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Author Topic: Gone With the Wind  (Read 1947 times)
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LittleThunder

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« Reply #15 on: October 08, 2019, 01:25:46 PM »

In France, it was adapted in a musical some years ago : https://en.wikipedia.org/...Autant_en_emporte_le_vent

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Autant en emporte le vent is a French musical adaptation of the novel Gone with the Wind produced by Dove Attia and Albert Cohen in 2003, with music and lyrics by Gérard Presgurvic and staging and choreograohy by Kamel Ouali.

You can see it whole here on YouTube : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qWdhtLYExsE (1 hrs 57 min) (In French)

And a 4 minutes official video clip of one of the songs "Libres" (Free -plural-) : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0ozCWwpQtGQ ; and another one here sung by Laura Presgurvic (Scarlett) "Nous ne sommes pas" (We are not) on a TV show. I think she's quite good as Scarlet, but I didn't watch it all yet, I only remember this musical because of this thread.  Grin
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Lady Liebe

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« Reply #16 on: October 08, 2019, 01:56:17 PM »

Note that Vivien Leigh hides her hands. She  had the original man hands!!!

Well fiddle dee dee! Never knew that.
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KimmySue

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« Reply #17 on: October 08, 2019, 03:55:00 PM »

I have been thinking about this a lot lately (mostly since re-watching the movie on a trans-Pacific flight a couple of months ago!), as a lover of both the movie and the book..... given the rise of limited series tv, I wonder if anyone would be brave enough to tackle a remake of the book, that covers the whole story, the history parts and all? I guess its so iconic, it would be hard to match.

Also, I loved the sequel book, Scarlett, too..... but HATED the mini series they made of that!

I was wondering about the book Scarlett, I haven't read it yet. Looks like I need to check that one out!
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KimmySue

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« Reply #18 on: October 08, 2019, 03:56:54 PM »



I don't think they could ever do a remake that would come near to the original.



Please don't give Hollywood folks ideas Nerves

Vivien Leigh is Scarlett, Olivia is Melanie and Clark is Rhett! Period!

I agree!!!! Antyhing else, any kind of immitation will be just an immitation and a very bad copy. No matter how hard they try, there is only one Gone with the Wind movie and anything else is out of the picture.

Agree! Nothing will ever be as good as the original.
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LarLa

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« Reply #19 on: October 08, 2019, 04:17:50 PM »

The Scarlett mini series was so bad. Timothy Dalton was NOT Rhett Butler.

I think someone like HBO or Amazon Prime, etc could do a great job of a limited run series based on Gone with the Wind.
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Principessa

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« Reply #20 on: October 08, 2019, 04:19:02 PM »

I have been thinking about this a lot lately (mostly since re-watching the movie on a trans-Pacific flight a couple of months ago!), as a lover of both the movie and the book..... given the rise of limited series tv, I wonder if anyone would be brave enough to tackle a remake of the book, that covers the whole story, the history parts and all? I guess its so iconic, it would be hard to match.

Also, I loved the sequel book, Scarlett, too..... but HATED the mini series they made of that!

I was wondering about the book Scarlett, I haven't read it yet. Looks like I need to check that one out!

A former classmate of my read Gone with the wind & Scarlett during secondary school (we were then around 15 years old), she was enthusiastic about both.

Scarlett has been made into a miniseries with respectively Joanne Whalley (then known as Joanne Whalley Kilmer) and Timothy Dalton as Scarlett and Rhett. Both did their best, but Vivien Leigh and Clark Gable will stay the one and only ones……

I have never fully read both books and I have never seen the full movie of Gone with the wind (only saw several parts of it). During my childhood it would now and then being aired on Dutch tv at the Christmas season (just like the Sissi movies and Sound of music). Then it became clear it was apparently the first movie in the cinema my parents saw together (when they were dating).
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Lady Liebe

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« Reply #21 on: October 08, 2019, 05:05:50 PM »

Arrgh . . . so help me I've got the theme music running through my head . . .
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Duchess of Verona

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« Reply #22 on: October 08, 2019, 05:55:59 PM »

I really enjoyed the book Rhett Butler's People which fills in his whole background.
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Curtains

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« Reply #23 on: October 08, 2019, 06:19:52 PM »

I really enjoyed the book Rhett Butler's People which fills in his whole background.

Agreed - preferred it to “Scarlett”.   Star
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« Reply #24 on: October 09, 2019, 02:36:10 AM »

The dresses of Scarlett O'Hara     
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ow0r3j4blV8
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Lady Alice

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« Reply #25 on: October 09, 2019, 03:21:05 PM »

Let me begin by saying that GWTW has been in my reading rotation most of my life. I bought Scarlett when it came out (I liked the first half, but when it devolved into reducing the Irish to superstitious, murderous idiots...), and I've read Rhett Butler's People (not bad), and Ruth's Journey (I think the best of the successor novels). However:

As I've gotten older and more worldly, and the fact that we live in a more psychologically and socially aware society, I don't see Rhett in a romantic light anymore. Frankly, he's an asshole - he'd actually fit in with today's politicians quite well. In fact, he spends most of GWTW goading and gaslighting Scarlett, yanking her chain, pushing her to break the mold, wrecking her relationships in her family and circle, bringing out the worst in her, playing on her ignorance, and when he builds her up, he punctures her balloon every time. He taught her how to be the rule-breaking, rude, arrogant, not-a-lady that broke societal norms, but when that bored him, and knowing full well she'd had a lifelong obsession with Ashley on top of it, he dropped her. She was literally left with nothing but the house when he walked out on her. I don't think that's terribly romantic, honestly.

It was written in an era where segregation was still legal, where spousal abuse was not unusual, and women - who had only had the vote for twenty years in 1939 - being treated like delicate, mindless objects was pretty much still the norm. Today, this book would go down in flames and never fly in light of modern attitudes. I think a lot of its success was because many contemporary women could identify with Scarlett and her relationship issues.

GWTW is still a great book, beautifully written, a historic time capsule in a fictional setting. It's riveting and wonderful. But I don't see it as a romance; I see it as two black sheep who are bad for each other, who feed each other's egos, and ends in ruined relationships.
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« Reply #26 on: October 09, 2019, 03:46:30 PM »

Let me begin by saying that GWTW has been in my reading rotation most of my life. I bought Scarlett when it came out (I liked the first half, but when it devolved into reducing the Irish to superstitious, murderous idiots...), and I've read Rhett Butler's People (not bad), and Ruth's Journey (I think the best of the successor novels). However:

As I've gotten older and more worldly, and the fact that we live in a more psychologically and socially aware society, I don't see Rhett in a romantic light anymore. Frankly, he's an asshole - he'd actually fit in with today's politicians quite well. In fact, he spends most of GWTW goading and gaslighting Scarlett, yanking her chain, pushing her to break the mold, wrecking her relationships in her family and circle, bringing out the worst in her, playing on her ignorance, and when he builds her up, he punctures her balloon every time. He taught her how to be the rule-breaking, rude, arrogant, not-a-lady that broke societal norms, but when that bored him, and knowing full well she'd had a lifelong obsession with Ashley on top of it, he dropped her. She was literally left with nothing but the house when he walked out on her. I don't think that's terribly romantic, honestly.

It was written in an era where segregation was still legal, where spousal abuse was not unusual, and women - who had only had the vote for twenty years in 1939 - being treated like delicate, mindless objects was pretty much still the norm. Today, this book would go down in flames and never fly in light of modern attitudes. I think a lot of its success was because many contemporary women could identify with Scarlett and her relationship issues.

GWTW is still a great book, beautifully written, a historic time capsule in a fictional setting. It's riveting and wonderful. But I don't see it as a romance; I see it as two black sheep who are bad for each other, who feed each other's egos, and ends in ruined relationships.
I don't see it as a romance either. It's a great criticism of the era it was written and an interesting perception of the era it's set. As for Scarlett, imo she is an admirable character because she fought for her place in the world and she broke the norms of the time she lived. For whatever reason, she made a difference.
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leatherface

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« Reply #27 on: October 09, 2019, 04:03:26 PM »

Let me begin by saying that GWTW has been in my reading rotation most of my life. I bought Scarlett when it came out (I liked the first half, but when it devolved into reducing the Irish to superstitious, murderous idiots...), and I've read Rhett Butler's People (not bad), and Ruth's Journey (I think the best of the successor novels). However:

As I've gotten older and more worldly, and the fact that we live in a more psychologically and socially aware society, I don't see Rhett in a romantic light anymore. Frankly, he's an asshole - he'd actually fit in with today's politicians quite well. In fact, he spends most of GWTW goading and gaslighting Scarlett, yanking her chain, pushing her to break the mold, wrecking her relationships in her family and circle, bringing out the worst in her, playing on her ignorance, and when he builds her up, he punctures her balloon every time. He taught her how to be the rule-breaking, rude, arrogant, not-a-lady that broke societal norms, but when that bored him, and knowing full well she'd had a lifelong obsession with Ashley on top of it, he dropped her. She was literally left with nothing but the house when he walked out on her. I don't think that's terribly romantic, honestly.

It was written in an era where segregation was still legal, where spousal abuse was not unusual, and women - who had only had the vote for twenty years in 1939 - being treated like delicate, mindless objects was pretty much still the norm. Today, this book would go down in flames and never fly in light of modern attitudes. I think a lot of its success was because many contemporary women could identify with Scarlett and her relationship issues.

GWTW is still a great book, beautifully written, a historic time capsule in a fictional setting. It's riveting and wonderful. But I don't see it as a romance; I see it as two black sheep who are bad for each other, who feed each other's egos, and ends in ruined relationships.

I've always considered GWTW as the chronicle of one woman's journey through life at a significant point in American history. I have never considered it a romance because I don't think Scarlett was ever capable of having a non-toxic romantic relationship without significant therapy prior to.

And you are right, it is a time capsule and communicates to the reader the unspoken and intangible cultural norms of Southern-American society during the Reconstruction Era.

Also Scarlett resonated with me, because it was refreshing to read a story told from a female point of view who wasn't a standard, paint by numbers heroine.
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #28 on: October 10, 2019, 02:47:33 AM »

The White Ruffle Gown of Scarlett     
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pwIlJjt4mxQ
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cordtx

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« Reply #29 on: October 10, 2019, 03:06:49 AM »

The author Margaret Mead was very critical of southern culture in the way women were treated in southern culture so she was not writing the book to glamorize the south for sure. Also have any of you reread it as you got older and were shocked to find out that Scarlet’s mother was 28 in the book and that was considered old!!
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