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Author Topic: The Princely al-Hassan bin Talal Family of Jordan  (Read 1291 times)
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Chandrasekhi

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« on: July 11, 2020, 05:15:37 PM »

I searched for her fashion and found an amazing mind.



Princess Sarvath addresses John Hopkins University [1998] - a history primer, one of the most intelligent and significant addresses by a Royal.
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3oW-kquDduY

Princess Sarvath El Hassan bin Talal discusses the increased education of women in Islamic countries. She discusses how the colonization of many Muslim countries created better infrastructure within the country but neglected health care and education. This neglect caused a low literacy rate among women which has only recently been reversed. She also focuses her talk on the efforts to improve education in Jordan. This talk was sponsored by Nitze (Paul H.) School of Advanced International Studies and Johns Hopkins University. The talk was introduced by Paul D. Wolfowitz, Dean Nitze (Paul H.) School of Advanced International Studies.

This talk was recorded on December 7, 1998 and broadcast on C-Span on December 8, 1998.
« Last Edit: July 11, 2020, 05:32:30 PM by Chandrasekhi » Logged

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« Reply #1 on: July 11, 2020, 05:21:53 PM »






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« Reply #2 on: July 11, 2020, 05:30:53 PM »

With other royals


« Last Edit: July 11, 2020, 05:41:15 PM by Chandrasekhi » Logged

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« Reply #3 on: July 11, 2020, 09:13:15 PM »

Amazing photos.  The sari (I presume it is, I'm not sure what else to call it) that Sarvath is wearing in the first photo, I adore it.  She has wonderful taste & the strong colors in all her clothing are a dream! 
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« Reply #4 on: July 11, 2020, 09:21:04 PM »

Great thread! Is she Indian? Or is that traditional Jordanian wear? Doesn't look so to me. GORGEOUS clothes.
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« Reply #5 on: July 11, 2020, 10:12:33 PM »

Great thread! Is she Indian? Or is that traditional Jordanian wear? Doesn't look so to me. GORGEOUS clothes.
Princess Serveth is from Pakistan
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« Reply #6 on: July 11, 2020, 11:06:54 PM »

Great thread! Is she Indian? Or is that traditional Jordanian wear? Doesn't look so to me. GORGEOUS clothes.

She was born in Calcutta, India. Her family moved to Pakistan when India was partitioned.
Quote
https://en.wikipedia.org/...rincess_Sarvath_al-Hassan
Her father, the Bhopal-born Mohammed Ikramullah, was a senior member of the Indian Civil Service in the Government of British India prior to Partition. He went on to join the Partition Committee of Muhammad Ali Jinnah, later becoming Pakistan's first Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs and Ambassador to Canada, France, Portugal and the United Kingdom. His last post was as chairman of the Commonwealth Economic Committee. Sarvath's Bengali mother, the Kolkata-born Begum Shaista Suhrawardy Ikramullah, was a writer and one of Pakistan's first two female members of Parliament. Begum Ikramullah also served as Ambassador to Morocco and several times as a delegate to the United Nations. Princess Savrath has three siblings, including the late Bangladeshi barrister Salma Sobhan and the British-Canadian filmmaker Naz Ikramullah.[1][3]
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« Reply #7 on: July 11, 2020, 11:09:13 PM »

Amazing photos.  The sari (I presume it is, I'm not sure what else to call it) that Sarvath is wearing in the first photo, I adore it.  She has wonderful taste & the strong colors in all her clothing are a dream! 

It is a Banarasi silk sari.
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« Reply #8 on: July 11, 2020, 11:36:26 PM »

Great thread! Is she Indian? Or is that traditional Jordanian wear? Doesn't look so to me. GORGEOUS clothes.

She was born in Calcutta, India. Her family moved to Pakistan when India was partitioned.
Quote
https://en.wikipedia.org/...rincess_Sarvath_al-Hassan
Her father, the Bhopal-born Mohammed Ikramullah, was a senior member of the Indian Civil Service in the Government of British India prior to Partition. He went on to join the Partition Committee of Muhammad Ali Jinnah, later becoming Pakistan's first Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs and Ambassador to Canada, France, Portugal and the United Kingdom. His last post was as chairman of the Commonwealth Economic Committee. Sarvath's Bengali mother, the Kolkata-born Begum Shaista Suhrawardy Ikramullah, was a writer and one of Pakistan's first two female members of Parliament. Begum Ikramullah also served as Ambassador to Morocco and several times as a delegate to the United Nations. Princess Savrath has three siblings, including the late Bangladeshi barrister Salma Sobhan and the British-Canadian filmmaker Naz Ikramullah.[1][3]


East Pakistan/Bangladesh?

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« Reply #9 on: July 12, 2020, 12:25:44 AM »

Great thread! Is she Indian? Or is that traditional Jordanian wear? Doesn't look so to me. GORGEOUS clothes.

She was born in Calcutta, India. Her family moved to Pakistan when India was partitioned.
Quote
https://en.wikipedia.org/...rincess_Sarvath_al-Hassan
Her father, the Bhopal-born Mohammed Ikramullah, was a senior member of the Indian Civil Service in the Government of British India prior to Partition. He went on to join the Partition Committee of Muhammad Ali Jinnah, later becoming Pakistan's first Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs and Ambassador to Canada, France, Portugal and the United Kingdom. His last post was as chairman of the Commonwealth Economic Committee. Sarvath's Bengali mother, the Kolkata-born Begum Shaista Suhrawardy Ikramullah, was a writer and one of Pakistan's first two female members of Parliament. Begum Ikramullah also served as Ambassador to Morocco and several times as a delegate to the United Nations. Princess Savrath has three siblings, including the late Bangladeshi barrister Salma Sobhan and the British-Canadian filmmaker Naz Ikramullah.[1][3]


East Pakistan/Bangladesh?
Pakistan (Karachi). India's partition occurred in 1947. Bangladesh broke away from the rest of Pakistan in 1971.
Quote
http://royalwatcherblog.c...incess-sarvath-of-jordan/
Born in Calcutta to Mohammed Ikramullah and Begum Shaista Suhrawardy Ikramullah, both of her parents served in prominent positions in the Pakistani establishment, and they lived in Karachi (personal note- the family home (which she frequently visit) is on the same street as my grandparent’s home in Karachi).
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« Reply #10 on: July 12, 2020, 01:46:49 AM »

Great thread! Is she Indian? Or is that traditional Jordanian wear? Doesn't look so to me. GORGEOUS clothes.

She was born in Calcutta, India. Her family moved to Pakistan when India was partitioned.
Quote
https://en.wikipedia.org/...rincess_Sarvath_al-Hassan
Her father, the Bhopal-born Mohammed Ikramullah, was a senior member of the Indian Civil Service in the Government of British India prior to Partition. He went on to join the Partition Committee of Muhammad Ali Jinnah, later becoming Pakistan's first Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs and Ambassador to Canada, France, Portugal and the United Kingdom. His last post was as chairman of the Commonwealth Economic Committee. Sarvath's Bengali mother, the Kolkata-born Begum Shaista Suhrawardy Ikramullah, was a writer and one of Pakistan's first two female members of Parliament. Begum Ikramullah also served as Ambassador to Morocco and several times as a delegate to the United Nations. Princess Savrath has three siblings, including the late Bangladeshi barrister Salma Sobhan and the British-Canadian filmmaker Naz Ikramullah.[1][3]


East Pakistan/Bangladesh?
Pakistan (Karachi). India's partition occurred in 1947. Bangladesh broke away from the rest of Pakistan in 1971.
Quote
http://royalwatcherblog.c...incess-sarvath-of-jordan/
Born in Calcutta to Mohammed Ikramullah and Begum Shaista Suhrawardy Ikramullah, both of her parents served in prominent positions in the Pakistani establishment, and they lived in Karachi (personal note- the family home (which she frequently visit) is on the same street as my grandparent’s home in Karachi).


Thank you, Chandrasekhi.  Pakistan was/is a big place, and it helps me to know they lived in Karachi.  I am more familiar with the Quetta area.
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« Reply #11 on: July 12, 2020, 03:25:30 AM »

Boy, the Partition reverberates to this day. When I was in India two Decembers ago, we took my friend's mom to the Pakistan/India border near Atari to see the changing of the guard loud extravaganza. She was crying as we walked through the crowd, and I learned she had not been that close to the border since the Partition days. She grew up near Lahore. I don't think she's been back to the childhood home.
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« Reply #12 on: July 12, 2020, 02:12:18 PM »

Boy, the Partition reverberates to this day. When I was in India two Decembers ago, we took my friend's mom to the Pakistan/India border near Atari to see the changing of the guard loud extravaganza. She was crying as we walked through the crowd, and I learned she had not been that close to the border since the Partition days. She grew up near Lahore. I don't think she's been back to the childhood home.

The Partition was a terrible and brutal time. Families on both sides of the border were torn apart, women raped and abducted. There was nothing glorious about it at all. Only the political elites benefited, IMHO. Some historians and political commentators say it was inevitable. It just became inevitable - too many lost opportunities for different outcomes. It is considered the largest mass migration in the recorded history of humanity: 15 million people.

Princess Sarvath in a sari is symbolic of the tragedy of that period: religion was all that separated neighbours and it was enough.

https://en.wikipedia.org/...ng_the_partition_of_India

Here is a brilliant movie on that period with some of the most talented and underrated artists to grace Bollywood:
"Pinjar" -
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pinjar_(film)
It is in Hindi & Urdu. I will post a link with English subtitles if I can find it.
« Last Edit: July 12, 2020, 02:44:49 PM by Chandrasekhi » Logged

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« Reply #13 on: July 12, 2020, 04:29:41 PM »

I will try to watch it. Thanks, Chandra. You, like many on RD, are a wealth of information!

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Chandrasekhi

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« Reply #14 on: October 16, 2020, 07:45:56 PM »

Boy, the Partition reverberates to this day. When I was in India two Decembers ago, we took my friend's mom to the Pakistan/India border near Atari to see the changing of the guard loud extravaganza. She was crying as we walked through the crowd, and I learned she had not been that close to the border since the Partition days. She grew up near Lahore. I don't think she's been back to the childhood home.

The Partition was a terrible and brutal time. Families on both sides of the border were torn apart, women raped and abducted. There was nothing glorious about it at all. Only the political elites benefited, IMHO. Some historians and political commentators say it was inevitable. It just became inevitable - too many lost opportunities for different outcomes. It is considered the largest mass migration in the recorded history of humanity: 15 million people.

Princess Sarvath in a sari is symbolic of the tragedy of that period: religion was all that separated neighbours and it was enough.

https://en.wikipedia.org/...ng_the_partition_of_India

Here is a brilliant movie on that period with some of the most talented and underrated artists to grace Bollywood:
"Pinjar" -
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pinjar_(film)
It is in Hindi & Urdu. I will post a link with English subtitles if I can find it.
UPDATE: "Pinjar" is now streaming on Amazon Prime (US).
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