, especially when there are children around. Then they grow into loving dogs ... mine was such a good boy on Thursday when he had to have his vaccinations and I hope he will be as good this coming Thursday when he has to have his teeth cleaned (and it will cost me more than having my own done but he is worth every cent).

I currently have a 3 month old puppy and two small girls, 3 & 5. Itís absolute CHAOS.

Please tell me more, or message me.  We want a dog and we are thinking of waiting until my girls were at least 3 and 5.  Would you recommend to wait until 4/6? Or chaos no matter how you slice it?

Puppies just have tons of energy anyway you slice it. They will destroy things in your home. (Goodbye Pelaton power cord 🙄)
Research your breeds carefully.
 Itís a good lesson in responsibility, but they really donít help with anything beside letting her outside and feeding. I would think at 4/6 they would be able to help more and understand dog training a lot more. My kids have no concept of setting boundaries with the dog.

That being said my kids love that damn dog so much. 

Message me any specific questions you might have 🙂
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« Reply #4569 on: January 25, 2021, 06:04:13 PM »

I will add my two cents if I may.
Both me and my brother were adopted when we were tots(me at 11m my brother at 23m) so we where followed by a psychologist. Who suggested that a dog will help us with responsibilities, social skills and immune system. My parents took some years of thinking it, mom is a clean freak and other factors etc. So when i was around 9y and my brother 7y, Joy a little Pekingese came to our life. My parents chose a pure breed after a vet suggested it and found us a good breeder.
 Joy was a real joy, a little bit nervous and aggressive with the neighbors cats but with us she was a real gold. She like many  Pekingese had breathing problems but the rest was okay. My brother shared everything with her from his cookies to his ice cream. Mom repeatedly try to tell him no and that Joy had her doggie food but he found it unfair for her that she couldn’t eat what he was eating . Joy when to the great kennel at age 8 which was devastating for us.Our second one ,took him when I was at high school, is a much more easier dog (health and temperament) we choose to adopt a cross breed (poodle/terrier) this time around but dear god he is such a messy one. He marks his territory he destroys his staff animals but on the plus side we have yet to find an animal or a person he doesn’t like.
In the end what I’m saying is that my fondest childhood memories are with them, I love them and the tough me a lot. But I think that as many poster said is up to the kids first and family dynamics and then you have to think about the breed, age space economic burden etc!
What ever you choose good luck
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« Reply #4570 on: January 25, 2021, 08:25:27 PM »

This Burns Night, weíve teamed up with @NHSCharities to provide staff at @NHSTayside with a Burns celebration lunch of haggis, neeps and tatties.

Thank you for all that you do ó Slŗinte Mhath! #BurnsNight2021 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿

https://twitter.com/kensi.../1353772163317305346?s=21
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« Reply #4571 on: January 25, 2021, 08:41:11 PM »

Haggis....BLECH!
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« Reply #4572 on: January 25, 2021, 08:57:15 PM »

Haggis....BLECH!
Ooh. I love haggis. Itís lovely as stuffing in a chicken breast.

I do wish Kate would stop dressing as a tin of shortbread every time she visits or has anything to do with Scotland. She lived these for four years, so she should know thatís not actually how Scots dress every day.
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« Reply #4573 on: January 25, 2021, 09:03:31 PM »

Haggis....BLECH!

Oh you poor thing, you just haven't had the really good stuff, just the crap they feed to tourists at "Scottish Experiences".  Now that really is yucky!
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« Reply #4574 on: January 25, 2021, 09:25:39 PM »

This Burns Night, weíve teamed up with @NHSCharities to provide staff at @NHSTayside with a Burns celebration lunch of haggis, neeps and tatties.

Thank you for all that you do ó Slŗinte Mhath! #BurnsNight2021 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿

https://twitter.com/kensi.../1353772163317305346?s=21

Fisher and Donaldson is an awesome St Andrews bakery!  Nice touch!
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