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Author Topic: Sacred Calling  (Read 991 times)
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CyrilSebastian

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« on: January 21, 2020, 10:54:07 PM »

Cecily, the daughter of King William I and Queen Matilda of England, entered Holy Trinity as a novice in 1075, eventually becoming abbess in 1113.
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« Reply #1 on: January 22, 2020, 08:05:52 AM »

I would think that specially in old times it was almost a tradition to leave a daughter or son to a monastery or (the) church. Some of those positions were relatively important and impressive (with regards to influence, money and suchs). Also for some it was a career instead of (forced) marriage and so.

In origin my family, both paternal as maternal, is catholic (not very devote and/or conservative, but still). A few generations back there were at least 3 a 4 females who became a nun and about 2 or 3 men who went into a monastery and or became a missionary. At that time the females had good positions in the healthcare (local hospitals), which at the time and the corresponding situation they would not have managed to gain/reach as a common person (no nun).
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« Reply #2 on: January 22, 2020, 01:52:25 PM »

I am a huge fan of St. Hildegard of Bingen. She was 'tithed' to the church when she was 8 years old. She came from an aristocratic German family and it was common to give up your last/tenth child to the church.
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #3 on: January 23, 2020, 10:22:35 PM »

Mary (1136-1182) was the youngest daughter of King Stephen of England and his wife Matilda of Boulogne. She became a novice at the Priory of Lillechurch in Kent. She later transferred to Romsey Abbey in Hampshire. It was at Romsey that she became a nun. Mary became Abbess of Romsey in 1155.
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« Reply #4 on: January 24, 2020, 01:40:32 PM »

As already stated the british aristocracy had a bystem: the eldest son would inherit the title and property, the second son would go into the armed forces (Navy or army, with an officers rank to start obviously) the third would become a cleric (and depending on how wealthy the family was, the more influencial his post would be, as many posts could be "bought" or were granted by related or affiliated landowners) the other sons would need to become either scholars (as secretaries, stewards, teachers etc trying to get into politics if somewhat educated enough) or they would also go into the armed forces.
With the daughters it was different: if there was enough beauty/dowry/pedigree each girl would be married off. Girls that failed the marriage market (ouch, isn't that a horrid expression?) would either be forced to become gouvernesses, companions or were expected to "assist" their more successful sisters in their households.
Of the aristocracy women joined a convent out of two reasons only: they indeed had a calling or they were considered disgraced, either by their family (affairs, illegitimate pregnancies) or their husbands, who simply needed to get rid of an unwanted wife..
Of the lower noble classes, more girls were sent to convents, their parents simply couldn't afford their dowry or their upbringing.
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #5 on: January 26, 2020, 11:29:17 PM »

Prince Georg of Bavaria (1880-1943) was the eldest son of Prince Leopold of Bavaria and his wife Archduchess Gisela of Austria. In 1919 Georg resigned his military career and began studying theology in Innsbruck, Austria. He was ordained a Catholic priest on March 19, 1921.
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Kristallinchen

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« Reply #6 on: January 26, 2020, 11:57:06 PM »

Prince Georg of Bavaria (1880-1943) was the eldest son of Prince Leopold of Bavaria and his wife Archduchess Gisela of Austria. In 1919 Georg resigned his military career and began studying theology in Innsbruck, Austria. He was ordained a Catholic priest on March 19, 1921.

He had a brief marriage with Archduchess Isabella, daughter of Archduke Friedrich and Princess Isabella of Croy-Dülmen. It was quickly dissolved.

Another Prince of this generation joining the church was Crownprince Georg of Saxony (1893-1943), eldest child of the last King of Saxony Friedrich August II. and Archduchess Luise.

His death is still a mystery. It's given as a heart attack, but he was knowing some of the militaries involved in the 20. July 1944 attack on Hitler so you never know, if there isn't more to it.
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« Reply #7 on: January 27, 2020, 08:33:43 AM »

Prince Georg of Bavaria (1880-1943) was the eldest son of Prince Leopold of Bavaria and his wife Archduchess Gisela of Austria. In 1919 Georg resigned his military career and began studying theology in Innsbruck, Austria. He was ordained a Catholic priest on March 19, 1921.

He had a brief marriage with Archduchess Isabella, daughter of Archduke Friedrich and Princess Isabella of Croy-Dülmen. It was quickly dissolved.

Another Prince of this generation joining the church was Crownprince Georg of Saxony (1893-1943), eldest child of the last King of Saxony Friedrich August II. and Archduchess Luise.

His death is still a mystery. It's given as a heart attack, but he was knowing some of the militaries involved in the 20. July 1944 attack on Hitler so you never know, if there isn't more to it.

Yes, Georg and Isabella, that has always been an intriguing story for me. If I understood it correct the marriage was already over at their honeymoon, so indeed very brief.

The second prince mentioned in your post and his story also sound intriging.
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Kristallinchen

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« Reply #8 on: January 27, 2020, 08:38:25 AM »

Prince Georg of Bavaria (1880-1943) was the eldest son of Prince Leopold of Bavaria and his wife Archduchess Gisela of Austria. In 1919 Georg resigned his military career and began studying theology in Innsbruck, Austria. He was ordained a Catholic priest on March 19, 1921.

He had a brief marriage with Archduchess Isabella, daughter of Archduke Friedrich and Princess Isabella of Croy-Dülmen. It was quickly dissolved.

Another Prince of this generation joining the church was Crownprince Georg of Saxony (1893-1943), eldest child of the last King of Saxony Friedrich August II. and Archduchess Luise.

His death is still a mystery. It's given as a heart attack, but he was knowing some of the militaries involved in the 20. July 1944 attack on Hitler so you never know, if there isn't more to it.

Yes, Georg and Isabella, that has always been an intriguing story for me. If I understood it correct the marriage was already over at their honeymoon, so indeed very brief.

The second prince mentioned in your post and his story also sound intriging.

It's sad that Isabella never married again, but for her as a super catholic Archduchess it seems to have been a sin doing so.
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« Reply #9 on: January 28, 2020, 03:25:08 PM »

Prince Alexander Henrique of Bourbon-Two Sicilies (1974), ordained a priest in Rome on 22 December 2007. He is the youngest son and child of  Princess Maria Cristina of Savoy-Aosta (1933) and Prince Casimir of Bourbon-Two Sicilies.


Georg, Crown Prince of Saxony or George (1893 – 1943) the last Crown Prince of Saxony, was the heir to the King of Saxony, Frederick Augustus III, at the time of the monarchy's abolition on 13 November 1918. He later became a Roman Catholic priest and a Jesuit. In the spring of 1918, newspapers announced the prince's engagement to Duchess Marie Amelia, daughter of Albrecht, Duke of Württemberg, the heir to the throne of the Kingdom of Württemberg. The end of the Saxon monarchy and the prince's desire to become a priest apparently led to the end of the engagement. The duchess died unmarried in 1923.

Prince Maximilian William Augustus Albert Charles Gregory Odo of Saxony, Duke of Saxony (German: Maximilian Wilhelm August Albert Karl Gregor Odo)(1870 – 1951) was a member of the Albertine branch of the House of Wettin and a Roman Catholic priest. The seventh of the eight children of Prince George of Saxony and his wife Infanta Maria Anna of Portugal. He was born with the titles Prince and Duke of Saxony, with the style Royal Highness. Amongst his siblings was the last Saxon king Frederick Augustus III and Princess Maria Josepha mother of the last Austrian Emperor Charles I.On 26 July 1896, despite initial opposition from his family, Prince Maximilian entered into the church and was ordained as a priest. He renounced his claim to the throne of Saxony on entering the priesthood and also expressed a determination to refuse the apanage that he was entitled to from the Kingdom of Saxony. In January 1899 Prince Maximilian became a Doctor of Theology after gaining the degree from the University of Würzburg. After working as a pastor at a church in Nuremberg, on 21 August 1900 Prince Maximilian accepted the post of Professor of canonical law at the University of Fribourg. In late 1910 Prince Maximilian caused controversy by publishing an article in an ecclesiastical periodical on the union of the Eastern and Roman churches. Prince Maximilian argued that the six dogmas should be waived in order to facilitate the return of the Eastern to the Roman Catholic Church. As a result of the article he went to see Pope Pius X to explain his article, and as a result of meeting the pope he agreed to retract the article and he signed a declaration acknowledging errors in his article and it was announced that he had renewed his full and unconditional adhesion to the doctrines of the Roman Catholic Church. During the First World War Prince Maximilian served as an Army chaplain and in this capacity he attended to wounded soldiers, gave unction to the dying and said mass while under shell fire. He was liked by the French prisoners of war as he also dedicated himself to their welfare. He also used the international bureau in Geneva to send word to the families of the French prisoners. Following the German Empire's defeat in the war his brother King Frederick Augustus III was forced to abdicate as the monarchy was abolished.


Prince Georg of Bavaria (German: Georg Franz Joseph Luitpold Maria Prinz von Bayern) (1880 – 1943) was a member of the Bavarian Royal House of Wittelsbach and a Catholic priest.The elder son of Prince Leopold of Bavaria and his wife Archduchess Gisela of Austria.In 1912 he married Archduchess Isabella Maria Theresia Christine Eugenie of Austria-Teschen (1888 – 1973). On 17 January 1913 the union was dissolved by the Royal Bavarian Supreme Court; on 5 March 1913 the union was annulled by the Holy See on the grounds of non-consummation.During World War I, Georg fought both on the Western Front (including the First Battle of Arras and the First Battle of Ypres) and on the Eastern Front.In 1919 Georg resigned his military career and began studying theology in Innsbruck, Austria. He was ordained a Catholic priest on 19 March 1921 and shortly afterwards received a doctorate in canon law from the Catholic Faculty of Theology at the University of Innsbruck. He continued his religious studies in Rome and in 1925 graduated from the Pontifical Ecclesiastical Academy. On 18 November 1926 Pope Pius XI named Georg a domestic prelate with the title Monsignor. In the 1930s, Georg was appointed a secular canon at St. Peter's Basilica in Rome. On 12 November 1941 Pope Pius XII named Georg a protonotary apostolic de numero participantium (one of the highest ranks of monsignor). Throughout his time in Rome, Georg lived at Villa San Francesco with the Franciscan Brothers of Waldbreitbach. On 31 May 1943 Georg died at Villa San Francesco. One source says that he had been ill for some time. Another source says that he died unexpectedly of tuberculosis contracted while working at a hospital.


Princess Ileana of Romania, also known as Mother Alexandra (1909 –  1991), was the youngest daughter of King Ferdinand I of Romania and his consort, Queen Marie of Romania. She was a great-granddaughter of Queen Victoria and of Tsar Alexander II. She was born as Her Royal Highness Ileana, Princess of Romania, Princess of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen. In 1931, Ileana married the Archduke Anton of Austria, Prince of Tuscany. This marriage was encouraged by Ileana's brother, King Carol II, who was jealous of Ileana's popularity in Romania and wanted to get her out of the country. Ileana and Anton had six children; they were raised in the Roman Catholic faith of her husband and of the country Ileana and Anton officially divorced in 1954. Then later in 1954  she married to Dr. Stefan Nikolas Issarescu. Her second marriage ended in divorce (without issue) in 1965. In 1961, Ileana entered the Orthodox Monastery of the Protection of the Mother of God, in Bussy-en-Othe, France. On her tonsuring as a monastic, in 1967, Sister Ileana was given the name Mother Alexandra. She moved back to the United States and founded the Orthodox Monastery of the Transfiguration in Ellwood City, Pennsylvania, the first English language Orthodox monastery in North America. She was the third female descendant of Queen Victoria to become a Mother Superior in a convent of her own foundation. She served as abbess until her retirement in 1981, remaining at the monastery until her death.


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« Reply #10 on: January 28, 2020, 03:29:48 PM »

Prince Frederick Alfred of Saxe-Meiningen (1921-1997) Son of Countess Klara Marie von Korff genannt Schmissing-Kerssenbrock (1895-1992) and  Georg, Prince of Saxe-Meiningen (1892 – 1946). Renounced the succession allowing it to pass to his uncle. He was a Carthusian monk since 1953. He was an older brother of princess Regina who would marry Otto of Habsburg, crown prince of the Austrian empire.

Prince Alexander Leopold Franz Emmerich of Hohenlohe-Waldenburg-Schillingsfürst (1794 – 1849) was a German priest and reputed miracle-worker. a son of Charles Albert II, Prince of Hohenlohe-Waldenburg-Schillingsfürst (1742-1796) and his second wife, Baroness Judith Reviczky of Revisnye (from 1753 to 1836).


Princess Alice of Battenberg (Victoria Alice Elizabeth Julia Marie) (1885 – 1969)  the eldest child of Prince Louis of Battenberg and his wife Princess Victoria of Hesse and by Rhine. In 1903 she married Prince Andrew of Greece and Denmark (1882-1944), together they had 4 daughters and 1 son (= Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh). In January 1949, the princess founded a nursing order of Greek Orthodox nuns, the Christian Sisterhood of Martha and Mary, modelled after the convent that her aunt, the martyr Grand Duchess Elizabeth Feodorovna, had founded in Russia in 1909. She trained on the Greek island of Tinos, established a home for the order in a hamlet north of Athens, and undertook two tours of the United States in 1950 and 1952 in an effort to raise funds. Her mother was baffled by her actions, "What can you say of a nun who smokes and plays canasta?", she said.


Princess Elisabeth of Hesse and by Rhine, later Grand Duchess Elizabeth Feodorovna of Russia (Russian: Елизавета Фёдоровна Романова, Elizabeth Feodorovna Romanova; canonised as Holy Martyr Elizabeth Feodorovna)(1864 – 1918) was a German Hessian and Rhenish princess of the House of Hesse-Darmstadt, and the wife of Grand Duke Sergei Alexandrovich of Russia (1857 – 1905), the fifth son of Emperor Alexander II of Russia and Princess Marie of Hesse and by Rhine. After Sergei's death, Elisabeth wore mourning clothes and became a vegetarian. In 1909, she sold off her magnificent collection of jewels and sold her other luxurious possessions; even her wedding ring was not spared. With the proceeds she opened the Convent of Saints Martha and Mary and became its abbess. She soon opened a hospital, a chapel, a pharmacy and an orphanage on its grounds. Elisabeth and her nuns worked tirelessly among the poor and the sick of Moscow. She often visited Moscow's worst slums and did all she could to help alleviate the suffering of the poor. For many years, Elisabeth's institution helped the poor and the orphans in Moscow by fostering the prayer and charity of devout women. In 1918, Vladimir Lenin ordered the Cheka to arrest Elisabeth. They then exiled her first to Perm, then to Yekaterinburg, where she spent a few days and was joined by others: the Grand Duke Sergei Mikhailovich; Princes Ioann Konstantinovich, Konstantin Konstantinovich, Igor Konstantinovich and Vladimir Pavlovich Paley; Grand Duke Sergei's secretary, Fyodor Remez; and Varvara Yakovleva, a sister from the Grand Duchess's convent. They were all taken to Alapayevsk on 20 May 1918, where they were housed in the Napolnaya School on the outskirts of the town. On July 18 1918 they were killed after being place in a shaft and having bombs dropped upon them. In 1981 Elisabeth was canonized by the Russian Orthodox Church Abroad, and in 1992 by the Moscow Patriarchate.







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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #11 on: February 01, 2020, 10:56:28 PM »

Philipp Wilhelm of Bavaria (1576-1598) was the son of Duke William V of Bavaria. He studied theology and philosophy at Ingolstadt University. He was given the honorary posts of canon of Cologne, Meinz, Salzburg and Trier. Philipp was made a cardinal by Pope Clement VIII in the consistory of December 18, 1596.
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #12 on: February 10, 2020, 11:49:45 PM »

Princess Marie of Valois of Valois (1393-1438) was the daughter of King Charles VI and Queen Isabeau of France. Marie entered the convent of Poissy on September 8, 1397. She took her vows as a nun on May 26, 1408. In later years she became prioress of the convent.
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CyrilSebastian

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« Reply #13 on: February 14, 2020, 10:38:10 PM »

Odo of Bayeux, Earl of Kent was the half-brother of King William I of England. William made him bishop of Bayeux in 1049. Odo was an ordained Christian cleric.
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« Reply #14 on: February 17, 2020, 09:29:16 AM »

Prince Alexandr Mikhailovich Volkonsky (Russian: Александр Михайлович Волконский) (1866 –  1934) . Son of Piotr Grigoriewich Wolkonsky and Vera Aleksandrovna Volkonskaya (born L'viv). He was a Russian military diplomat and writer and a Bulgarian Roman Catholic priest. Alexandr was among others Aide-de-camp of Emperor Nicholas II . In 1912 he had to resign for political reasons. During the World War I he returned to the active service with the rank of colonel. From 1915 to 1917 he was again appointed Russian military attache to Rome. After the Bolshevik revolution he remained in Italy in exile.  In 1930 he converted to the Catholic Faith from Russian Orthodoxy. On 6 July 1930 was ordained to the priesthood by Bulgarian Roman Catholic bishop, Exarch of Sofia Cyril Kurtev. He participated in the Congress of the Russian Catholic clergy in Rome (1930), on behalf of which he wrote historical and the dogmatic work "Catholicism and the Holy Tradition of the East " (Paris, 1933–1934). Volkonsky worked at the Pontifical Commission Pro Russia, which was responsible for all matters concerning Catholics of all rites inside the Soviet Union and Russians in the Diaspora, and as a teacher of Russian and other Slavic languages at the Pontifical Oriental Institute.


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