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Author Topic: Social Unrest in Minneapolis and Other US Cities  (Read 31308 times)
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esther angeline

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« Reply #30 on: May 30, 2020, 03:13:06 AM »

 Thank you  for your post Miss Molly.    Star

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Hester
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« Reply #31 on: May 30, 2020, 03:49:35 AM »

For years, black men and women tried to protest peacefully by kneeling down, and it changed nothing. And those same men and women who were outraged by the sheer audacity of kneeling, are now among the ones saying "I'd listen to the protesters if they only weren't violent". I don't condone violence, not one bit, not at all. But I understand why the protesters feel that they are nearing the end of their tether.

This sheet has being on since before Rodney King, y'all. That was in 1991. We have all known about this since 1991 and done nothing. Something has to change so that people can be safe in their own skin. This feeling of unsafety is very, very unpleasant, but that is a temporary feeling for most. But a lot of POC live with that feeling every time they go outside. And sometimes, when they are inside their own homes, because the police kills them there, too

The recent story of the nurse (?) who was shot in her home by police barging in, shooting first and asking later certainly underlines that not even home is a safe space.

I donít understand why thereís not a universal wish to change society away from that pattern. Instead we have Karens calling the police lying about AA men threatening them. Itís very disturbing to see.

What is a ďKarenĒ?
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anastasia beaverhausen

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« Reply #32 on: May 30, 2020, 04:21:51 AM »

For years, black men and women tried to protest peacefully by kneeling down, and it changed nothing. And those same men and women who were outraged by the sheer audacity of kneeling, are now among the ones saying "I'd listen to the protesters if they only weren't violent". I don't condone violence, not one bit, not at all. But I understand why the protesters feel that they are nearing the end of their tether.

This sheet has being on since before Rodney King, y'all. That was in 1991. We have all known about this since 1991 and done nothing. Something has to change so that people can be safe in their own skin. This feeling of unsafety is very, very unpleasant, but that is a temporary feeling for most. But a lot of POC live with that feeling every time they go outside. And sometimes, when they are inside their own homes, because the police kills them there, too

The recent story of the nurse (?) who was shot in her home by police barging in, shooting first and asking later certainly underlines that not even home is a safe space.

I donít understand why thereís not a universal wish to change society away from that pattern. Instead we have Karens calling the police lying about AA men threatening them. Itís very disturbing to see.

What is a ďKarenĒ?

A Karen is an entitled suburban white woman who either wants to call police on any person of color she sees or, if itís a good day, wants to speak to the manager. Her male counterpart is a Kevin.

https://www.theguardian.c...en-meme-what-does-it-mean
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Nappyolean

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« Reply #33 on: May 30, 2020, 05:08:34 AM »

The problem with this whole ďKaren, KevinĒ thing is itís still using stereotyping and name calling. I donít pretend to have an answer but I do know that code words are not usually a solution.
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« Reply #34 on: May 30, 2020, 05:34:32 AM »

The problem with this whole ďKaren, KevinĒ thing is itís still using stereotyping and name calling. I donít pretend to have an answer but I do know that code words are not usually a solution.

Several of the most ardent campaigners for refugee and Indigenous rights that I know are affluent white women. I disagree with any stereotyping based on race.
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karma chamelion

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« Reply #35 on: May 30, 2020, 05:45:09 AM »

The problem with this whole ďKaren, KevinĒ thing is itís still using stereotyping and name calling. I donít pretend to have an answer but I do know that code words are not usually a solution.

Several of the most ardent campaigners for refugee and Indigenous rights that I know are affluent white women. I disagree with any stereotyping based on race.

Hear, hear! Star
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Aubiette

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« Reply #36 on: May 30, 2020, 06:56:51 AM »

I wasnít going to post here because I donít think it belongs on here and I donít think it will lead anywhere good but here goes.

I am furious and sad about George and I want all 4 cops put in prison for murder for the rest of their sorry lives. Itís horrible. Arrest the other 3 NOW.
But this madness on the streets must stop.

Iíve spent the evening watching this destruction of my country city by city. Iíve watched cops and secret service and other first responders put up with abuse that thereís no way I would stand still for. Iím watching buildings burn. Businesses and innocent lives destroyed. Neighborhoods of innocent people destroyed. Looters who are just criminals and belong in jail. Arsonists who are criminals that belong under the jail. Itís despicable. Itís disgusting. I want it stopped. I want a show of force that will stop it. Enough. A peaceful protest/march is great and what our country allows and encourages. This madness in most cases is not that.
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lilyrose

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« Reply #37 on: May 30, 2020, 07:16:02 AM »

No offense to anyone upset by these protests, but black Americans have spent the last ten years thanks to the advent of social media and camera phones having to relieve a personal hell what feels like every other month. We're sick and tired of it. We've tried to protest peacefully. Nothing changed, and people criticized us for protesting peacefully too. So we're fed up, and this is the result. You don't have to like it, but I really wish people would understand it. I'm tired of people being more outraged over the rioting than they are over lives being lost.

I'm honestly not worried about looters and arsonists right now. I want justice for every single innocent person victimized by police brutality. We've lost to many men, women and children for me to care about a Target being vandalized and looted. Physical things can be replaced. The lives we've lost can't be. If we don't push for change, this will keep happening.
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Maria
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« Reply #38 on: May 30, 2020, 11:57:34 AM »

Colin Kaepernick knelt peacefully. Fat lot of good that did.
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Maria
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« Reply #39 on: May 30, 2020, 12:03:37 PM »

It can be very uncomfortable being accused of things or being called names or held responsible for something because of the colour of your skin or your religion. But being called Karen is a lot less hurtful or unpleasant than being accosted by the police or risking your life simply living because you can be killed with few consequences for the one killing you. 
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thecrownjewelthief

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« Reply #40 on: May 30, 2020, 02:08:40 PM »

No offense to anyone upset by these protests, but black Americans have spent the last ten years thanks to the advent of social media and camera phones having to relieve a personal hell what feels like every other month. We're sick and tired of it. We've tried to protest peacefully. Nothing changed, and people criticized us for protesting peacefully too. So we're fed up, and this is the result. You don't have to like it, but I really wish people would understand it. I'm tired of people being more outraged over the rioting than they are over lives being lost.

I'm honestly not worried about looters and arsonists right now. I want justice for every single innocent person victimized by police brutality. We've lost to many men, women and children for me to care about a Target being vandalized and looted. Physical things can be replaced. The lives we've lost can't be. If we don't push for change, this will keep happening.

Colin Kaepernick knelt peacefully. Fat lot of good that did.

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Chandrasekhi

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« Reply #41 on: May 30, 2020, 03:54:23 PM »

No offense to anyone upset by these protests, but black Americans have spent the last ten years thanks to the advent of social media and camera phones having to relieve a personal hell what feels like every other month. We're sick and tired of it. We've tried to protest peacefully. Nothing changed, and people criticized us for protesting peacefully too. So we're fed up, and this is the result. You don't have to like it, but I really wish people would understand it. I'm tired of people being more outraged over the rioting than they are over lives being lost.

I'm honestly not worried about looters and arsonists right now. I want justice for every single innocent person victimized by police brutality. We've lost to many men, women and children for me to care about a Target being vandalized and looted. Physical things can be replaced. The lives we've lost can't be. If we don't push for change, this will keep happening.

What will that change look like, lilyrose? It is a call made after the numerous incidents of publicized police brutality (the ones we know of) and racial profiling, yet here we are again.

CNN H/O being burned down: very little journalistic integrity, so no great loss. However, looting is indiscriminate. The losses are suffered by the communities in which the looting occurs (income, access to services, education, libraries). CNN, Target most certainly have insurance in place to cover public unrest. The Mom and Pop shop around the corner does not. These Mom and Pop shops are likely to be Black/Hispanic/Native Indian/Other PoC. They can lose everything in looting incidents. We have seen this back home. This sets into motion another generation of poverty. Poverty has unfortunately a predominant colour in the States and back home but is present in all race /ethnic groups.

In this Wiki article on Police Brutality: https://en.wikipedia.org/...lity_in_the_United_States,
Quote
...Police brutality can be associated with racial profiling. Differences in race, religion, politics, or socioeconomic status often exist between police and the citizenry. Some police officers may view the population (or a particular subset thereof) as generally deserving of punishment. Portions of the population may perceive the police to be oppressors. In addition, there is a perception that victims of police brutality often belong to relatively powerless groups, such as minorities, the disabled, and the poor.[13]

GGMM has shared her terrifying experience when stopped by the cops. Their attitude to her changed once they discovered that she was not a poor, powerless Black woman but worthy of respect because of the socio-economic status of her mom. GGMM remained Black during the entire encounter but the attitude to her changed.

When looting occurs in our communities, we lose the momentum and resources (income, libraries, schools, clinics) we need to end the generational poverty. Looting serves no-one. It makes us all poorer. And so the cycle continues and we further entrench the colour of the powerless/disenfranchised/impoverished.

The fury, injustice, discrimination, that drives the looting is understandable. Sorry, I cannot condone it: there is too much at stake!
Whatever our ethnic origins, might our efforts not be better rewarded by ensuring the programmes/interventions put in place after every Black life lost to police brutality, is implemented so that we do not require another human sacrifice as a reminder? Then, we need not just dream of a society in which socioeconmic status and the perceived dignity of life that goes with it, does not have a colour, better still, that all life has dignity irrespective of colour or socio-economic status.

On a related note:
Quote
https://en.wikipedia.org/..._against_Native_Americans

Native Americans ages 20Ė24, 25Ė34, and 35Ė44 are three of the five groups most likely to be killed by police (the others are Black people 20Ė24 and 25Ė34) making them more likely than any other racial group to be killed by police despite the fact that they only make up 1.2% of the population of the United States. Native Americans are 3.1 times more likely than white Americans to be killed by police.[1] Police brutality, especially killings, are underreported, however, because officer's frequently visually assess one's race and Native Americans are often mistaken for Black, White, or Hispanic.[2]

In a study of hate crimes and police violence against Native Americans, Silent Victims, Barbara Perry interviewed 278 Native Americans as well as non-Native service providers from eight tribes in seven states.[3] Her interviewees frequently reported "police misconduct Ö running the continuum from negligence to extreme forms of violence." She concluded that, "they can neither trust the police to respect their rights, nor to protect them when others violate their rights."[4]


R.I.P George Floyd. You lost your life over an alleged measly counterfeit bill. The cost of the loss of your life is now running into the millions/billions. If only you had seen a fraction of that when you were alive, you might have been treated with more dignity and might still be with us.
« Last Edit: May 30, 2020, 04:02:39 PM by Chandrasekhi » Logged

ďThe sheep fear the wolf, only to be eaten by the shepherd." Ė Flash Gordon
anastasia beaverhausen

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« Reply #42 on: May 30, 2020, 07:30:32 PM »

It can be very uncomfortable being accused of things or being called names or held responsible for something because of the colour of your skin or your religion. But being called Karen is a lot less hurtful or unpleasant than being accosted by the police or risking your life simply living because you can be killed with few consequences for the one killing you. 

I agree. A meme might be hurtful, but itís not fatal. And quite frankly, this meme might make some people more aware of the privilege they take for granted every day.

Also, I hope nobody thought I was promoting the meme by providing a definition.
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karma chamelion

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« Reply #43 on: May 30, 2020, 08:55:53 PM »

First off, nowhere did I nor would I compare being called a Karen to the anxiety that POC live with 24/7.

Affluent white women who are so far up their own butt that they can't see daylight don't care what you call them. You're not getting through to them with a meme. But you are hurting the whites who are trying to help, because they DO care how you perceive them. They would never call you names, even joking. So why is it okay to call them names?

It's all about respect. It's about changing the way people see each other. The problem is, there are always going to be those self-righteous bigots that will never change their view of other people, ever. They are a lost cause, you have to just move around them. Just know that for every one of them you cross paths with there is at least another one, and hopefully many, who get it and care.

I would say right now the majority of my friends are POC. The person other than family that I love most in this world is Indonesian. Judging from my lack of pigment you would never realize that I am supporting, mourning with, laughing and loving with such a diverse group of people. That's all I'm trying to say.

GGMM & Chandra, excellent posts. Star
« Last Edit: May 30, 2020, 09:01:47 PM by karma chamelion » Logged
esther angeline

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« Reply #44 on: May 30, 2020, 10:42:32 PM »

GGMM, Chandra, and  Karma.    Star Star
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