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Author Topic: Danish Prince Joachim, 51, had to go to hospital in Toulouse, France  (Read 37147 times)
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Paulina

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« Reply #120 on: August 13, 2020, 05:06:04 AM »

Does anyone here know if the household language of Fred and Jokke was Danish or French? I'm sure they both speak both fluently, (of course) but what was the language they were raised with inside the palaces?

Fred always looks more relaxed without his wife. Glad he took this trip solo.

I hope Jokke gets better, soon. Do people recover fully from strokes?
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esther angeline

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« Reply #121 on: August 13, 2020, 06:46:49 AM »

Recovery is relative.  The extent of damage and success of rehab is everything.  It is early days so it may be too early to predict.  

And we donít know the true situation.  It is interesting to note that there is no place setting in front of Joachim, only a basket of a broken roll. Maybe significant or just happenstance.  Either way, I feel like Frederikís pensive face says it all.
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« Reply #122 on: August 13, 2020, 07:13:50 AM »

Does anyone here know if the household language of Fred and Jokke was Danish or French? I'm sure they both speak both fluently, (of course) but what was the language they were raised with inside the palaces?

Fred always looks more relaxed without his wife. Glad he took this trip solo.

I hope Jokke gets better, soon. Do people recover fully from strokes?

My sister had one aged 21 - she had a brain bleed and needed an operation. She needed therapy but we were told that she would never go back to her previous self. Parts of the brain are damaged as a result of the stroke - although the severity varies significantly - and you can re-learn how to do activities. Age is also a factor - younger people often respond better to therapy than older ones.

Some people do recover almost fully - apparently around 10% of cases. The likely prognosis is apparent within the first few months, and recovery can occur over the first two years. After that stage further improvement is unlikely.
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« Reply #123 on: August 13, 2020, 08:39:25 AM »

Recovery is relative.  The extent of damage and success of rehab is everything.  It is early days so it may be too early to predict.  

And we donít know the true situation.  It is interesting to note that there is no place setting in front of Joachim, only a basket of a broken roll. Maybe significant or just happenstance.  Either way, I feel like Frederikís pensive face says it all.

I noticed that, too. But there is a place setting on Joachimís right, which could be his. Maybe he had been sitting further to his right and then was asked to move closer to Frederik for the picture (the basket thing with the pieces of baguette seems to be for them to share). Why he had to move and not Fred, dunno. Maybe the background was just a tad nicer this way, otherwise it would have been castle walls.
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« Reply #124 on: August 13, 2020, 08:48:52 AM »

Do people recover fully from strokes?

That depends on a whole lot of factors.

My father had to have a brain scan and it was then discovered that he had had at least one stroke but so mild that he didn't even know he had had one.

Others never recover while most get a degree of recovery.

The Duke of Kent had a stroke a few years back and appears to have made an excellent recovery (he was in his 80s when it happened).

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« Reply #125 on: August 13, 2020, 12:18:09 PM »

In NL there is some distinction I have noticed: there is the use of the following words 'beroerte' (CVA) and  'TIA' (including some additional words. According to the website of the Dutch Brain Foundation (= Hersenstichting):

Beroerte (stroke) is the collective name for a TIA, cerebral infarction and cerebral haemorrhage. The medical term is Cerebrovascular Accident (CVA). This literally means an "accident of the blood vessels of the brain." In such an accident, something goes wrong with the blood supply to the brain. As a result, part of that brain gets too little oxygen. As a result, brain cells in this area can die and brain functions fail.

Different forms and their causes

Cerebral infarction
In most cases, a stroke is a cerebral infarction. A whole system of (small) arteries ensures that oxygen-rich blood reaches all parts of the brain. During a cerebral infarction, such an artery in the brain becomes narrowed or blocked. This is often the result of arteriosclerosis: fatty substances (cholesterol) and blood clot attach to a damaged piece of the blood vessel wall. This clot can accumulate so much that the artery clogs up. A piece can also come loose and block a smaller artery further in the brain. This results in a cerebral infarction or TIA.


A TIA as a warning
In a TIA (Transient Ischaemic Attack), there is a temporary decrease in blood supply in the arteries of the brain. Symptoms usually last for less than 30 minutes, but can officially last for 24 hours. Because the symptoms last for a short time, a TIA is also referred to as a minor stroke. Getting a TIA is an important warning about possible strokes in the (near) future. It is therefore also important for a TIA to immediately seek medical help.

Brain hemorrhage
A brain haemorrhage is a serious type of stroke. In a brain haemorrhage, a blood vessel ruptures so that blood can flow in and around the brain. The blood pushes away part of the brain tissue so that it gets damaged. Weak spots in the blood vessel wall can arise due to, for example, high blood pressure and arteriosclerosis. Such a weak spot can also develop into a bulge, an aneurysm. Aneurysms have a thin blood vessel wall and are therefore more likely to rupture.


Risk factors
Almost three quarters of people who have a stroke are older than 65. As arteries calcify with age, the risk of a stroke increases. Fortunately, something can be done to prevent that arterial calcification process from going faster than necessary. With a healthy lifestyle, for example. High blood pressure and high cholesterol in particular cause arteriosclerosis. Other risk factors for stroke are smoking, obesity and diabetes. In some cases heredity plays a role.


It is often said a TIA has in most of the cases reversible effects; while brain haemorrhage has in most of the cases non reversible effects.
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« Reply #126 on: August 13, 2020, 12:41:34 PM »

Theyíd finished breakfast. Thereís a tiny piece of crust in Joachimís plate. He probably pushed the plate to enjoy the coffee.
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« Reply #127 on: August 13, 2020, 12:52:27 PM »

Henrik and Margrethe spoke French so I am guessing F&J grew up with both languages from childhood. I have heard someone say that Fred speaks Danish as if he thinks fundamentally in French - that could perhaps explain his rather odd Danish.

I think he and Mary speaks (or spoke) mostly English. Their children are obviously bilingual too. I think Mary has far preferred English but probably speaks more Danish now.

I think Alexandra spoke Danish as much as possible. I donít know about Marie. Her Danish is really very good but itís difficult to imagine the four of them donít speak mostly French now. OTOH the kids started school in Denmark and likely also speak Danish with Joachim and N&F too.

I should add that many Danish children add a lot of English when they speak. I blame YouTube. Danglish is a thing. Not just specific words but also English words translated wrongly into something that sounds Danish but isnít. I guess itís a part of how languages develop..
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« Reply #128 on: August 13, 2020, 12:59:32 PM »

Henrik and Margrethe spoke French so I am guessing F&J grew up with both languages from childhood. I have heard someone say that Fred speaks Danish as if he thinks fundamentally in French - that could perhaps explain his rather odd Danish.

I think he and Mary speaks (or spoke) mostly English. Their children are obviously bilingual too. I think Mary has far preferred English but probably speaks more Danish now.

I think Alexandra spoke Danish as much as possible. I donít know about Marie. Her Danish is really very good but itís difficult to imagine the four of them donít speak mostly French now. OTOH the kids started school in Denmark and likely also speak Danish with Joachim and N&F too.

I should add that many Danish children add a lot of English when they speak. I blame YouTube. Danglish is a thing. Not just specific words but also English words translated wrongly into something that sounds Danish but isnít. I guess itís a part of how languages develop..


The same with Dutch also. A few years back I heard some late teenagers, early twenties having a short converstation. I noticed that they spoke Dutch, but that their sentences contained more English (and streetslang) words then Dutch.

But in previous times there have been several foreign words that found their way in Dutch. F.e. regular Dutch contains many words of French origin and some of German origin. A Dutch comic once stated: "Ik spreek Łberhaupt... maar een woord Duits.".= "I speak at all ... just one word of German."  The fun is the word Łberhaupt in his phrase, as this is a German word also used in Dutch. With a former French-Dutch colleague (she was raised in French, despite her Dutch mother) I had a lot of fun about the French words in Dutch, especially one word the Dutch mainly pronounce as Lisjemoo or Liezjemo (lits-jumeaux)  


It also goes around, f.e. American English contains words of Dutch origine (and/or derived from Durch words).
« Last Edit: August 13, 2020, 01:15:46 PM by Principessa » Logged
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« Reply #129 on: August 13, 2020, 01:07:53 PM »

Henrik and Margrethe spoke French so I am guessing F&J grew up with both languages from childhood. I have heard someone say that Fred speaks Danish as if he thinks fundamentally in French - that could perhaps explain his rather odd Danish.

I think he and Mary speaks (or spoke) mostly English. Their children are obviously bilingual too. I think Mary has far preferred English but probably speaks more Danish now.

I think Alexandra spoke Danish as much as possible. I donít know about Marie. Her Danish is really very good but itís difficult to imagine the four of them donít speak mostly French now. OTOH the kids started school in Denmark and likely also speak Danish with Joachim and N&F too.

I should add that many Danish children add a lot of English when they speak. I blame YouTube. Danglish is a thing. Not just specific words but also English words translated wrongly into something that sounds Danish but isnít. I guess itís a part of how languages develop..


Mary really is a trendsetter.   Crazy
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« Reply #130 on: August 13, 2020, 02:14:52 PM »

Henrik and Margrethe spoke French so I am guessing F&J grew up with both languages from childhood. I have heard someone say that Fred speaks Danish as if he thinks fundamentally in French - that could perhaps explain his rather odd Danish.

I think he and Mary speaks (or spoke) mostly English. Their children are obviously bilingual too. I think Mary has far preferred English but probably speaks more Danish now.

I think Alexandra spoke Danish as much as possible. I donít know about Marie. Her Danish is really very good but itís difficult to imagine the four of them donít speak mostly French now. OTOH the kids started school in Denmark and likely also speak Danish with Joachim and N&F too.

I should add that many Danish children add a lot of English when they speak. I blame YouTube. Danglish is a thing. Not just specific words but also English words translated wrongly into something that sounds Danish but isnít. I guess itís a part of how languages develop..


The same with Dutch also. A few years back I heard some late teenagers, early twenties having a short converstation. I noticed that they spoke Dutch, but that their sentences contained more English (and streetslang) words then Dutch.

But in previous times there have been several foreign words that found their way in Dutch. F.e. regular Dutch contains many words of French origin and some of German origin. A Dutch comic once stated: "Ik spreek Łberhaupt... maar een woord Duits.".= "I speak at all ... just one word of German."  The fun is the word Łberhaupt in his phrase, as this is a German word also used in Dutch. With a former French-Dutch colleague (she was raised in French, despite her Dutch mother) I had a lot of fun about the French words in Dutch, especially one word the Dutch mainly pronounce as Lisjemoo or Liezjemo (lits-jumeaux) 


It also goes around, f.e. American English contains words of Dutch origine (and/or derived from Durch words).

I think it goes for English as well.... the American influence is more pervasive than it was ... I find myself thinking and speaking that way but then I did live there many years ago .... my parents and grandmother had a more UK influence in how they spoke and when I was younger I was told I did not sound very Australian ... my accent was a middle non specific one .... a product of a school that taught elecoution to suppress dialects
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« Reply #131 on: August 13, 2020, 02:26:22 PM »

Schools opened this Monday in Denmark so Christian & Co are very likely back in school, as I imagine Felix is too.

Does anyone know when schools open in France? I guess itís a lot more peaceful in Cayx than in Paris. Probably safer too concerning Covid-19 but at some point they will need to go back to Paris..

AFAIK, school year in France starts on August 31st. So, still a couple of weeks before the kids need to return to school. They can enjoy the peace of Cayx a bit more Smiley

This is the quote from DRF official Facebook page:



Quote
H.K.H. The Crown Prince came home yesterday from France, where he visited his brother H.K.H. Prince Joachim in recent days,
H.K.H. Princess Marie and the couple's two children at Ch‚teau de Cayx.

Prince Joachim is still in fast recovery, but still needs peace around him.

Photo: The Royal House ©️

Fred was with his brother and the Shacks for a few days, before returning to Denmark yesterday. Probably visited after doctors gave permission for Joachim to start having external visits, outside his wife and kids.

As someone said, Frodo can be a complete waste of space, but glad he was there for his brother, Marie and the small kids. And was not a "quick PR visit". Being there for a few days shows at least some effort.

And they both look good in the picture.

I think Jokke looks terrible, sorry. Poor thing! Heís on some hardcore medication.
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« Reply #132 on: August 13, 2020, 03:22:13 PM »

He definitely does not look at his best and medicated, but for someone that had brain surgery and huge health scare recently, he looks quite good imo.
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« Reply #133 on: August 13, 2020, 04:21:05 PM »

The blackberry jam in the front looks like it's homemade - a friendly neighbour? Marie? Making confiture is also a French thing  Wink and a fun thing to do during summer holidays.

(nm, I've been busy this week making blackberry jam etc from mine - the bramble in my garden is absolutely loaded)


Jokke must have looked Death in the eye.
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« Reply #134 on: August 13, 2020, 04:45:24 PM »

Joachim has that odd expression peculiar to stroke victims - not so much the expected asymmetry, but a loss of the normal facial expression. Does that make sense?

Good luck to him. It's a long road ahead, even for minor strokes.
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