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Author Topic: Harry - News & Events 2019  (Read 262839 times)
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« Reply #1260 on: July 29, 2019, 06:47:36 PM »

Only British women? Pulezze, Meghan is now thinking globally, the UK is a little too small for her.
As to having all the women on one photo.. well photoshop is amazing today, but it was probably far easier to have them all instruct their offices to send a black and white press photo or one from a recent photoshoot.
They all changing and saving the world... Halo


gosh just read that letter from the guest Editor..."Over a steaming cup of mint tea, we teased through how one can shine light in a world filled with seemingly daily darkness. Lofty? Of course. Worth it? Without question."
Jezz... Blink
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« Reply #1261 on: July 29, 2019, 06:52:19 PM »

The celebration of these 15 gamechangers feels very much like the official launch of BrandSussex (TM) if you ask me.
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« Reply #1262 on: July 29, 2019, 06:52:35 PM »

She's trying to collect more A-list BFFs a la Amal so when her and Harry do eventually divorce, she'll have them to cry to since Doria seems to be her only family she's in contact with and she dumps friends who are of no use to her. This woman is so tone deaf. Wearing Gucci to a Smart Works charity?

As far as who should be on the list, they should have all been British based, and surely there's a woman out there with an MD or PhD that did some sort of groundbreaking research on a project? Or a high ranking military woman? A woman who is the first in her family to go to university? Someone who started from humble means and grew a business from the ground up? What about one of the women from the cookbook?

https://www.dailymail.co....-Smart-Works-charity.html
One hand washes the other. Gucci belongs to Kering Group - you know, where Salma Hayek's husband is the CEO?

Kering does several charitable things, one of it is the "Chime for Change"-initiative for education, health and fairness.
Patrons of this initiative are the chef designer of Gucci, Salma, and ... tadaaaa ... Beyoncé.
See how they all revolve around themselves?
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« Reply #1263 on: July 29, 2019, 06:53:45 PM »

The guest editor's letter...

Quote
Within hours of our meeting’s end, we were already texting one another – philosophising about how to communicate this shared understanding and the lens through which we see the world, how to pivot from a perspective of frustration to one of optimism.

So I asked the question. Actually, I typed and deleted the question several times until I built up the courage to ask the question in question.

Edward… instead of doing the cover, would you be open to me guest editing your September issue?”



Lots of (trendy) word salad. The bolded part does not surprise me at all.
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« Reply #1264 on: July 29, 2019, 06:54:02 PM »

What is the average age of the British Vogue reader? I mean, Jane Fonda? Most people under the age of 50 (sorry ladies!) will know of her from her workout videos, or some of her movies. And anyone over that age is either not buying this magazine or loathes her to this day for that stunt she pulled in Vietnam. Most under 30 will have never heard of her. Is she the token older woman in this tableau?

What stunt did she pull in Vietnam?
She was rabidly anti vietnam-war to the extent that she was accused of being a traitor. In 1972 she visited Vietnam and toured a lot of enemy camps and POW camps, she was then photographed sitting on top of a anti Aircraft- gunnery grinning and pulling faces. An anti-Aircraft gun, that was used to bring down Us planes..
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« Reply #1265 on: July 29, 2019, 06:54:56 PM »

She's trying to collect more A-list BFFs a la Amal so when her and Harry do eventually divorce, she'll have them to cry to since Doria seems to be her only family she's in contact with and she dumps friends who are of no use to her. This woman is so tone deaf. Wearing Gucci to a Smart Works charity?

As far as who should be on the list, they should have all been British based, and surely there's a woman out there with an MD or PhD that did some sort of groundbreaking research on a project? Or a high ranking military woman? A woman who is the first in her family to go to university? Someone who started from humble means and grew a business from the ground up? What about one of the women from the cookbook?

https://www.dailymail.co....-Smart-Works-charity.html
One hand washes the other. Gucci belongs to Kering Group - you know, where Salma Hayek's husband is the CEO?

Kering does several charitable things, one of it is the "Chime for Change"-initiative for education, health and fairness.
Patrons of this initiative are the chef designer of Gucci, Salma, and ... tadaaaa ... Beyoncé.
See how they all revolve around themselves?

Even lovely Jane Goodall, interviewed in the Vogue September issue by Harry Markle himself, is represented by Meghan's former agents, Kruger Cowne. And Meghan and Gemma Chan have the same make up artist. It's a small world, isn't it?
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« Reply #1266 on: July 29, 2019, 07:02:20 PM »

What is the average age of the British Vogue reader? I mean, Jane Fonda? Most people under the age of 50 (sorry ladies!) will know of her from her workout videos, or some of her movies. And anyone over that age is either not buying this magazine or loathes her to this day for that stunt she pulled in Vietnam. Most under 30 will have never heard of her. Is she the token older woman in this tableau?

What stunt did she pull in Vietnam?

https://patriotpost.us/pages/80 It's a conservative website - but it had the best pictures . . . .

Protesting at home is one thing, but this was way, way out of line. And that's putting it nicely.
« Last Edit: July 29, 2019, 07:08:33 PM by Lady Liebe » Logged

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« Reply #1267 on: July 29, 2019, 08:13:48 PM »

What is the average age of the British Vogue reader? I mean, Jane Fonda? Most people under the age of 50 (sorry ladies!) will know of her from her workout videos, or some of her movies. And anyone over that age is either not buying this magazine or loathes her to this day for that stunt she pulled in Vietnam. Most under 30 will have never heard of her. Is she the token older woman in this tableau?

What stunt did she pull in Vietnam?

https://patriotpost.us/pages/80 It's a conservative website - but it had the best pictures . . . .

Protesting at home is one thing, but this was way, way out of line. And that's putting it nicely.

I think the most famous picture is her sitting on a bomb meant for US soldiers.

Now, she has stated many times she regrets this and while she's still very liberal she is much more aware of her words/ actions.  But many will never forgive her.

I honestly am surprised by no one from her charities being represented.  She mentions Smart Works but why can't their creator be profiled,  she states the charity is the reason she contacted vogue. But it only gets a mention in the forward but even there it didn't describe what it is.  Or why isn't Dr Goodall on the cover? Only room for one woman over 60?

And the MO interview makes no sense... it says they meet over chicken tacos, but then she talks about how she sends MO questions and MO is so quick to respond and so thorough,  and she would have asked more or better questions if she knew.  So were they even together in the same room?
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« Reply #1268 on: July 29, 2019, 08:30:27 PM »

I’ve just skimmed it but read the MO part as Meghan offered chicken tacos and Michelle was just like “yeah no, just send me the questions” or that Michelle’s people wanted to see the questions in advance and she just answered them and sent them back. 
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« Reply #1269 on: July 29, 2019, 08:32:36 PM »

The guest editor's letter...

Quote
Within hours of our meeting’s end, we were already texting one another – philosophising about how to communicate this shared understanding and the lens through which we see the world, how to pivot from a perspective of frustration to one of optimism.

So I asked the question. Actually, I typed and deleted the question several times until I built up the courage to ask the question in question.

Edward… instead of doing the cover, would you be open to me guest editing your September issue?”



Lots of (trendy) word salad. The bolded part does not surprise me at all.


We are beyond word salad.  We are knee-high in word slurry here.  I hate this way of talking and writing but I absolutely detest when those  spilling such slurry just pump out empty words that they don't live by.
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« Reply #1270 on: July 29, 2019, 08:38:39 PM »

Can you pivot from a perspective? And why not just say "after our meeting" instead of "hours after our meeting's end"?
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« Reply #1271 on: July 29, 2019, 08:54:32 PM »

The guest editor's letter...

Quote
It was in early January, on a cold and blustery London day, that I sat down for a cup of tea with British Vogue’s editor-in-chief, Edward Enninful. Though we have several mutual friends, our first encounter had been years in the making, the impetus for which was my asking him to support an organisation I strongly believe in called Smart Works.

What evolved over the next hour was a promising pow wow of two like-minded thinkers, who have much in common, including our love of writing. Over a steaming cup of mint tea, we teased through how one can shine light in a world filled with seemingly daily darkness. Lofty? Of course. Worth it? Without question.

Within hours of our meeting’s end, we were already texting one another – philosophising about how to communicate this shared understanding and the lens through which we see the world, how to pivot from a perspective of frustration to one of optimism.

So I asked the question. Actually, I typed and deleted the question several times until I built up the courage to ask the question in question.

“Edward… instead of doing the cover, would you be open to me guest editing your September issue?”

(Mind you, I know how important the September issue is for the fashion industry. I realise the reach, and I see the opportunity to be a part of fashion’s push for something greater, kinder, more impactful. But I am also a little nervous to be boldly asking the editor-in-chief, whom I’d only just met, to take a chance on me.)

I sent the text.



The ellipsis… the “dot dot dot” that inspires the greatest practice of patience in this digital era.

And then it appeared, EE’s reply: “Yes! I would love for you to be my guest editor.”

Sitting on my sofa at home, two dogs nestled across me, I quietly celebrated when the words appeared on my screen.

Within a week, Edward and I were having our regular meetings – discussing goals, ideas, who would feature on the cover, all while I was undergoing a crash course in editorial lingo (“the well”, meaning the inner crux of the book) and acronyms aplenty (“FOB”, which I took a stab at being “front of book”). I was trying to blend in, to keep up with the pace of these seasoned professionals, and to learn as much as I could as quickly as possible.

There were facets I felt were of prime importance to include within this issue – elements that would hopefully set the tone, knowing this issue hits stands in August, just as readers gear up for the September fashion shows, where judgement can become clouded and focus skewed toward the superficial. I had read a book many moons ago called The Four-Chambered Heart, by Anaïs Nin, which had a quote that has always resonated with me: “I must be a mermaid, Rango. I have no fear of depths and a great fear of shallow living.” For this issue, I imagined, why would we swim in the shallow end of the pool when we could go to the deep end? A metaphor for life, as well as for this issue. Let’s be braver. Let’s go a bit deeper.

That’s what Edward and I have aimed to achieve. An issue of both substance and levity. It is, after all, the September issue of British Vogue, and an opportunity to further diversify what that typically represents. Throughout these pages you’ll find Commonwealth designers, ethical and sustainable brands, as well as features with designers not about clothes but about heritage, history and heirloom. You’ll also find a beauty section that puts its energy towards internal beauty, celebrating the power of breathing and meditation, and a favourite workout that urges you to use your heart as much as your core.

As you flip the pages, you’ll find familiar faces and names that I hope you get to know a bit better, a bit more deeply, even. And there are less familiar names that you may want to know, such as the women of Luminary Bakery and Tessa Clarke, co-founder of food-sharing app Olio, whom I met with discreetly last year.

There are inspiring reads from Brené Brown and Jameela Jamil. You’ll also find a very special piece with Dr Jane Goodall, interviewed by my husband, and a candid and heartfelt conversation between myself and the extraordinary Michelle Obama.

But more than anything, this issue is about the power of the collective. In identifying our personal strengths, it is anchored in the knowledge that we are even stronger together. You will find that spirit of inclusivity on the cover: diverse portraiture of women of varying age, colour, creed, nationality and life experience, and of unquestionable inspiration. Some, I’ve had the pleasure of meeting and enlisted personally for this issue, others I’ve admired from afar for their commitment to a cause, their fearlessness in breaking barriers, or what they represent simply by being. These are our forces for change. And among all of these strong women on the cover, a mirror – a space for you, the reader, to see yourself. Because you, too, are part of this collective.

There is one caveat for you to remember: this is a magazine. It’s still a business, after all. I share that to manage expectations for you: there will be advertising sections that are requisite for every issue, so while I feel confident that you’ll feel my thumbprint on most pages, please know that there are elements that just come with the territory. The overall sentiment I hope you’ll find, however, will be one of positivity, kindness, humour and inclusivity.

I was about five months pregnant when this process began, and by the time you hold this issue in your hands, my husband and I will be holding our three-month-old baby boy in ours. It’s a very special time for me personally, on so many levels; working with Edward and his team, both during my pregnancy and my maternity leave, has played no small part in that joy – it has been a privilege to be welcomed and supported by this amazing team. To Edward, thank you for entrusting me with this. I am deeply honoured. To the women who have taken my aspirations for this issue and brought them to life by being a part of this time capsule, both on the cover and in-book, I am so grateful; you are inspirations to me and I’m humbled by your support.

And to you, the reader, thank you – and I hope you enjoy...


Oh my god, just shut up already.
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« Reply #1272 on: July 29, 2019, 09:00:47 PM »

The guest editor's letter...

Quote
It was in early January, on a cold and blustery London day, that I sat down for a cup of tea with British Vogue’s editor-in-chief, Edward Enninful. Though we have several mutual friends, our first encounter had been years in the making, the impetus for which was my asking him to support an organisation I strongly believe in called Smart Works.

What evolved over the next hour was a promising pow wow of two like-minded thinkers, who have much in common, including our love of writing. Over a steaming cup of mint tea, we teased through how one can shine light in a world filled with seemingly daily darkness. Lofty? Of course. Worth it? Without question.

Within hours of our meeting’s end, we were already texting one another – philosophising about how to communicate this shared understanding and the lens through which we see the world, how to pivot from a perspective of frustration to one of optimism.

So I asked the question. Actually, I typed and deleted the question several times until I built up the courage to ask the question in question.

“Edward… instead of doing the cover, would you be open to me guest editing your September issue?”

(Mind you, I know how important the September issue is for the fashion industry. I realise the reach, and I see the opportunity to be a part of fashion’s push for something greater, kinder, more impactful. But I am also a little nervous to be boldly asking the editor-in-chief, whom I’d only just met, to take a chance on me.)

I sent the text.



The ellipsis… the “dot dot dot” that inspires the greatest practice of patience in this digital era.

And then it appeared, EE’s reply: “Yes! I would love for you to be my guest editor.”

Sitting on my sofa at home, two dogs nestled across me, I quietly celebrated when the words appeared on my screen.

Within a week, Edward and I were having our regular meetings – discussing goals, ideas, who would feature on the cover, all while I was undergoing a crash course in editorial lingo (“the well”, meaning the inner crux of the book) and acronyms aplenty (“FOB”, which I took a stab at being “front of book”). I was trying to blend in, to keep up with the pace of these seasoned professionals, and to learn as much as I could as quickly as possible.

There were facets I felt were of prime importance to include within this issue – elements that would hopefully set the tone, knowing this issue hits stands in August, just as readers gear up for the September fashion shows, where judgement can become clouded and focus skewed toward the superficial. I had read a book many moons ago called The Four-Chambered Heart, by Anaïs Nin, which had a quote that has always resonated with me: “I must be a mermaid, Rango. I have no fear of depths and a great fear of shallow living.” For this issue, I imagined, why would we swim in the shallow end of the pool when we could go to the deep end? A metaphor for life, as well as for this issue. Let’s be braver. Let’s go a bit deeper.

That’s what Edward and I have aimed to achieve. An issue of both substance and levity. It is, after all, the September issue of British Vogue, and an opportunity to further diversify what that typically represents. Throughout these pages you’ll find Commonwealth designers, ethical and sustainable brands, as well as features with designers not about clothes but about heritage, history and heirloom. You’ll also find a beauty section that puts its energy towards internal beauty, celebrating the power of breathing and meditation, and a favourite workout that urges you to use your heart as much as your core.

As you flip the pages, you’ll find familiar faces and names that I hope you get to know a bit better, a bit more deeply, even. And there are less familiar names that you may want to know, such as the women of Luminary Bakery and Tessa Clarke, co-founder of food-sharing app Olio, whom I met with discreetly last year.

There are inspiring reads from Brené Brown and Jameela Jamil. You’ll also find a very special piece with Dr Jane Goodall, interviewed by my husband, and a candid and heartfelt conversation between myself and the extraordinary Michelle Obama.

But more than anything, this issue is about the power of the collective. In identifying our personal strengths, it is anchored in the knowledge that we are even stronger together. You will find that spirit of inclusivity on the cover: diverse portraiture of women of varying age, colour, creed, nationality and life experience, and of unquestionable inspiration. Some, I’ve had the pleasure of meeting and enlisted personally for this issue, others I’ve admired from afar for their commitment to a cause, their fearlessness in breaking barriers, or what they represent simply by being. These are our forces for change. And among all of these strong women on the cover, a mirror – a space for you, the reader, to see yourself. Because you, too, are part of this collective.

There is one caveat for you to remember: this is a magazine. It’s still a business, after all. I share that to manage expectations for you: there will be advertising sections that are requisite for every issue, so while I feel confident that you’ll feel my thumbprint on most pages, please know that there are elements that just come with the territory. The overall sentiment I hope you’ll find, however, will be one of positivity, kindness, humour and inclusivity.

I was about five months pregnant when this process began, and by the time you hold this issue in your hands, my husband and I will be holding our three-month-old baby boy in ours. It’s a very special time for me personally, on so many levels; working with Edward and his team, both during my pregnancy and my maternity leave, has played no small part in that joy – it has been a privilege to be welcomed and supported by this amazing team. To Edward, thank you for entrusting me with this. I am deeply honoured. To the women who have taken my aspirations for this issue and brought them to life by being a part of this time capsule, both on the cover and in-book, I am so grateful; you are inspirations to me and I’m humbled by your support.

And to you, the reader, thank you – and I hope you enjoy...


Oh my god, just shut up already.



"Shining a light in a world of darkness." My God, does anyone seriously talk or write like that? Sounds like the New Testament.. Would someone please this lady to put a sock in it.
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« Reply #1273 on: July 29, 2019, 09:01:33 PM »

It's a world of darkness and frustration because not everyone worships Meghan.
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« Reply #1274 on: July 29, 2019, 09:03:49 PM »

It's a world of darkness and frustration because not everyone worships Meghan.

"Seemingly daily darkness" or, as I call it, the nighttime.
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