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Principessa

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« Reply #15 on: November 05, 2019, 02:27:50 PM »

Various Dutch folk costumes:




Dutch town Spakenburg:




Former island of Marken (near Amsterdam):



The town Volendam, near Amsterdam, is know for the pictures (aimed at tourists) of people dressed up in folk costume. Variations of this particular female costume is also often used at miss pageants (when participants dress up in a country related costume).
Hereby a picture of a Volendam couple who married in folk costume:




Several folk costumes of the Dutch province of Zeeland:
















The second pictured Zeeland costume is relatively well known in the Netherlands. An old Dutch brand of margarine is named Zeeuws meisje (Zeeland girl), with the top part of this costume on the packaging. Also in commercials for this product girls and women in this costume were used.



Frisian folk costumes:







Folk costumes from the Dutch province Drenthe







Folk costumes from the Dutch province Groningen:






You will notice that the costumes of the 3 so called Northern provinces (Friesland, Groningen & Drenthe) are very look a like.



« Last Edit: November 05, 2019, 02:48:14 PM by Principessa » Logged
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« Reply #16 on: November 05, 2019, 02:29:22 PM »

The Dutch royals also have worn Dutch folk costumes and are associated with it:

Juliana as a child in the folk custome of the Zeeland city of Axel:


Juliana in the folk custome of the Zeeland region Zuid-Beveland:


WA wearing a top of the male folk costume of the former island Urk:


In 1975 Juliana was gifted a doll in the local folk costume of the city of Rijssen (in the East of the Netherlands - region Twente):




Queen Wilhelmina (pictured together with husband prince Hendrik) in Frisian folk costume:

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« Reply #17 on: November 05, 2019, 04:27:26 PM »

Anirac, Hi! Haven't seen (read your Posts) in a while!!
Please do not believe I want to make fun of traditional costumes, but seriously some features really are extremely funny and one wonders how they came up with them.
The little golden squares on the cap look like rear mirrors in some pictures and in others it looks like  a device going thru the foreheadů
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« Reply #18 on: November 05, 2019, 08:04:56 PM »

Anirac, Hi! Haven't seen (read your Posts) in a while!!
Please do not believe I want to make fun of traditional costumes, but seriously some features really are extremely funny and one wonders how they came up with them.
The little golden squares on the cap look like rear mirrors in some pictures and in others it looks like  a device going thru the foreheadů

Yup, they are a bit weird...and some are very heavy and/or hard to put on. Amazing.
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« Reply #19 on: November 05, 2019, 10:58:44 PM »

Thank you to everyone for the wonderful contributions!   
 
Hungarian traditional folk costumes   
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TH2VP0N_-_4
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« Reply #20 on: November 05, 2019, 11:30:08 PM »

I'm loving this topic. Thank you all for the lovely contributions.  Jumping

I'm absolutely in love with the Dutch culture and wish I could wear these clothes. 

(the little gold square is indeed curious, I was intrigued)  Smiley
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« Reply #21 on: November 06, 2019, 12:56:26 AM »

Children in Breton costumes   
http://www.pinterest.com/pin/722687071437835874
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« Reply #22 on: November 06, 2019, 09:41:01 AM »

I'm loving this topic. Thank you all for the lovely contributions.  Jumping

I'm absolutely in love with the Dutch culture and wish I could wear these clothes.  

(the little gold square is indeed curious, I was intrigued)  Smiley

Just wondering what you like about the Dutch culture  Thinking

In general most of these costumes are nowadays only worn by the folk groups (sing, dance, clothing) and / or on special events. In some places it is mainly aimed at tourists. In a few places there are still some, predominantly women, who wear the local folk costume (almost) daily. For example in the town of Staphorst.

In my birthplace, where I also spend my childhood, there was a fish salesman from Spakenburg (coming over once or twice a week with a fish sell truck). One of the salespersons, an older lady, would often wear the folk costume of Spakenburg. I have found it very impressive.



Spakenburg is a former fishing village. The village is located north of Amersfoort on the Eemmeer. Before the construction of the Afsluitdijk, the village lay on the Zuiderzee.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spakenburg

The traditional costume of Spakenburg is a traditional costume that is worn in Spakenburg and Bunschoten. In 2015 there were approximately 200 women who wear this costume, in 2005 there were 600. Most of the women who wear traditional costumes are older than 65 years. Putting on the clothes is very laborious

Hereby a link to a Dutch language Wikipedia about the Spakenburg folk costume:
https://nl.wikipedia.org/...ederdracht_van_Spakenburg

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« Reply #23 on: November 06, 2019, 09:57:31 AM »

For the ones interested in the metal headgear of some Dutch (female) folk costumes:

In Dutch they are called oorijzer(s) (= ear iron(s) )

A Dutch language wiki about it: https://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oorijzer

Rough translation:

The ear-iron is part of the traditional dress for women, especially in the northern provinces of the Netherlands and Zeeland. It originally formed part of the civilian dress, which has been taken over in the regional costumes.

Initially the ear-iron was a metal bracket to hold the hats in place. It was worn over a cap and a luxurious top cap was attached to it. Over time the ear-iron grew into a showpiece. Decorated gold plates or curls protruded from the front of the ear-irons. Hat pins were used to attach the cap to the ear-iron.

The term hoofdijzer (=  head iron) is used in the traditional costume of Scheveningen. The decorations are in that case above the forehead.

The broad golden ear-iron that was worn in Friesland around 1870 is the final piece in a development of three centuries. At the end of the 16th century, a narrow metal bracket came into fashion in the Netherlands to clamp a cap on the head. The ends with embellished button rest on the cheek, which was thereby pressed slightly. It became a piece of jewelry that was made of silver or gold. However, earplugs made of gold-plated copper have also been found. Around 1650, the ear-iron is out of fashion, but in the countryside and in orphanages, for example, the ear-iron remains part of the costume. It is a form of dowry. Until the French time, the Frisian ear-iron hardly changed. The band becomes slightly wider and the decorated button takes the form of a bird's head or griffin.

It was not until the 19th century that various forms of the ear-iron emerged in the Netherlands as a specific part of Dutch regional donations. In Images of clothing, morals and customs from 1803-1807 there is no mention of an ear-iron among women from Friesland. After the formerly independent regions of the Republic of the United Netherlands came under one regime in the French period, there was a need in the regions to retain their own identity. In Friesland the ear-iron dress is cultivated and undergoes its own development. Prosperity is high, which means that the ear-iron is getting bigger and bigger. Moreover, the large German cap is replaced by a cloak cap or veil cap, under which the ear-iron was easier to see.

In the course of the century, the narrow band becomes wider and wider, the buds become larger and flatter and take the shape of a flower pot. Around 1850 the pastor and writer Joost Hiddes Halbertsma feared that the growing ear iron would eventually resemble a helmet. That also happened. By 1870 the ear-iron had become at its largest and almost enclosed the head.

Sunday look - Spijkenisse (close by Rotterdam):


Ameland (Island belonging to the province of Friesland):


Ear irons on display in the Dutch Zuiderzee museum (South Sea museum):



In the Dutch region where most of my family comes from they have so called 'mutsenbellen' (= hat bells). This was jewelry hang to the cap of the female folk costume. Besides the lace of the cap, these bells were als an indication of the situation of the wearer (financial speaking).

On this old picture you see a female in the folk costume including mutsenbellen:


My mother once mentioned that she (or her mother) had some mutsenbellen inherited from family, but that they have been screwed up by the actions of a jeweler they consulted.
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« Reply #24 on: November 07, 2019, 12:54:32 PM »

I'm loving this topic. Thank you all for the lovely contributions.  Jumping

I'm absolutely in love with the Dutch culture and wish I could wear these clothes.  

(the little gold square is indeed curious, I was intrigued)  Smiley

Just wondering what you like about the Dutch culture  Thinking

In general most of these costumes are nowadays only worn by the folk groups (sing, dance, clothing) and / or on special events. In some places it is mainly aimed at tourists. In a few places there are still some, predominantly women, who wear the local folk costume (almost) daily. For example in the town of Staphorst.

In my birthplace, where I also spend my childhood, there was a fish salesman from Spakenburg (coming over once or twice a week with a fish sell truck). One of the salespersons, an older lady, would often wear the folk costume of Spakenburg. I have found it very impressive.



Spakenburg is a former fishing village. The village is located north of Amersfoort on the Eemmeer. Before the construction of the Afsluitdijk, the village lay on the Zuiderzee.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spakenburg

The traditional costume of Spakenburg is a traditional costume that is worn in Spakenburg and Bunschoten. In 2015 there were approximately 200 women who wear this costume, in 2005 there were 600. Most of the women who wear traditional costumes are older than 65 years. Putting on the clothes is very laborious

Hereby a link to a Dutch language Wikipedia about the Spakenburg folk costume:
https://nl.wikipedia.org/...ederdracht_van_Spakenburg



I really meant it, I'm in love with Holland and every time my family and I go to the Netherlands we like it more.

Starts from Dutch painters, and I don't mean only Van Gogh (who I like, but is a unanimity !  Smiley) , but the Dutch Golden Age painters and Renaissance Dutch painters with Bosch being one of my favourites.

In alternative music (which my husband and I are into) our favourite band comes from Holland. 

I've visited a great deal of cities in the world, and hands down Amsterdam is my favourite place in the world

I know it's a bit of a taboo topic here in the board, but my favourite tattoo artists are Dutch and yes, I like (good!) tattoos.  Secret Smiley

Last but not least we love dutch bakery food (I'm a pastry chef) and we make it in our special occasions (poffertjes being very loved here at home , Stroopwafel being one of my favourite sins.....)  Grin

And yes, I admit it, we have all the souvenir stuff from Kanal houses, tulips and little couples salt and pepper dressed as "dutch" - just to remind us always to go back.  Smiley
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Principessa

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« Reply #25 on: November 07, 2019, 10:23:15 PM »

@Picar  Thumb up

We even had a Mcdonalds Mcflurry ice with stroopwafels over here  Wink
And we noticed that taken stroopwafels along at holidays and sharing them creates a lot of new international friends  Grin

Poffertjes are indeed great, just simply with butter and some sugar powder  Drool
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #26 on: November 11, 2019, 01:45:51 AM »

Austrian folk costume     
http://www.pinterest.com/pin/340655159293600227     
http://www.pinterest.com/pin/340655159291007714
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