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Author Topic: King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra  (Read 6044 times)
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #15 on: June 22, 2019, 03:29:28 AM »

Queen Alexandra attended a Royal Maundy Service.     
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6LLBvfqKMew
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #16 on: July 07, 2019, 03:53:39 AM »

Alexandra, Princess of Wales was once upset because Queen Victoria refused to allow her to take the children to Denmark while their father was in India. The Queen insisted that a decision given by the judges in the reign of George II gave her the right to prevent the royal children from leaving the country.
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #17 on: July 20, 2019, 03:36:44 AM »

King Edward VII's trust in his daughter-in-law, Princess Mary was so great that he gave her his express permission to see the King's Boxes along with the Prince of Wales.
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Duchess of Verona

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« Reply #18 on: July 20, 2019, 04:27:22 AM »

Alexandra, Princess of Wales was once upset because Queen Victoria refused to allow her to take the children to Denmark while their father was in India. The Queen insisted that a decision given by the judges in the reign of George II gave her the right to prevent the royal children from leaving the country.
Perhaps QV was concerned that Alexandra had had enough of Edward's wandering caressing and might not return with the children.
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #19 on: July 29, 2019, 03:51:56 AM »

Queen Alexandra's West End tour among the rose sellers in 1917   
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LMTaKLCiM7c
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #20 on: August 12, 2019, 03:58:45 AM »

King Edward VII was a patron of Saville Row. He liked to wear a "reefer" jacket, originally of naval origin and popular for yachting.
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #21 on: September 01, 2019, 03:05:57 AM »

The sight of King Edward VII on a German railway station in a green cap, pink tie, white gloves and brown overcoat induced the Tailor and Cutter to express the fervent hope that King Edward had not brought this outfit home.  No No No
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #22 on: September 30, 2019, 03:02:07 AM »

After her engagement to Albert Edward, Princess Alexandra traveled from Denmark to Britain aboard the royal yacht Victoria and Albert. She arrived at Gravesend, Kent on March 7, 1863 to a royal and literary welcome when Poet Laureate Alfred Lord Tennyson wrote an ode in her honor.
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fairy

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« Reply #23 on: September 30, 2019, 08:50:57 AM »

Queen Alexandra's West End tour among the rose sellers in 1917   
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LMTaKLCiM7c
LOL, we would probably slam Kate or someone like her, had she had her horses (or car) speed without concern for the whiteclad girls running along to pass some flowers. Quite apparently These girls were not just random fans, but it had been prepared for them to hand over baskets of flowers...
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Mary's life motto:
"if I had the choice between world peace and a Prada handbag, I'd choose the latter one" Marian Keyes.
Lady Liebe

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« Reply #24 on: September 30, 2019, 12:01:33 PM »

The sight of King Edward VII on a German railway station in a green cap, pink tie, white gloves and brown overcoat induced the Tailor and Cutter to express the fervent hope that King Edward had not brought this outfit home.  No No No

I always enjoy the little snippets of history you post CyrilSebastian. Thank you!  Star
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #25 on: October 01, 2019, 02:48:07 AM »

The sight of King Edward VII on a German railway station in a green cap, pink tie, white gloves and brown overcoat induced the Tailor and Cutter to express the fervent hope that King Edward had not brought this outfit home.  No No No

I always enjoy the little snippets of history you post CyrilSebastian. Thank you!  Star
     
 
Lady Liebe, I am glad that you like the snippets.  Smiley Smiley
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #26 on: October 02, 2019, 02:41:55 AM »

The Family of Albert Edward, Prince of Wales   
http://www.pinterest.com/pin/763149099338449349
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #27 on: October 26, 2019, 03:12:30 AM »

In 1868 Edward and Alexandra made plans to go abroad for several months. The Princess was determined to take her three eldest children with her as far as Copenhagen. Queen Victoria was not at all disposed to agree Princess Louise ought to be left behind. Alexandra burst into tears. Queen Victoria gave way about Princess Louise.
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #28 on: November 08, 2019, 10:49:15 PM »

During the First World War, Queen Alexandra begged King George V to remove Emperor Wilhelm II of Germany's honorary flags from the chapel of St. George's at Windsor.
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Gemsheal

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« Reply #29 on: November 09, 2019, 02:27:35 AM »

King Edward VII's favorite theatrical performances were plays about modern upper-class society, musical comedies and light opera. Queen Alexandra preferred grand opera.       
   
Because of his mother's long reign, Edward spent most of his life performing only ceremonial duties.   
 
Could King Edward VII have prevented the First World War?


CyrilSebastian, I think this a very interesting question.   In my opinion - no.  The distrust between Germany and Britian and a feeling of enmity was being fostered for years before 1914.  That was one factor.  Another, Edward VII was in poor health.  If he had managed to live until 1914 he wouldn't, likely, have been able to influence events just due to that alone.  Finally, I think looking at the relatively young monarchs provides a partial clue.  When push came to shove, all three of them proved to be in the hands of their ministers, and what the ministers (cabinets, advisors, whatever one could call them) wanted was a war.  I don't think Edward would have been able to resist, any more than George V, the real push to war that took place in summer 1914.  Indeed his dislike for his nephew might have made him eager to show him what Britain could do.   (George V and Mary didn't dislike Willy - they thought he made Royalty ridiculous, but they had no quarrels with him. But even they could be quickly convinced that he was a war mongering monster.  In fact like everyone else, Willy was overtaken by events, and thought:  short, decisive war.)

There it is: the mistake that just about every gov't, minister, advisor etc. made (or thought, or hoped) was that this war would be decisive and *short*.   When it became trench warfare, a war of attrition, peace should have been actively sought, but instead, millions of young men were lost in a futile effort to "win."   Personally this loss of life is what gets me upset when reading about WWI.   All well and fine to pay tribute to the dead after the fact ... grant medals, "at the going down of the sun we will remember them" "... bury him among Kings ..." But to sue for peace and *preserve* these millions of lives, oh no!!   

[I definitely DO think the soldiers of WWI should be paid every honor, I just wish the spin were different.  Even today there are people who blather about the honorable sacrifice of these plives for King (royal) and Country - the very ideals that deserted these soldiers when they needed them most.]
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