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Author Topic: The Plantagenets  (Read 21140 times)
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karma chamelion

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« Reply #120 on: August 30, 2020, 02:04:27 AM »

I wish I was able to trace my ancestry back that far but as far as I can go is about 120 years - largely due to babies not being registered, toddlers knowing nothing about their family being found by the side of the road with no identification and fires destroyed records offices and church records.

Yep me too! And I have this very sad conviction that most likely I would find my ancestors not among the John Gaunts but among his foot servants. There is this strange fascination about the "below stairs" that I have when I tour noble mansions and palaces - as if part of my genetic memory remembers that this was where gramps and auntie spent their time ... Crap
Quite sad, but the closest any of my "known" family got to celebrity was as a house-keeper to Brigitte Bardot. Cool

Same here. On my fatherís side, his great great great whoever was deported from the UK, so ignominy is my ancestry.

AB, I count John Murray, 1st Marquess of Atholl as an ancestor - though on the wrong side of the blanket.
I've got Cromwell's too - from the uncle of Oliver, and a whole host of lowland Scots who were not exactly known to behave themselves . . . . That's the fun of it!

Change that to highland Scots and thereís my paternal line!  From them I inherited my fish belly white skin, love of single malt and unreasonable stubbornness.

And KC, thank you so much  Hug.  I remember Hotspur was one of your first aviís!

I think the ignominy in the family is a source of amusement. That side is very bright, but not a lot of energy or desire to improve their circumstances. Somebody did research our heritage back to the 18th century, which was interesting indeed. Some chose transport to Australia, some chose the US, and my line stayed until the early 20th century (stubborn!).  But loads of fun.

Momís side came from Settimo Rottaro at around the same time (1920ís) and I was  fortunate to visit her family there a few times. Beautiful place!

I admire you all for digging through your family histories. This is such an amazing place!

I hope you'll continue to indulge me for a minute, I just wanted to share a story. When I was about five I remember going through my mom's things and there were a pair of lion figurines that I fell in love with. I begged for them and she let me have them. She told me to take good care of them because they were one of the only things her father left her (he was a hobo who died a few years before I was born). I have adored them all my life and they are still with me. They look something like this only mine are standing and are much older and more nicely painted:



Well, her father was second generation German and from a poor family not accustomed to luxury items like figurines. As I got older and started to investigate the lions I realized that they are English and would have had to been imported into Germany at a fair expense. Not really matching up with my grandpa.

I got into my family tree about 5 years ago. My maternal grandmother had always tried to tell me family stories and my mom always hushed her up (out of embarrassment about her father I suppose) so I've always wanted to know more. That's when I found out about Hotspur and Alnwick Castle. Not far from Staffordshire compared to Germany and my mother's mother is where the Hotspur bloodline comes from.

I saw the picture of the lion on the bridge at Alnwick and lo and behold I concluded my lions had come down through the Hotspur branch. Grandma's mother had died at 27 from TB when grandma was 4, so it's quite possible they came from her but the family history got lost with her death. I never told my mother that they probably weren't her dad's.



Neat story! You should take them to Antiques Roadshow when it comes around!

I love AR, they've come to Seattle a couple of times and I've tried to get in both times and couldn't get tickets. Sad It would be really nice to get them dated, I'm sure they're not from the 1300's so it would be nice to get an idea of who might have picked them up. Someone who missed the family castle maybe since all Hotspur's possessions were taken by the Crown and now form the Duchy of Lancaster.
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Gemsheal

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« Reply #121 on: August 30, 2020, 03:57:02 AM »

There is a definite English strain on my mother's side of the family.  Her great ((paternal)) granddad was named Harry Bedford and he was reputed to be a sailor from (or based in) Liverpool.  He fathered two daughters with my paternal great-great-grandma but did not come to America with them.  Apparently she was able to support herself & the girls as a seamstress.  I wish I knew more ...
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karma chamelion

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« Reply #122 on: August 30, 2020, 04:59:08 AM »

There is a definite English strain on my mother's side of the family.  Her great ((paternal)) granddad was named Harry Bedford and he was reputed to be a sailor from (or based in) Liverpool.  He fathered two daughters with my paternal great-great-grandma but did not come to America with them.  Apparently she was able to support herself & the girls as a seamstress.  I wish I knew more ...

Gemsheal, what was your GG grandma's name? I can try to find more info for Harry Bedford if I have her name to cross reference. I'll look them up on my ancestry.com subscription if you haven't done that already. Should we start a separate thread, I'm afraid I'm derailing this one.
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Lady Liebe

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« Reply #123 on: August 30, 2020, 05:37:32 AM »

There is a definite English strain on my mother's side of the family.  Her great ((paternal)) granddad was named Harry Bedford and he was reputed to be a sailor from (or based in) Liverpool.  He fathered two daughters with my paternal great-great-grandma but did not come to America with them.  Apparently she was able to support herself & the girls as a seamstress.  I wish I knew more ...

Gemsheal, what was your GG grandma's name? I can try to find more info for Harry Bedford if I have her name to cross reference. I'll look them up on my ancestry.com subscription if you haven't done that already. Should we start a separate thread, I'm afraid I'm derailing this one.


Absolutely right about the separate thread KC. Look for the brand spanking new Genealogy Thread in the Off Topic Section.
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #124 on: September 12, 2020, 01:58:36 AM »

The Plantagenet dynasty consisted of four royal houses:   
The Angevins (1154-1216)   
The Plantagenets (1216-1399)     
The Houses of Lancaster and York (1399-1485)
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #125 on: September 13, 2020, 02:09:22 AM »

The usual forms of address for a king for much of the Plantagenet era were 'Your Highness' and 'Your Grace'. King Richard II introduced the terms 'Your Majesty' and 'Your High Majesty'.
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #126 on: October 06, 2020, 01:20:19 AM »

In 1185 the future Richard I sent his brother John to take possession of Ireland. Since John could not be called king there with the Irish kings still in place, he took the title Lord of Ireland.
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« Reply #127 on: October 20, 2020, 01:17:41 AM »

Who was the minister who married King Edward IV and Elizabeth Woodville?
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #128 on: October 28, 2020, 06:44:00 PM »

Princess Joan of England (1210-1238) was the daughter of King John of England. She married King Alexander II of Scotland on June 21, 1221 at York Minster. She was Queen Consort of Scotland from 1221 until 1238.
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #129 on: November 09, 2020, 12:27:00 AM »

King Henry V and the Conclusion of the Treaty of Troyes   
http://www.alamy.com/the-...-1788-image246579462.html
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #130 on: November 23, 2020, 12:02:07 AM »

In November 1259 Queen Eleanor of Provence left for France to witness the confirmation of the treaty of Paris and to attend her daughter Beatrice on her journey to marry John, Duke of Brittany. Before she embarked, she defiantly made a gift of the first available wardship with a value of fortry to sixty pounds to her steward Matthias.
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #131 on: December 19, 2020, 01:14:25 AM »

King Richard II was impressed by French culture and customs. He installed French cooks in his kitchens.
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #132 on: January 10, 2021, 11:32:30 PM »

The first Parliament King Edward I summoned, in 1275, followed the precedent set by Simon de Montfort in 1265, in that it included knights and burgesses, as well as peers.
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« Reply #133 on: January 25, 2021, 12:08:01 AM »

King Edward I had the Hundred Rolls. The information collected in the Hundred Rolls was used to initiate a steady stream of legal moves called  Quo warranto (by what warrant?) proceedings, in which noblemen and local officials were required to show proof in writing that they actually held viable appointments to their posts or titles to their properties.
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« Reply #134 on: February 03, 2021, 11:46:23 PM »

In the spring of 1448 King Henry VI demonstrated his confidence in the leaders of the court party by creating Edmund Beaufort Duke of Somerset.
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